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    $17.13 $13.24 list($25.95)
    1. Freakonomics : A Rogue Economist
    $13.96 $9.00 list($19.95)
    2. Fish! A Remarkable Way to Boost
    $124.95 $82.00
    3. Financial Management : Theory
    $112.75 $40.00 list($136.00)
    4. Economics
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    5. How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive
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    6. Good to Great: Why Some Companies
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    7. Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement
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    8. Now, Discover Your Strengths
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    9. The First 90 Days: Critical Success
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    10. Conspiracy of Fools : A True Story
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    11. Think and Grow Rich
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    12. The Toyota Way: 14 Management
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    13. Principles of Economics (7th Edition)
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    14. Never Eat Alone : And Other Secrets
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    15. The Fred Factor : How passion
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    16. China, Inc. : How the Rise of
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    17. Winning
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    18. The Richest Man in Babylon
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    19. Microeconomics (6th Edition) (Prentice-Hall
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    20. Who Moved My Cheese? An Amazing

    1. Freakonomics : A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything
    by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
    list price: $25.95
    our price: $17.13
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 006073132X
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
    Publisher: William Morrow
    Sales Rank: 5
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Economics is not widely considered to be one of the sexier sciences. The annual Nobel Prize winner in that field never receives as much publicity as his or her compatriots in peace, literature, or physics. But if such slights are based on the notion that economics is dull, or that economists are concerned only with finance itself, Steven D. Levitt will change some minds. In Freakonomics (written with Stephen J. Dubner), Levitt argues that many apparent mysteries of everyday life don't need to be so mysterious: they could be illuminated and made even more fascinating by asking the right questions and drawing connections. For example, Levitt traces the drop in violent crime rates to a drop in violent criminals and, digging further, to the Roe v. Wade decision that preempted the existence of some people who would be born to poverty and hardship. Elsewhere, by analyzing data gathered from inner-city Chicago drug-dealing gangs, Levitt outlines a corporate structure much like McDonald's, where the top bosses make great money while scores of underlings make something below minimum wage. And in a section that may alarm or relieve worried parents, Levitt argues that parenting methods don't really matter much and that a backyard swimming pool is much more dangerous than a gun. These enlightening chapters are separated by effusive passages from Dubner's 2003 profile of Levitt in The New York Times Magazine, which led to the book being written. In a book filled with bold logic, such back-patting veers Freakonomics, however briefly, away from what Levitt actually has to say. Although maybe there's a good economic reason for that too, and we're just not getting it yet. --John Moe

    Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner Answer The Amazon.com Significant Seven

    Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, author and co-author of this season's bestselling quirky hit, Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, graciously answered the Amazon.com Significant Seven questions that we like to run by every author.

    Levitt and Dubner answer the Amazon.com Significant Seven questions

    ... Read more

    Reviews (118)

    4-0 out of 5 stars interesting, but not rocket science
    Unlike a lot of economics books this book is pretty fair and unbiased. I don't think it is as funny as some readers thought, but the subjects are interesting. Most of it is common sense. Like that teachers cheat to make their students look smarter on standardized tests and real estate agents won't necessarily being doing everything they can to help you. As a graduate student in economics, I find is reasoning for the decline in crime being attributed to abortion highly speculative. Common sense would tell you that "aborting" fetuses that are likely to become criminals will reduce crime, only if that mother doesn't have as many children as she would if abortion were illegal. The author does a good job of staying away from the politics of abortion.

    This book is good for the layman but is nothing new to the average economists. I personally think that it has been given too much praise and attention.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking but falls a bit short
    While Levitt has the propensity to ask many interesting and thought-provoking questions, his data analysis is often suspect to the same tunnel vision which he attributes to many academic studies. Levitt seems so intent on proving the "conventional wisdom" wrong that he immediately accepts data from a single source as long as it provides a sensational conclusion. For instance, just about all of Levitt's conclusions on education and parenting come from a single ECLS study conducted 15 years ago. The early chapters on information and cheating are quite solid and alone may be worth the price of the book. However once Levitt tackles education, crime, and parenting his down-to-earth anecdotal approach becomes insufficient to explain these complex issues. Freakonomics is similar to many other pop-science bestsellers in that it makes its subject more approachable through oversimplified explanations and conclusions.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Great, Quick Read, Perfect for Summer
    I very much have enjoyed reading this book.As a grade school teacher, it doesn't surprise me that teachers cheat on their students' end-of-the-year assessments; what is surprising is that this is rarely talked about and people seem to be shocked and surprised when, on the rare occasion, someone gets caught.With the pressure to have one's students earn high scores coming from both parents and administrators, how could it not happen?Much more is expected of teachers today, and not all are up to the hard work, time and energy.But this book isn't only about teachers--you'll learn about drug dealers and how they organize their gangs quite similar to corporations; you'll be surprised that sumo wrestlers cheat (I actually hadn't thought about them or the game, but there is a way they can cheat), among other topics. Perhaps the most controversial notion is about what brought down crime levels in the 1980s, a time when everyone predicted crime would rise.It's an interesting idea, but Levitt doesn't provide much support, which was disappointing.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Layman's LanguageAnalyses of Various Social Canards
    Too often articles or books written by economists are couched in arcane verbiage and statistics.Levitt avoids this, and the result is a very interesting, though-provoking review of several social myths.

    He begins by summarizing the status of crime in the mid-1990's - high, and projected to go much higher with the coming "teenager boom."Instead, it began a long, steep decline.The most common "explanations" were "roaring economy," "gun control," and "innovative policing." Levitt then goes on to summarize data that convincingly reture them all.For example, a good economy might decrease economic crimes, but why did violent crimes drop even more?Further, why didn't crime also fall during the booming '60s?As for innovative policing, Levitt reports that the declines began prior to this initiative, and that its prime contribution was through adding policeman (accounting for about 10% of the drop).Similarly he refutes the logic for crediting increased rights of citizens to carry guns, and gun buy-backs, while the drop in crack prices is credited with 15% of the drop.

    Levitt then reports the results of Romania's strong anti-abortion posture in the 60s - a large contingent of resented children, many of whom became serious problems when they grew up.Finally, the "shocker" - Levitt presents various data that provide a solid case for concluding that the drop in crime was primarily due to Roe v. Wade making abortions available to lower-income women - many of whom would have had problems raising the unwanted children.

    Other topics addressed by Levitt include documenting cheating associated with "high-stakes" (eg. potential job loss, raises, school closure) pupil testing (estimated at about 5% in Chicago Public Schools), documenting and explaining the lack of drug traffic profits for most of those involved (rakeoffs by those at higher levels).Another interesting and useful topic covered is how society often misplaces efforts into low-payoff efforts to protect children (eg. child-resistant packaging, flame-retardant pajamas, avoiding being seated near front-seat airbags, and keeping their children out of homes with guns), instead of the much higher-payoff of keeping children away from homes with swimming pools.

    Throughout the book, Levitt carefully summarizes supporting data, while also informing readers of how similar data are often misused.His "bottom-line," so to speak, is for the reader to become more aware of the effect of incentives, and the frequent lack of factual bases for conventional thinking.

    An interesting, useful two-hour read.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Revelations?!only if you're the type to wear shades at night
    while interesting, the subject matter of this book is not sublime, the questions are not revolutionary and the 'answers' are soooo not comprehensive. though a contribution is likely, to claim that crime went down simply because of abortion is silly. and duh swimming pools are 'more dangerous' if you look at data collected from past incidences. but you cannot claim this to be true of the inherent/accidental potential for danger of a swimming pool compared to a gun. this book seems to ignore that probability is only predictive if circumstances are equal. and that sometimes a name might carry significance beyond where it can get you in life. but perhaps that one is more than what can expected of educated white men. Still... fun reading, great cover. And I'm sure levitt's classes are more intellectually engaging than this book. ah! one more thing: drug dealers live at home because 'Gator boots, with the pimped out gucci suit/ Ain't got no job, but I stay sharp/ Can't pay my rent, cause all my money's spent/ But thats ok, cause I'm still fly/ Got a quarter tank gas in my new e-class/ But that's alright cause I'm gon' ride/ Got everything in my moma's name/ But I'm hood rich da dada dada da' - Still Fly by Big Tymers ... Read more


    2. Fish! A Remarkable Way to Boost Morale and Improve Results
    by Stephen C. Lundin, Harry Paul, John Christensen
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0786866020
    Catlog: Book (2000-03-08)
    Publisher: Hyperion
    Sales Rank: 966
    Average Customer Review: 3.61 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Here's another management parable that draws its lesson from an unlikely source--this time it's the fun-loving fishmongers at Seattle's Pike Place Market. In Fish! the heroine, Mary Jane Ramirez, recently widowed and mother of two, is asked to engineer a turnaround of her company's troubled operations department, a group that authors Stephen Lundin, Harry Paul, and John Christensen describe as a "toxic energy dump." Most reasonable heads would cut their losses and move on. Why bother with this bunch of losers? But the authors don't make it so easy for Mary Jane. Instead, she's left to sort out this mess with the help of head fishmonger Lonnie. Based on a bestselling corporate education video, Fish! aims to help employees find their way to a fun and happy workplace. While some may find the story line and prescriptions--such as "Choose Your Attitude," "Make Their Day," and "Be Present"--downright corny, others will find a good dose of worthwhile motivational management techniques. If you loved Who Moved My Cheese? then you'll find much to like here. And don't worry about Mary Jane and kids. Fish! has a happy ending for everyone. --Harry C. Edwards ... Read more

    Reviews (161)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Motivation ?
    FISH! is he story of a woman searching for a way to revitalize her workgroup and in the process save her job. The solution she finds comes from the unlikely place of the local fish market. By listening to the stories of one of the market's clerks our heroine is able to take back to her own problem four basic tenets for success. She meets her staff at the corporate "toxic waste dump" and is able to convert them to a person from a group of dispirited losers into the best team in the company.

    The 112 pages of this book read very quickly and the ideas in the book are quicker still. They are basic and they certainly are sound ideas for motivating people. However, I think that the parable of Mary-Jane and her dysfunctional team was far too simplistic to stand up to real world application and that is a serious detriment to the book. Once the lead is converted she meets with her team who, after one negative comment, begin to embrace the ideas wholeheartedly. Where are the perpetual whiners ? Where are the "We have always done it this way" complaints. How about that perennial favorite "It isn't our fault" ? And best of all - The sullen non-complainers who will agree to anything to get the meeting over with but resist any real change ? I am not trying to be a spoil-sport here but these are serious obstacles to the kinds of change that this book tries to implement. I think that this book is either much too long to explain what the four ideas are (and they are good), or it is much too short to actually serve as any kind of an implementation tool.

    It is also a poorly written story. Rather than as a parable of one woman's self discovery, I would much rather have seen it as a non-fiction management book with the story of Mary-Jane interjected as an example. As written it is not a good manual nor is it a helpful example.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Fish Story That's Real & Inspirational
    What does a "Toxic Energy Dump" and throwing fish have to do with life, especially performance in the workplace? A great deal according to the authors of The Fish.

    In this parable you learn very quickly and easily how to turn around a "toxic" environment. Although the solutions may sound simple and obvious, they remind us - that regardless of our position in an organization, it's a great thing to find enjoyment and satisfaction in our ordinary day-to-day work lives. The writers provide simple descriptions of what attitude and fun can do to turn around the "toxic energy dump" in the workplace. The fable and principles show you how to bring hope and excitement to the people who perform the "back room" functions.

    This book is a quick read, with principles that are easy to grasp and apply. Laughter and fun are great bridge builders between people - I encourage you to try The Fish and see how these principles are used to build bridges not only at a renowned fish market in Seattle, but between people within a back room department and other departments.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Always Smell Your Fish Before You Buy
    This book was given to me as part of a Fish seminar conducted by my company. The book must be addressed on three different levels: as a story, as a philosophy, and as a business book. The story is about a woman who takes over a failing department in her company, finds the inmates are running the asylum, learns some pearls of wisdom from some local fishmongers, teaches the employees the philosophy, and ends up with a successful department. The preceding explanation is only slightly shorter than the book itself, which contains so much white-space that it could easily be halved, and repeats so often that it could easily be halved again. As bad as the story and writing are, the philosophy underlying the Fish idea is even worse. It is essentially a hedonistic philosophy - that what employees really need to perform well is enough fun at work. The problem is that all jobs and careers involve a certain amount of tedium. Everone must "pay their dues." Too often the people complaining the loudest are those that refuse to deal with tedium as a fact of life. As a business book it fails as so many business books do because the ultimate goal of the book is not to attract a reader, but to convince corporations to buy a whole suite of products and services: the books, videotapes, fun fish things, decorations. Avoid this book, read Drucker instead.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Would rather be fishing
    This book reminded me of a story about cheese. The ideas make sense, but the story is childish and doesn't provide an action plan. I recommend reading Rat Race Relaxer: Your Potential & The Maze of Life instead.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Insipid Garbage
    I was unfortunate enough to have been made to read this utter, banal trash. This 'book' is yet another in the endless deluge of 'management' aids. Being a manager myself I was extremely disappointed as this book offers no new insight or any hints to great management secrets. Once one gets past the countelss pages of fluff, the underlying moral is simple...your job is what you make of it. If you have a positive attitude and outlook, your job will be enjoyable. If you think your job is boring and menial then it will be just that. These are basic common sense ideals that any capable manager should already be instilling on its employees. If you are a manager and are unfamiliar with these concepts then you are obviously either ill-trained or completely inexperienced and should not be a manager in the first place.
    My true rating would be NO STARS, but the lowest possible was one star. ... Read more


    3. Financial Management : Theory and Practice with Thomson ONE (Harcourt College Publishers Series in Finance)
    by Eugene F. Brigham, Michael C. Ehrhardt
    list price: $124.95
    our price: $124.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0324259689
    Catlog: Book (2004-03-12)
    Publisher: South-Western College Pub
    Sales Rank: 4069
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    Book Description

    This text remains the only text in the market that presents a balance of financial theory and applications.The authors maintain the same four goals as with the first edition: helping learners to make good financial decisions, providing a solid text for the introductory MBA course, motivating learners by demonstrating finance is relevant and interesting, and presenting the material clearly. ... Read more


    4. Economics
    by Campbell R. McConnell, Stanley L. Brue
    list price: $136.00
    our price: $112.75
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0072340363
    Catlog: Book (2001-10-15)
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
    Sales Rank: 17861
    Average Customer Review: 4.12 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    McConnell-Brue's Economics 15e is the best-selling textbook and has been teaching students in a clear, unbiased way for 40 years. The 14th edition grew market share because of its clear and careful treatment of principles of economics concepts, its balanced coverage, and its patient explanations.More students have learned their principles of Economics from McConnell-Brue than any other text--12 million of them.The 15th edition is a substantial revision that delivers a tighter, modern, Internet-savvy book. ... Read more

    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book!
    I am pursuing an MBA. I had no economics background, however I found this book to be easy to read, very well structured and most of all, you can find the actual applications of Economics. I highly recommend this book over Economics from Samuelson, he's a brilliant economist but he clearly doesn't explain as good. If you are going to buy only one book of economics, I recommend this one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book!
    I used this textbook in an advanced placement Macroeconomics course. Believe me the textbook itself is more interesting than the class. The text provides well detailed explainations of concepts and even provides a comprehensive glossary for those who might find the language alittle to difficult to understand. An overall great book, I've read other economics texts and this one is absolutely stellar in comparison.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very good tool !!!
    I don't study Economy, but I found that this book is easily understandable for those that have at least some notions on the subject. I liked it, because it includes the main themes on which everybody should know at least something, and it is quite entertaining (for a book on this subject).

    Also, at the end of each chapter the authors include some questions that help you to understand it better. There is also a web link that provides you with the answers to those questions (so, if you are like me, and want to be sure you answered correctly, you have the opportunity to find out).

    Anyway, I highly recommend this book: it is a thoroughly good introduction to economy!!!!. And last, but not least, it is also of good help in exams, because some basic questions have a tendency to be repeated, and with this book: you have the answers!!!).

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not bad.
    This definately wasn't written for the layperson, but for the college level reader/student.

    Overall, the book wasn't that bad. However, there were some instances where it just seem to drag on and on, which was a tad annoying. I think the authors could've written some things in a better way to make it more understandable.

    Although Economics isn't necessarily an easy subject, this book is considered authoritative in the feild of macro/microeconomics. The authors should've definately made it a little more easier to understand.

    Thank you.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good, in fact very good
    As an MBA (with a fair subject background)interested in applied economics I found this to be an impressive piece of writing. The real world examples and colloquial expression can only comfort a reader intimidated by this very complex and volumnous discipline. I was rather srprised to see some of the reviews calling this a very difficult-to-comprehend text. In my opinion even someone relatively new to economics will find his knowledge stacking up as he progresses through the text. Given that the sequencing is not classic with micro followed by macro, I feal the authors have done a good job of going against the conventional and merging the potent interrelationships of these two basic areas-after all one evolves into the other. Also the web-based material was also more than helpful. Finally a book in its fifteenth edition, read over 40 odd years better be good. ... Read more


    5. How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life
    by Tom Rath, Donald O. Clifton
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.57
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1595620036
    Catlog: Book (2004-08-10)
    Publisher: Gallup Press
    Sales Rank: 427
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    Book Description

    How did you feel after your last interaction with another person? Did that person-your spouse, best friend, coworker, or even a stranger -fill your bucket" by making you feel more positive? Or did that person "dip from your bucket," leaving you more negative than before? The number one New York Times and number one Business Week bestseller, How Full Is Your Bucket? reveals how even the briefest interactions affect your relationships, productivity, health, and longevity. Organized around a simple metaphor of a dipper and a bucket, and grounded in 50 years of research, this book will show you how to greatly increase the positive moments in your work and your life-while reducing the negative. Filled with discoveries, powerful strategies, and engaging stories, How Full Is Your Bucket? is sure to inspire lasting changes and has all the makings of a timeless classic. ... Read more


    6. Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap... and Others Don't
    by Jim Collins
    list price: $27.50
    our price: $19.25
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0066620996
    Catlog: Book (2001-10)
    Publisher: HarperBusiness
    Sales Rank: 52
    Average Customer Review: 4.47 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com's Best of 2001

    Five years ago, Jim Collins asked the question, "Can a good company become a great company and if so, how?" In Good to Great Collins, the author of Built to Last, concludes that it is possible, but finds there are no silver bullets. Collins and his team of researchers began their quest by sorting through a list of 1,435 companies, looking for those that made substantial improvements in their performance over time. They finally settled on 11--including Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo--and discovered common traits that challenged many of the conventional notions of corporate success. Making the transition from good to great doesn't require a high-profile CEO, the latest technology, innovative change management, or even a fine-tuned business strategy. At the heart of those rare and truly great companies was a corporate culture that rigorously found and promoted disciplined people to think and act in a disciplined manner. Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not so great, the book offers a well-reasoned road map to excellence that any organization would do well to consider. Like Built to Last, Good to Great is one of those books that managers and CEOs will be reading and rereading for years to come. --Harry C. Edwards ... Read more

    Reviews (298)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Jim Collins: REQUIRED READING (See why.)
    With an overall keen focus on discipline and accountability, Jim Collins was assisted by a large team of gifted, discerning graduate students. Hence, "Good to Great" is a most welcome piece of major solid research in our current time when "business spin" has contributed to the failure of corporations, market values, employee careers, etc. Unfortunately, similar books over the past few decades have relied more on "impressionism" from the author(s), including the now famous "In Search of Excellence" which has since been exposed as not fully grounded in the true facts of the time. While Warren Buffet is not identified as a "Level 5" leader in "Good to Great," this is a volume which could surely bear the imprimatur from that "Sage of Omaha." This book could even assist GE's Jack Welch "grow" into a more effective individual. [Prepare yourself for a surprise-jolt: based on Jim Collins' penetrating analyses across 11 major organizations, Mr. Welch would probably be considered as a "Level 4" leader.]

    This book is of significant value to anyone wanting to move from "good to great" no matter if it is within a profit, not-for-profit, or even in a home-family setting. Great, easy reading and, most importantly, an excellent, life-long reference manual to help you remain "tuned-up." Notably, this book should be a required supplemental text for all general management courses (undergraduate or graduate).

    5-0 out of 5 stars Achieving and continuing spectacular business success
    In 1994, Jim Collins and Jerry Porras wrote one of the most successful management books of the last decade: Built to Last. Collins and Porras had studied 18 visionairy companies, many of which had existed for 60 years or more. These companies had a strong focus on values and people and great ability to to learn and exchange knowledge. They gave less priority to maximalizing shareholder value but paradoxically outperformed the market enormously. In a conversation with Jim Collins, McKinsey director Bill Meehan said he, too, loved the book, but added: "Unfortunately, it's useless". He explained why. The companies featured in Built to Last had always been great companies. But because most companies are just good (not great) they are not interested in a book which shows how to stay great (Built to Last) but in a book that shows how to become great. The matter inspired Collins. He built a research team of 15 people and started a 5 year study.

    The team tried to identify companies that had jumped from good to great and had managed to continue their great growth for at least 15 years. They found 11 of these (Abbott, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gilette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreens, Wells Fargo). These good-to-great companies (GTG's) outperformed the market by a factor 6.9 in the 15 year period of the analysis! (General Electric outperformed the market 'only' by a factor 2.8 between 1985 and 2000).

    The study focused on the question: what did the GTG's have in common that distinguished them from comparable companies in comparable circumstances? The GTG's were compared with two sets of other companies: 1) the direct-comparisons: companies within the same sector and in comparable circumstances, 2) the unsustained comparisons: companies that had had a breakthrough but that had not been able to continue their success. Collins intended to, from the ground up, build a theory which could explain the successful transformation of the GTG's.

    As it turned out, all of the GTG's had a period of build up, preparation (often lasting many years) before the breakthrough moment. Three phases could be identified:

    PHASE 1: DISCIPLINED PEOPLE
    1. LEVEL 5 LEADERSHIP: contrary to the expectation, leaders of the GTG's turned out to be quiet, self effacing and even shy. At the same time, however, they were very determined. Mostly, they were leaders that came from within the company and that have remained unknown to the greater public.

    2. FIRST WHO...THEN WHAT: also contrary to what you might expect was that GTG's first got the right people on the bus and the wrong people off and only then focused on strategic direction and vision.

    PHASE 2: DISCIPLINED THOUGHT
    3. CONFRONT THE BRUTAL FACTS (..BUT NEVER LOSE HOPE). Characteristic was a combination of realism and hope.
    4. THE HEDGEHOG CONCEPT (SIMPLICITY IN THREE CIRCLES): just like a hedgehog, the GTG's seemed to have a very simple but effective success formula: all of the activities of the company had to lie within the intersection of the following three circles: 1) what can we become best in the world at? 2) what are we passionate about? 3) what can we make money with?

    PHASE 3: DISCIPLINED ACTION
    5. CULTURE OF DISCIPLINE: the GTG's turned out to have a culture of discipline that made hierarchy and bureaucracy largely superfluous.
    6. TECHNOLOGY ACCELERATORS: none of the GTG's had technology as a cause of the success, but technology did play the role of accelerator of the success.

    Collins rather convincingly demonstrates the validity of this model. All of the GTG's showed these practices throughout the 15 year period, while none of the direct comparisons did. The unsustained comparisons showed some of these practises often right until the moment of their decline.

    Looking at the share price development of the GTG's, you might expect that there has been a clear marking point of the transformation because their share price stays rather flat at first (for many years) and then just suddenly takes off and keeps on going up. An important finding of the team was, however, that there were nó special change programs, and nó breakthrough decisions or products. On the contrary, the process evolved very fluently. To eplain, Collins uses the metaphor of the flying wheel. When you start to turn this wheel it goes heavily and moves slowly. But by continuously keeping on turning the wheel, it starts to build momentum and then, just suddenly, a point is reached at which the wheel turns at great speed without you having to turn it any harder than at first. Is this the practice of many companies? Not at all! The reality of many companies is nót consistently following a chosen path but rather swinging from one hype to another.

    I think this research evokes one principal issue. That the concept 'great' is operationalized in a financial way is easily understood from a practical standpoint. This criterion is clear and rather easily obtained and makes it easy to compare the companies scientifically. But is 'great' the best word to describe spectacular financial success? Does their financial success necessarily make GTG's 'great'? Wouldn't that be like saying that Bill Gates en Silvio Berlusconi are great people while implying Martin Luther King and Mother Theresa are not?

    But, having said that, demonstrating how companies achieve and continue spectacular financial success, in itself, is extremely interesting and valuable. This is a terrific book that, I think, has the quality to equal or perhaps even surpass the success of Built to Last. Unlike most management books (which contain creative but highly speculative ideas), the message of this book is based on well-designed research and mindful interpretation of results that is explained and justified terrifically. Despite this thoroughness, the book remains a pleasant read. A pity that the book does not offer some more practical suggestions to help readers get started. I think that would have made it even better.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Study on Critical Factors for Organisational Greatness
    Collins' curiosity and clear study brings to light some of those factors that contribute to greatness. These findings are grounded within individual, teachable 'points of view' which are easily applied to large organisations and applicable to small busness as well.
    Collins puts his findings in clear accessable language. Including the finding that is responsible for the title... That good is the enemy of great.
    I highly recommend this book/CD to leaders that are enaged with designing futures and those that work with them. It is core reading for key teams. It has made a significant difference in being able to articulate powerful conversations with teams about that which is tacit and critical to success. Giving common language and principles to engage with. A great study book for learning teams.

    3-0 out of 5 stars But, what about........?

    Read it - but maybe buy it used

    This books does however ask some good questions about how to go from being good to GREAT such as:

    1. What am I(or what is the company) intrinsically passionate about?
    2. What is the company\I good at? and does this "thing" come naturally?
    3. Finally does this area that was chosen have "GREAT" potential?

    On the other hand, here are some questions that I felt were left unanswered:

    Can't you be GREAT at two things at the same time?

    According to Jack Welch's book, you should strive to be #1 OR #2.
    btw: Aren't there three medals awarded in the Olympics?

    What about sales? The Mary Kay Company motto is "Nothing happens until somebody sells something." (from her book)

    What about creating barriers to entry for competitors? (to protect market share like Carnegie or Rockefeller did)

    Why didn't you include MORE on the failures of the Good to Great companies? Not just the failures of the competition. Guys like Edison, Lincoln had many defeats before they found ultimate success.
    Doesn't bouncing back from failures have something to do with going from Good to Great?

    The author mentions getting the right people in the right seats on the bus and the wrong people off. I believe this is an oversimplification. Age, salary, tenure, unions, hierarchy etc make this a very difficult task to accomplish!!

    Yes this book took 5 years to write and was supported by 21 staff researchers BUT I am not totally convinced of the results. (and I liked the first book - Built to Last)
    That's why I gave it only 3 stars

    5-0 out of 5 stars Must read for any executive, manager, or entrepreneur
    This book was number one on the Wall Street Journal's list for a long time for good reason. It is a very pleasurable and easy read that will certainly set off light bulbs in your head. The coverage of the iterative process of buildup and breakthrough is outstanding. If you are an executive, manager, or entrepreneur, make sure you grab this book and take it to the beach or knock it out over a weekend. It certainly belongs in your library. ... Read more


    7. Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
    by Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce Patton
    list price: $15.00
    our price: $10.20
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0140157352
    Catlog: Book (1991-12-01)
    Publisher: Penguin Books
    Sales Rank: 741
    Average Customer Review: 4.36 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Since its original publication in 1981, Getting to Yes has been translated into 18 languages and has sold over 1 million copies in its various editions. This completely revised edition is a universal guide to the art of negotiating personal and professional disputes. It offers a concise strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. ... Read more

    Reviews (66)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Essential reading
    This is the first book I've read on the issue of negotiation. The book is easy to read, and the authors use good, solid examples to illustrate the techniques they are teaching. The end of the book, with it's summary review, really pulls it all together. The writing style is clean, clear, and simple, without being so simplistic as to seem unbelieveable.

    The authors try to show readers how to remain objective in negotiations, rather than letting their emotions take control. The speak of being "soft on people and hard on principles", the idea of staying focussed on the problem and not attacking or blaming people. The parts I found most useful are the notions of focussing on interests rather than positions, and finding alternatives that will allow both parties in the negotiation to gain something. The idea of moving away from positions to finding the common ground of shared interests is one that is particularly useful in that it can be applied to any situation, be it a parent/child conflict, a work situation, or any negotiation. This concept shows readers how to focus on their long term goals rather than on being "right" and winning in the short term.

    I have used the techniques in this book to great success many times, in a variety of areas in my life. They are easy to use, and they work! I highly reccommend this classic text to everyone.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This book is the foundation for successful negotiations
    I read this book in an MBA course for Dispute Mediation. Although it was not a required reading, every text and article mentioned this book. You can easily read it in a weekend. Do not expect theory, paradigm, or lofty descriptions-this is cut to the chase stuff that lets you know many techniques for negotiating and helping the other side make a decision that is right for all involved. Some helpful key concepts include elimintating emotions from the process, or dealing with the emotional techniques that the other side may use against you. It also describes BATNA, or the best alternatives to a negotiated agreement-those agreements which may be the most realistic and beneficial terms for both sides. I think that the other book, getting past no, by the same author, is an additional reference that anyone considerring this book should also read as an excellent complementary text to the principles outlined in this classic.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Don't take it personally!
    I must confess I ordered and read this book because my new boss recommended it. Well, now that we have unpacked all the boxes from our move to take this job - I find we have about 5 copies of this book. This book is GREAT! This is not a new book but has been read by millions of people and is now a classic. The first edition came out in 1981 and the second edition 10 years later. The newest edition benefits from many updates and has an additional chapter (#10) with common questions (and answers) that people have commonly asked about Getting to Yes. This new chapter really helps the reader to understand the method better - in fact I can't imagine the book without it. One of the best things that authors Fisher, Ury and Patton do in this popular book do is give the reader a practical framework for developing better relationships that lead to better outcomes in life and work. The ideas are helpful in getting along with family as well as in the workplace. In many cases their methods will sound like things you already knew and have practiced in some of the more successful moments in your life. However, the book puts it all in perspective and gives you the complete picture to know why it works better when you focus on helping the other person get what they want so you can, too. After reading Getting to Yes you will be more prepared to negotiate more effectively in every type of situation. This book helped me decide I like the new boss, too!

    3-0 out of 5 stars Don't buy from audible
    Don't buy the audio version from audible.com .

    Their programming skills are terrible. I could not download some of the books I bought, could not burn into cd the ones I could download, and forget about making it work with an mp3 player, unless you're lucky.

    I know about 5 people who bought stuff from there and only one had the luck of downloading a working file and burning it successfully to a cd.

    The quality of the narrations is awful, at least in the books I managed to hear (only on windows media player, nothing else worked). If you're used to books on cd or tape, you're up for a big disappointment buying from audible.

    On top of all that, they have the worst customer service I have ever witnessed. The site was not working right when I tried to purchase there for the first time. I sent them a message with no answer.

    In a second attempt, I bought the stuff and some files never downloaded (which means they just stole my money and I don't know what I can do since I don't live in USA). I sent another message with no answer again.

    Then their weird program, which turns Windows Media Player automatically on instead of working alone, showed no compatibility to Itunes and no possibility of burning cds or dreaming about hearing books on Ipod. I sent them a third message and nothing. A fourth and guess what? Nothing again.

    So I am at least trying to warn other people here to avoid being caught by such scheme. I hope Amazon gets rid of audible as soon as possible. I always got great service from Amazon and the affiliated bookstores, or even other stores selling electronics, health products and others, but audible is just the worst company I ever wasted my money with. Too bad we cannot give notes to them like with the affiliated booksellers.

    Sorry by the poor text, I am just mad with them.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Packed with Knowledge!
    Authors Roger Fisher, William L. Ury and Bruce M. Patton offer a seminal step-by-step guide to negotiating effectively. The authors use anecdotal examples to illustrate both positive and negative negotiating techniques. They believe that, with principled negotiation, both parties can reach an agreement in an amicable and efficient manner. Principled negotiation is based on the belief that when each side comes to understand the interests of the other, they can jointly create options that are mutually advantageous, resulting in a wise settlement. Since this is the second edition, the authors take the opportunity to answer ten common questions from readers of the first edition. If you become skeptical about these fairly rosy negotiation techniques as you read, the Q and A section is very useful. This classic text is easy to understand and you can implement its techniques immediately. We can't ask for more than that. ... Read more


    8. Now, Discover Your Strengths
    by Marcus Buckingham, Donald O. Clifton
    list price: $28.00
    our price: $18.48
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0743201140
    Catlog: Book (2001-01-29)
    Publisher: Free Press
    Sales Rank: 190
    Average Customer Review: 4.02 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com's Best of 2001

    Effectively managing personnel--as well as one's own behavior--is an extraordinarily complex task that, not surprisingly, has been the subject of countless books touting what each claims is the true path to success. That said, Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton's Now, Discover Your Strengths does indeed propose a unique approach: focusing on enhancing people's strengths rather than eliminating their weaknesses. Following up on the coauthors' popular previous book, First, Break All the Rules, it fully describes 34 positive personality themes the two have formulated (such as Achiever, Developer, Learner, and Maximizer) and explains how to build a "strengths-based organization" by capitalizing on the fact that such traits are already present among those within it.

    Most original and potentially most revealing, however, is a Web-based interactive component that allows readers to complete a questionnaire developed by the Gallup Organization and instantly discover their own top-five inborn talents. This device provides a personalized window into the authors' management philosophy which, coupled with subsequent advice, places their suggestions into the kind of practical context that's missing from most similar tomes. "You can't lead a strengths revolution if you don't know how to find, name and develop your own," write Buckingham and Clifton. Their book encourages such introspection while providing knowledgeable guidance for applying its lessons. --Howard Rothman ... Read more

    Reviews (126)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Mentoring, not hand-holding
    I've read quite a few of these kinds of books starting way back when with "What Color is Your Parachute," through "The Acorn Principle" and "Please Understand Me." This has been a long-term process of discovering my interests, talents, abilities, skills, knowledge, preferences, and potential - always with the intention of finding my true calling in life.

    But this book is not just another addition to that list; this is a superior method for focusing in on very specific talents and strengths and clarifying your own thinking about your life choices. The assessment and categories of strengths are more straightforward than taking the Meyers-Briggs or other similar tests. The book confirms some of what I already knew, but completely clarified the concept of natural talent combined with skills and knowledge creating the strengths that one can use throughout their life.

    People have complained in other reviews that some of the book is "fluff" or that it doesn't tell you what job to go get. This is only true for people who want one 250-page book to answer some of the greatest of life's questions. I greatly appreciate that the authors give simple, straightforward examples and their own theories quickly and pointedly. They leave it up to ME to make decisions based on that information.

    If you are prepared to do the work over the course of time and use this book as a mentor (not a nanny who tells you what to do) you will gain great insight into yourself and your path.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Management, Not Psychology
    As a manager, perhaps one of our greatest challenges is juggling the uniqueness of our employees. It's not our job to fix them, rather it's our job to facilitate their success.

    I agree with what "First, Break All the Rules" said, in that, we should seek to build the strengths of our employees rather than fix their weaknesses. But, I walked away from that book saying "ok, that was great, but how do you determine a strength or talent?"

    "Now, Discover your Strengths" gives practical insights on the strengths and inate talents of people. I was impressed by this and also by the real life examples of people displaying the stregth being discussed. The disheartening thing about the test is that it only gives your top 5 strengths when it's likely that 8-10 strenths are outwardly shown (in my opinion).

    Unlike other readers, I DID NOT see this and the online test as meant to be a "personality" test. Quite the contrary. I believe it accurately measures what it says it does: STRENGTHS.

    I'm looking forward to applying this information to the organizations I work with.

    Since my question after reading the first book (how do you determine someone's strenghts?) was answered with "Now Discover your Strenthgs", I'm guessing that if there is a third book, it will discuss what to do with your strengths now that they're discovered.

    4-0 out of 5 stars beware of used copies
    An integral part of this book is the online profile. Each copy of this book comes with a unique PIN number inside the book jacket. If you buy a used copy, the PIN number may be already used, and thus will not allow you to use the online profile. However, the book is still interesting if you enjoy reading through the signature themes and guessing what your profile would have uncovered. It is also fun to read each theme and think of people you know who come to mind, and consider ways in which you can support their strengths.

    I would give this book 5 stars if an unlimited number of people could use the online profile with each book purchase.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A motivating speaker
    I saw Marcus Buckingham speak at the SHRM Conference last week in New Orleans and it was an excellent complement to the book. Very motivating and enlightening as is the book. I also purchased the Emotional Intelligence Quickbook which I saw recommended on this page and that title is excellent as well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Take these lessons beyond the work place
    Excellent read, Clifton gives clarity and tools for success. I enjoyed the online inner strength tests very much and found it fascinating. While Clifton gives us the the key to unlocking our abilities and the confidence to pursue the path, it is up to us to take the journey.
    I have taken this book and its philosophies into my personal life as well, filling everyday.
    Everyone has different things that can free them further.

    I started singing because I had always secretly found that to be exhilerating. I bought singing lessons on CD off of Amazon,
    "Voice lessons To Go" by Vaccarino- fantastic!

    I also purchased and carefully followed the "New Sex Now" video by Arte with my husband- it was mind blowing for us.

    Just those two examples show how much I have removed my own personal fear in life. The kind that held me back and locked my strengths in. You know the strength is there in any crisis, why not manifest them into your eveyday? How powerful is that? ... Read more


    9. The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels
    by Michael Watkins
    list price: $24.95
    our price: $16.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1591391105
    Catlog: Book (2003-09-18)
    Publisher: Harvard Business School Press
    Sales Rank: 1217
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Whether challenged with taking on a startup, turning a business around, or inheriting a high-performing unit, a new leader's success or failure is determined within the first 90 days on the job.

    In this hands-on guide, Michael Watkins, a noted expert on leadership transitions, offers proven strategies for moving successfully into a new role at any point in one's career. The First 90 Days provides a framework for transition acceleration that will help leaders diagnose their situations, craft winning transition strategies, and take charge quickly.

    Practical examples illustrate how to learn about new organizations, build teams, create coalitions, secure early wins, and lay the foundation for longer-term success. In addition, Watkins provides strategies for avoiding the most common pitfalls new leaders encounter, and shows how individuals can protect themselves-emotionally as well as professionally-during what is often an intense and vulnerable period.

    Concise and actionable, this is the survival guide no new leader should be without.

    "Few companies develop a systematic 'on-boarding' process for their new leaders, even though this is a critical function with major organizational implications. Michael Watkins's The First 90 Days provides a powerful framework and strategies that will enable new leaders to take charge quickly. It is an invaluable tool for that most vulnerable time-the transition."

    -Goli Darabi, Senior Vice President, Corporate Leadership & Succession Management, Fidelity Investments

    "Every job-private- or public-sector, civilian or military-has its breakeven point, and everyone can accelerate their learning. Read this book at least twice: once before your next transition-before getting caught up in the whirl and blur of new faces, names, acronyms, and issues; then read it again after you've settled in, and consider how to accelerate transitions for your next new boss and for those who come to work for you."

    -Colonel Eli Alford, U.S. Army

    "Watkins provides an excellent road map, telling us what all new leaders need to know and do to accelerate their learning and success in a new role.The First 90 Days should be incorporated into every company's leadership development strategy, so that anyone making a transition in an organization can get up to speed quicker and smarter."

    -Suzanne M. Danielle, Director of Global Leadership Development, Aventis

    "Michael Watkins has nailed a huge corporate problem and provided the solution in one fell swoop. The pressure on new leaders to hit the ground running has never been greater, and the likelihood and cost of failure is escalating. Watkins's timing with The First 90 Days is impeccable."

    -Gordon Curtis, Principal, Curtis Consulting "The First 90 Days is a must-read for entrepreneurs. Anyone who's been the CEO of a start-up or early-stage company knows that you go through many 90-day leadership transitions in the course of a company's formative years. In this groundbreaking book, Michael Watkins provides crucial insights, as well as a toolkit of techniques, to enable you to accelerate through these transitions successfully."

    -Mike Kinkead, President and CEO, timeBLASTER Corporation, serial entrepreneur, and Cofounder and Trustee, Massachusetts Software Council ... Read more

    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good advice, wish I'd read it sooner
    I bought this book in anticpation of a move that never happened. That said, it was remarkably useful even in my current position. It helped me frame many of my career experiences in a larger context, and when I do make a move in the future, I will be prepared for it.

    I even bought it for a friend as a "happy new job" gift. She loved it, too.

    5-0 out of 5 stars His earlier stuff is good too
    I work for a leading health care company and went through one of Watkins's transition forum programs here. If really helped me get off to a running start. We also got his negotiation book, Breakthrough Business Negotiation, which also was very helpful. I've since also read his book on influencing government and business strategy, Winning the Influence Game. Definitely helpful if you are dealing with issues of regulation and reimbursement as we are. It's nice to see him getting recognition for the First 90 days, but his earlier stuff is just as good, if negotiation or influence are important to what you do.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Watkins' negotiation book is great too.
    I bought The First 90 Days when I was heading into a new VP Sales position. It was a huge help just like the other reviews say. Then I got his Breakthrough Business Negotiation book and it was great too. I bought copies for all my regional and district sales managers. It's the best thing for tough negotiations I've read.

    5-0 out of 5 stars just what I needed
    I was on day 6 of a new CEO job and everything was falling apart -- I encountered serious resistance to even minor changes that obviously needed to be made. Reading this book, I realized I had walked into a problem where management saw the company was in need of a turnaround, but the employees had no idea and saw their company as a steady success story.

    Every bit of this book is gold. From how to approach change implementation based on situation, to managing upwards, to making the mental switch to your new position, it's all been helpful.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Many great ideas to think about!
    There are many original great ideas presented in this book which stand alone on their own merit. But perhaps the biggest idea of the book is for companies to view a job transition as any other business process- and subsequently look to optimize it. There are so many transitions in most companies in any given year, that having a process that makes more transitions successful and the new employees effective sooner should noticeably improve the bottom line. Most importantly, this book makes you think!

    Also noteworthy in this book is its straightforward organization- the book lays out 10 areas to consider during a transition, then dedicates a chapter to each, and concludes with a brief summary. The book also reads well, and has examples to clarify the 10 areas. ... Read more


    10. Conspiracy of Fools : A True Story
    by Kurt Eichenwald
    list price: $26.00
    our price: $17.16
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0767911784
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-14)
    Publisher: Broadway
    Sales Rank: 142
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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    Download Description

    In 2000, when The Informant was published, few would’ve imagined that a story about price fixing at Archer Daniels Midland could be as un–put–downable as the best crime fiction. Yet critics—and consumers—agreed: The New York Times reporter Kurt Eichenwald had taken the stuff of dry business reporting and turned it into an unparalleled page–turner. With Conspiracy of Fools, Eichenwald has done it again.

    Say the name “Enron” and most people believe they’ve heard all about the story that imperiled a presidency, destroyed a marketplace, and changed Washington and Wall Street forever. But in the hands of Kurt Eichenwald, the players we think we know and the business practices we think have been exposed are transformed into entirely new—and entirely gripping—material. The cast includes but is not limited to George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Paul O’Neill, Harvey Pitt, Colin Powell, Gray Davis, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alan Greenspan, Ken Lay, Andy Fastow, Jeff Skilling, Bill Clinton, Rupert Murdoch, and Michael Eisner. Providing a you–are–there glimpse behind closed doors in the executive suites of the Enron Corporation, the Texas governor’s mansion, the Justice Department, and even the Oval Office, Conspiracy of Fools is an all–true financial and political thriller of cinematic proportions.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (53)

    2-0 out of 5 stars strange brew
    This is the book counterpart of a video reconstruction.As best I can tell from the extensive endnotes, the author did a phenomenal research job, and then (from my point of view) turned his work into fiction.Instead of presenting us with the facts (fascinating in themselves) the author presents everything "through the eyes" of the participants, pretenting to be in their thoughts, and using quotation marks with the abandon of a novelist.We all know that this is just plain made up, but by using this form of presentation, the author blurs the distinction between fact and fiction.He DOESN'T know what these people were thinking, and making it up implies that he does; requiring me to search the footnotes at the end of each sentence -- what is true and what is made up? For example, on the first page we follow Ken Lay's thoughts as he is driven to work -- the footnote shows us the source for what kind of car it was -- but of course no reference for Lay's thoughts (and even if Lay had said what he was thinking, we have know knowledge that he told the truth).Accordingly, although the book is entertaining, I demote it to a "2" for horrendously bad journalistic practice.

    4-0 out of 5 stars The End of an Empire
    I'm certain that all of us like to read a good book. One filled with intrigue, deceit, back-stabbing, illegal acts, social issues, fear, egos, greed, scandals,etc.

    All the ingredients of an interesting novel. Only it's not. It is the true story ofENRON's humble pipeline beginnings to its bankruptcy and the saga of a hidden but eventually disclosed paper trail.

    The book---"Conspiracy of Fools" by Kurt Eichenwald.

    Notwithstanding the complicated financial transactions involved, it is written in a fast moving manner by a winning New York Times writer

    5-0 out of 5 stars If you get one book this summer, this is it!
    Everyone knows the Enron scandal.The directors of the corporation have been depicted as nothing less than caricatures of corporate greed and the company itself a cliche of managers run amok.

    This book ends all that.It brings dimension and personality to everyone involved and does justice to the events that transpire in a very evenhanded way.The "fly on the wall" narrative and the incredulous attitude of the author constantly ask the question we all wanted to ask right from the start: "What were they thinking?"Even moreso, a corollary becomes "Why did everyone else just let it happen?"Hard to believe, but the problems of Enron could have been predicted back in the early 90s.

    This is a top-notch book and worth every penny.Its not particularly difficult to comprehend (the dialogue and complex schemes are broken down for laymen to understand), and believe it or not, its a quick read. Once it absorbs you, you just won't put it down.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Reads like a thriller
    I read this book in three days.I have a two year old to chase around, so that tells you just how much time I devoted to finishing it.COF reads like a thriller.I kept waiting for the bad guys to get caught and became more and more incredulous that it took so long.

    COF does an excellent job of showing what a dangerous combination greed, hubris and ignorance is and how prevelant it is in corporate America.Throw in a dash of politics and you have a national scandal.

    Eichenwald does a good job of showing us all the nuances of what happened at the executive level of Enron, but I was disapointed that we never got to see any of it from the perspective of the thousands of employees that woke up one morning without jobs or retirement funds.We also never see the impact of Enron's fall on the varous companies and local governments that invested so heavily in them.

    My last "complaint" is a silly one.There were no pictures of the principals featured in the book, which is pretty standard for non-fiction stories.I wanted to know what Lay, Skilling and the rest looked like so I could put faces with names.

    Overall, well worth the read if you want some suspense and/or an insight into just what went wrong at Enron.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The BEST book I have read in years
    I never thought I would like to read an Enron book, but my father really pushed this on me. I LOVED it. This is the best book I have read in years, certainly since A Civil Action. It is thrilling, unbelievable, captivating. I am up late writing this because the book kept me up until 3 and now I am having trouble not thinking about it. Unlike other books of this type, the research is incredible. Anyone who reads it has to thumb through the footnotes, and see all of the documents and other information that Eichenwald pulled together. A fabulous reporter and a spectacular writer all add up to a great book. ... Read more


    11. Think and Grow Rich
    by NAPOLEON HILL
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0449214923
    Catlog: Book (1987-05-12)
    Publisher: Ballantine Books
    Sales Rank: 368
    Average Customer Review: 4.54 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Book Description

    Here are money-making secets that can change your life. Inspired by Andrew Carnegie's magic formula for success, this book will teach you the secrets that will bring you a fortune. It will show you not only what to do but how to do it. Once you learn and apply the simple, basic techniques revealed here, you will have mastered the secret of true and lasting success. And you may have whatever you want in life.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (225)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great book--Great foreward by Melvin Powers
    Over the years I have bought several copies of Think and Grow Rich but this particular edition, original unabridged version is perhaps the best and my personal favorite.

    Think and Grow Rich is without a doubt one of the most prestigious and beloved books in the field of motivational literature. This version is a reprint of the original, unabridged, classic edition of Think and Grow Rich by Napolean Hill. No doubt, Think and Grow Rich has helped shape the lives of millions of people around the world. Perhaps moreso than any other book ever.

    In Think and Grow Rich, Napolean Hill shares his brilliant philosophy and practical techniques for achieving your financial goals, reaching your highest potential, and ultimately creating a life that brings you great personal happiness.

    Think and Grow Rich will teach you how to harness the awesome mental magic of your mind. You are given a blueprint for self mastery. You learn that there are no limitations to what you can accomplish, only those you impose on yourself.

    Napolean Hill said, "If you can conceive it, you can believe it." This precept has proven true repeatedly throughout history. Did we not send a man to the moon and accomplish other seemingly miraculous feats in many fields of endeavor? Every one of these feats began as an idea that was then transformed into reality. Think and Grow Rich shows youhow to transform your dreams into reality too.

    Melvin Powers inspiring foreward and indicating how this great book transformed his life adds just on more great testimonial of the power behind Think and Grow Rich.

    If you were to buy just one book on personal development, you wouldn't go wrong by making Think and Grow Rich that one and only book.

    Thank you Napolean for sharing your wisdom!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Bugaboos of the Mind Revealed
    Why do some achieve great wealth when the vast majority wallow in poverty?

    Napoleon Hill interviewed nearly 500 wealthy men (including steel magnate Andrew Carnegie) to determine the underlying causes of wealth. In addition, Hill interviewed thousands of financial failures to determine what drove them to poverty.

    Think & Grow Rich is a remarkable text that outlines what Napoleon Hill learned from his vast number of interviews. Hill enables readers to emulate the traits of the wealthy while shunning those characteristics of the financially challenged.

    Several highlights of the text are:

    (1) Prerequisites to wealth acquisition include a statement of: (a) the amount of money desired (b) the sacrifice one is willing to give in exchange for the money (c) the deadline for obtaining the money (d) a definite plan for acquiring this money (e) a declaration of this statement twice daily once before sleeping and once after waking.

    Hill remarks, "You may as well know, right here, that you can never have riches in great quantities unless you can work yourself into a white heat of desire for money, and actually believe you possess it."

    (2) The subconscious mind can be a powerful ally (or foe) in the pursuit of wealth. One should truly believe that one will become wealthy and "the subconscious mind will hand over the plan that you need". This belief should be infused with emotion.

    (3) Create a Master Mind group of encouraging individuals who can provide the specialized knowledge necessary to achieve wealth

    (4) "Success requires no explanations; Failure permits no alibis"

    (5) Common causes of failures include: Lack a well defined purpose in life, Lack of ambition, Lack of self-discipline, Procrastination, Lack of Persistence, Lack of decision.

    (6) Persistence is absolutely critical to wealth. Hill mentions that "I had the happy privilege of analyzing both Mr. Edison and Mr. Ford ... I found no quality save persistence that even remotely suggested the major source of their stupendous achievements."

    (7) To develop persistence one must have a: (a) specific goal with a yearning for its attainment (b) definite plan (c) mind closed against negative influences (d) friendly alliance with those who will encourage one to achieve the goal

    (8) Sublimate your sexual urges to a yearning to accomplish your goals

    (9) "You have absolute control over but one thing, and that is your thoughts"

    This is a remarkable book that is a paean to the power of the mind and its ability to create wealth in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles ...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent! but the hardcover version is abridged
    Wonderful book, which inspires me and makes me think big and stay motivated. I love the unabridged version from wilshire book company. Unfortunately it comes only in paperback. I recently bought the hardcover, collector's edition. Unfortunately it is abridged, in some chapters several pages in total. The format in this book is among the best i've seen though. Leatherbound, goldedges etc. Anyway, great book!

    5-0 out of 5 stars It Helped Jim Carrey, myself and it can help you too...
    What can I say? I bought this book at a church bookstore, ironic huh? Having been fortunate enough to attend elite academic institutions in America and Europe, I can say without a doubt that the principles espoused by Mr. Hill's writing are by far more valuable than much of what I learned in a formal academic environment--this is real education....SELF education, i.e. knowledge of Self.

    Jim Carrey reputedly read this book while working a low wage job before becoming famous, applied the fundamentals and the rest, as we say is history.

    I always like to point out interesting teaching points from books and here are a few:

    **"Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve"

    **"There are no limitations to the mind EXCEPT those we acknowledge"

    **"Both poverty and riches are the offspring oof thought"

    One of my greatest ambitions is to actualize the level of success I envision for myself and in doing so, be in a position where I can mentor others about the principles of success such as those. Mssr. Hill teaches. One of the first things I shall do is give this book away in order to complete the cycle of giving and receiving.

    I also recommend reading this book along side Joseph Murphy's book "Power of Your Subconscious Mind" and Claude M. Bristol's "The Magic of Believing" along with "It Works" by RJH. These books along with Think & Grow Rich can truly enable you to achieve whatever you desire not only financially but in health, relationships, peace of mind and true expression--true wealth.

    I have personally achieved some wonderful results through the application of these principles and look forward to applying them even further for higher and higher levels of achievement. I hope you do so as well!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not his best, but a great book by Napolean Hill
    Think & Grow Rich is a condensed version of Hill's 17 principles of success; he course that he used to teach in over 17 lessons via weekly lectures and is still available in other books and tape programs like Your Right To Be Rich.

    Nonetheless, Think & Grow Rich is an excellent intro to the principles and techniques that Hill discovered after interviewing the wealthiest people of his time.

    Think & Grow Rich will open your mind and open opportunities to you. Great book by Hill. ... Read more


    12. The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles From The World's Greatest Manufacturer
    by JeffreyLiker
    list price: $24.95
    our price: $16.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0071392319
    Catlog: Book (2003-12-17)
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill
    Sales Rank: 1711
    Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    How to speed up business processes, improve quality, and cut costs in any industry

    In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability.

    Complete with profiles of organizations that have successfully adopted Toyota's principles, this book shows managers in every industry how to improve business processes by:

    • Eliminating wasted time and resources
    • Building quality into workplace systems
    • Finding low-cost but reliable alternatives to expensive new technology
    • Producing in small quantities
    • Turning every employee into a qualitycontrol inspector
    ... Read more

    Reviews (15)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Jeff Liker does it again!
    Jeff Liker does it again. For those who have read and enjoyed his previous book, Becoming Lean: Experiences of U.S. Manufactures, (1998 Shingo Prize) it gives practical insight into the transformation process from those who lead the process. The Toyota Way gives insight into how business philosophy must change and evolve in order to support a true transformation. At the core of a true business change is not the techniques, tools, or methods, but an attitude toward the business and a "way of life".

    The book, The Toyota Way, is worth reading from cover-to-cover and should also be re-referenced as one tries to guide their business, themselves, and others through the deep changes that must occur to truly transform to a lean enterprise. Dr. Liker reveals how the fourteen principles have been applied at Toyota using practical examples from new car development programs, daily functions, and major international business decisions. The Toyota Way applies to all levels of activities and people. But the only way for others to accomplish their own Toyota Way is to read this book and start to apply its lessons directly - by learning by doing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Toyota DNA
    Even though no other company will have the exact Toyota DNA, the principles in this book should be like the 14 commandments for all companies. There is something that wows me just about in every page I read.

    I'm only through half of the book, but if I had the money I would send it to many of my manufacturing friends. But that is much rather like pushing it, and I am not sure they would read it, even as a freebie.

    I have read many of the "Lean books", Womack, etc. and liked them too. But "The Toyota Way" has been the best. There are many automotive Japanese companies, but Toyota is very special. No wonder everybody is trying to copy the tools used there. But what everybody misses is the basic philosophy and the 14 principles around Challenge, Kaizen, Respect, Teamwork and Genchi Genbutsu, or the 4 Ps of Liker.

    Liker does an excellent work in explaining them.

    a manufacturing engineering manager

    5-0 out of 5 stars Clear and informative for any business
    What a clear explanation of management principles. Anyone who runs any sort of company, or even a single household, can profit by reading this book. The many graphs are clear, clever, and illuminating. The book goes so much beyond the more simple "lean" theory I had read about before.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Explainning Toyota's DNA
    I think this book is the first one for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best book ever in recent years on Toyota DNA
    There are very few books or papers available to give details on Toyota DNA in a plain english and that too with examples.

    Thank you Dr.Liker for doing excellent job and looking forward to see your next book.

    I completely agree with what Dr. Liker described in Principles 8 and 11, as I was fortunate to experience "Toyota Way" as a supplier. ... Read more


    13. Principles of Economics (7th Edition)
    by Karl E. Case, Ray C. Fair
    list price: $136.00
    our price: $136.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0131441728
    Catlog: Book (2003-12-29)
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
    Sales Rank: 38123
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    These two highly-respected authors have revised this best-selling book to include more current, modern subject matter and events while maintaining those features that have contributed to its great success. It continues to use stories, graphs, and equations and a unified, logical organization to make economic concepts easy-to-understand and relevant to all readers. Users of this book see the connection between growth, trade, comparative advantage, and the production possibilities frontier. When readers understand how a simple competitive market system works, they are ready to focus on problems of real-world markets. Currency data has been updated through the second quarter of 2003, with coverage of deflation, the effects of the war with Iraq and the war on terrorism, and the wars' impact on the national deficit. A comprehensive overview introducing economics begins the book; subsequent topics include: foundations of microeconomics: consumers and firms; market imperfection and the role of government; concepts and problems in macroeconomics; the goods and money markets; macroeconomic analysis; and the world economy. An excellent desk reference for economists; this book will serve any business owner, as an understanding of basic economics will prove helpful in all ventures.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent book for economic students in their first year
    This book presents and explains both Micro and Macro Theory in a very friendly way.It explains step by step the functions of the micro and macro theory and describes the fuctions of the instituions andorganizations involve in the economy as a whole.It gives historicalbackground, which many students look for in order to understand how? why?who? the study of economics. Besides it explains really well the economicterminology introduce as you read the book.Finally the book presentscurrent event cases through the chapters which are related it to theideaspresented in the reading. ... Read more


    14. Never Eat Alone : And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time
    by Keith Ferrazzi, Tahl Raz
    list price: $24.95
    our price: $16.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0385512058
    Catlog: Book (2005-02-22)
    Publisher: Currency
    Sales Rank: 151
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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    Download Description

    Do you want to get ahead in life?

    Climb the ladder to personal success?

    The secret, master networker Keith Ferrazzi claims, is in reaching out to other people. As Ferrazzi discovered early in life, what distinguishes highly successful people from everyone else is the way they use the power of relationships–so that everyone wins.

    In Never Eat Alone, Ferrazzi lays out the specific steps–and inner mindset–he uses to reach out to connect with the thousands of colleagues, friends, and associates on his Rolodex, people he has helped and who have helped him.

    The son of a small–town steelworker and a cleaning lady, Ferrazzi first used his remarkable ability to connect with others to pave the way to a scholarship at Yale, a Harvard MBA, and several top executive posts. Not yet out of his thirties, he developed a network of relationships that stretched from Washington’s corridors of power to Hollywood’s A–list, leading to him being named one of Crain’s 40 Under 40 and selected as a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the Davos World Economic Forum.

    Ferrazzi’s form of connecting to the world around him is based on generosity, helping friends connect with other friends. Ferrazzi distinguishes genuine relationship–building from the crude, desperate glad–handling usually associated with “networking.” He then distills his system of reaching out to people into practical, proven principles. Among them:

    Don’t keep score: It’s never simply about getting what you want. It’s about getting what you want and making sure that the people who are important to you get what they want, too.

    “Ping” constantly: The Ins and Outs of reaching out to those in your circle of contacts all the time–not just when you need something.

    Never eat alone: The dynamics of status are the same whether you’re working at a corporation or attending a society event&mdash “invisibility” is a fate worse than failure.

    In the course of the book, Ferrazzi outlines the timeless strategies shared by the world’s most connected individuals, from Katherine Graham to Bill Clinton, Vernon Jordan to the Dalai Lama.

    Chock full of specific advice on handling rejection, getting past gatekeepers, becoming a “conference commando,” and more, Never Eat Alone is destined to take its place alongside How to Win Friends and Influence People as an inspirational classic.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (46)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Simply Worth it
    I do not buy many books. I only buy the ones that I am interested in keeping. If I only want to read a book, I simply get it in the library.

    After reading a few reviews of "Never Eat Alone" I went to my local bookstore to have a closer look at it. Although I definitely liked the look of the book, my first reaction was "No, too expensive". And it is expensive! But then I sat down to read some passages. The more I read, the more interested I was becoming... You know the outcome - I finally DID buy it. I don't think I need to say anything else...

    The other books that I have recently bought:

    "Blink" by Malcolm Gladwell. This book actually prompted my interest in "Never Eat Alone" as they are both offered by Amazon in one package.
    "Can We Live 150 Years" by Mikhail Tombak - this one is so INEXPENSIVE

    5-0 out of 5 stars I Just Ordered 5 more copies of this Book !
    Excellent! A must-read for seasoned professionals wanting to expand their sales, or young people coming up the ladder needing to know "how things really work". The book is very easy to read and quite entertaining, and actually helped me yesterday respond correctly to an important opportunity.

    The section on how to get through a very tough secretary, to talk the Boss, is priceless.

    If I see a 28 year-old buying his very own Gulfstream IV jet, it'll probably be because he read this book and applied the lessons in it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Critiques and criticisms - Is this for real?
    A review of a book is meant to be an opinion.Something that others can reference to find a comparison point and understand better whether they are appropriately interested in a text or manuscript - and subsequently how much value they may place on it within the context of their own lives.

    I will provide these items to note: I read first through the negative critiques of Keith's book, I continued to scan quickly through the positive ones - to which I give limited weight.An important first step to understand whether the book is really valuable or not.I then proceeded to evaluate the book from an image/impression point of view.Lastly, I read and evaluated whether the book might have value in my life as a professional.Not in the life of others.Not in the life of similar people.In my life.Is it valuable to me.This is what I came up with:

    Opines of the naysayers:
    Many of the critiques (there were many - which usually makes for at least a marketable, controversial piece of literature) were overloaded with negative connotations about 'manipulation', 'deception', 'dishonesty', and 'insincerity' with the processes used by Keith to acquire friends, and take advantage of these friends and their relationships.Several reviewers also go out of their way to show how he drops names everywhere and glorifies himself and 'toots' his own horn throughout his book..

    My first guess is that most of those who are commenting in this way do NOT have the same level of connectivity that Keith has established through many years of building a network.That said, what Keith has done implements applying these name drops to actual experiences where dropping names can be of value.

    Think about it objectively - would you attend a party where you know there would be wealthy billionaires attending or one where you can meet with typical professionals in your field who you have little knowledge of whether they are successful.Yes, I'm sure there's some humility involved in this process.Keith touched on that a few times in his book - including his efforts to consider respect for all levels of individuals (you really don't know who they know).This includes his comments about learning from his past mistakes as he shot up through the ranks.But human beings are social animals.There is a pecking order in life (even if you don't believe it).There are people who live life more fully (not necessarily financially) and those who live it less so than you.

    Most importantly, as a reader you must be able to sift that material out of the picture.Keith uses it to depict a point or concept, not only to glorify himself.And even if he does, does it really matter?You are seeking to determine whether you will use his techniques to modify your lifestyle and adopt one where friendships are also business-related and vice-versa.In most of his book, he also adds that he is expected to provide the same for others.Just because he asked a friend to help him out and move him further along the success curve or happiness curve doesn't mean that he has done anything wrong.Keith supports this with his variation of 'pay it forward' and 'reciprocity' where he expects others to ask the same of him - in which case he would submit appropriately.

    I must admit, some of the stars that Keith hangs out with - however briefly - are truly spectacular movers and shakers.With that comes a bit of caution, as we all know the tendency for a definite increase in the nose gradient as people begin to associate with top dogs of the world.But in Keith's case, he has earned that right by moving through the ranks of truly effective firms and reaching the stardom through hard work and perseverance (and in many cases, networking).

    Ultimately, the naysayers have neglected to consider that the world is built of social structures and every situation has political motives so long as complete trust is not delivered and accepted by all parties involved.Keith's concepts prove to be a great way to increase the trust levels required to build strong forthcoming relationships that don't 'wither on the vine' but are recirculated and built into powerful abilities for accomplishment however great or small.

    Most of the naysayers have the wrong reasons for criticizing - they attack him personally and not the content of his book for whatever reasons.Certainly criticizing him for self-aggrandizement cannot be considered that much out of line, as all he's doing is supporting his processes, thoughts, and perhaps his personal business through his book.However, he has no obligations at all to share his experiences with the public, and by doing so, opens himself up to more than just criticism.

    Moving onward to the next topic - the image/impression of the book.

    I was amazed at the fluorescent orange cover with some strange words about eating on it.At first I would have no clue this book was about networking (which I believe many of the first people to spot the book had a difficult time anyway).But then I saw that it relates closely to FedEx's branding strategy with their color coordination, and even the 'XXX for dummies' line of books.It stands out from the rest of the pack based on the color coordination.Given that the book relates to personal branding and marketing of oneself for moving forward in corporate circles, it wouldn't be thrown out as an outcast.

    The image of the book can be summarized to me as the following:
    Building Shareholder Value in You - in a highly adventurous manner.The least I would call it would be conservative.Some of his techniques require lifestyle changes.Some of his methods are radical.

    Last topic - The book.

    There are successful people who do NOT use Ferrazzi's methods to achieve success.There are also individuals who avoid relationships altogether, yet still are able to accomplish their aims in achieving happiness, financial freedom, and significant life accomplishments.However, 'Never Eat Alone' touches on one aspect of achieving success through the building of relationships and the empowerment of others to help you.Does this mean you are taking advantage of others?Does this mean you are establishing an inequitable relationship?Does this mean you are being dishonest or unethical?

    For me, business has always been a 2-way street.Keith stresses this point throughout his book.He goes back to the classic adages of the past such as 'do unto others...', and 'you have to give to get', et. al.He puts them together and shows how when applied, they really have value - because ultimately that's how social structures are built.They have time-tested foundations of common knowledge, that not everyone has accepted or can accept.For me, his techniques were preaching to the choir.However, his book is great for those who have yet to believe it and can see true effects from their conditions of helping others out.He does not condone opportunism (at least not unethical opportunism) however, he does support business sense.In all transactions you have a buyer and seller, and in networking, you have the same.Except, just as it was ages ago, you are bartering, not buying with currency.What you barter is information primarily, but also other things such as emotional empathy.For instance when you call up your contact on their birthday to let them know, you have made a significant exchange of emotional empathy - showing you care.Even if you have some ideas in mind of what you'd like to get from your friend in the future - maybe a business reference, or a possible job contact, or maybe admission to a country club.Keith stresses that your gift, trade, exchange, whatever, has to be given in good faith.You have to mean what you say/do with genuineness and sincerity.This aspect of his technique justifies the methodology (and in many cases anything else will immediately negate the value of what you contribute to a relationship)

    Ultimately, the book was a refresher course in mixing with people, both high and low in status.It provides some great tips on how to address specific situations, and the value of face-to-face as opposed to single channels of communication.It stresses the importance of relationships - although it may not apply in all circumstances.And lastly, was an easy read in story format.Some of these things - for salespeople or marketing folks - should be inherent to their nature.

    Other items, like the name droppings, well, that's for show.If you can read through show, then maybe you can understand the wealth of information underneath.

    Just my humble opinion.

    As a side note and disclaimer: I have had the fortune of meeting Keith, and from my limited impression, he does believe and follow his scriptures.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Mostly good....
    This is actually a great book.I heard the author speak twice at Wharton Business School & then read the book.You have to be willing to get through a lot of name dropping, descriptions of how cool the author is and overly detailed stories of things he has done (which are usually, but not always, related to the topic in hand) but there are a lot of great ideas and tips in here.He even explains, for the socially retarded, how to run a dinner party step-by-step!

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is an important book
    I've read quite a few business books over the last year, and this one stands out for me.It's presented me with a radically different worldview.

    Where I would approach a task with the question "How do I get this done?", Keith approaches it with "Who are the people that can help me get this task done?"This is a stunning shift in one's point of reference.I wish I'd read this book 20 yrs ago.
    ... Read more


    15. The Fred Factor : How passion in your work and life can turn the ordinary into the extraordinary
    by MARK SANBORN
    list price: $14.95
    our price: $10.17
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0385513518
    Catlog: Book (2004-04-20)
    Publisher: Currency
    Sales Rank: 1866
    Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Meet Fred.

    In his powerful new book THE FRED FACTOR, motivational speaker Mark Sanborn recounts the true story of Fred, the mail carrier who passionately loves his job and who genuinely cares about the people he serves. Because of that, he is constantly going the extra mile handling the mail - and sometimes watching over the houses - of the people on his route, treating everyone he meets as a friend. Where others might see delivering mail as monotonous drudgery, Fred sees an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of those he serves.

    We've all encountered people like Fred in our lives. In THE FRED FACTOR, Mark Sanborn illuminates the simple steps each of us can take to transform our own lives from the ordinary - into the extraordinary. Sanborn, through stories about Fred and others like him, reveals the four basic principles that will help us bring fresh energy and creativity to our life and work: how to make a real difference everyday, how to become more successful by building strong relationships, how to create real value for others without spending a penny, and how to constantly reinvent yourself.

    By following these principles, and by learning from and teaching other "Freds," you, too, can excel in your career and make your life extraordinary. As Mark Sanborn makes clear, each of us has the potential be a Fred.THE FRED FACTOR shows you how. ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    4-0 out of 5 stars "God works all things for good--even our daily jobs!!"
    If ever there were a 'feel good' book, that is, one that you're just glad you had the chance to pick up and read, this is it!

    Sanborn teaches us to appreciate what we miss in the ordinary course of a working day--the little things-that mean much to others-and even more to God.

    Just as we take for granted the beauty of a flower, and yet fail to see the intricacies of the tiny elements that make it special-so too, we fail to appreciate the many ramifications of what we are-and what we do-in the service of God.

    This book teaches us to look at life from God's perspective--not ours. It reminds me of another wonderful book "WITH JOSPEPH IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ADVERSITY" which in a similar way helps us to see that God is working all things for good in the lives of His children. The adversities, the mundane job we think we have--all things. RECOMMENDED

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Helpful
    This book was extremely helpful for me in identifying the importance of passion in my life. Also wonderful was a dvd I found here on amazn called "New Free Sex" which helped me to bring more passion into my most intimate areas of life, without being offensive or pornographic in ANY way.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fred Factor hits the spot!
    I just finished reading "The Fred Factor" after returning from a wonderful conference where Mark Sanborn delivered an amazing speech! He truly does deserve to be in the top 20 best speakers in the country!
    I have found that this easy to read book (finished it on the one and a half hour flight home)explains in a simple yet challenging way how to really find purpose and meaning in what you do (no matter what your profession or job), and to live above and beyond that which is expected or required. If only there were more "Freds" in the world! I am thankful that I am married to a real Fred! (Yes, his real name is Fred and his character epitomises this great book!) Be inspired and motivated to enjoy life the "Fred" way! Get this book..you won't regret it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Find your passion!
    I just finished reading The Fred Factor on my way home from a business trip. It took less than 2 hours to read and they were 2 hours well spent. Mark Sanborn does a great job in using the example of Fred to help visualize what it looks like when someone in a very ordinary job takes an extrordinary view of their job. Fred is just a regular person and that's what makes this book so appealing. I don't have to be a super-performer to find my passion in what I do. We all see examples of poor service every day. I train thousands of people each year, many of whom are going through "rustout" instead of burnout. I plan to include this book in some of my workshops. This book has really inspired me to be a Fred to my customers! ... Read more


    16. China, Inc. : How the Rise of the Next Superpower Challenges America and the World
    by Ted C. Fishman
    list price: $26.00
    our price: $17.16
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0743257529
    Catlog: Book (2005-02-08)
    Publisher: Scribner
    Sales Rank: 476175
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    17. Winning
    by Jack Welch
    list price: $39.95
    our price: $26.37
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060785683
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
    Publisher: HarperAudio
    Sales Rank: 418
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    If you judge books by their covers, Jack Welch's Winning certainly grabs your attention. Testimonials on the back come from none other than Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Rudy Giuliani, and Tom Brokaw, and other praise comes from Fortune, Business Week, and Financial Times. As the legendary retired CEO of General Electric, Welch has won many friends and admirers in high places. In this latest book, he strives to show why. Winning describes the management wisdom that Welch built up through four and a half decades of work at GE, as he transformed the industrial giant from a sleepy "Old Economy" company with a market capitalization of $4 billion to a dynamic new one worth nearly half a trillion dollars.

    Welch's first book, Jack: Straight from the Gut, was structured more as a conventional CEO memoir, with stories of early career adventures, deals won and lost, boardroom encounters, and Welch's process and philosophy that helped propel his success as a manager. In Winning, Welch focuses on his actual management techniques. He starts with an overview of cultural values such as candor, differentiation among employees, and inclusion of all voices in decision-making. In the second section he covers issues around one's own company or organization: the importance of hiring, firing, the people management in between, and a few other juicy topics like crisis management. From there, Welch moves into a discussion of competition, and the external factors that can influence a company's success: strategy, budgeting, and mergers and acquisitions. Welch takes a more personal turn later with a focus on individual career issues--how to find the right job, get promoted, and deal with a bad boss--and then a final section on what he calls "Tying Up Loose Ends." Those interested in the human side of great leaders will find this last section especially appealing. In it, Welch answers the most interesting questions that he's received in the last several years while traveling the globe addressing audiences of executives and business-school students. Perhaps the funniest question in this section comes at the very end, posed originally by a businessman in Frankfurt, who queried Welch on whether he thought he'd go to heaven (we won't give away the ending).

    While different from the steadier stream of war stories and real-life examples of Welch's first book, Winning is a very worthwhile addition to any management bookshelf. It's not often that a CEO described as the century's best retires, and then chooses to expound on such a wide range of management topics. Also, aside from the commentary on always-relevant issues like employee performance reviews and quality control, Welch suffuses this book with his pugnacious spirit. The Massachusetts native who fought his way to the top of the world's most valuable company was in many ways the embodiment of "Winning," and this spirit alone will provide readers an enjoyable read. --Peter Han ... Read more

    Reviews (63)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Interesting Insight
    Although it is true that the business environment in the U.S. is changing at lightning speed, this book still has a lot to offer.I can't comment so much on the business advice in this book since I work in a small school, but his advice on attitude is dead on.People often make their own hell because they have the wrong attitude.Some say they work in a bad environment and that they can't work well, but the worker himself is a big part of that environment.You would be suprised at how a little kindness or a smile will change a working environment.Offer a little extra, and don't be afraid to help out.You'll enjoy your work and life more.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Insightful At Times, but Mostly Superficial
    Jack Welch clearly is a legendary business leader; however, a great writer he is not. The book offers a few insights - eg. the power of corporate vision and value, budgeting and rewarding performance in the real (dynamic) world - but his book is not nearly as specific and helpful as Larry Bossidy's (Welch's former #2) "Confronting Reality," and "Execution." Sadly, the book also does not reference how Welch greatly simplified planning and accountability by getting rid of the planners, and instead focusing on fast reaction - a lesson that some firms, government and public education still need to learn.

    In addition, Welch does not address most of the vast changes simplifying much of management in the last few years - even though he pioneered much of their use. The job has become primarily one of reducing costs - especially by shifting work away from Americans. This is accomplished by:

    1)Maximizing outsourcing (eg. to Canada - primarily to avoid U.S. healthcare costs; to China and India - primarily to greatly reduce production labor, call-center, and design and programming costs,

    2)Maximizing use of illegal immigrants within the U.S. - eg. in the meatpacking, construction, and other food-processing and food-serving areas,

    3)Maximizing use of legal temporary immigrants within the U.S. - eg. Indian citizens with H-1B and L1 visas in areas such as electronics design and manufacturing, and computer programming.

    4)Maximizing use of aggressive accounting - eg. capitalizing expenses, pre-booking revenues, optimistic assumptions about corporate pension fund growth, creating new entities to "hide" excess debt etc., and taking "special write-offs" wherever possible.

    5)Minimizing exposure to risk of major commodity price increases - eg. large-scale futures buying of aviation fuel.

    Further American worker head-count reductions are accomplished by implementing new IT systems, process improvements (eg. Six Sigma, cycle-time reductions), "rank and yank" personnel evaluations (Welch does reference this topic, but sugar-coats it to seem beneficial to all), and divesting or consolidating companies (mergers and acquisitions), divisions, functions (eg. personnel, IT, procurement), products, components, and suppliers. Cost reductions for those remaining American employees can be achieved by reducing salaries (eg. competitive contracting out "non-core" functions - defined as broadly as possible), infrastructure (eg. work-at-home, "owner-operator" truckers), health-care benefits (through increasing worker contributions) and pensions (eg. via canceling, or switching from "defined benefit" to "defined contribution" plans. And then all the preceding measures are forced through the supply chain by requesting price reductions and/or the "China price."

    Finally, leveraging tax reductions, abatements, pension plan takeovers, exemptions from lawsuit liability and various regulations (eg. EPA, OSHA. zoning) and various other "freebies" from government has also become another major modern "management skill" (eg. via threatening or actually moving production and/or headquarters; promising to create new jobs, threatening lawsuits, making large campaign donations) that Welch fails to reference in "Winning."

    In summary, "Winning" is somewhat interesting, but mostly superficial and irrelevant. And overall, "winning" is no longer a skill to be proud of, worth multi-million dollar payouts to CEOs, or necessarily good for America.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Full of energy and a passion for results
    Having read Dr Welch's earlier book "Jack: Straight from the Gut", I was eagerly awaiting the release of Winning. This book is logically split into several sections and chapters ranging from Strategy, Performance Management, Mergers and Acquisitions, Recruitment, Promotion and finally a chapter on answers to questions on China and other issues not addressed in the other chapters.

    True to his style, candor is the hallmark of this book. One may not fully agree with Dr Welch on many issues, and he has not changed his opinion and conviction on some of the policies that he rigorously implemented at GE. But this book is an excellent summary in crisp and simple text, distilling his over four decades of experience in working for and leading one of the most admired companies of this planet.

    Those interested in a serious discussion of management theories and looking for an approach based on data and research may be disappointed. But if one is looking for what works and what does not in reality, this book is sure to impress.

    Content is one thing about books. What makes this book very different from what could have otherwise been published as a summary of concepts is the first person narrative style of the author. Every page is filled with energy, strong belief and commitment to the ideas discussed.After all this is a book based on true personal experience and not a discourse on theoretical concepts.

    Dr Welch, thank you so much for this wonderful gift to next generation managers.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Can You Spell Class Action
    The Jack and Suzy show has fallen flat on its face. Welch's
    coda, to fire 10% of the workforce every year, translates into massive age discrimination (you need "vitality" in your staff) in the workplace, and is currently the subject of a 15,000 person class action lawsuit against a major US corporation, which has the misfortune of being run by a runner-up in the succession sweepstakes "won" by Jeff Immelt. Ironically, the CEO of this company was 51 years old at the time of Welch's retirement, and was probably passed over for the top job because Immelt was 44. The abused become the abusers.

    1-0 out of 5 stars WARNING!
    I have no doubt that the book version is excellent. I have no doubt that the message is great, but the audio cd version of this book sucks. Jack Welch reads it so slow that it sounds like he is reading it to a group of first graders who don't speak english. I wish I hadn't opened the package because I would love to return the cds. I might as well have thrown the money in the waste basket.


    ... Read more


    18. The Richest Man in Babylon
    by George S. Clason
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0451205367
    Catlog: Book (2001-12-01)
    Publisher: Signet Book
    Sales Rank: 393
    Average Customer Review: 4.82 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Over two million copies in print of the classicpersonal wealth parable

    Millions have been helped by the famous "Babylonian parables," hailed as the greatest of all inspirational works on thrift,financial planning, and personal wealth. In language as simple as the Bible's, this modern classic shows the way to the road to riches.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (227)

    5-0 out of 5 stars An Old Book with a Fair Amount of Wisdom
    I often give this book out as a gift whenever a person younger than me asks for my advice on money. I always present this book to them saying "if you read it and do as it says, it will work magic." It really contains excellent, time tested advice, and would make a good gift for someone in their early 20s who is on their own for the first time, and struggling.

    The book is a series of parables about money written in the 1920s by George Clason. They were written as individual essays of a few thousand words, but the theme throughout them is consistent -- save 10% of your money, give 10% away, use 10% to reduce your debt load, and live on the remaining 70%.

    The stories in the book are entertaining; they are reminiscent of some of the parables in the Bible, such as the Prodigal Son or the story of the Workers in the Vineyard. I think this is intentional on the part of the author; certainly readers in the 1920s had an appreciation for "old fashioned stories with a moral" that people today seem to have lost. I enjoy the book greatly, though, and any thoughtful person who reads the book should find it interesting, especially if they are trying to get their finances in order.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This knowledge is Golden and Timeless
    This book is so beautiful in its simplicity. It provides the quintessential, capitalistic concept that the majority seem to miss- on saving and investing. This book is not the in-depth 21st century read about investing wisely in today's markets, rather it is the all time read to acquiring and investing your wealth. It shows how everyone, even a lowly trashman can one day retire comfortably as long as he learns the "ways of money". It provides the basic concepts and you apply your current scenarios. Every time, without fail, you will come up with one thing: how to build your wealth. This is the TRIED AND TRUE method to increasing your worth. This IS NOT the get rich quick book you might be expecting. This book teaches you how to save, make your money work for you and in general how to be a lord of your wealth (or wise in the ways of money), as opposed to your money ruling you. Timeless and priceless knowledge that every single person not living under totalitarian or communistic rule should know so that they can seek their own financial freedom.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Timeless, simple truths...
    This incredible little book was recommended to me for many years because of the texts inspirational qualities, in terms of offering timeless simple truths concerning thrift, financial planning and the value of a good work ethic. The formula offered for financial independence is highly practical and workable. Promoted as success secrets of the ancients, the text is written in parable form, similar to the bible, which gives the entire work a credible quality. I know from personal experience, that with persisitence, a good work ethic and a strong will to succeed; one can achieve a modicum of financial prosperity. Which, by the way, includes enjoying the fruits of one's labours. "Enjoy life while you are here. Do not overstrain or try to save too much...live otherwise according to your income and let not yourself get niggardly and afraid to spend. Life is good and life is rich with things worthwhile and things to enjoy." (20) In other terms, the lesson offered is a practice in moderation, not letting one's behavioural pendulum swing too far either way, but earning well and living well in the mean is a key to achieving a happy life. If you read any 'financial success' book this year, let it be this one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Simple wisdom but SO powerful
    First published in 1927 this is a parable, a story set in ancient Babylon, focusing on the simple ways to set yourself up for financial success. Excellent book.
    Lori
    www.communecate.biz

    5-0 out of 5 stars A book worth reading over and over
    I think that some people underestimate this book due to it's small size. This is NOT a book that you will want to read only once and put away, you will NEED to read this over and over untill the ideas saturate both your conscious and subscious minds and untill the ideas become habits. Then you will achieve some real results. ... Read more


    19. Microeconomics (6th Edition) (Prentice-Hall Series in Economics)
    by Robert S. Pindyck, Daniel L. Rubinfeld
    list price: $138.33
    our price: $138.33
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0130084611
    Catlog: Book (2004-05-28)
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
    Sales Rank: 10472
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    This book is well known for its coverage of modern topics (Game theory, Economics of Information, and Behavioral Economics), clarity of its writing style and graphs, and integrated use of real world examples. The emphasis on relevance and application to both managerial and public-policy decision-making are focused goals of the book. This emphasis is accomplished by including MANY extended examples that cover such topics as the analysis of demand, cost, and market efficiency; the design of pricing strategies; investment and production decisions; and public policy analysis. Economists and strategists looking to stay current with economic information.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (17)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Unneccessarily Long
    This textbook takes microeconomics which can be explained in a technical, exact manner and makes it abstract and foreign.

    This textbook's sentences run-on and lose their direction, confusing the reader...If a reader had a firm understanding of economics prior to this textbook, after reading it, it is certain that they will no longer have the understanding of economics, that they did previously.

    It is a travestly when a textbook designed to teach the reader about a certain subject, actually makes them less knowledgeable of the subject.

    I must also ask why it is being used to teach university students in different years and programs, when it should not be, for example in my university it is being taught in the following programs

    IBBA - Year 1
    BBA - Year 2
    BAS - Year 3
    MBA - Year 1

    5-0 out of 5 stars A good book for intermediate level students
    Organization of the books is good. Topics are discussed with enough clarity and graphs and illustrations are describing enough. The level of algebra and math is at an intermediate undergraduate level (economics major). I think it is a complete book for anybody who wants to have an understanding of microeconomics. I am a Ph.D. student of economics now and if I am going to teach an undergrad micro course, I will certainly choose this textbook.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Its clearly written, however laughable as an inter. Text
    The book is clearly written, however, I found that it is to simple and somewhat weak as a intermediate level text. I agree with most of the other comments that it would be more suitable as an entry level Economics text. This book would probably be better suited for students who are buisness or non-economics majors taking the intermediate course.

    1-0 out of 5 stars translated from klingon?
    Perhaps one of the worst written textbooks of all time.The convoluted sentences contain multiple sub clauses and prepositional phrases.The graphs are inadequately labeled and do more to confuse than clarify.Couldn't the publisher at least have hired a Wall Street Journal editor to give it a rewrite?They might as well have printed this in ancient Sumerian.The accompanying study guide reiterates the key topics in plain English, but contains typos.Politically speaking, the book displays a strong libertarian, anti-regulation, anti-worker bias.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Book Review
    I found this book to have clarity in the major topics of microeconomics which could help you to understand the basics. However this should only be used as basis reading and other books should be used to cover the various topics in more depth, such as Koutsoyanis and others which give more insight on specific topics. All in all it is a good solid core text book which can give you the basic knowledge needed in microeconomics. ... Read more


    20. Who Moved My Cheese? An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life
    by Spencer Johnson
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0399144463
    Catlog: Book (1998-09-01)
    Publisher: Putnam Pub Group (Paper)
    Sales Rank: 232
    Average Customer Review: 3.22 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Change can be a blessing or a curse, depending on your perspective. The message of Who Moved My Cheese? is that all can come to see it as a blessing, if they understand the nature of cheese and the role it plays in their lives. Who Moved My Cheese? is a parable that takes place in a maze. Four beings live in that maze: Sniff and Scurry are mice--nonanalytical and nonjudgmental, they just want cheese and are willing to do whatever it takes to get it. Hem and Haw are "littlepeople," mouse-size humans who have an entirely different relationship with cheese. It's not just sustenance to them; it's their self-image. Their lives and belief systems are built around the cheese they've found. Most of us reading the story will see the cheese as something related to our livelihoods--our jobs, our career paths, the industries we work in--although it can stand for anything, from health to relationships. The point of the story is that we have to be alert to changes in the cheese, and be prepared to go running off in search of new sources of cheese when the cheese we have runs out.

    Dr. Johnson, coauthor ofThe One Minute Manager and many other books, presents this parable to business, church groups, schools, military organizations--anyplace where you find people who may fear or resist change. And although more analytical and skeptical readers may find the tale a little too simplistic, its beauty is that it sums up all natural history in just 94 pages: Things change. They always have changed and always will change. And while there's no single way to deal with change, the consequence of pretending change won't happen is always the same: The cheese runs out. --Lou Schuler ... Read more

    Reviews (1208)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well worth your time
    This little book is right up there on the New York Times best-seller list. A short read (one hour at most) on how to deal with change in your life.

    Four mice named Sniff Scurry, Hem and Haw live in a Maze and look for cheese to nourish them to stay happy. The Maze is a metaphorical place where you look for what you want in life. The mice, it turns out, act like people and the cheese is a metaphor for whatever it is you want out of life.

    In this charming story, the mice are faced with unexpected change because their cheese disappears. Some of the characters are able to deal successfully with this change and some are not. One of them (the successful one) writes about what he learns from this disaster on the walls of the Maze and thereby hangs the gist of this short, sweet tale. Among the "writings on the wall" are:

    "If you do not change. you can become extinct." "What would you do if you weren't afraid?" "The quicker you let go of old cheese, the sooner you find new cheese." "Old beliefs do not lead you to new cheese." "Noticing small changes early helps you adapt to bigger changes that arc to come."

    Well worth your time. Give a copy to your kids or grandkids. Promise (them money if thev read it, but make them write you a book report to prove they really read it...

    4-0 out of 5 stars gourmet cheese between two slices of moldy bread
    Who Moved My Cheese? is divided into three sections: A Gathering, The Story, and A Discussion.

    The Story is about Sniff, Scurry, Hem and Haw, four unique characters who live in a maze and look for cheese to survive. When their familiar source of cheese dries up, each character handles the situation differently.

    The Story on its own is brilliant -- a simple illustration that allows the reader to assess their own reaction to change in their life. It could almost be considered (alongside Dr. Seuss' Oh, the Places You'll Go!) as a classic primer for recent graduates, displaced employees or budding entrepreneurs who know that today there is no such thing as "job security".

    Where this book falls apart is in A Gathering and A Discussion. These two sections assume that the reader is not smart enough to figure out The Story's metaphor on their own, and are jammed with shameless infomercial-type dialogue.

    This book has great content if you stick to the middle section. Five stars for The Story, less one star each for A Gathering and A Discussion.

    Larry Hehn...

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Modern Day Parable
    Some people just don't get "Who Moved My Cheese?" This is prefectly acceptable, because it will not work for everybody. Just like biblical parables, it is often interpreted in different ways. If you have not read it, I suggest that you give it a chance.

    I first encountered the book in graduate school and enjoyed it a great deal. Only recently, has my cheese been moved. Although prepared for my cheese to be moved, I find myself looking for my new cheese. The theme of the book deals with the adjustments or adaptations we must make in our lives periodically. All facets of life are really based in social darwinism, or survival of the fittest. While you may not like the book, you must agree that adaptation is the key to success and satisfaction in life.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best parable for dealing with change
    I have read lots of books on change management. Most of them are dry and boring. This book shows you various reactions to change and how one arrives at the right response. How mice deal with supplies of cheese provides an entertaining and educational context for this topic. The book is well worth the investment. I would recommend reading it in conjunction with Optimal Thinking--How To be Your Best Self. Optimal Thinking is the "mental software" to make the most of any situation and will help you deal with all the emotions and thoughts that stop you from making the most of change.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding selection
    This is a ourstanding book. The story or parable is set up to give the reader the information they can use to come up with a lesson for themselves. A story that we can all understand. You can almost let your children read it as a childrens book. That is how universal this book is. I've given away several copies of this book and everyone has found some value in it. I consider this to be one of the best Self help books out there. You might to. read and heed it. ... Read more


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