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1. Jim Cramer's Real Money: Sane
$11.53 $6.50 list($16.95)
2. Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich
$12.11 $12.10 list($17.30)
3. 21 Things I Wish My Broker Had
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4. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator
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5. Weekend Millionaire Mindset :
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6. Rich Dad's Guide to Investing:
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7. Trump Strategies for Real Estate
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8. Investing in Fixed Income Securities
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9. Investments : An Introduction
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10. Investing for Dummies, Third Edition
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11. Tools and Tactics for the Master
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12. Financial Institutions, Investments,
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13. Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding
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14. Missed Fortune 101 : A Starter
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15. Trading Commodities and Financial
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16. intelligent investor : The Classic
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17. The Automatic Millionaire : A
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18. The Intelligent Investor: The
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19. The Wall Street Journal Guide
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20. Smart Couples Finish Rich : 9

1. Jim Cramer's Real Money: Sane Investing in an Insane World
by James J. Cramer
list price: $26.00
our price: $17.16
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0743224892
Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Sales Rank: 49
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

How do we fatten our portfolios and stay financially healthy? Former hedge-fund manager and longtime Wall Street commentator Jim Cramer explains how to invest wisely in chaotic times, and he does so in plain English in a style that is as much fun as investing is -- or should be, when it's done right.

For starters, Cramer recommends devoting a portion of your assets to speculation. Everyone wants to find the big winners that can bring outsized gains, and Cramer explains how to allocate your portfolio so that you can afford to take this kind of risk wisely. He explains why "buy and hold" is a losing philosophy: For Cramer, it's "buy and homework." If you can't spend an hour a week researching each of your stocks, then you should hand off your portfolio to a mutual fund-- and Cramer identifies the very few mutual funds that he'd recommend.

Cramer reveals his Ten Commandments of Trading (Commandment #5: Tips are for waiters). He explains why he's not afraid to compare investing to gambling (and tells you which book on gambling you should read to become a better investor). He discloses his Twenty-Five Rules of Investing (Rule #4: Look for broken stocks, not broken companies).

Cramer shows how to compare stock prices in a way that you can understand, how to spot market tops and bottoms, how to know when to sell, how to rotate among cyclical stocks to catch the big moves, and much more. Jim Cramer's Real Money is filled with insider advice that really works, information that Cramer himself used to make millions during his fourteen-year career on Wall Street.

Written in Cramer's distinctive turbocharged style, this is every investor's guide to what you really must know to make big money in the stock market. ... Read more

Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Best investment book ever
Thanks Cramer for sharing your insights. I have also sign up the action alert, and profit from your realtime calls, thanks all the help.

5-0 out of 5 stars Thank You Professor Cramer
In Law School, you learn the Law, but you also learn how to Think like a Lawyer. If you want your hand held and told which stock you would Never lose money in..then this book is not for you. But if you want to Learn how to think and analyze like a Pro...then this is the Best Book ever written on this Subject (sorry Benjamin Graham). Reading this book, I was amazed to find so many things Mr. Cramer and the Great Mr. Buffet share in common.. from their thought, anaylsis to their overall personality. Neither one believes in holding more then 15 different companies, both live for Homework and both LOVE a bargain...be it a Stock or shopping at Target or finding a really good price on a Case of Coke (men after my heart). Neither Man waste money or are flashy with their wealth...and I think that is the greatest lesson that these Men (and this Book) can teach our status seeking society. I also suggest that you read this book before you read his first book, Confessions of a Street Addict...because once you have taken Cramer 101, you can truly enjoy Confessions....including the Horror of the $50,000.00 Desk...do you Know HOW much Sears Holding you can buy with that!

1-0 out of 5 stars Should you listen to Kramer?
Anybody who thinks they know everything about the stock market should be avoided at all costs. Kramer is one of the world's biggest idiots.I am, unfortunately, the world's greater idiot for listening to him time and again... not believing exactly that he knew what he was talking about, but for believing that other people would follow his advice, resulting in a stock going up or down. I have lost many thousands of dollars taking his advice.He has far too much power for his limited intellect;and his bulldog rants move stocks for all the wrong reasons.In my humble opinion,Eliott Spitzer should investigate him.

5-0 out of 5 stars Very Good
Unlike Cramer's Mad Money TV show, Cramer's Real Money is a little slow to get started. However,like many other books, you have to slog through the "where-I've-been-and-how-I-got-to-where-I-am-today" portion to more appreciate what he has to say when he gets to the meat of the book.Cramer offers an interesting perspective from the "inside", possibly revealing more than some Wallstreeters would prefer, and demonstrates he is not just another financial "talking head".His book is definately a "must read" for anyone in the market today.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book on Trading
This is one of the best trading books out there (and I have gone through most of the books on trading and investing). Just the chapters on picking the bottom and top are worth more than the price of the book.Whether or not you agree with everything he says, the book will surely make you think and trade better, and likely wealthier. ... Read more


2. Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money--That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!
by Robert T. Kiyosaki, Sharon L. Lechter
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.53
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0446677450
Catlog: Book (2000-04-01)
Publisher: Warner Business Books
Sales Rank: 78
Average Customer Review: 3.86 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

"Personal-finance author and lecturer Robert T. Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective from two very different influences--his two fathers.One father (Robert's real father) was a highly educated man, but fiscally poor.The other father was the father of Robert's best friend--the Dad who was an eighth grade dropout who became a self-made multi-millionaire.The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his "poor dad" pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his "rich dad."Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retore at 47.RICH DAD, POOR DAD, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter lays out Kiyosaki's philosophy behind his relationship with money.RICH DAD, POOR DAD opens readers eyes by:

- exploding the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich
- challenging the belief that your house is an asset
- defining once and for all an asset versus a liability
- explaining what kids need to know about money for their future financial success" ... Read more

Reviews (1475)

5-0 out of 5 stars Eye opener !
I am a 35 y/o computer person. As I grew up, my parents told me to go to school and become an engineer, or an accountant, so that I could have lots of money. I grew up thinking it would happen, and my belief got stronger when I chose a profitable computer carreer. However, I spent 15 years working on computers, with many over-time hours, and lots of time away from friends and family because I was learning newer technologies to try to make more money.

However, I never got rich, I made good money but I was never able to accumulate more than $5,000 on my bank account. I never understood why after working so hard, money was still a big concern! I figured out that there's gotta be another way to become wealthy. I gave it my best shot at studying and working hard, and years went by and things didn't get better.

I started looking for information on wealth accumulation books, and a friend of mind recommended this book. This book has been very enlighting, I wish I had learned the principles shown in here 15 years ago. If I had, I know for a fact that money would not be a big concern for me today. I feel much better now because, even though I don't have lots of money (not yet), this book pointed me in the right direction.

I also recommend "Think and Grow Rich" by Napoleon Hill. It goes deep into detail about what to put in your mind if you want to become wealthy.

I hope my review helps.

5-0 out of 5 stars This book is an eye opener to all of those who desire money.
I have read both 'Rich Dad, Poor Dad' and 'Cashflow Quadrant.' Being young and still in college, these two books have taught me how the rich think. As Kiyosaki emphasizes, getting a high paying job after college is not the answer to becoming financially indepent and satisfied. His books unteach the reader everything he/she has learned about money and allows the reader to focus on building wealth the way millionaires do. His books are enlightening, and his method to achieving wealth makes sense logically. After reading 'Millionaire Next Door', I could honestly tell that Kiyosaki's method is the way the truly rich think. 'Millionaire Next Door' simply focuses on frugality and spending as little money as possible. Who wants to enjoy all of their money when they become 60 yeas of age, having spent their prime years living as cheap as possible? Kiyosaki's book is excellent in teaching the common man/woman how to have money work for them and allows them to live life to their fullest. I recommend this book and 'Cashflow Quadrant' as the first two readings for someone seeking financial independence.

5-0 out of 5 stars Powerful, life changing program
A few months ago, I was working in sales for a B>B Business Group. I followed Mr. Kiyosaki's advice and started investing my money in passive income. I bought some equities, a rental or two and started a home based business.

While my colleagues spent their checks and worked for ThankGodItsFriday and cheer for Wednesdays because it was "hump day" and yell hooray for the weekend, and then made wise cracks about my goals. I invested, left that company over 6 weeks ago and am now full time in my own business. Meanwhile, my colleagues were recently served notice that their company (my former company) is laying off 150 people!

Thank God for Robert Kiyosaki.

2-0 out of 5 stars Can't communicate to save theirselves
Easy read-18 minutes & spelling and grammer errors are throughout. Plus, pure money making "Dribble". Follow this & you LOOSE!

5-0 out of 5 stars A book on how to think like the rich do
This book is about strategy, not tactics. Here you will start to learn how the rich think. This book changed my life as it was the first book of my new life! It's not going to teach you the exact tactics the rich use (try the new van tharp's book for that) but more importante it will teach you the thinking behind what they do. Don't mind the bad reviews: it worked for me. ... Read more


3. 21 Things I Wish My Broker Had Told Me : Practical Advice for New Real Estate Professionals.
by Frank Cook
list price: $17.30
our price: $12.11
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0793154375
Catlog: Book (2002-06-05)
Publisher: Dearborn Real Estate Education
Sales Rank: 1118
Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Written with humor and insight, 21 Things I Wish My Broker Had Told Me provides hands on advice that will help agents start, or maintain, a sucessful career in real estate.This has real life stories from dozens of sucessful, top producing, real estate professionals will help new agents know what to expect and how to succeed.(186 pages, 2003 copyright) ... Read more

Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, and brutally honest
I am a liccensed CA Real Estate Broker. I ordered the book after I had read a positive review about the book from newspaper real estate columnist/investor/attorney, Robert Bruss. Bruss has never steered me wrong, and I highly respect his opinions.
This book is the MOST straightforward, no BS, book I have read yet about any aspect of the business. I tip my hat to the author, who himself is a real estate columnist, for digging up the information... The truths are universal in this business (which is scary/weird), but I feel that anyone who is starting out in this business MUST read this book so you know what to expect, as I cannot think of any other business that chews up and spits out people so quickly. I imagine some will buy it looking for a way to riches, which this book is NOT about. It is about understanding how the business really works and what to expect, thereby giving one an edge against any disappointment and discouragement a "green" agent will surely feel in the first 18 months of this business. The dropout rate is high, and I think the author offers much encouragement. There has been so much stuff written about selling real estate, and all the "pump up" stuff to keep one motivated, but this book is not about that at all. This book would make an excellent gift to anyone who just passed their Real Estate test and is willing to take the plunge into a business where, quite frankly, every day that you wake up, you are seeking work! After reading it, you won't feel so distraught at the bumpy road which lies ahead.
I'm sure even seasoned vets of the business would appreciate it, and may find themselves chuckling to themselves as they are reminded of the many hard lessons that were learned -and there will be many- as the book points out, or perhaps I should say, the book says "Look Out!"
I read it in one evening, as it entertains the reader as well. Well done, Mr. Cook, and thank you for approaching a subject that I think few have touched upon. Your organization of the subject matter seems well thought out.
The one underlying theme which he displays in various interviews with Realtors is one must certainly rely on hard work, rather than luck (we all know the stories about stepping out for a $4.95 sandwich, only to lose a $20,000 commission to the one agent who answered the phone), to make it. Plus, thank you for mentioning that this is a misunderstood profession, in the eyes of the public, and calling upon all agents to act professionally, and putting the client's needs before our own.
Buy it, read it, and good luck to all the new agents out there. Office managers: make this required reading for new agents and you'll save yourself a lot of hand holdiing...

5-0 out of 5 stars Would recommend this book to a starting out agent
This is a great book. It gives you a bunch of information you would otherwise not find out until after your first year in the business. It gives you a bunch of associations to be aware of that you can join, things you can do to promote your business. I finished it in one sitting, and am planning to read it again. I would definitely recommend this book for anyone in their first year of real estate. Will save you a lot of time on doing things that don't matter. Focus on results.

5-0 out of 5 stars The only one
This is the first book you should read if considering entering into real estate. Some of the personal stories are scarey yet true, but are important to face before entering a new career.
A lot of other books are "rah, rah, you can do it" hype. This is one book that speaks about the sucesses and failures from a personal perspective. I have now read it twice once for pleasure and once to take notes! This book really does speak of the things your broker will never tell you.

4-0 out of 5 stars good book
must have book for new agents. I would recommend this book and also "The idiot's guide to Success as a real estate agent" by Marilyn Sullivan which is another super book for new agents.

2-0 out of 5 stars You have heard it all before!!
This book is attractive due to the title, however, it was a great disappointment. Everything in the book are things that a typical broker would tell you. All of the examples and advice are very general, except for one or two good points. What I found particularly interesting is the author's take on "fair housing" issues. The author, who is obviously not a minority, gives the advice that "one should walk away" if someone made a comment regarding letting a "minority" move into a property you are selling. That is true..However, what if you as the Real Estate Agent (and not the client) happens to be Black (or Hispanic or Jewish)?<-THIS IS HOW IT IS IN THE BOOK
There are more ways to view an issue. Maybe he should have consulted an agent that happens to belong to the Black (or Hispanic or Jewish) population for assistance with this topic. ... Read more


4. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator (A Marketplace Book)
by EdwinLefèvre, Marketplace Books
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0471059706
Catlog: Book (1994-05-11)
Publisher: Wiley
Sales Rank: 1620
Average Customer Review: 4.68 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Stock investing is a relatively recent phenomenon and the inventory of true classics is somewhat slim. When asked, people in the know will always list books by Benjamin Graham, Burton G. Malkiel's A Random Walk Down Wall Street, and Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings by Philip A. Fisher. You'll know you're getting really good advice if they also mention Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lef&egrave;vre.

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator is the thinly disguised biography of Jesse Livermore, a remarkable character who first started speculating in New England bucket shops at the turn of the century. Livermore, who was banned from these shady operations because of his winning ways, soon moved to Wall Street where he made and lost his fortune several times over. What makes this book so valuable are the observations that Lef&egrave;vre records about investing, speculating, and the nature of the market itself. For example:

"It never was my thinking that made the big money for me. It always was my sitting. Got that? My sitting tight! It is no trick at all to be right on the market. You always find lots of early bulls in bull markets and early bears in bear markets. I've known many men who were right at exactly the right time, and began buying or selling stocks when prices were at the very level which should show the greatest profit. And their experience invariably matched mine--that is, they made no real money out of it. Men who can both be right and sit tight are uncommon."

If you've ever spent weekends and nights puzzling over whether to buy, sell, or hold a position in whatever investment--be it stock, bonds, or pork bellies, you'll be glad that you read this book. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator is full of lessons that are as relevant today as they were in 1923 when the book was first published. Highly recommended. --Harry C. Edwards ... Read more

Reviews (114)

5-0 out of 5 stars Very Interesting but not particularly useful...
I have read this book several times and always find it entertaining. The psychology of the markets is, I guess, always fairly similar; however, this book will not make you a dime. Do not buy this book if you think that you will learn valuable money making insights by reading it.

The worth in this book is in the entertainment value. Experienced traders will relate to certain events and conditions mentioned in this book (at least I do). Really, this book is a just a novel for traders that transcends generations in terms of relevance.

Victor Niederhoffer heavily borrowed from this book when he wrote "Education of a Speculator." In that book, he basically said that he would not give up his trading secrets for the price of a book. What came about was a biography on the basics of how he developed his mind of a successful trader. That is the essence of "Reminiscences of a Stock Operator:" how Edwin LeFevre developed his trading mind.

Will a neophite leap frog elemental educational experience in the financial markets by instead reading this book? I think not. The neophite will also not learn of a succesful money making strategy by reading this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is my "bible" of investing
I have a library of nearly 100 books about the markets. Reminiscences was the third book I ever read and it remains my "bible" more than a decade later. You might wonder how an 80-year old book about the stock market could still be relevant. Well, that is because financial markets are determined by human nature as much as anything else, and human nature acts today as it did a century ago. Greed, fear, herd thinking, impatience - those are the same influences that drive markets today and haunt traders and investors who are striving to make the right decisions. Many of the lessons that dictate my investment philosophy ("Cut your losses, let your winners run", "if you don't like the odds, don't bet") were taught to me by the protagonist, who is the fictional characterization of the legendary Jesse Livermore. That he tells his stories with such color and suspense makes the book completely entertaining beyond its invaluable trading lessons. BUY THIS BOOK FOR YOURSELF. BUY ANOTHER ONE FOR A FRIEND (I've given 4 copies). You'll not only improve your own investing results, but your gift will impress as well.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece
I bought this book after it was mentioned on the book Market Wizards. After I finished reading it, I found myself going back to it over and over again. This is a must read book for anyone that is really interesting in how the trading markets work in real life. It's brilliant, funny... Great!!!!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars Dated Yet Insightful
This book's contribution to the literature of the financial markets is incontrovertible. For an investing public starved of trading wisdom in a pre-Markowitz era when stock traders relied more or less on rules of thumb, "Reminiscences" stood out as a true gem. It should be read both as a source of profound insight into the workings of financial markets past and present, and as a critique of speculative activity in the years prior to the bursting of the stock market bubble in 1929.

One of the most important lessons mentioned in the book is that a trader does not have to be invested in the market all the time. It sounds hackneyed today, but this tenet is actually difficult to follow in practice, given the propensity of traders and investors to ride out losing positions.

It is important to remember that, having been written during a massive bull run and prior to the systemic failure of the stock market in 1929, during which the market's 'boundless hope and optimism', as described in Galbraith's "The Great Crash 1929", run roughshod over sentiments that the markets were overheating, "Reminiscences" should be read with an eye towards portfolio preservation, not injudicious speculation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Hardcover Marketplace Book version worth the price ?
Wonderful book.
However I wanted a version printed on good paper so it would last a long time.
I bought a very costly hardcover Marketplace copy, just to discover that it was printed on weak paper.
It probably is just the paperback version with a hardcover, for which a 4.5 times the paperback price tag is quite rich. ... Read more


5. Weekend Millionaire Mindset : How Ordinary People Can Achieve Extraordinary Success
by MikeSummey, RogerDawson
list price: $18.95
our price: $12.89
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0071453350
Catlog: Book (2005-03-31)
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Sales Rank: 6765
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Learn the secrets to wealth from "The Weekend Millionaire"

In their runaway bestseller The Weekend Millionaire's Secrets to Investing in Real Estate, Mike Summey and Roger Dawson gave readers a blueprint for making a killing in real estate in their spare time. Now Summey and Dawson take readers inside the minds and hearts of super successful entrepreneurs, showing them how to think and act like winners and realize their dreams of financial freedom.

In the tradition of Napoleon Hill's hit Think and Grow Rich, The Weekend Millionaire Mindset combines compelling biographical details with powerful, practical lessons. Packed with fascinating anecdotes taken from Summey and Dawson's own lives and the lives of other millionaire entrepreneurs, this book will inspire, energize, and motivate while arming readers with practical advice and guidance on how to:

  • Evaluate and redirect their lives with an eye to becoming rich
  • Create a lifestyle of success
  • Set realistic goals and stick to them
  • Make the right decisions when faced with challenging learning experiences
  • Spot golden opportunities
  • Realize dreams through patience, practice, and persistence

With Mike Summey and Roger Dawson's invaluable advice, readers can overcome their obstacles and find a personal path to wealth for a lifetime.

... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Don't let the title turn you off! Life changer book
Okay, I must admit when I saw the BRIGHT yellow book cover and the word "millionaire" in the title title the first time, I rolled my eyes when a friend handed me the book and said read this. My first thought was oh god, not another book telling me how to be a millionaire overnight (or over the weekend) and it is by a real estate investor no less. When my eyes stopped rolling I began reading.That little negative voice in my head was quickly silenced as soon as I read chapter one and realized that this was more than theory. It was Mike's story. By the end of chapter two I was inspired enough by his story and the clarity of my own story to create a budget and believe that I too could go beyond this ordinary financial existence. Why do so few of us build wealth settling instead for an ordinary American financial existence? I am a believer now and I will be a millionaire by the time I am 60 (or sooner since I am starting at 40) as well. This book is NOT a real estate book. It IS a book that WILL change your mindset and your future...and it CAN change your mindset in a WEEKEND if you allow it to do so. Give this to every high school graduate. Give this book to every teenager before they finance their first car. As Mike says, if you aren't doing well in this country, you are doing something wrong.

Thanks Mr. Summey for sharing your story and for helping me understand what I was doing wrong.
signed, future millionaire in NYC

5-0 out of 5 stars YOU'LL BE MOTIVATED TO TRANSLATE THOUGHTS INTO ACTIONS!
You can feel the sincerity of the authors, encouraging through words, to create desire, teach you how to set goals and reach those goals.

The real life stories and adventures in the book are fun to read as well as informative. I really enjoyed the "story telling" layout with the bullets of information at the end of each chapter. Almost parable like at times.

Most people will read it and say great book, excellent book, put it down and do nothing afterwards. But for those people not so "most people", this book can give the means to TRANSLATE THOUGHT INTO ACTION and accept personal responsibility for one's own success.

I really appreciated the message in this book. If you're yearning for change and are not sure where to start, then why not start with this one?

5-0 out of 5 stars The Truth About Millionaires
Mike Summey is a very successful man who, like many others, started out with no advantages in life over his peers; but trained himself to overcome disadvantages by conditioning his thinking. It is your reaction to what happens to you that determines the long-term effect more than what actually happened.

Having studied the lives of many self-made millionaires over the years, I can say that Mike's experience resembles that of many great men. It is not outstanding natural ability that makes one a success or failure, but the strength of his determination and desire and the willingness never to give up.

Mike's celebrated fame is as a real estate investor, but the mindset he has developed, and teaches you to develop in yourself, will lead to success in any other worthwhile pursuit--it transcends mere real estate investing. It is the secret to successful living, period.

As a real estate investor myself, I certainly appreciate Mike's accomplishments in that arena, but there is more to life than financial wealth and this book shows you why Mike has achieved so much in every area.

Roger is also an accomplished man who started from humble beginnings and he adds confirmation to the lessons Mike teaches.

My only challenge is to the subtitle of the book. I beleive that once you have read this book and taken its lessons to heart, you no longer can be considered "ordinary".

I wish my friends Mike and Roger the best of success with this very fine book.

Al Lee ... Read more


6. Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not!
by Robert T. Kiyosaki, Sharon L. Lechter
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0446677469
Catlog: Book (2000-06)
Publisher: Warner Business Books
Sales Rank: 1174
Average Customer Review: 3.58 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

The rich are different from the rest of us, if for no other reason than U.S. tax and securities laws allow them to invest in ways that keep us from catching up to them. That's why 90 percent of all corporate shares of stock are owned by 10 percent of the people. Kiyosaki believes it's possible for anyone to move up into that 10 percent, but it takes a different view of investing than most people have: it takes a plan to be a successful investor. And a plan is more than simply buying and selling, or collecting "assets" that bring in no cash and are thus more akin to liabilities. The way most people invest, "they might as well be pushing a wheelbarrow in a circle," he writes. A plan is "mechanical, automatic, and boring," a formula for success that has worked historically for most of those who've used it. Kiyosaki's "rich dad" (actually, the father of his best friend) tells him the simplest analogy is the game Monopoly: buy four green houses, trade them for one red hotel, and repeat until you become rich.

The overall message of Rich Dad's Guide to Investing is that this is an abundant world, full of opportunity for the sophisticated investor. However, it sometimes takes a while to find this point. Much of the book is told in dialogues between young Kiyosaki and his rich dad, and these conversations can ramble. There are rewards for the careful reader--for example, in the middle of a section on the basic rules of investing, Kiyosaki's rich dad compares investor education to toilet training: difficult at first but eventually automatic. But getting to these inspired metaphors means wading through a lot of repetitive dialogue. It's a bit ironic that someone who advocates investor discipline should show so little as a writer. But by the end of the book, even the rambling starts to make sense. By the hundredth time you read that the rich don't work for money, and that you don't need money to make money, both concepts start to make sense. It still looks difficult to apply these ideas, but Rich Dad's Guide to Investing certainly makes the case that they'll work for anyone bold and smart enough to practice them. --Lou Schuler ... Read more

Reviews (143)

5-0 out of 5 stars A must for those who want to be Financially Independent
This book continues from where Kiyosaki left off in Cashflow Quadrant, his 2nd book in the trilogy (now complete with Rich Dad's Guide to Investing).

In his 1st book Rich Dad Poor Dad, Kiyosaki addressed the differences in mindsets between the Rich and the Poor. Then, in his 2nd book Cashflow Quadrant, he spoke on the 4 quadrants from which one can generate income. To be wealthy, Kiyosaki recommended that we learn to generate our incomes from the "B" (Business-owner) and "I" (Investor) quadrant as opposed to the "E" (Employee) and "S" (Self-employed) quadrant.

In his 3rd book Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, Kiyosaki tells how he got started in his investment journey, starting with nothing, and in fact at one stage, with a negative net worth. Most of us, having read his first 2 books, would have wondered if we could have embarked on our journey to become financially independent without much resource at hand. In this book, Kiyosaki shows how anyone can get started and how it does not take money to make money. He teaches how time is more important than money; how investing in one's self and getting an education and experience precedes excessive cash; how having a plan is more important than being in a hurry to make money.

This is not a book for those who want hot tips and quick fixes. This is a book on mindsets. Kiyosaki plants ideas and provides a road-map. The reader must take the first step and learn to navigate his/her own journey.

What I like about this book, is Kiyosaki's concept of being an Ultimate Investor, a "selling-investor". The Ultimate Investor creates deals and businesses that the public hunger for and are willing to pay a premium to acquire a share of. With the internet, it has never been easier to create businesses and deals which one can take public.

As in all his other books, Kiyosaki's book is worth reading again and again. I would also recommend that one reads Robert Allen's Multiple Streams of Income in conjunction with Kiyosaki's Rich Dad's Guide to Investing.

5-0 out of 5 stars RDGTI is the Ultimate Investors Guide
This book is about the 90/10 investor difference. As Kiwosaki explains [quoting Rich Dad] "If you want to be rich, just find out what everyone else is doing and do the exact opposite"RDGTI explains the differences between the 10% of investors who make 90% of the money and the 90% who make only 10% of the money.It's not what they invest in, but how they think.The RDGTI goes against standard, accepted dogma. To me, the greatest revelation was when I realized that by changing my thoughts, as espoused by Rich Dad AND told to Kiwosaki, I could [and did] change my investment results.The average investors philosphy is to not take risks and buy and hold [actually buy and pray--average down]I like the fact that this book is written in an easy to read format. The story telling and metaphors help drive the ideas home. The mental attitude quizzes clears the cobwebs from your head and gets you thinking like an entrepeneur, champion investor. While some of the information is repeated from the RDPD and CFQ--so what? Ever taken a class? Don't teachers review previous material before moving on to newer studies? This book builds on the prior books Kiwosaki and Lechter will tell you some things that you don't want to hear and blow holes wide open on typical misconceptions.So where do you want to be, in the 90% who go nowhere or the 10% who succeed. I have chosen to be inthe 10%. Care to join me? Start by reading this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Powerfully impacted my investment results
Prior to reading (...and applyiny) the advice in Rich Dad's Guide to Investing I was like a gerbel in a cage going nowhere with my investing. I was loosing money, not making money and my broker wasn't making me feel any better by reminding me that all of his clients were loosing money, everybody is loosing money, the market is down and so on.

I recalled a saying by Will Rogers:

"I am not so worried about the return on my investment as I am on the return of my investment."

Listening to brokers was causing me to loose money.

Rich Dad's Guide to Investing gives you all the keys you need to get to where you want to go. It's not theory, it's how the rich invest. It is how the rich become rich.

I also recommend Rich Dad's Prophecy which since it has been written has been 100% accurate. That is a pretty good batting average. I'd count on the rest to be accurate as well.

If you are serious about making money investing, read and apply Rich Dad's Guide to Investing and Rich Dad's Prophecy my two favorite Rich Dad books after of course Rich Dad Poor Dad.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great advice that really works
If you were one of those 80 million Americans who lost over a trillion dollars following your stock brokers or convential advice, then you will love this book.

While no one has a time machine, we can't correct the past, we can certaintly plan for the future and this great book by Robert Kiyosaki will show you how to do just that---plan for your future and actually make some money investing...and in more than just the stock market too.

CAUTION: Brokers won't like this book and in fact will hope you never read this book, but then, you know why they are called brokers don't you? It's because they are usually broker than you are! The massive downsizing of brokers by so many brokerage firms shows just how valuable these guys really are.

By the way, I also recommend Rich Dad's Prophecy.

5-0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER WINNER BASED ON AUTHOR'S WISDOM
I am a fan of Robert Kiyosaki. On the book shelf next to me is his CD and workbook course titled "Choose To Be Rich" (produced by Time Life) bought at a live lecture in 2002 in Fresno, California where he took the time to autograph the course for me after he spoke even though he was trying to get away to get to the airport. So I have made it a point to read all the books he has written as he has walked his talk. In addition to this book, I would recommend that readers have on their bookself to read and constantly refer to "Making Dollars With Pennies: How The Small Investor Can Beat the Wizards On Wall Street," by R. Max Bowser. This book is also by an author who after many years created a system that enables investors to become wealthly over time. It is available used and new on Amazon.com. ... Read more


7. Trump Strategies for Real Estate : Billionaire Strategies Any Investor Can Apply to Deals Large and Small
by GeorgeRoss
list price: $24.95
our price: $16.47
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0471718351
Catlog: Book (2005-02-11)
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Sales Rank: 212423
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8. Investing in Fixed Income Securities : Understanding the Bond Market (Wiley Finance)
by GaryStrumeyer
list price: $69.95
our price: $44.07
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0471465127
Catlog: Book (2005-01-28)
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Sales Rank: 381115
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Book Description

A comprehensive overview of the fixed income investment arena

Investors who’ve primarily purchased equity securities in the past have been looking for more secure investment alternatives; namely, fixed income securities. This book demystifies the sometimes daunting fixed income market, through a user-friendly, sophisticated, yet not overly mathematical format. Investing in Fixed Income Securities covers a wide range of topics, including the different types of fixed income securities, their characteristics, the strategies necessary to manage a diversified portfolio, both domestic and non-U.S. securities, bond pricing concepts, and yield curves. These and other issues will be explored, so that readers can make the most informed investment decisions possible when dealing with fixed income securities.

Gary Strumeyer (New York, NY) is the Managing Director (Bond and Money Market Group) of BNY Capital Markets, a registered broker-dealer subsidiary of The Bank of New York Company, Inc. He was the former adjunct professor (Economics and Finance) of New York University’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies. ... Read more


9. Investments : An Introduction
by Herbert B. Mayo
list price: $135.95
our price: $135.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0324289162
Catlog: Book (2005-01-03)
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
Sales Rank: 32923
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Book Description

Covering the same topics found in more advanced-level texts, Investments incorporates minimal math and is much more student-friendly, resulting in an increased excitement for and understanding of the basic investment course material. It is the text of choice for the College of Financial Planning. It includes a strong focus on the individual financial planner and features a ?Financial Advisor?s Investment Case? at the end of each chapter. These short cases illustrate how text material applies to real investment decisions. Financial calculators are introduced and utilized throughout the text with explanations employing both interest tables and the calculator. It is also ideal for non-majors courses. ... Read more


10. Investing for Dummies, Third Edition
by EricTyson
list price: $21.99
our price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0764524313
Catlog: Book (2002-11-25)
Publisher: For Dummies
Sales Rank: 1170
Average Customer Review: 4.14 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

It’s been said, and too often quoted, that the only certainties in life are death and taxes. To these can be added one more: being confused by investing. But remember that no one is born with financial knowledge. It's acquired over time.

If you’ve succeeded in accumulating some money to invest, congratulations! You’ve already accomplished a feat that the majority of people haven’t done yet. But with the increased coverage of the investment world, you may think that investing times have changed. But to a large degree, things haven’t changed all that much. Investments that were lousy years ago are still considered lousy today. But the best investments for building wealth – stocks, real estate, and small business – haven’t changed.

Whether you have a modest or immodest economic means, this easy-to-use guide can help you understand how to increase your wealth by

  • Living within your means and systematically saving and investing money, ideally in a tax-favored manner.
  • Buying and holding stocks, ide ally through the best mutual funds.
  • Building your own small business or career.
  • Investing in real estate.

Equally, if not more, important is understanding and choosing investments compatible with your personal and financial goals. Nearly every professional athlete, movie star, or business big shot that gets on the evening news by making an investment blunder and losing considerable money could have – and should have – avoided the error. With Investing For Dummies, 3rd Edition, you'll discover how to do just that. You'll also

  • Cut through the jargon and get to the heart of what investments are.
  • Figure out what rate of return you can expect and how much risk you should take to get it.
  • Explore the financial markets and how you can participate.
  • Research stocks and how to best buy them.
  • Uncover the best resources to use and the experts worth listening to.

You don’t need a fancy college degree or a rich mom or dad to invest money. What you do need is a desire to practice simple yet powerful lessons and strategies. This book can help by showing you everything you need to start and maintain and investment program. ... Read more

Reviews (51)

5-0 out of 5 stars Helps you build a solid foundation for further reading
I have been investing in stocks, mutuals funds and real estate for about 8 years without ever reading a book on the topic. I bought this book to learn the nuts and bolts of investing. Despite the fact that I am not a beginner I still found the book informative. For example, Tyson says when a stock plummets don't bale out, buy some more at the lower price. I baled out of amazon.com at $11 and of course I deeply regret it now. I have since learned to hold during the bad times and now I am in profit territory with all of my stocks. He suggests that college savings accounts, such as 529 plans, may be a bad idea because it could hurt your child's chances of getting financial aid. He explains how bonds can go down in value and says instead of buying individual bonds it is better to buy bond mutual funds. I had been wary of bonds before reading this book, now I am thinking about buying a bond fund in the interests of diversification.

I didn't agree with Tyson on everything. He is more conservative than I am. I am only in my early 30s, so I believe I am young enough to take some financial risks. Also, he believes that it is a bad idea to pick your own stocks. Yet he also says that if you buy good companies and hold for several years you will always come out ahead as long as you have a diversified portfolio. I see no reason to pay a financial planner (who may put his/her own interests ahead of mine) to do this for me.

One thing I really like about the book is that he doesn't just focus on financial instruments. He also discusses investing in both real estate and small businesses. I will be buying a franchise within the next year and I found this information very helpful. Of course, I will need to do further reading on this topic.

This is an excellent book that I had a hard time putting down. If you want to learn more about investing I suggest that you start with this book. It will provide a solid foundation, and help you move onto more complicated financial books and magazines.

5-0 out of 5 stars Very good book.
Eric Tyson's Investing for Dummies in broad in scope, but still written in plain english. Even the most naive to investing can understand and apply what he writes.I also recommend Personal Finance for Dummies and Mutual Funds For Dummies.You will find these books more informative than Jane Bryant Quinn's books. What is the love affair with her anyway? I made the mistake of buying How To Make the Most of Your Money and found it to be a complete waste. Couldn't get rid of it fast enough. Read and apply Eric Tyson's great work. You'll be glad you did.

4-0 out of 5 stars Practical Introduction for Beginners
Considering that I know hardly anything about investing in stocks, real estate, etc., this book was a very good one because it introduced me to the basics. It starts with each topic on "level one" and gradually leads you to the level where you understand the topic but do not have useless information. It discusses stocks and bonds, real estate, portfolio buiding, and even the interesting psychological obstacles in investing. I thought an interesting idea was that to succeed long term in mutual fund investing, your portfolio must be diversified and well-researched. This book also discusses the pros and cons of having a financial advisor, and gives resources for more information. The book has cartoons, which add humor and taught me how investing would be applied to my life. The section of the book least applicable to me was about running and buying business, but it was interesting nevertheless. It was a great introduction to investing and I feel much more prepared than I did before reading the book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Buy the Third Edition instead of this OLD one
The Third Edition of this book is already out. Why would you buy the second edition if the third edition is newer?

1-0 out of 5 stars Lacking
There are very few good nuggets of information in this one.
I listened to the entire audio version in my car on the way to work. I didn't have to stop once to jot down anything important. ... Read more


11. Tools and Tactics for the Master DayTrader: Battle-Tested Techniques for Day,Swing, and Position Traders
by Oliver Velez, Greg Capra
list price: $55.00
our price: $44.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0071360530
Catlog: Book (2000-06-29)
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Sales Rank: 58724
Average Customer Review: 2.81 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Over 30,000 online investors daily flock to pristine.com, the top-rated Website run by day trading legends Oliver Velez and Greg Capra, for up-to-the-minute strategies and market commentaries. In Tools and Tactics for the Master Day Trader, Velez and Capra revisit and completely update over 100 of their daily commentaries from the past four years, with new material explaining what worked, what didn't, and why.

This no-nonsense, easy read, meant to be referenced by traders every trading day, covers everything from potent trading strategies to intuitive insights on psychology and discipline. Proving once again that the best teacher is experience, Tools and Tactics for the Master Day Trader will help any trader log on with the technical skills, market knowledge, and confidence they need to capture more winning trades, and reap new profits.

... Read more

Reviews (101)

5-0 out of 5 stars Dissenting Opinion from a Full-time Trader
The people who previously reviewed this new book by Oliver Velez and Greg Capra seem to have started in the middle of the book, looking only for The Holy Grail to lead them to immense profits heretofore undiscovered by anyone else. I found the real value in the first half of the book, which tries to show you why you haven't been a successful trader up to now and what to do about it. This is worth the price of the book in itself. They are teaching you how to fish, not giving you a fish, as the old saying goes. They should include a mirror with every copy, as I see myself in every page when they describe the mistakes made by beginning traders. I started trading commodities in 1989 and switched to stocks in 1998, so I have had the rare opportunity to make all the mistakes they describe and more. But the good news is...that's what makes you a success later on. Chapter 5, "The Seven Deadly Sins of Trading", doesn't just tell you the sins, but actually tells you how to eliminate them. This chapter alone is worth the price of the book to me.

I became profitable in 1998 and support my family totally from trading income, using many of the tools described in this book. I have tried many of the software "black box" programs out there, been to many seminars (some great ones, some worthless ones), bought many trading books, and it has all led me to where I am now. If I had let an unfavorable review like the ones here steer me away from a fantastic book like this one, I would not be trading today and making a living working for myself half a day and hiking, biking and skiing the other half. So what if they promote their own seminars, web pages, trading room, etc. in the book. Wade Cook and many others use their books as free advertising the same way...nobody is forced to buy the other products. We all have the ability to decide whether or not we will delve further into these products, don't we?

To be fair to the other reviewers, they may already be successful traders that don't need the advice in the first half of the book and were only looking for a book that would reveal a system or method to double their income in the next three months. All I can say is that I have been trading for eleven years and the book will probably double my income in the next six months even if I never read the second half. Buy it, read it and decide for yourself.

5-0 out of 5 stars Required Reading for Profitable Trading
What makes this one of the very best books on day trading is the clear, simple and direct language the authors use to illuminate a complex subject, and few books in the genre are as comprehensive in scope, as well organized and presented. In Tools and Tactics for the Master Day Trader, authors Oliver Velez and Greg Capra have created the essential primer for neophytes, as well as a book seasoned traders will find of lasting value for the insights and wisdom the authors only could have acquired through long experience in the trenches themselves.

Their approach is technical, based on a number of reliable chart patterns that identify key short-term shifts in market psychology, those points when a change occurs in the balance between buyers and sellers. Charting techniques, market indicators and timing, and execution skills are detailed in a concise and focused way. But the book excels in discussions about trader psychology, the emotional challenges that must be overcome, and the attitude and discipline a successful trader must have in approaching the markets. For example:

"The need or desire for certainty is one of those natural human traits that every aspiring trader must learn to overcome, because certainty is a myth. It does not exist in life, nor does it exist in the market. It is a phantom, a dream that is chased by far too many market players. As traders, we must be capitalists of the unknown. We can never escape the fact that we are forced to act in the face of uncertainty. Those who must know all the facts before they trade will find opportunity forever leaving them behind. Fortune waits for its captor in the shadows of uncertainty. It lies hidden on the path least traveled. The active trader will find that the greatest opportunities will be found where no one else is willing to go. The trader can never be certain that the trade just taken will work. The trader can properly assess the odds and devise an intelligent strategy in an attempt to exploit those odds. But each trade will still possess the ability to disappoint. Each attempt will carry with it the potential to fail. The aspiring trader must learn to deal with this and must learn to act before he or she knows. Because by the time the trader knows, the opportunity is long gone."

The authors include chapters on "the seven deadly sins of trading"; how to identify and kill your deadliest demons, and rules the master trader lives by. This book is required reading for all who intend to trade profitably.

1-0 out of 5 stars Save your money!!
This book is a real piece of crap. Don't waste your money. It reads like a 389 page advertisment for Pristine Day Trading seminars.As a professional trader, I pity the newbie who buys this book expecting to get any usable information from of it. I buy books hoping for ONE good idea: I lost!"Methods of a Wall St. Master" by Vic Sperandeo is a MUCH better buy.Velez and Capra advise their readers to ignore market fundamentals: Those fools who choose to ignore the fundamentals of the market do so at their own risk!!!

1-0 out of 5 stars OVERPRICED
This book has large fonts and i feel is very overpriced for the small amount of info it has. The strategies work no better than half the time and can be found for free on many internet sites. For $12 i might recommend this book for beginners but otherwise pass on it.

1-0 out of 5 stars A Documentary Of The Largest Scam in The Daytrading Arena
1 Star was the lowest rating I could find, if "SCAM" was na option I would have selected it. This book will soon serve as "exhibit A" in the case against these highway thieves. Do your homework first. Look at this post before you spend anything on this book[...]

Proceed with caution! ... Read more


12. Financial Institutions, Investments, and Management : An Introduction
by Herbert B. Mayo
list price: $108.95
our price: $108.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0324178174
Catlog: Book (2003-06-05)
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
Sales Rank: 470127
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Book Description

A general introduction to the three primary aspects of Finance and examination of how they interrelate.The book discusses financial institutions and their roles in helping to allocate savings in the economy, along with a description and analysis of securities issued and traded in money and capital markets.The book covers fundamentals of investing in stocks, mutual funds, derivatives, and other marketable securities with an emphasis on securities markets, mechanics of trading, techniques of analysis, diversification, and valuation of assets.Finally, the book lays out the processes, decisions structures, and institutional arrangements concerned with the use and acquisition of funds by a firm.This will include the management of the asset and liability structure of the firm under certain and risky situations. ... Read more


13. Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money and Investing (Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money & Investing)
by Kenneth M. Morris
list price: $15.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0684869020
Catlog: Book (1999-08-02)
Publisher: Fireside
Sales Rank: 10579
Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money & Investing initiates you into the mysteries of the financial pages -- buying stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures and options, spotting trends and evaluating companies. For those who are curious but intimidated by everyday financial jargon, this guide offers a literate, forthright and lively alternative. ... Read more

Reviews (50)

3-0 out of 5 stars Incomplete and Misleading Basic Definitions
To me a guide from a brand name source like The Wall Street Journal should always elucidate and never mislead. If this book were called a dictionary of money and investing, I would give it a five star rating. For it works well as a dictionary. In fact, it is better than a dictionary because the explanations are clearer, more detailed, and better illustrated.

In the sections on what money, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and economic indicators are, the book functions as that five star dictionary.

Within each section beginning with stocks, the "guide" also begins to guide you in subtle ways that can cause you harm. Let me cite a few examples. The guide seems to suggest that when the market is going up, a company's earnings are doing well, and interest rates are not rising that is a good time to buy a stock. The illustrated graph seems to show other times when it is good not to buy stocks. As such, it suggests the mentality of buying and selling stocks to catch cycles. Yet research has shown that few people can master that process, so those who try will tend to do less well than those who buy and hold.

Another example is in failing to discuss the role of management fees, expenses, portfolio turnover, and diversification on which mutual fund to pick. As John Bogle shows in Common Sense on Mutual Funds, these are very important factors to consider. Yet they are not defined or cited.

The book also teaches people a little about short selling, commodities, futures, and other exotic investments. The book fails to point out that these are well beyond the skill of the average investor, and that many people get hurt in these areas. Basically, this is like a book of definitions about poisonous snakes that fails to mention that the snakes are poisonous if they bite you.

Other obvious omissions included no mention of tracking stocks, ADRs in the stock section (you find the definition in International markets, where to me it fits less well), the differences in discount brokers, electronic trading choices, and how to find information about stocks on the Internet (the only source cited in the SEC).

The focus is overly on the U.S. with only a small section on international securities. The area of interest rate futures, where Europe dominates, is barely referred to in this book.

Some of the information is just plain out of date. NAIC is cited as being the National Association of Investment Clubs. I believe it dropped that name over 10 years ago although it still goes by NAIC. The guide refers to there being 37,000 investment clubs in the U.S. I think that number was exceeded many years ago.

Further, much of the information is basically about how to read economic statistics. Many people would argue technical analysis is at least as important as economic statistics, but nothing about technical analysis is included in the book.

If you want to learn about investing, you need to know investing principles more than you need to know these terms (such as the various aspects of a stock certificate's printing and engraving). You will find most of the relevant terms covered in basic investing books like Louis Engel's book, How to Buy Stocks. You would be far better off reading ChangeWave Investing, Common Sense on Mutual Funds, and Rich Dad, Poor Dad's Investment Guide than this book for getting a sense of what the basic investing issues are.

Overcome your misconception that anything with The Wall Street Journal's name on it is bound to be the best resource. Certainly, that isn't true in this case.

My suggestion is that The Wall Street Journal revise this book and either cut it back into being an expanded dictionary, or expand it into an investing guide worthy of its name.

5-0 out of 5 stars A foundation for investing.
I purchased this book six years ago so that I could start down the long road of learning how to invest my money. It is far and away the best beginning level investment book that I have ever seen! THE GOOD: 1) It starts from the beginning! It begins by explaining money, the Federal Reserve, and economic cycles. From there it moves on to stocks, bonds, mutual funds and futures & options. 2) It is simple! With its colored charts, simple paragraphs and real world examples even grade school kids can understand the concepts presented here. 3) It is concise! It gives you enough information so that you completely understand the concept, yet it does it in two pages! No more wading through economic textbooks looking for the meaning of "price/earning ratio." THE BAD: 1) It starts from the beginning. If you already know about money cycles, common and preferred stock or U.S. Treasury bonds then this book may bore you. 2) It is simple. Don't go looking for too much detail here. If you want detailed information about which mutual find to buy, look elsewhere. 3) It is concise. Once it covers the basics it ends. If you already know the basics, then you could be considered a graduate of this book. OVERALL: The title really says it all: it is a guide to understanding money and understanding investing. Once you understand the concepts you can move on to more detailed books.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best
As many have said in their reviews, this is a great starting point for those new to investing and financial markets. In fact, it's the best I've ever found and I've looked a lot. The simple, plain English explanations are what makes this book stand out. For the nuances and more detailed information regarding the topics in the book, look to a textbook from a college finance class. But for the person who knows very little, start with this.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good for beginner investors
If you are new to investing and need a simple primer, read this book. It's well organized and written. Those that have invested for a while will find this book simplistic. Nevertheless, I think every beginning investor should get a copy and read it.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is My Bible
Even now, after much study of investing, I always come back to this book for clarification. Consider this book as the very basic starting point for all other investing knowledge.

YOU CANNOT GO WRONG WITH THIS BOOK!!!! ... Read more


14. Missed Fortune 101 : A Starter Kit to Becoming a Millionaire
by Douglas R. Andrew
list price: $23.95
our price: $16.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0446576573
Catlog: Book (2005-01-03)
Publisher: Warner Business Books
Sales Rank: 24433
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15. Trading Commodities and Financial Futures: A Step by Step Guide to Mastering the Markets, Third Edition
by George Kleinman
list price: $39.95
our price: $27.17
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0131476548
Catlog: Book (2004-10-18)
Publisher: Financial Times Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 53902
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16. intelligent investor : The Classic Text on Value Investing
by Benjamin Graham
list price: $29.95
our price: $19.77
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060752610
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: HarperBusiness
Sales Rank: 6553
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Book Description

The Original 1949 Edition

Benjamin Graham's classic best seller on value investing has taught and inspired hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. This reissue of the pure, unadulterated 1949 text by Graham offers the investing principles as he originally laid them out -- principles that continue to stand more than half a century since the book was first published.

Time and market developments have proven the wisdom of Graham's basic strategies, and in today's volatile market, this is the most important book you will ever read on making the right decisions to protect your investments and make them a success.

... Read more

17. The Automatic Millionaire : A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich
by David Bach
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0767914104
Catlog: Book (2003-12-30)
Publisher: Broadway
Sales Rank: 375
Average Customer Review: 4.02 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Despite its sensational title, David Bach's The Automatic Millionaire: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich is not a get-rich-quick guide. Rather, the book is a straightforward march through common-sense personal financial planning that suggests readers "automate" their contributions to retirement and investment vehicles. Bach, in fact, calls his model the "tortoise approach" to becoming wealthy by retirement age.

In the early part of the book Bach builds on ideas he established in Smart Women Finish Rich and other bestselling titles. His core principle is that, to succeed, you must "Pay Yourself First." In other words, he suggests using pre-tax retirement accounts (i.e. 401(k)s, IRAs, or Roth IRAs) to set aside a fixed, monthly sum of money before considering what is left for living expenses. The "automatic" part of the title comes from Bach's emphasis on using automated payroll deductions to avoid the temptation of using the money to pay today's bills.

Bach insists that "regardless of the size of your paycheck, you probably already make enough money to become rich." But his claims that his plan requires "no budget, no discipline," is a bit disingenuous. His discussion of the "The Latte Factor" shows that, to find money to start a retirement plan, a person with a modest income needs to make an up-front commitment to stop accruing debt and to reduce spending on such "wasteful" items as lattes and cigarettes.

In the end The Automatic Millionaire does not offer much that is new for readers already familiar with personal finance basics like accelerated mortgage payments, "the miracle of compound interest," and the setting up of emergency funds. But, for those just starting with financial planning, Bach provides a host of resources to put recommendations into action. He walks his readers through such fundamentals as shopping for interest rates, creating a balanced retirement portfolio, and consolidating debt. And Bach's conversational style will make this quick read highly palatable for those daunted by more detailed investment and personal finance titles. --Patrick O'Kelley ... Read more

Reviews (190)

5-0 out of 5 stars Income is not wealth, income only pays for your lifestyle
I used to think that income represented wealth. The fact is your income is not your wealth, only potential wealth. You can live off your income, but you can't get wealthy off your income. You only get wealthy by investing and the proper use of money strategies.

Dave Bach offers powerful money strategies that really work. The first and most important one is to pay yourself first. You must save at the very least, 10% of what you earn before you pay any bills. Isn't it amazing that Americans have such great difficulty saving 10% while the Asians save over 30%!

I know some Doctors who earn a 6 figure income, but are always broke and have nothing to show for it. $150,000 income is nothing when you are spending $175,000.

Bach also offers strategies to cut your mortgage payoff time in half. Pay off credit card debt in 2-3 years, not 5-10 years and more.

I'm with a company that does business in 10 different countries. Our company did over $40 million in sales in it's first year and has created several millionaires in 17 months. Some of the millionaires in this company highly recommend Bach's advice and live by it. That's why they are millionaires. EARNING MONEY IS THE EASY PART. KEEPING IT IS THE DIFFICULT PART. NEEDLESS TO SAY, I RECOMMEND THIS BOOK TO EVERYONE AROUND THE WORLD!

I can't rave enough about Dave Bach's book. I also have his tape set from Nightingale-Conant which goes even deeper into the strategies than this book does.

5-0 out of 5 stars An easy read and effective, too.
My grandmother, who lived through the depression and experienced WWII, gave me this book. My grandmother grew up dirt poor(she had one pair of shoes for school). She dropped out of the eighth grade and yet she is one of the most well read people I know.

This book is so easy to read and just as easy to understand. I've started putting into action the principles put forward in this book and I will have $7,000 saved by the end of the year. I will most likely double that every year, if I keep utilizing the strategies in this book.

I highly recommend this book. Granted most of the advice in this book should be common knowledge. You could learn such things in a Personal Financial Management class; but it's the book's simple language that makes it a quick and easy read. Buy this book, then read it, then practice what it preaches, and you'll be on your way to not having to sit around waiting for the government to take care of you(which is a very scary thought because I don't trust the government to know or care what's best for me).

If more people would stop counting on Medicare and social security, we would all have more money from our paychecks to save and invest for ourselves, instead of giving our tax dollars to losers who don't want to work or take initiative and save/invest for their own futures.

3-0 out of 5 stars Nothing earth shattering, but useful
A lot of people are screaming that there is nothing really new in here. Sometimes you just have to be reminded of the basics. This is not a 7 figures in 7 days type of book. If you looking for instant wealth, look elsewhere. If you want to retire and not be stuck eating government cheese, then read it, follow it and just do it.

It reminded me of a couple things that I already knew, but just needed somebody to tell me again.

2-0 out of 5 stars What about normal people?
I have 2 problems with this book, otherwise it is a good tool.

#1...what if you aren't in your 20's? What if you picked up this book because you are 40 and just realized that you need to do something by the time you're 65! Not much help there. This book is aimed at 20 year olds.

#2...What about when real life happens??? I did actually start saving in a 401K in my twenties. I had a couple of thousand bucks saved and was on my way...Then life happened and I got a divorce. Suddenly I needed that money just to keep my house, and by the time I was 33 I was broke and starting over. Oh yeah, and then when I started saving again in a new 401K, the market crashed and my a/c went to less than 1/2 what it had been.

I wish Mr. Bach had made the book so it could be used by people of any age. Yes, wouldn't it be nice if we all started saving at 20, but most people who pick this book up (I would bet) are in their late 30's or older, in panic mode, hoping for a couple of good ideas to help them get them from here to there without waiting another 40 years to retire.

5-0 out of 5 stars Here's what I think about this book...
People may criticize this book and say its too simple and a bunch of common sense, I disagree. I found it very helpful and feel that simple, straightforward advice will always win in the end over some get rich quick scheme. I give it 5 stars for giving the reader sound advice most people don't practice. Other self-help books I like include "The Multifidus Back Pain Solution. ... Read more


18. The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book On Value Investing, Revised Edition
by Benjamin Graham, Jason Zweig
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060555661
Catlog: Book (2003-07-01)
Publisher: HarperBusiness
Sales Rank: 586
Average Customer Review: 4.23 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Among the library of investment books promising no-fail strategies for riches, Benjamin Graham's classic, The Intelligent Investor, offers no guarantees or gimmicks but overflows with the wisdom at the core of all good portfolio management.

The hallmark of Graham's philosophy is not profit maximization but loss minimization. In this respect, The Intelligent Investor is a book for true investors, not speculators or day traders. He provides, "in a form suitable for the laymen, guidance in adoption and execution of an investment policy" (1). This policy is inherently for the longer term and requires a commitment of effort. Where the speculator follows market trends, the investor uses discipline, research, and his analytical ability to make unpopular but sound investments in bargains relative to current asset value. Graham coaches the investor to develop a rational plan for buying stocks and bonds, and he argues that this plan must be a bulwark against emotional behavior that will always be tempting during abrupt bull and bear markets.

Since it was first published in 1949, Graham's investment guide has sold over a million copies and has been praised by such luminaries as Warren E. Buffet as "the best book on investing every written." These accolades are well deserved. In its new form--with commentary on each chapter and extensive footnotes prepared by senior Money editor, Jason Zweig--the classic is now updated in light of changes in investment vehicles and market activities since 1972. What remains is a better book. Graham's sage advice, analytical guides, and cautionary tales are still valid for the contemporary investor, and Zweig's commentaries demonstrate the relevance of Graham's principles in light of 1990s and early twenty-first century market trends. --Patrick O'Kelley ... Read more

Reviews (22)

3-0 out of 5 stars Tired
Although I am mostly a value investor, this has never been my favorite book. The old 1973 edition which this replaces was dated and the examples were hard to relate to today's market. Even the previous editions were not ones I particularly enjoyed. Quite frankly, the book was and is boring. Also many of the investment ideas in the book simply do not work in today's market. For example, I agree with Niederhoffer that buying companies for less that Net Current Assets is ridiculous in general. Most who claim to be successful at this are simply liars. This technique worked for a short time following and during the great depression. But that was basically it. The idea of approaching one's investments as a business is old hat now but for those not familiar with the concept this book may be worthwhile although whether it is worth buying the book for this tidbit is debatable. The Buffettology books do this just as well and are more up to date. Despite the laughter and venom directed against these books they are useful modern investment books which the budding value investor would do well to read. This update does use more modern examples but with the rise of the internet this type of information is just not as rarely available as it once was. I just wonder how many more "revisions" this book can stand before it becomes like Graham's Security Analysis. Keep in mind this is a new edition of a book by a man who has been dead for years ( and not the first one at that). The modern investor would probably be better off learning something about valuation and applying that to determine if companies are undervalued. The primitive methods in Graham are not particularly useful today and do not reflect the methods of today's successful value investor.

5-0 out of 5 stars Too bad real estate was not also in Benjamin Graham's field
If you have only time to read one book on investing, this classic should probably be it. But if you recently have read some of the popular get-rich-quick books, "The Intelligent Investor" is a necessary and powerful antidote.

The author has an extremely realistic view of the investment world. He sees the real risk where speculators may imagine there are instant riches. For Benjamin Graham, safety of capital comes first. But at the same time, he makes it clear that safety is not guaranteed, even if you do have a properly selected and well balanced portfolio of stocks and bonds.

On page 25, Mr. Graham warns the reader that: "There is no certainty that a stock component will insure adequately against 'large-inflation' but it should carry more protection than the bond component." The author does recognize that: "The outright ownership of real estate has long been considered as a sound long-term investment, carrying with it a goodly amount of protection against inflation." With this statement, he seems to recognize that inclusion of real estate could make an investment portfolio stronger. But he does not analyze real estate extensively as an investment in his book because he says that it is not his field.

Too bad he did not broaden his scope and also become an expert in real estate. If income-producing real estate had been looked at as thoroughly as stocks and bonds in "The Intelligent Investor," I believe many readers, with most of their equity in real estate, would be calling Amazon.com about giving this book a sixth star.

2-0 out of 5 stars Classic book, but annoying commentaries
I was deciding between getting this edition or the more expensive hardbound edition (which does not contain the Jason Zweig commentaries). I naturally thought, why not go for the cheaper one and get the commentary for free? After all, I could just ignore the commentary if it doesn't help.

Bad bad choice. It was like choosing between a Beethoven CD and the same CD but with free shrieking commentary by a Damon Wayans movie character during and in between each symphony.

Zweig's writing when inserted between Graham's is like the annoying paperclip in MS Office, except there is no way to turn it off. He's in the footnotes (virtually every page!), he's in between every chapter. Open the book at a random page, and most likely you'll open it to a Zweig page.

The content and style of his writing feels condescending and contrasts so much with Graham's. When reading Graham you have elegant timeless prose by a humble, wise man who makes you feel he is sincerely interested in your well-being. By contrast, Zweig feels like someone who wants to impress you with his word plays, and puns. He really should have attempted to recede into the background and limited his voice.

I would recommend everyone to just buy the hardcover edition.

Buy Graham only. If you cannot read Graham, Zweig will only help marginally, and you still need to verify his comments against other contemporary Graham commentators. Get another book. If you *can* read Graham, then you do not need the commentaries in this book. Any questions you may have can be answered in thousands of sites on the net.

5-0 out of 5 stars one of, if not the best, equity investment book
this is buffets' bible for good reason.

the book's central concept, the margin of safety, is reinforced time and again w/ supporting ratios and working examples, both from the 60-70s and from zweig's excellent supplements (an extremely valuable supplement to the original text, if for no other reason than to show that graham's teachings are timeless). while occasionally ratios will appear dated and no longer relevant (i.e. book value's importance has declined w/ the transition of the US eq mkt to increasing intellectual capital in a company's mkt cap), its discipline, focus and litmus tests (i.e. bond yields vs E/P ratios) still remain valid.

for the individual investor, there simply is no better book.

5-0 out of 5 stars A classic!
This is an excellent text for anyone who wants to learn about investing. Strongly recommended! ... Read more


19. The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money and Investing, Third Edition (Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money and Investing)
by Kenneth M. Morris, Virginia B. Morris
list price: $15.95
our price: $10.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0743266331
Catlog: Book (2004-09-07)
Publisher: Fireside
Sales Rank: 8751
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20. Smart Couples Finish Rich : 9 Steps to Creating a Rich Future for You and Your Partner
by DAVID BACH
list price: $14.95
our price: $10.17
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0767904842
Catlog: Book (2002-01-08)
Publisher: Broadway
Sales Rank: 644
Average Customer Review: 4.51 out of 5 stars
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Book Description


From first-time newlyweds to people on their second or third marriage, couples face an overwhelming task when it comes to money management.Nationally renowned financial advisor and bestselling author David Bach knows that it doesn’t have to be this way.In Smart Couples Finish Rich, he provides couples with easy-to-use tools that cover everything from credit card management, to investment advice, to long-term care.You and your partner will learn how to work together as a team to identify your core values and dreams, creating a financial plan that will allow you to achieve security, provide for your family’s future financial needs, and increase your income.Together, you’ll learn why couples that plan their finances together, stay together!
... Read more

Reviews (35)

5-0 out of 5 stars STRONG, SOUND ADVICE!
Investing for your future is sound, strong advice at any age. As a teacher of business management and having counselled an overwhelming number of people in the area of finance, I believe investing is particularly critical for young people today. I am so happy to read that previous reviewers, in their twenties, have learned from this book and are planning for their future. If you are starting your career and in your twenties, now is the time for financial planning, even though you might not be able to put a lot of money aside, "every penny saved, is a penny earned."

There are many books on the market today on investing and financial planning. Some I would highly recommend, others are not worth the time it takes to read the book - save the money you would spend on those "guaranteed get rich quick books" and invest the money where it will guarantee a return. "Smart Couples Finish Rich" is filled with a wealth of information on money management, retirement accounts, living trusts, types of insurance and investing in general. After reading it, you will be better equiped to manage your money and save for the future. That not only makes "smart cents," it makes smart sense. Hopefully, with some financial peace of mind and stability, couples will not only finish rich, they will finish rich... together!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great advice, very helpful.
There's a lot of financial advice books on the market, but I really think this one is the best. The best for couples anyway.

One of the key concepts of the book is for both you & your spouse to read the book, get you to start discussing your values, finances, and future, as a couple so you're on the same page. Not being on the same page as a couple is probably one of the biggest reason for couples splitting up. My husband is not into self-help books, but this was one book that he did read. It has many helpful exercises, as a couple, to get you to realize some of the why's of your finances & to get you to plan better for your future. For example, it makes you start planning goals. Funny, many businesses have goals, but how many couples have established goals for their futures? And I'm sure most people would agree that their relationship with their spouse is more important than their work.

Before I read this, I read Suze Orman's Financial Guidebook, which was also a great book. But I feel I got greater value out of Smart Couples Finish Rich.

After reading this, I've actually started tracking all of my finances & have a much better understanding of how I'm doing financially & what I need to do to meet my newly established goals.

This book is a must for any couple to help plan for their futures.

4-0 out of 5 stars excellent resource
_____This book is great to have if you are a novice to the world of personal finance. The text is geared toward married couples, but that doesn't mean a single person cannot read it and learn a lot from it (i.e. the advice generally applies to either singles or couples, with some extra information for couples).

_____The information contained is truly minimal when you compare it to many other books on the shelves. But for a novice I think that is good - Bach himself stresses that the information is meant to present to the reader the aspects of personal finance, while providing links to sources for more detailed information.

_____While I agree that pretty much all of the information contained can be found for free on the internet, the value of this book is in the fact that it contains brief synopses of that information, all gathered into one place, with the added bonus of providing a purpose for all the different aspects of personal finance. Not just "what" and "where," but also "how" and "why."

4-0 out of 5 stars good, but conservative, advice
This is an excellent book to use when planning your family's finances. Obviously, given the power of compounding, to which the author repeatedly refers, the earlier in your life you start planning for your financial future, the better off you will be. I recommend the book to anyone with the understanding that it follows a conservative, fairly conventional path toward financial security.

If you are a finance whiz, you will find parts of the book too conservative and too plain. If you try to magnify your investment returns by trading options, for example, or you invest in real estate, or any other kind of investment other than 'plain vanilla stocks and bonds' you will find the book limiting.

That said, the book provides an excellent organizational structure for any one trying to get a hold on his financial picture.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good advice, especially for young couples.
This is one of the only financial planning books I've ever purchased and actually read. It was an easy read, and I would say that Bach's plan is easy to follow. It's nothing incredibly unique, but it's a good message to youger people like me (I'm 30) who seem to these days not have good financial basics or the ability to save. I am somewhat in this category and have plenty of friends who are as well.

The lessons are simple. Find where to save, save a little each month, invest it wisely (preferably in your companies 401K or a mutual fund), and pay down your debt before racking up more. However, Bach seems to put it in a manner where he does show how this can pay off, and even gets you half-way motivated to do it yourself. Ultimately though, it will be up to the reader to buckle down and prepare for their financial future.

I have recommended this book to my friends. I also hear that Bach is working on a 'Get Rich for Older Couples' type book and I will probably get that for my parents. ... Read more


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