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1. Winning
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2. Execution: The Discipline of Getting
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3. Financial Management : Theory
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4. How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive
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5. Marketing Management
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6. Good to Great: Why Some Companies
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7. Monday Morning Leadership
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8. The One Thing You Need to Know
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9. An Introduction to Management
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10. Management (8th Edition)
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11. Never Eat Alone : And Other Secrets
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12. The Toyota Way: 14 Management
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13. Project Management: A Systems
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14. Organizational Behavior (10th
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15. Hardwiring Excellence: Purpose,
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17. Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions
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19. Statistics for Business and Economics
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20. The One Minute Manager Anniversary

1. Winning
by Jack Welch, Suzy Welch
list price: $27.95
our price: $14.27
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060753943
Catlog: Book (2005-04)
Publisher: HarperBusiness
Sales Rank: 12
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

If you judge books by their covers, Jack Welch's Winning certainly grabs your attention. Testimonials on the back come from none other than Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Rudy Giuliani, and Tom Brokaw, and other praise comes from Fortune, Business Week, and Financial Times. As the legendary retired CEO of General Electric, Welch has won many friends and admirers in high places. In this latest book, he strives to show why. Winning describes the management wisdom that Welch built up through four and a half decades of work at GE, as he transformed the industrial giant from a sleepy "Old Economy" company with a market capitalization of $4 billion to a dynamic new one worth nearly half a trillion dollars.

Welch's first book, Jack: Straight from the Gut, was structured more as a conventional CEO memoir, with stories of early career adventures, deals won and lost, boardroom encounters, and Welch's process and philosophy that helped propel his success as a manager. In Winning, Welch focuses on his actual management techniques. He starts with an overview of cultural values such as candor, differentiation among employees, and inclusion of all voices in decision-making. In the second section he covers issues around one's own company or organization: the importance of hiring, firing, the people management in between, and a few other juicy topics like crisis management. From there, Welch moves into a discussion of competition, and the external factors that can influence a company's success: strategy, budgeting, and mergers and acquisitions. Welch takes a more personal turn later with a focus on individual career issues--how to find the right job, get promoted, and deal with a bad boss--and then a final section on what he calls "Tying Up Loose Ends." Those interested in the human side of great leaders will find this last section especially appealing. In it, Welch answers the most interesting questions that he's received in the last several years while traveling the globe addressing audiences of executives and business-school students. Perhaps the funniest question in this section comes at the very end, posed originally by a businessman in Frankfurt, who queried Welch on whether he thought he'd go to heaven (we won't give away the ending).

While different from the steadier stream of war stories and real-life examples of Welch's first book, Winning is a very worthwhile addition to any management bookshelf. It's not often that a CEO described as the century's best retires, and then chooses to expound on such a wide range of management topics. Also, aside from the commentary on always-relevant issues like employee performance reviews and quality control, Welch suffuses this book with his pugnacious spirit. The Massachusetts native who fought his way to the top of the world's most valuable company was in many ways the embodiment of "Winning," and this spirit alone will provide readers an enjoyable read. --Peter Han ... Read more

Reviews (63)

5-0 out of 5 stars Interesting Insight
Although it is true that the business environment in the U.S. is changing at lightning speed, this book still has a lot to offer.I can't comment so much on the business advice in this book since I work in a small school, but his advice on attitude is dead on.People often make their own hell because they have the wrong attitude.Some say they work in a bad environment and that they can't work well, but the worker himself is a big part of that environment.You would be suprised at how a little kindness or a smile will change a working environment.Offer a little extra, and don't be afraid to help out.You'll enjoy your work and life more.

2-0 out of 5 stars Insightful At Times, but Mostly Superficial
Jack Welch clearly is a legendary business leader; however, a great writer he is not. The book offers a few insights - eg. the power of corporate vision and value, budgeting and rewarding performance in the real (dynamic) world - but his book is not nearly as specific and helpful as Larry Bossidy's (Welch's former #2) "Confronting Reality," and "Execution." Sadly, the book also does not reference how Welch greatly simplified planning and accountability by getting rid of the planners, and instead focusing on fast reaction - a lesson that some firms, government and public education still need to learn.

In addition, Welch does not address most of the vast changes simplifying much of management in the last few years - even though he pioneered much of their use. The job has become primarily one of reducing costs - especially by shifting work away from Americans. This is accomplished by:

1)Maximizing outsourcing (eg. to Canada - primarily to avoid U.S. healthcare costs; to China and India - primarily to greatly reduce production labor, call-center, and design and programming costs,

2)Maximizing use of illegal immigrants within the U.S. - eg. in the meatpacking, construction, and other food-processing and food-serving areas,

3)Maximizing use of legal temporary immigrants within the U.S. - eg. Indian citizens with H-1B and L1 visas in areas such as electronics design and manufacturing, and computer programming.

4)Maximizing use of aggressive accounting - eg. capitalizing expenses, pre-booking revenues, optimistic assumptions about corporate pension fund growth, creating new entities to "hide" excess debt etc., and taking "special write-offs" wherever possible.

5)Minimizing exposure to risk of major commodity price increases - eg. large-scale futures buying of aviation fuel.

Further American worker head-count reductions are accomplished by implementing new IT systems, process improvements (eg. Six Sigma, cycle-time reductions), "rank and yank" personnel evaluations (Welch does reference this topic, but sugar-coats it to seem beneficial to all), and divesting or consolidating companies (mergers and acquisitions), divisions, functions (eg. personnel, IT, procurement), products, components, and suppliers. Cost reductions for those remaining American employees can be achieved by reducing salaries (eg. competitive contracting out "non-core" functions - defined as broadly as possible), infrastructure (eg. work-at-home, "owner-operator" truckers), health-care benefits (through increasing worker contributions) and pensions (eg. via canceling, or switching from "defined benefit" to "defined contribution" plans. And then all the preceding measures are forced through the supply chain by requesting price reductions and/or the "China price."

Finally, leveraging tax reductions, abatements, pension plan takeovers, exemptions from lawsuit liability and various regulations (eg. EPA, OSHA. zoning) and various other "freebies" from government has also become another major modern "management skill" (eg. via threatening or actually moving production and/or headquarters; promising to create new jobs, threatening lawsuits, making large campaign donations) that Welch fails to reference in "Winning."

In summary, "Winning" is somewhat interesting, but mostly superficial and irrelevant. And overall, "winning" is no longer a skill to be proud of, worth multi-million dollar payouts to CEOs, or necessarily good for America.

5-0 out of 5 stars Full of energy and a passion for results
Having read Dr Welch's earlier book "Jack: Straight from the Gut", I was eagerly awaiting the release of Winning. This book is logically split into several sections and chapters ranging from Strategy, Performance Management, Mergers and Acquisitions, Recruitment, Promotion and finally a chapter on answers to questions on China and other issues not addressed in the other chapters.

True to his style, candor is the hallmark of this book. One may not fully agree with Dr Welch on many issues, and he has not changed his opinion and conviction on some of the policies that he rigorously implemented at GE. But this book is an excellent summary in crisp and simple text, distilling his over four decades of experience in working for and leading one of the most admired companies of this planet.

Those interested in a serious discussion of management theories and looking for an approach based on data and research may be disappointed. But if one is looking for what works and what does not in reality, this book is sure to impress.

Content is one thing about books. What makes this book very different from what could have otherwise been published as a summary of concepts is the first person narrative style of the author. Every page is filled with energy, strong belief and commitment to the ideas discussed.After all this is a book based on true personal experience and not a discourse on theoretical concepts.

Dr Welch, thank you so much for this wonderful gift to next generation managers.

1-0 out of 5 stars Can You Spell Class Action
The Jack and Suzy show has fallen flat on its face. Welch's
coda, to fire 10% of the workforce every year, translates into massive age discrimination (you need "vitality" in your staff) in the workplace, and is currently the subject of a 15,000 person class action lawsuit against a major US corporation, which has the misfortune of being run by a runner-up in the succession sweepstakes "won" by Jeff Immelt. Ironically, the CEO of this company was 51 years old at the time of Welch's retirement, and was probably passed over for the top job because Immelt was 44. The abused become the abusers.

1-0 out of 5 stars WARNING!
I have no doubt that the book version is excellent. I have no doubt that the message is great, but the audio cd version of this book sucks. Jack Welch reads it so slow that it sounds like he is reading it to a group of first graders who don't speak english. I wish I hadn't opened the package because I would love to return the cds. I might as well have thrown the money in the waste basket.


... Read more


2. Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
by Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan, Charles Burck
list price: $27.50
our price: $18.15
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0609610570
Catlog: Book (2002-06-15)
Publisher: Crown Business
Sales Rank: 256
Average Customer Review: 3.38 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Disciplines like strategy, leadership development, and innovation are the sexier aspects of being at the helm of a successful business; actually getting things done never seems quite as glamorous. But as Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan demonstrate in Execution, the ultimate difference between a company and its competitor is, in fact, the ability to execute.

Execution is "the missing link between aspirations and results," and as such, making it happen is the business leader's most important job. While failure in today's business environment is often attributed to other causes, Bossidy and Charan argue that the biggest obstacle to success is the absence of execution. They point out that without execution, breakthrough thinking on managing change breaks down, and they emphasize the fact that execution is a discipline to learn, not merely the tactical side of business. Supporting this with stories of the "execution difference" being won (EDS) and lost (Xerox and Lucent), the authors describe the building blocks--leaders with the right behaviors, a culture that rewards execution, and a reliable system for having the right people in the right jobs--that need to be in place to manage the three core business processes of people, strategy, and operations. Both Bossidy, CEO of Honeywell International, Inc., and Charan, advisor to corporate executives and author of such books as What the CEO Wants You to Know and Boards That Work, present experience-tested insight into how the smooth linking of these three processes can differentiate one company from the rest. Developing the discipline of execution isn't made out to be simple, nor is this book a quick, easy read. Bossidy and Charan do, however, offer good advice on a neglected topic, making Execution a smart business leader's guide to enacting success rather than permitting demise. --S. Ketchum ... Read more

Reviews (126)

5-0 out of 5 stars Execute optimally!
This book describe a necessary leadership behavior in the Execution paradigm -- Insist on realism. As thinking is the basis of action, this concept requires more exploration and explanation. Prior to the introduction of Optimal Thinking into the corporate world, the pervasive motto was Think Positive. Optimism promotes persistence, but it is a poor strategy when the cost of failure or probability of failure are high. With the current integration of Optimal Thinking into leading corporations, the transformation from AnyCorp (consisting of any thinkers) to Opticorp (consisting of Optimal Thinkers) empowers the corporate culture to practice optimal realism. Optimal Thinkers accept what is out of their control, and optimize what is within their control. Using Optimal Thinking to ask questions like, What is within my/our control here? What are my/our options here? What is the worst event scenario? What is our optimal contingency plan? What is in our best interest? What is our highest priority? What are the best actions we can take to achieve it? What is the best thing you/we can do under the circumstances? empowers us to set clear priorities, and take the most constructive actions to follow through -- essential for optimal leadership and optimized execution. Execution-driven leaders who thrive on accountability and reward performance, must select the right people for the right jobs. This is achieved with Optimal Thinking. Read these two books, get your key people to read them too, and you will OPTIMIZE productivity.

4-0 out of 5 stars Leadership for the real world
Reading "Execution" and pondering its theses is a lot like listening to your mother telling you to eat your broccoli: There are other things you'd rather have, but in your heart you know it's the right thing. Much of "Execution" is plain old common sense; to move a business forward, everyone from the CEO downward needs to work to make things happen.

A refreshing departure from the fuzzy style of most leadership books, "Execution" is invaluable for up-and-coming business leaders of all stripes, though its focus is primarily senior management in very large organizations. Some readers will find that Bossidy and Charan spend a lot of time re-stating the obvious. For every "ah-ha!" moment this book presents, there are at least two "well, duh!" moments. But in light of many of the problems facing businesses today, the obvious bears repeating.

Others will find that "Execution" barely scratces the surface of a highly complex series of topics, and will want a greater diversity of business cases. Much time is spent fawning over Jack Welch at the expense of other, equally deserving business leaders. To that end, a sequel or a companion workbook would be helpful. But for getting managers thinking about their jobs in a new and beneficial light, "Execution" accomplishies its goal admirably. Much like broccoli!

5-0 out of 5 stars The book that Jack should have written.
This is perhaps one of the best business books I have ever read. Unlike many books which use extensive academia and complex formulas which rarely see the light of day or work well outside of a controlled environment, this book is simple. That said this simplicity can be a bit deceiving. When I worked for GE, as did Bossidy and Jack Welch, the concepts which turned that business into a global leader in industry were remarkably simple. It wasn't the simplicity of the ideas, but rather the ability to get a hundred thousand people executing flawlessly on them that makes the difference.

In the book Bossidy describes how he personally would ensure execution occurs within his businesses. Start with the right people. Too many times we assume people are merely interchangeable cogs, but great business leaders who get results know differently. Chapter 5 discusses the responsibility and focus required to ensure the right people are in the right jobs. Even as a CEO he spent up to 40% of his time on developing and hiring the right people.

Another interesting aspect is the ability to speak directly and level set expectations and have a firm grasp on reality, regardless of how painful that reality may be at the time. Throughout the book is example after example that illustrates the value of direct conversation and clear feedback and communication. As you read the book, look for not only the content of what is discussed, but how it is discussed. Nearly always the method is to truly listen and engage people in a dialog which will set expectations, and ensure misunderstandings or mixed messages are limited. This allows people to focus on what needs to be done instead of being distracted with politics and other non value added issues.

While some may see the content as too simplistic, those same people are usually unable to deliver results in the same manner as Bossidy did at GE, or Honeywell. The value of this book is both in content and style.

The book itself is never dry, is easy to read, flows smoothly in conversational format, and is highly engaging. Highly recommended to anyone in a business situation who wants to improve execution and results.

2-0 out of 5 stars Standard business consulting verbiage
I was hoping that this was a down-to-earth book with interesting and useful ideas like Built to Last or No Excuses Management. Alas, it's just a standard, boring, fluffy business book filled with many more words that are called for. It might be worth reading if you're stuck on an airplane with it.

5-0 out of 5 stars A must for serious business officers
The principles of the book helped us move our stock from $1 to $6 in 2 years. I not only like the book, I now use it as a tool for my consulting business. It helps focusing on the essential and provides a template for structuring a business for success. I believe that it can be adapted to any venture.

I recommend it because of its simplicity and connection to reality. If you have managed operations, you will appreciate this down-to-earth layout of how to steadily drive your business or evaluate another business. Use that approach and you are above 99% of the business crowd out there. I am grateful. ... Read more


3. Financial Management : Theory and Practice with Thomson ONE (Harcourt College Publishers Series in Finance)
by Eugene F. Brigham, Michael C. Ehrhardt
list price: $124.95
our price: $124.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0324259689
Catlog: Book (2004-03-12)
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
Sales Rank: 4069
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Book Description

This text remains the only text in the market that presents a balance of financial theory and applications.The authors maintain the same four goals as with the first edition: helping learners to make good financial decisions, providing a solid text for the introductory MBA course, motivating learners by demonstrating finance is relevant and interesting, and presenting the material clearly. ... Read more


4. How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life
by Tom Rath, Donald O. Clifton
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
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Asin: 1595620036
Catlog: Book (2004-08-10)
Publisher: Gallup Press
Sales Rank: 427
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Book Description

How did you feel after your last interaction with another person? Did that person-your spouse, best friend, coworker, or even a stranger -fill your bucket" by making you feel more positive? Or did that person "dip from your bucket," leaving you more negative than before? The number one New York Times and number one Business Week bestseller, How Full Is Your Bucket? reveals how even the briefest interactions affect your relationships, productivity, health, and longevity. Organized around a simple metaphor of a dipper and a bucket, and grounded in 50 years of research, this book will show you how to greatly increase the positive moments in your work and your life-while reducing the negative. Filled with discoveries, powerful strategies, and engaging stories, How Full Is Your Bucket? is sure to inspire lasting changes and has all the makings of a timeless classic. ... Read more


5. Marketing Management
by Philip Kotler
list price: $135.00
our price: $135.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0130336297
Catlog: Book (2002-05)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 2674
Average Customer Review: 4.21 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This worldwide best-selling book highlights the most recent trends and developments in global marketing-with an emphasis on the importance of teamwork between marketing and all the other functions of the business. It introduces new perspectives in successful strategic market planning, and presents additional company examples of creative, market-focused, and customer-driven action.Coverage includes a focus on customer relationship management, partner relationship management, the Internet and its effects and uses, brand building and brand asset management, alternative go-to-market channels, and marketing around the globe. Chapter topics discuss building customer satisfaction, market-oriented strategic planning, analyzing consumer markets and buyer behavior, dealing with the competition, designing pricing strategies and programs, and managing the sales forceFor marketing managers who want to increase their understanding of the major issues of strategic, tactical, and administrative marketing-along with the opportunities and needs of the marketplace in the years ahead. ... Read more

Reviews (34)

4-0 out of 5 stars The "Bible" of Marketing
Phillip Kotler's Marketing Management is the the classic MBA marketing text. It's comprehensive and encyclopedic--that means its not an easy read. Kotler's writing style could be described as a list of lists. Each topic is parsed into its elements and he then recites all possible attributes.

The book has an enormous market share, which means it comes with every possible ancilliary product (for instructors who adopt the book) such as videos and power points. Because Prentice Hall sells so many of this book, they can afford to issue new editions on an accelerated, two-year cycle. The good news from this is it allows them to move with the times (in this edition, they've eliminated all the trivial "Did you know ...?" sidebars that detracted from the seriousness of the last "Millennial Edition." The bad news (from a student point of view) is that you may be forced to buy new, because used copies won't be correct.

However, this is one book that you'll want to keep on your professional library shelves--it's as much a reference as a text. All other marketing texts either derive from Kotler or distance themselves from this book, so you might as well go to the source.

4-0 out of 5 stars IT RAMIFIED EVERY ASPECT OF MARKETING
Using a variety of case-study analyses, this "Marketing Management" elaborated on the principal concepts of 21st Century marketing. Post-graduate students, as well as practising professionals will find it useful. Its specialized chapters did their best in ramifying every aspect of marketing. Information is everywhere; although that its versatility led to the boring repetition of strategies.
This book is simple and well-written. It is very good; but in comparison, the "Principles of Marketing", which is cheaper and comes with an attached CD-ROM, (and was written by Gary Armstrong and this same Philip Kotler) offers much more for less money.

5-0 out of 5 stars Marketing Management
The eleventh edition of this bestselling marketing management text reflects the recent trends and developments in global marketing. It emphasizes the importance of teamwork between marketing and all other functions of the business.

5-0 out of 5 stars For teaching
Generally useful and apply to real life situation

3-0 out of 5 stars Broad Focus
Kotler is a name synonomous with marketing. I have several of his books and have enjoyed them very much. It is a broad focus though. It doesn't dig very deep into specific industries of course. If you happen to be looking for restaurant marketing specific book recommendations, there are several at the Quantified Marketing Group website at www.quantifiedmarketing.com. We have several complimentary restaurant marketing resources and book recommendations there. ... Read more


6. Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap... and Others Don't
by Jim Collins
list price: $27.50
our price: $19.25
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0066620996
Catlog: Book (2001-10)
Publisher: HarperBusiness
Sales Rank: 52
Average Customer Review: 4.47 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com's Best of 2001

Five years ago, Jim Collins asked the question, "Can a good company become a great company and if so, how?" In Good to Great Collins, the author of Built to Last, concludes that it is possible, but finds there are no silver bullets. Collins and his team of researchers began their quest by sorting through a list of 1,435 companies, looking for those that made substantial improvements in their performance over time. They finally settled on 11--including Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo--and discovered common traits that challenged many of the conventional notions of corporate success. Making the transition from good to great doesn't require a high-profile CEO, the latest technology, innovative change management, or even a fine-tuned business strategy. At the heart of those rare and truly great companies was a corporate culture that rigorously found and promoted disciplined people to think and act in a disciplined manner. Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not so great, the book offers a well-reasoned road map to excellence that any organization would do well to consider. Like Built to Last, Good to Great is one of those books that managers and CEOs will be reading and rereading for years to come. --Harry C. Edwards ... Read more

Reviews (298)

5-0 out of 5 stars Jim Collins: REQUIRED READING (See why.)
With an overall keen focus on discipline and accountability, Jim Collins was assisted by a large team of gifted, discerning graduate students. Hence, "Good to Great" is a most welcome piece of major solid research in our current time when "business spin" has contributed to the failure of corporations, market values, employee careers, etc. Unfortunately, similar books over the past few decades have relied more on "impressionism" from the author(s), including the now famous "In Search of Excellence" which has since been exposed as not fully grounded in the true facts of the time. While Warren Buffet is not identified as a "Level 5" leader in "Good to Great," this is a volume which could surely bear the imprimatur from that "Sage of Omaha." This book could even assist GE's Jack Welch "grow" into a more effective individual. [Prepare yourself for a surprise-jolt: based on Jim Collins' penetrating analyses across 11 major organizations, Mr. Welch would probably be considered as a "Level 4" leader.]

This book is of significant value to anyone wanting to move from "good to great" no matter if it is within a profit, not-for-profit, or even in a home-family setting. Great, easy reading and, most importantly, an excellent, life-long reference manual to help you remain "tuned-up." Notably, this book should be a required supplemental text for all general management courses (undergraduate or graduate).

5-0 out of 5 stars Achieving and continuing spectacular business success
In 1994, Jim Collins and Jerry Porras wrote one of the most successful management books of the last decade: Built to Last. Collins and Porras had studied 18 visionairy companies, many of which had existed for 60 years or more. These companies had a strong focus on values and people and great ability to to learn and exchange knowledge. They gave less priority to maximalizing shareholder value but paradoxically outperformed the market enormously. In a conversation with Jim Collins, McKinsey director Bill Meehan said he, too, loved the book, but added: "Unfortunately, it's useless". He explained why. The companies featured in Built to Last had always been great companies. But because most companies are just good (not great) they are not interested in a book which shows how to stay great (Built to Last) but in a book that shows how to become great. The matter inspired Collins. He built a research team of 15 people and started a 5 year study.

The team tried to identify companies that had jumped from good to great and had managed to continue their great growth for at least 15 years. They found 11 of these (Abbott, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gilette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreens, Wells Fargo). These good-to-great companies (GTG's) outperformed the market by a factor 6.9 in the 15 year period of the analysis! (General Electric outperformed the market 'only' by a factor 2.8 between 1985 and 2000).

The study focused on the question: what did the GTG's have in common that distinguished them from comparable companies in comparable circumstances? The GTG's were compared with two sets of other companies: 1) the direct-comparisons: companies within the same sector and in comparable circumstances, 2) the unsustained comparisons: companies that had had a breakthrough but that had not been able to continue their success. Collins intended to, from the ground up, build a theory which could explain the successful transformation of the GTG's.

As it turned out, all of the GTG's had a period of build up, preparation (often lasting many years) before the breakthrough moment. Three phases could be identified:

PHASE 1: DISCIPLINED PEOPLE
1. LEVEL 5 LEADERSHIP: contrary to the expectation, leaders of the GTG's turned out to be quiet, self effacing and even shy. At the same time, however, they were very determined. Mostly, they were leaders that came from within the company and that have remained unknown to the greater public.

2. FIRST WHO...THEN WHAT: also contrary to what you might expect was that GTG's first got the right people on the bus and the wrong people off and only then focused on strategic direction and vision.

PHASE 2: DISCIPLINED THOUGHT
3. CONFRONT THE BRUTAL FACTS (..BUT NEVER LOSE HOPE). Characteristic was a combination of realism and hope.
4. THE HEDGEHOG CONCEPT (SIMPLICITY IN THREE CIRCLES): just like a hedgehog, the GTG's seemed to have a very simple but effective success formula: all of the activities of the company had to lie within the intersection of the following three circles: 1) what can we become best in the world at? 2) what are we passionate about? 3) what can we make money with?

PHASE 3: DISCIPLINED ACTION
5. CULTURE OF DISCIPLINE: the GTG's turned out to have a culture of discipline that made hierarchy and bureaucracy largely superfluous.
6. TECHNOLOGY ACCELERATORS: none of the GTG's had technology as a cause of the success, but technology did play the role of accelerator of the success.

Collins rather convincingly demonstrates the validity of this model. All of the GTG's showed these practices throughout the 15 year period, while none of the direct comparisons did. The unsustained comparisons showed some of these practises often right until the moment of their decline.

Looking at the share price development of the GTG's, you might expect that there has been a clear marking point of the transformation because their share price stays rather flat at first (for many years) and then just suddenly takes off and keeps on going up. An important finding of the team was, however, that there were nó special change programs, and nó breakthrough decisions or products. On the contrary, the process evolved very fluently. To eplain, Collins uses the metaphor of the flying wheel. When you start to turn this wheel it goes heavily and moves slowly. But by continuously keeping on turning the wheel, it starts to build momentum and then, just suddenly, a point is reached at which the wheel turns at great speed without you having to turn it any harder than at first. Is this the practice of many companies? Not at all! The reality of many companies is nót consistently following a chosen path but rather swinging from one hype to another.

I think this research evokes one principal issue. That the concept 'great' is operationalized in a financial way is easily understood from a practical standpoint. This criterion is clear and rather easily obtained and makes it easy to compare the companies scientifically. But is 'great' the best word to describe spectacular financial success? Does their financial success necessarily make GTG's 'great'? Wouldn't that be like saying that Bill Gates en Silvio Berlusconi are great people while implying Martin Luther King and Mother Theresa are not?

But, having said that, demonstrating how companies achieve and continue spectacular financial success, in itself, is extremely interesting and valuable. This is a terrific book that, I think, has the quality to equal or perhaps even surpass the success of Built to Last. Unlike most management books (which contain creative but highly speculative ideas), the message of this book is based on well-designed research and mindful interpretation of results that is explained and justified terrifically. Despite this thoroughness, the book remains a pleasant read. A pity that the book does not offer some more practical suggestions to help readers get started. I think that would have made it even better.

5-0 out of 5 stars Study on Critical Factors for Organisational Greatness
Collins' curiosity and clear study brings to light some of those factors that contribute to greatness. These findings are grounded within individual, teachable 'points of view' which are easily applied to large organisations and applicable to small busness as well.
Collins puts his findings in clear accessable language. Including the finding that is responsible for the title... That good is the enemy of great.
I highly recommend this book/CD to leaders that are enaged with designing futures and those that work with them. It is core reading for key teams. It has made a significant difference in being able to articulate powerful conversations with teams about that which is tacit and critical to success. Giving common language and principles to engage with. A great study book for learning teams.

3-0 out of 5 stars But, what about........?

Read it - but maybe buy it used

This books does however ask some good questions about how to go from being good to GREAT such as:

1. What am I(or what is the company) intrinsically passionate about?
2. What is the company\I good at? and does this "thing" come naturally?
3. Finally does this area that was chosen have "GREAT" potential?

On the other hand, here are some questions that I felt were left unanswered:

Can't you be GREAT at two things at the same time?

According to Jack Welch's book, you should strive to be #1 OR #2.
btw: Aren't there three medals awarded in the Olympics?

What about sales? The Mary Kay Company motto is "Nothing happens until somebody sells something." (from her book)

What about creating barriers to entry for competitors? (to protect market share like Carnegie or Rockefeller did)

Why didn't you include MORE on the failures of the Good to Great companies? Not just the failures of the competition. Guys like Edison, Lincoln had many defeats before they found ultimate success.
Doesn't bouncing back from failures have something to do with going from Good to Great?

The author mentions getting the right people in the right seats on the bus and the wrong people off. I believe this is an oversimplification. Age, salary, tenure, unions, hierarchy etc make this a very difficult task to accomplish!!

Yes this book took 5 years to write and was supported by 21 staff researchers BUT I am not totally convinced of the results. (and I liked the first book - Built to Last)
That's why I gave it only 3 stars

5-0 out of 5 stars Must read for any executive, manager, or entrepreneur
This book was number one on the Wall Street Journal's list for a long time for good reason. It is a very pleasurable and easy read that will certainly set off light bulbs in your head. The coverage of the iterative process of buildup and breakthrough is outstanding. If you are an executive, manager, or entrepreneur, make sure you grab this book and take it to the beach or knock it out over a weekend. It certainly belongs in your library. ... Read more


7. Monday Morning Leadership
by David Cottrell
list price: $12.95
our price: $11.01
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0971942439
Catlog: Book (2002-11-12)
Publisher: Cornerstone Leadership Inst
Sales Rank: 3489
Average Customer Review: 4.88 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Monday Morning Leadership is a story that can help your career!Everyone likes a good story, especially if there are lessons that can be immmediately applied to life.This book is one of those stories - about a manager and his mentor.It offers unique encouragement and direction that will help you become a better manager, employee, and person. ... Read more

Reviews (32)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent!
This book is great.

Our managers are required to read several management books each year. Monday Morning Leadership is the best I have read - by far. The book has a great combination - the least number of pages combined with the most useful information- of any of the books we have read. No fluff- or bulla bulla as Tony would say - just good stuff that I can actually use.

Buy the book. I am sure you will enjoy the journey with Jeff and Tony.

5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Book - Monday Morning Leadership
This book is refreshing and well written for those of us who continuously work with others, as well as those that strive to be a great leader. David Cottrell writes from a perspective that we can all understand. Best book I have read in a long time.

5-0 out of 5 stars Worth Buying!
This book is worth buying! It has digestable nuggets of good, common sense wisdom. It is easy to read and every person that I have bought this book for has found it to be entertaining and useful.

It is a permament part of my company's new manager circulum.

4-0 out of 5 stars Monday Morning Leadership
Monday Morning Leadership is a quick read that any leader from business to education can read for knowledge, but maybe more importantly - reflection! The personal story leads the reader through his own personal re-discovery of strengths and weaknesses in business and personal life. The mentor, Tony, leads "Jeff" through 8 mentoring sessions that guide Jeff through his personal discovery of his own leadership style. These sessions with Tony helps him to re-discover changes that he can make to be the leader he once was, or could be - only new and improved with Tonys reflective questioning guidance.

5-0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING!!!
This book is outstanding.
The author spoke at one of our management meetings and our company gave us the book. He was fantastic.
This book hits home with me ... it is not rocket scientist stuff but it is filled with information that I can use.

I recommend it highly. ... Read more


8. The One Thing You Need to Know : ... About Great Managing, Great Leading, and Sustained Individual Success
by Marcus Buckingham
list price: $29.95
our price: $20.37
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0743261658
Catlog: Book (2005-03-08)
Publisher: Free Press
Sales Rank: 456
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

As a social science researcher and an esteemed business consultant, Marcus Buckingham (First, Break All the Rules and Now, Discover Your Strengths) has spent considerable time studying the big picture. This wide-angle approach led him to an unexpectedly narrow conclusion: There is a core concept to even the most complex topic. What he has discovered in The One Thing You Need to Know is that single "controlling insights" exist for a whole range of situations, and when properly applied, can encourage exponential improvement and lead to precise action and results. In applying this concept to managing, leading, and individual performance he has pinpointed the single element necessary for achieving success in each of these three key positions.

Buckingham acknowledges the subtleties of the topic and his goal is "not to make these subjects simpler, merely clearer." And what could be clearer than one thing? The challenge lies in filtering out the nonessential matters and distinguishing "between what is merely important and what is imperative" in order to produce the greatest and most far-reaching effects. In offering advice on how to do this he also details the three things you need to learn about a person to manage them effectively, explains why a lack of balance is a good thing, shows how to identify your own strengths and weaknesses, and discusses which personality traits all great leaders must possess.

Clearly written, informative, and enjoyable, the book aims to motivate readers to act--not just think--differently by providing concrete examples and specific lessons. And it need not be confined to the office--the concepts outlined in these pages can help people feel more fulfilled and productive in all aspects of life. --Shawn Carkonen

Essential Buckingham


First, Break All the Rules

Now, Discover Your Strengths

The One Thing You Need To Know, Audio CD

First, Break All The Rules, Audio CD

Now, Discover Your Strengths, Audio CD

First, Break All the Rules, Audio Cassette

If You Like Buckingham, You'll Love...

  • Jack Welch
  • Jim Collins
  • Larry Bossidy
  • Patrick Lencioni
  • Stephen Covey
  • Malcolm Gladwell
  • Tom Rath
  • Daniel Goleman
  • Clayton Christensen
... Read more

Reviews (13)

5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant !
(*****)

This book tackles very delicate theories in managing and leadership brilliantly.Marcus Buckingham's approach is straightforward, uses easy language but it definitely kicks you hard.

Part of the charm of the book perhaps is in managing expectations.I expected to learn just `One Thing' but instead there are so many things you'd read that would change your outlook.

The better books are those that would change your views, the best ones change your actions... this one is part of the latter.Aside from changing my views of managing and leading forever (in a way are opposites), this book has changed my routine and made me do changes here and now.

A must read!

3-0 out of 5 stars Some Nuggets - Same Ideas as previous books, but applied.
I like the overall tone of this book, as I am a real advocate of his earlier works with discovering & developing one's strengths.For me, however, it was largely recycled ideas - albeit good ones!

The best nuggest I got (so far - I'm still reading parts) is that great managers play chess rather than checkers with their people.That is, in chess, you have to know each particular piece - how each one moves & performs in a different way.In checkers, you treat all pieces the same regardless.Perfect analogy, which I will use in my classes & for clients!

1-0 out of 5 stars The one thing you need to know..
dont waste your money on this.

Just a collection of boring anecdotes.

5-0 out of 5 stars Very insightful, practical and useful...A must read!
I loved this book! I learned a great deal about how to improve my own performance at work as well how to better understand others around me. Buckingham cuts through the business babble out there and provides useful practical advice one can apply in the work world and in life. Although I'm a fan of the first two books, this one is the must read!

5-0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended!
Many soothsayers pontificate sonorously about leadership to anyone who will listen, but over time they gradually lose touch with their subject matter. You may at first wonder if best-selling guru Marcus Buckingham has stumbled into this very ditch after he devotes eight pages early in the book to what makes great marriages (FYI: he says it's always interpreting everything your spouse does in the warmest possible light, whether or not that is logical). Well, not to worry - Buckingham is just warming up. An original thinker who lets his intellect roam, he brings sharp insights to the evergreen topic of leadership. Although this book is essentially creative in nature rather than intellectually rigorous, you'll come to respect the powerful perceptions it has to offer. Buckingham must navigate a perilous balance between clarity and oversimplification, and he pulls it off rather well. While we wouldn't say this is the only book you need to read to understand leadership, we highly recommend it. ... Read more


9. An Introduction to Management Science : Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making (with CD-ROM and InfoTrac) (Introduction to Management Science)
by David R. Anderson, Dennis J. Sweeney, Thomas A. Williams
list price: $138.95
our price: $138.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0324202318
Catlog: Book (2004-03-12)
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
Sales Rank: 19785
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

ASW's Introduction to Management Science: A Quantitative Approach to Decision Making provides thorough, application-oriented coverage in a very readable writing style. This is the leading text on the market. Simply put, it's a classic!The problem-scenario approach introduces quantitative procedures through situations that include both problem formulation and technique application.The extensive linear programming coverage includes problem formulation, computer solution, and practical application. The text covers transportation, assignment, and the integer programming extension of linear programming, as well as advanced topics like waiting line models, simulation, and decision analysis. A large selection of problems includes self-test problems with complete solutions and case problems.Excel spreadsheet appendices are included as well. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars katz
Trust Me. This is the only book that you'll need to get started started in this area. The authors have done an excellent job in producing such a work, that takes care to explain all the details of management science.

I used this text for my professional exams (CIMA) and the it was great. All the chapters in this book are cleanly written to take that I doesn't leave anything unexplained. However, the following chapters are the ones that I like the most in this book:

1. Introduction to LP
2. LP: Sensitivity Analysis: Amazing work here.
3. LP Applications: formulation of problems in this chapter may be bit difficult at first, but keep reading and you'll learn and appreciate the work that the authors have put in.
4. LP - Simplex Method: My favorite chapter. Is highly readable. This one chapter alone is worth the book.
5. LP - Simplex Sensitivity.
6. Integer LP
7. Project Scheduling - Great, well written chapter, another favorite of mine.
8. Decision Analysis - Good but the problems are repetative.
9. Markov Process - An introduction only, but the application of markov process to accounts receivable anlaysis is very useful for anyone wondering about the applications of markov processes.

Overall a great book that is worth its price. ... Read more


10. Management (8th Edition)
by Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter
list price: $134.67
our price: $134.67
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0131439944
Catlog: Book (2004-01-14)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 9069
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Robbins and Coulter's best-selling text demonstrates the real-world applications of management concepts and makes management come alive by bringing real managers and readers together. As it successfully integrates the various functions of management, the book establishes a dialogue with managers from a variety of fields. The authors examine managerial issues concerning defining the manager's terrain, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. For managers of all kinds.

... Read more

Reviews (1)

3-0 out of 5 stars introduction to management
It very details and have many examples but if the summary could included more key element, it would be better. ... Read more


11. Never Eat Alone : And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time
by Keith Ferrazzi, Tahl Raz
list price: $24.95
our price: $16.47
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0385512058
Catlog: Book (2005-02-22)
Publisher: Currency
Sales Rank: 151
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Download Description

Do you want to get ahead in life?

Climb the ladder to personal success?

The secret, master networker Keith Ferrazzi claims, is in reaching out to other people. As Ferrazzi discovered early in life, what distinguishes highly successful people from everyone else is the way they use the power of relationships–so that everyone wins.

In Never Eat Alone, Ferrazzi lays out the specific steps–and inner mindset–he uses to reach out to connect with the thousands of colleagues, friends, and associates on his Rolodex, people he has helped and who have helped him.

The son of a small–town steelworker and a cleaning lady, Ferrazzi first used his remarkable ability to connect with others to pave the way to a scholarship at Yale, a Harvard MBA, and several top executive posts. Not yet out of his thirties, he developed a network of relationships that stretched from Washington’s corridors of power to Hollywood’s A–list, leading to him being named one of Crain’s 40 Under 40 and selected as a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the Davos World Economic Forum.

Ferrazzi’s form of connecting to the world around him is based on generosity, helping friends connect with other friends. Ferrazzi distinguishes genuine relationship–building from the crude, desperate glad–handling usually associated with “networking.” He then distills his system of reaching out to people into practical, proven principles. Among them:

Don’t keep score: It’s never simply about getting what you want. It’s about getting what you want and making sure that the people who are important to you get what they want, too.

“Ping” constantly: The Ins and Outs of reaching out to those in your circle of contacts all the time–not just when you need something.

Never eat alone: The dynamics of status are the same whether you’re working at a corporation or attending a society event&mdash “invisibility” is a fate worse than failure.

In the course of the book, Ferrazzi outlines the timeless strategies shared by the world’s most connected individuals, from Katherine Graham to Bill Clinton, Vernon Jordan to the Dalai Lama.

Chock full of specific advice on handling rejection, getting past gatekeepers, becoming a “conference commando,” and more, Never Eat Alone is destined to take its place alongside How to Win Friends and Influence People as an inspirational classic.

... Read more

Reviews (46)

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply Worth it
I do not buy many books. I only buy the ones that I am interested in keeping. If I only want to read a book, I simply get it in the library.

After reading a few reviews of "Never Eat Alone" I went to my local bookstore to have a closer look at it. Although I definitely liked the look of the book, my first reaction was "No, too expensive". And it is expensive! But then I sat down to read some passages. The more I read, the more interested I was becoming... You know the outcome - I finally DID buy it. I don't think I need to say anything else...

The other books that I have recently bought:

"Blink" by Malcolm Gladwell. This book actually prompted my interest in "Never Eat Alone" as they are both offered by Amazon in one package.
"Can We Live 150 Years" by Mikhail Tombak - this one is so INEXPENSIVE

5-0 out of 5 stars I Just Ordered 5 more copies of this Book !
Excellent! A must-read for seasoned professionals wanting to expand their sales, or young people coming up the ladder needing to know "how things really work". The book is very easy to read and quite entertaining, and actually helped me yesterday respond correctly to an important opportunity.

The section on how to get through a very tough secretary, to talk the Boss, is priceless.

If I see a 28 year-old buying his very own Gulfstream IV jet, it'll probably be because he read this book and applied the lessons in it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Critiques and criticisms - Is this for real?
A review of a book is meant to be an opinion.Something that others can reference to find a comparison point and understand better whether they are appropriately interested in a text or manuscript - and subsequently how much value they may place on it within the context of their own lives.

I will provide these items to note: I read first through the negative critiques of Keith's book, I continued to scan quickly through the positive ones - to which I give limited weight.An important first step to understand whether the book is really valuable or not.I then proceeded to evaluate the book from an image/impression point of view.Lastly, I read and evaluated whether the book might have value in my life as a professional.Not in the life of others.Not in the life of similar people.In my life.Is it valuable to me.This is what I came up with:

Opines of the naysayers:
Many of the critiques (there were many - which usually makes for at least a marketable, controversial piece of literature) were overloaded with negative connotations about 'manipulation', 'deception', 'dishonesty', and 'insincerity' with the processes used by Keith to acquire friends, and take advantage of these friends and their relationships.Several reviewers also go out of their way to show how he drops names everywhere and glorifies himself and 'toots' his own horn throughout his book..

My first guess is that most of those who are commenting in this way do NOT have the same level of connectivity that Keith has established through many years of building a network.That said, what Keith has done implements applying these name drops to actual experiences where dropping names can be of value.

Think about it objectively - would you attend a party where you know there would be wealthy billionaires attending or one where you can meet with typical professionals in your field who you have little knowledge of whether they are successful.Yes, I'm sure there's some humility involved in this process.Keith touched on that a few times in his book - including his efforts to consider respect for all levels of individuals (you really don't know who they know).This includes his comments about learning from his past mistakes as he shot up through the ranks.But human beings are social animals.There is a pecking order in life (even if you don't believe it).There are people who live life more fully (not necessarily financially) and those who live it less so than you.

Most importantly, as a reader you must be able to sift that material out of the picture.Keith uses it to depict a point or concept, not only to glorify himself.And even if he does, does it really matter?You are seeking to determine whether you will use his techniques to modify your lifestyle and adopt one where friendships are also business-related and vice-versa.In most of his book, he also adds that he is expected to provide the same for others.Just because he asked a friend to help him out and move him further along the success curve or happiness curve doesn't mean that he has done anything wrong.Keith supports this with his variation of 'pay it forward' and 'reciprocity' where he expects others to ask the same of him - in which case he would submit appropriately.

I must admit, some of the stars that Keith hangs out with - however briefly - are truly spectacular movers and shakers.With that comes a bit of caution, as we all know the tendency for a definite increase in the nose gradient as people begin to associate with top dogs of the world.But in Keith's case, he has earned that right by moving through the ranks of truly effective firms and reaching the stardom through hard work and perseverance (and in many cases, networking).

Ultimately, the naysayers have neglected to consider that the world is built of social structures and every situation has political motives so long as complete trust is not delivered and accepted by all parties involved.Keith's concepts prove to be a great way to increase the trust levels required to build strong forthcoming relationships that don't 'wither on the vine' but are recirculated and built into powerful abilities for accomplishment however great or small.

Most of the naysayers have the wrong reasons for criticizing - they attack him personally and not the content of his book for whatever reasons.Certainly criticizing him for self-aggrandizement cannot be considered that much out of line, as all he's doing is supporting his processes, thoughts, and perhaps his personal business through his book.However, he has no obligations at all to share his experiences with the public, and by doing so, opens himself up to more than just criticism.

Moving onward to the next topic - the image/impression of the book.

I was amazed at the fluorescent orange cover with some strange words about eating on it.At first I would have no clue this book was about networking (which I believe many of the first people to spot the book had a difficult time anyway).But then I saw that it relates closely to FedEx's branding strategy with their color coordination, and even the 'XXX for dummies' line of books.It stands out from the rest of the pack based on the color coordination.Given that the book relates to personal branding and marketing of oneself for moving forward in corporate circles, it wouldn't be thrown out as an outcast.

The image of the book can be summarized to me as the following:
Building Shareholder Value in You - in a highly adventurous manner.The least I would call it would be conservative.Some of his techniques require lifestyle changes.Some of his methods are radical.

Last topic - The book.

There are successful people who do NOT use Ferrazzi's methods to achieve success.There are also individuals who avoid relationships altogether, yet still are able to accomplish their aims in achieving happiness, financial freedom, and significant life accomplishments.However, 'Never Eat Alone' touches on one aspect of achieving success through the building of relationships and the empowerment of others to help you.Does this mean you are taking advantage of others?Does this mean you are establishing an inequitable relationship?Does this mean you are being dishonest or unethical?

For me, business has always been a 2-way street.Keith stresses this point throughout his book.He goes back to the classic adages of the past such as 'do unto others...', and 'you have to give to get', et. al.He puts them together and shows how when applied, they really have value - because ultimately that's how social structures are built.They have time-tested foundations of common knowledge, that not everyone has accepted or can accept.For me, his techniques were preaching to the choir.However, his book is great for those who have yet to believe it and can see true effects from their conditions of helping others out.He does not condone opportunism (at least not unethical opportunism) however, he does support business sense.In all transactions you have a buyer and seller, and in networking, you have the same.Except, just as it was ages ago, you are bartering, not buying with currency.What you barter is information primarily, but also other things such as emotional empathy.For instance when you call up your contact on their birthday to let them know, you have made a significant exchange of emotional empathy - showing you care.Even if you have some ideas in mind of what you'd like to get from your friend in the future - maybe a business reference, or a possible job contact, or maybe admission to a country club.Keith stresses that your gift, trade, exchange, whatever, has to be given in good faith.You have to mean what you say/do with genuineness and sincerity.This aspect of his technique justifies the methodology (and in many cases anything else will immediately negate the value of what you contribute to a relationship)

Ultimately, the book was a refresher course in mixing with people, both high and low in status.It provides some great tips on how to address specific situations, and the value of face-to-face as opposed to single channels of communication.It stresses the importance of relationships - although it may not apply in all circumstances.And lastly, was an easy read in story format.Some of these things - for salespeople or marketing folks - should be inherent to their nature.

Other items, like the name droppings, well, that's for show.If you can read through show, then maybe you can understand the wealth of information underneath.

Just my humble opinion.

As a side note and disclaimer: I have had the fortune of meeting Keith, and from my limited impression, he does believe and follow his scriptures.

4-0 out of 5 stars Mostly good....
This is actually a great book.I heard the author speak twice at Wharton Business School & then read the book.You have to be willing to get through a lot of name dropping, descriptions of how cool the author is and overly detailed stories of things he has done (which are usually, but not always, related to the topic in hand) but there are a lot of great ideas and tips in here.He even explains, for the socially retarded, how to run a dinner party step-by-step!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is an important book
I've read quite a few business books over the last year, and this one stands out for me.It's presented me with a radically different worldview.

Where I would approach a task with the question "How do I get this done?", Keith approaches it with "Who are the people that can help me get this task done?"This is a stunning shift in one's point of reference.I wish I'd read this book 20 yrs ago.
... Read more


12. The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles From The World's Greatest Manufacturer
by JeffreyLiker
list price: $24.95
our price: $16.47
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0071392319
Catlog: Book (2003-12-17)
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Sales Rank: 1711
Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

How to speed up business processes, improve quality, and cut costs in any industry

In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability.

Complete with profiles of organizations that have successfully adopted Toyota's principles, this book shows managers in every industry how to improve business processes by:

  • Eliminating wasted time and resources
  • Building quality into workplace systems
  • Finding low-cost but reliable alternatives to expensive new technology
  • Producing in small quantities
  • Turning every employee into a qualitycontrol inspector
... Read more

Reviews (15)

5-0 out of 5 stars Jeff Liker does it again!
Jeff Liker does it again. For those who have read and enjoyed his previous book, Becoming Lean: Experiences of U.S. Manufactures, (1998 Shingo Prize) it gives practical insight into the transformation process from those who lead the process. The Toyota Way gives insight into how business philosophy must change and evolve in order to support a true transformation. At the core of a true business change is not the techniques, tools, or methods, but an attitude toward the business and a "way of life".

The book, The Toyota Way, is worth reading from cover-to-cover and should also be re-referenced as one tries to guide their business, themselves, and others through the deep changes that must occur to truly transform to a lean enterprise. Dr. Liker reveals how the fourteen principles have been applied at Toyota using practical examples from new car development programs, daily functions, and major international business decisions. The Toyota Way applies to all levels of activities and people. But the only way for others to accomplish their own Toyota Way is to read this book and start to apply its lessons directly - by learning by doing.

5-0 out of 5 stars Toyota DNA
Even though no other company will have the exact Toyota DNA, the principles in this book should be like the 14 commandments for all companies. There is something that wows me just about in every page I read.

I'm only through half of the book, but if I had the money I would send it to many of my manufacturing friends. But that is much rather like pushing it, and I am not sure they would read it, even as a freebie.

I have read many of the "Lean books", Womack, etc. and liked them too. But "The Toyota Way" has been the best. There are many automotive Japanese companies, but Toyota is very special. No wonder everybody is trying to copy the tools used there. But what everybody misses is the basic philosophy and the 14 principles around Challenge, Kaizen, Respect, Teamwork and Genchi Genbutsu, or the 4 Ps of Liker.

Liker does an excellent work in explaining them.

a manufacturing engineering manager

5-0 out of 5 stars Clear and informative for any business
What a clear explanation of management principles. Anyone who runs any sort of company, or even a single household, can profit by reading this book. The many graphs are clear, clever, and illuminating. The book goes so much beyond the more simple "lean" theory I had read about before.

5-0 out of 5 stars Explainning Toyota's DNA
I think this book is the first one for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best book ever in recent years on Toyota DNA
There are very few books or papers available to give details on Toyota DNA in a plain english and that too with examples.

Thank you Dr.Liker for doing excellent job and looking forward to see your next book.

I completely agree with what Dr. Liker described in Principles 8 and 11, as I was fortunate to experience "Toyota Way" as a supplier. ... Read more


13. Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling
by HaroldKerzner
list price: $80.00
our price: $80.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0471225770
Catlog: Book (2003-01-31)
Publisher: Wiley
Sales Rank: 19640
Average Customer Review: 3.32 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

* Completely revised and streamlined for course use including expanded problems and exercises.
* Content has been refocused on the critical aspects of project management.
* Supplemented by instructors packages for both academic use and corporate trainers, includes online PowerPoint(r) presentations, student workbook, instructor's manual, and a new book of case studies.
... Read more

Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Made Even Better!
I have relied on this book for years as the single source for the critical project management information I've needed. The only way the author could have improved it is by streamlining some of the content. I bought my copy of the 8th edition - and he has done just that! This book has been completely revised and streamlined! It is still the best source of information for the PMI Certification Exam. I rely on it almost daily as an off-the-shelf reference while I'm on the job! If you have skipped buying Kerzner's book in the past because you've seen it all - now's the time to upgrade your library.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Source for Project Management Questions
If you have questions on any aspect of Project Management, this is the book to consult. From organizational behavior and structure to planning, scheduling and controlling processes vital to the successful practice of project management. Most of the vital issues are discussed in a thorough, thoughtful way.

If the book has a weakness, it is in the area of Integration - in my mind, the most difficult section of the PMP exam. The book is not only written as an undergraduate and graduate students, but also functional and senior managers. Its structure reveals the author's apparent belief that the practice of project management is more behavioral than quantitative.

His first five chapters lay the foundation for an understanding of project management principles. Chapters 6 through 8 deal with support functions of conflict and time management; chapters 9 and 10 deal with management support. Quantitative approaches to planning, time, cost and performance are developed in Chapters 11 to 15. Chapter 16 deals discusses trade-offs. The balance of the book deals with advanced topic and future trends.

If your budget limits you to the purchase of one project management, this is the one to own.

1-0 out of 5 stars This book is not a how to.
I had to use this book for a project management class. I can safely say that everyone taking the course dislikes this book. I could see this being used as a reference later on after one has a good foundation built in project management but as for someone looking to break in to the subject, without someone who is experienced in PMP standing over you explaining the confusing charts and graphs, this book would bore someone to the point that the rewards of project management aren't worth the torture of having to read this book.

2-0 out of 5 stars Not engaging, too repetitive, and ineffectual bulleted lists
I am a 2nd-year MBA student taking a course in Project Management, and this is the required text for the course. The professor insists that this is the preferred text for PM courses at other universities, but everyone in the class (the professor included) is thoroughly unimpressed by this book.

The first half of the book focuses largely on soft skills, and is mainly a rehash of the topics covered in a basic organizational behavior class, or even a psychology or sociology class. The material covered is very dry and very repetitive, and is almost entirely solid text, with few diagrams to illustrate the points of the discussion. The author also makes excessive use of verbose bulleted lists. Normally, I appreciate bulleted lists as an easy to read, concise way of conveying information, but this author often composes each bullet point as its own paragraph. Such an approach defeats the purpose of using bullets in the first place.

The second half of the text does improve somewhat over the first half. It begins an explanation of the more tangible aspects of project management, including the creation of work breakdown structures, scheduling projects, making budget projections, and applying techniques to keep a project on track. However, the style of writing is still quite thick, and makes for a slow read.

As of now, I have limited exposure to project management, and I have read no other books to which I can compare this one. However, I would be surprised if there isn't a better book on the market. Kerzner's book will eventually give you the information you're seeking, but you'll have to work hard to get there, and you'll need to wade through a lot of excess to get to the real meat of the topic.

5-0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive. One stop for Project Management knowledge.
Several people I have talked to seem to have mixed feelings about this book. Most never get past the first few pages in the book and many are afraid not to have this book prominently displayed on their desks. The latter is to avoid someone mistaking them for a junior project manager.

The best way to review this monumental book on project management is to list the most common arguments for and against the book.

The book presents comprehensive knowledge of project management that you can substitute only by purchasing several books on the subject by other authors. Dr. Harold Kerzner is also one of the most respected experts on Project Management. Dr. Kerzner now has several companion books to supplement this main text book. One area that the book was considered lacking in the past was with regards to case studies. You can now buy his latest book that is dedicated to covering just case studies. The writing style is extremely easy to read and follow. Once you read his explanation on any topic, you will find that it is hard to disagree with him because his explanations are very compelling.

The reasons many people have disliked the book - the book is too boring to read, it is too long a book, it is a compilation of bullet lists, there are not enough case studies (or problems/exercises), etc. I can't say anything about the first complaint because it is actually true but if you are in the middle of a project and have a burning question, I can promise you that is isn't so boring to pull up the relevant section in the book and find a reasonable explanation to your question. The book is very long because it is an exhaustive treatment of the Project Management field. There is no reason to read it in one sitting. Regarding being a compilation of bullet lists, it does seem that way. But when you have been in project management for a while and have an appreciation for the difficulty of the field, the lists don't get in the way. The author has enough explanations surrounding the bullet lists that I never found them annoying. To address the complaints regarding case studies, problems/exercises, there is now a book dedicated to case studies and I believe there have always been workbooks that he authored which contained more problems/exercises.

A good approach to follow regarding the usage of this book is to buy it early on in your career but stop after reading just the first few chapters. As you are gaining experience and have been exposed to a majority of the project management field, it is time to refer to this book more often. I have followed the book through several editions over the years and looked up various topics as questions popped up in my mind while going through a project. I am yet to finish the whole book (this is my 7th year reading the various editions of his book) after all these years but I didn't expect to. It is a great reference book and I have been using it as one.

There are better books to read on project management if you looking for a quick overview. 'The Little Black Book of Project Management' by Michael Thomsett comes to mind along with 'Project Management - Planning and Control' by Rory Burke. If you are looking for help with the PMP preparation, I highly recommend 'PMP Exam Prep' by Rita Mulcahy. Read my review on her book for more detailed information on taking the exam.

IIL offers several Project Management classes that are taught by excellent instructors if you like what you read in this book and are looking for more of the same. A copy is given out as part of the class materials (for some of their classes). I hope you benefit from reading this book as much as I did and thanks for your patience. This is indeed a difficult book to review. ... Read more


14. Organizational Behavior (10th Edition)
by Stephen P. Robbins
list price: $124.00
our price: $124.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0131000691
Catlog: Book (2002-10-16)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 18208
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Textbook, but easy to follow
We used this textbook for several courses in my Organizational Behavior program. Of all the texts we've used, this one has been the most valuable. The text is easy to read and is interesting, and the book offers a great deal of case studies to really emphasize the points. Overall, I think this is a great textbook and it is very versatile in business courses. ... Read more


15. Hardwiring Excellence: Purpose, Worthwhile Work, Making a Difference
by Quint Studer
list price: $28.00
our price: $19.60
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Asin: 0974998605
Catlog: Book (2004-03)
Publisher: Fire Starter Publishing
Sales Rank: 9166
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A "textbook with passion", Hardwiring Excellence offers a road map and practical how-to guide for creating and sustaining a culture of service and operational excellence.In this book, author Quint Studer, CEO of Studer Group, draws on his personal experience as a former hospital executive who led two organizations to the top 1% in patient satisfaction and his experience coaching hundreds of healthcare organizations since.

Studer, a nationally acclaimed educator, coach, and thought leader in healthcare today, is a master storyteller, mixing "chicken soup style" stories with personal insight, simple tools, and in-depth recommendations on how good organizations can become great ones.

Based on Studer Group’s Nine Principles SM, Quint Studer shows how to retain more employees; ensure better customer service; build strong leadership, align organizational values, goals, and results; increase communication; reward and recognize individual success while also requiring accountability; and move operational performance for better financials, market share, and growth.

At the core of the journey, he says, is a sense of purpose, worthwhile work and making a difference.When organizations learn how to harness this passion in their employees, they create a success spiral with ever increasing momentum.

In fact, Richard L. Clarke, FHFMA, President and CEO of Healthcare Financial Management Association says, "Quint Studer’s Nine Principles of service and operational excellence provide the missing link between people power and strong financials.It’s about courageous leadership." ... Read more

Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars Turning Passion into Performance
This book has something for everyone - those just starting to create their culture of excellence AND those who are already quite good and looking for the "tweaks" to be even better. Personal stories make it easy-to-read and show how hardwiring a few specific actions can turn passion into performance.

5-0 out of 5 stars The definitive textbook on excellence
Quint Studer has been making a difference in healthcare for years. His nine principles have been proven successful many times over in organizations large and small throughout the nation. Hardwiring Excellence is a primer of how the nine principles can help an organization achieve excellence. It is a step by step guide that provides an entertaining combination of wonderful stories and practical information that works. You will read and re-read this book many times over, and it will take you on a journey to achieve excellence that you never thought possible.

5-0 out of 5 stars A "How-To" for Excellence
Quint has an amazing way of always connecting, always reducing the complexity and showing the way to simplicity in the pursuit of excellence.
His advice and coaching tips are real-world and real-time and shouldn't be thought of as exclusive to healthcare. It would be difficult to make it to the end without identifying one or two leadership-enhancing behaviors....ready to be put to use tomorrow.
Having attended his speaking engagements, I can share that "Hardwiring Excellence" is like an extended conversation with Quint.

5-0 out of 5 stars Life Changing! If you are a burned out healthcare leader...
You simply must read this book. This clearly demonstrates how to take complex situations and make them easy to understand by connecting to purpose, worthwhile work and making a difference. I now remember why I got into healthcare in the FIRST place. I am a better leader because of these Principles.

5-0 out of 5 stars Changing Healthcare
While applicable to most environments, Hardwiring Excellence gives specific tips for healthcare providers on creating a culture of operational excellence. If each reader implements three recommendations from the book, they will improve their chances of retaining their excellent employees. ... Read more


16. Principles of Operations Management and Student CD-ROM, Fifth Edition
by Jay Heizer, Barry Render
list price: $127.00
our price: $116.84
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Asin: 0131406396
Catlog: Book (2003-02-19)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 47451
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17. Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team : A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators
by Patrick M.Lencioni
list price: $24.95
our price: $16.47
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Asin: 0787976377
Catlog: Book (2005-02-25)
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Sales Rank: 23348
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18. Strategic Management and Business Policy, Ninth Edition
by Tom Wheelen, J. David Hunger, David Hunger
list price: $133.00
our price: $133.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0131421794
Catlog: Book (2003-07-15)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 40475
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This comprehensive book offers an engaging look into new and traditional strategic management topics. Its thorough coverage helps readers develop an understanding of the wide range of theories and research available in this field—from competitive strategy and industry analysis to environmental trends and ethics. Integration of international issues throughout provides an essential understanding of global economics and its impact on business activities in any location. KEY TOPICS 43 timely and well-researched corporate cases examine real companies at all stages of development.For directors of strategic planning, competitive intelligence analysts, and strategic planners. ... Read more

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Common sense for those that know business concepts well...
Although one may learn new terms, most of the concepts laid out in this book are fairly common sense, if you've had any type of job in your life where you had to do payroll, forcast sales, or any other "strategic" processes of doing business. This is not to talk down at the book....it is an excellent book that covers the topic(s) that it set out to quite well. In the real business world, you would always try to figure out the most cost effective way to increase profits, decrease costs, and simultaneously maintain workplace efficiency. I didn't really need a textbook to tell me that.

I originally bought this book on the advice of bain4weeks.com which recommended this as the text of choice to successfully test out of the Excelsior College Exam ECE Business Policy and Strategy. 120collegecredits.com did not have a study guide for this test at the time . While I merely scanned through a few of the pages, I ended up getting a "B" on what was supposed to the the "capstone" business degree class. The test was all essay response, which made it sound hard, but to be honest, it was probably one of the easiest tests I've taken. It took all 3 hours, but it was kind of hard to fail that exam. AS LONG AS you put something down for an answer, and it made sense to the senario. It was very open-response and more or less asked for your opinion on the best way to solve the particular case study.

I strongly recommend anyone wishing to get 3 required upper level semester credits in Business Policy/Strategy to register NOW for that ECE exam; it will be discontinued in Sept 2004. Grab the Strategic Management book if you feel you'll need a good review of what would be unfamiliar business concepts for you. TECEP does have a version of the Business Policy test as well . But I'd try to take the Excelsior version while I can. outlines the whole credit-by-examination process and how to finish your degree a lot faster.

5-0 out of 5 stars See your business as an integrated whole
I originally used an older version of this book in 1991 when I took Wheelen's class "Strategic Management and Business Policy". The value of this book is Wheelen's methods of taking all the parts of a business and integrating them into a workable whole--the physical tool to enable such a transformation is the strategic business plan. I was only 20 when I read this book, and I was awestruck.

This was the most valuable book I read in college. ... Read more


19. Statistics for Business and Economics (Statistics for Business & Economics)
by David R. Anderson, Dennis J. Sweeney, Thomas A. Williams
list price: $132.95
our price: $127.95
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Asin: 032420082X
Catlog: Book (2004-01-06)
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
Sales Rank: 30918
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Book Description

This market leading text offers proven, comprehensive, applications-oriented approach. Written by authors who are highly regarded in the field, the text provides sound methodological development. The discussion and development of each technique is presented in an application setting, with the statistical results providing insights to decisions and solutions to problems. Statistics for Business and Economics, 9e offers proven accuracy that has led instructors to adopt it simply for its superior examples and exercises alone. ... Read more


20. The One Minute Manager Anniversary Ed : The World's Most Popular Management Method
by Kenneth H. Blanchard, Spencer Johnson
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.96
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Asin: 0688014291
Catlog: Book (1982-09-01)
Publisher: William Morrow
Sales Rank: 3728
Average Customer Review: 4.12 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

For more than twenty years, millions of managers in Fortune 500 companies and small businesses nationwide have followed The One Minute Manager's techniques, thus increasing their productivity, job satisfaction, and personal prosperity. These very real results were achieved through learning the management techniques that spell profitability for the organization and its employees.

The One Minute Manager is a concise, easily read story that reveals three very practical secrets: One Minute Goals, One Minute Praisings, and One Minute Reprimands.

The book also presents several studies in medicine and the behavioral sciences that clearly explain why these apparently simple methods work so well with so many people. By the book's end you will know how to apply them to your own situation and enjoy the benefits.

That's why The One Minute Manager has continued to appear on business bestseller lists for more than two decades, and has become an international sensation.

... Read more

Reviews (97)

4-0 out of 5 stars Got a few minutes?
"The One Minute Manger" by Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson teaches the readers the three skills to achieving effective management. Although the keys to being an effective and successful manager, as described by Blanchard and Johnson, seems unbelievably simple, they will strike an understanding chord among most people who have ever managed and supervised employees. Not because managers typically follow the principles, but precisely because these simple principles are ones that they intuitively know they should be practicing yet do not because of lack of conviction in the methods, worry about changing management styles, low level of interest, or apprehension that they will take too much time.

Not to fear, Blanchard and Johnson address these concerns in their short simple book. The allegory starts off with a young man in search of an effective manager. Initially disillusioned by the managers he encounters, who are only results-oriented at the expense of the employees or only people-oriented at the expense of the organization, the young man discovers The One Minute Manager. The young man learns from The One Minute Manager and the people whom he manages the philosophy of the one-minute management style. The authors gradually convince the readers through examples, anecdotes, explanations, and quotable quotes why and how their three principles, when followed appropriately, actually work. A brief guideline list accompanies each of the three management skills: the "one minute goal setting," "one minute praising," and "one minute reprimand." There is even a concise flow chart to help solidify the management principles into one page near the end of the book; no doubt, designed to be cut-out or photocopied and posted in every manager's office. By the end of the short 60 minutes required to finish the book, most readers will be convinced to at least test out the method. After all, the title of the book already suggests that time commitment is not an issue; one can become an effective manager by investing a short 60-second of time. When one reads the book, this really translates to several 60-second intervals per day, but the amount of time will be much less than what most managers are used to.

More effective management in significantly less time? Is it possible? The authors certainly make a compelling yet uncomplicated and clear case for this. One does have to wonder if this is too easy. Will it work for managing all types of people in all types of organizations? How about the slackers? Or the employee who is the wrong fit for the job, doesn't have the appropriate training, or lacks motivation? How about the company with a long tradition of top-down management style? The book doesn't get mired in the details or specifics of every possible variation or situation; instead it attempts to provide the general strategies of effective management. The simple message of the book is to focus on making people feel valued which will lead to greater self-motivation and increased productivity for the individual and organization. As the One Minute Manager best described it, "People who feel good about themselves produce good results." And because they are not difficult to understand, learn, or implement, the skills can be readily used by most managers immediately.

The book is not only for managers of people. The message from the book is relevant to anybody interacting with people or when managing your own work and life. For example, I can utilize the skills to not only manage the people who report to me, but also in working with my colleagues or my supervisor, although the lesson on reprimanding may be less applicable in such situations. The most useful setting to apply the skills, perhaps, is when teamwork is involved, such as in committees, meetings, and group projects. This is when setting goals and timelines are critical and working effectively with colleagues, including giving praise and constructive criticism, is paramount to success. Furthermore, I can even see me being a One Minute Manager to myself, be it in the work environment, personal life, educational pursuits, or participation in hobbies. Who wouldn't want to be happier and have better results in all of these activities? I wouldn't mind impressing my boss more, fulfilling all my New Year's resolutions, or running a marathon in 3 hours and 15 minutes. After reading "The One Minute Manger", most readers will want to be a One Minute Manager tomorrow.

5-0 out of 5 stars Simple and Fast
A quick read because the concepts it describes are simple yet powerful. "The One Minute Manager" has evolved into a management classic since its first edition in 1981. Managers will take three precepts from this book: Efficient Goal Setting with employees, Praise, and Reprimands. In other words, make sure your people know precisely what they are to do, and then give them feedback whether they meet those expectations or not. That's it. Simple and effective. It takes an hour to read "The One Minute Manager", consider it an investment.

5-0 out of 5 stars Here's what I think about it...
The book is not a comprehensive management tool but nonetheless contains good basic concepts all managers should use or at least give a great deal of thought to. A short, easy read that has many nuggets of wisdom, I give it five stars. Other self-help books I liked include "The Multifidus Back Pain Solution."

5-0 out of 5 stars Just A Minute
The ideas in One Minute Manager are very effective for anyone who feels stretched to the limit by the daily demands of modern business. The advice is both simple and to the point so it means less time analyzing the lesson and more time implementing tips that can improve your overall performance. I highly recommend this book to seasoned managers as well as those who aspire to join the ranks of management.

Rat Race Relaxer: Your Potential & The Maze of Life by JoAnna Carey is another great book for companies to share with employees because it offers entertaining stories and goal oriented advice about improving your workplace and your life.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best management style out there--Bar None!
This should be in the library of all managers and those aspiring to be leaders. It keeps accountability straight; and promotes initiative and quality in all involved. I find that this method gives each person in my command a sense of worth and it is very respectful of that person's ideas and performance. Better than any other style of management. ... Read more


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