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$14.99 $8.49
1. Complete Hans Christian Andersen
$10.87 $8.50 list($15.99)
2. The Book Without Words : A Fable
$6.29 $1.94 list($6.99)
3. Crispin : The Cross of Lead
$10.47 $9.00 list($14.95)
4. The End of the Beginning : Being
$12.21 $11.95 list($17.95)
5. The Jolly Postman
$5.39 $2.28 list($5.99)
6. The True Confessions of Charlotte
$5.39 $2.88 list($5.99)
7. The Book of Three (Chronicles
$5.99 $1.75
8. The High King (Chronicles of Prydain
$5.99 $3.61
9. The Black Cauldron (Chronicles
$6.26 $2.50 list($6.95)
10. A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass
$6.29 $3.90 list($6.99)
11. Hug
$10.88 $10.83 list($16.00)
12. Snowflake Bentley (Caldecott Medal
$19.01 $14.67 list($27.95)
13. Fairy Tales
$5.39 $2.45 list($5.99)
14. Poppy (rpkg) (Poppy Books)
$4.99 $3.24
15. My Five Senses (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out
$5.39 $1.94 list($5.99)
16. More Parts (Picture Puffins)
$5.39 $3.60 list($5.99)
17. Goodbye House (Moonbear Books)
$5.39 $2.25 list($5.99)
18. The Castle of Llyr (Chronicles
$13.59 $8.99 list($19.99)
19. Little Women (Illustrated Junior
$9.98 $5.73
20. The Classic Treasury of Aesop's

1. Complete Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales
by HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, LilyOwens
list price: $14.99
our price: $14.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0517092913
Catlog: Book (1993-05-10)
Publisher: Gramercy
Sales Rank: 5390
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Lilly Owens, ed. Illustrated edition of 159 cherished tales that have enchanted readers for generations. Includes The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Clothes, Snow Queen, all uncut with beautiful illustrations by Arthur Rackham, Hans Richter, et al. 60 B&W illustrations. 816 pages. ... Read more

Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Tales
Grimms-You call the Best but Hans Anderson, You call it a 'Classic of the classics' coz the beautiful stories lets your imagination go surfing on 'cloud nine' and these tales conveys moralistic message. Though the illustrations are in black and white, it doesn't matter as long as the stories are well read. Children learn to explore and imagine by listening and this is a book that every parent would love to read and narrate the stories to their loved ones. The Princess and the Pea is my fav' story and so is the 'Emperor's clothes' - Totally, an amazing fairy tales of Hans Anderson that grips you delightfully reading even as an adult. It would have been much better if more attention was given to make the book more trendy n new mod edition. Hans Anderson is so popular read that one can't resist a pick of any book that has his tales. An enchanting collection by bedside to read out to kid, any time, any day - A nice Pick 'Content is king' I would say!

4-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book for adults and children
I have always been a fan of the original versions of fairy tales, so I picked this book up a few years ago, just to read for myself. A few weeks ago my six year old found it hidden among my millions of other books, and asked me to read it to her. While easy to read silently, it is a bit hard to get into the rythm of the wording at first, but after stumbling through a few paragraphs, it becomes much easier to handle.

Since the discovery of this book, my children have been requesting stories from it almost every night. At first my three year old complained about the lack of pictures (it really isn't "fully illustrated"), but she quickly got over that and enjoys listening to every story. Both of my older children like to compare these stories to ones they've seen on TV, or read in the few modernized fairy tale books we own (given to us by friends and relatives). Maybe my children are warped - which is very likely - but they prefer the original stories, with their not-so-happy, and often times violent, endings.

I've never been one to believe children need to have their reality padded... real life doesn't always end the way we hoped, so neither should stories. Hopefully this book, and ones like it, will be a bedtime favorite for years to come.

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't even bother.
While I'm sure the stories are great, I can't get past the poor type setting, and cheap paper which is practically newsprint. The words and illustrations bleed through from the next page making reading very difficult. And to make matters worse, the stories are set in a terrible, hard to read font and tight leading. This book is NOT kid-friendly at all.

5-0 out of 5 stars The true story of "The Little Mermaid" will surprise you!
If you remember Thumbelina, The Nightingale, The Ugly Duckling or The Princess and the Pea, they are all here in a wonderful collection of stories written by Hans Christian Anderson. Unlike the Brothers Grimm, who collected and recorded popular tales, Hans Christian Anderson wrote his own "folk" tales, which also contain Danish history and foreign literature.

Not all of his stories end well, yet this is a side of life children should learn about so they can be aware of it later in life. Your child might be horrified to learn that not everything ends up quite as magical as it would in a Disney movie. My favorite tale has always been "The Little Mermaid." She wanted to be something she was not meant to be and for me that is a lesson of how we should be who we really are. She actually ends up not marrying the prince. I quote:

The little mermaid lifted up glorified eyes towards the sun, and felt them, for the first time, filling with tears. On the ship, in which she had left the prince......she saw him and his beautiful bride searching for her; sorrowfully they gazed at the pearly foam, as if they knew she had thrown herself into the waves.

Some of the stories are very moralistic, yet he retains a mischievous sense of humor in some stories. His stories always reflect his fertile imagination. This particular collection was translated by Mrs. H. B. Paull, H. Oskar Sommer, Jean Hersholt and several other unknown translators. Six distinguished artists helped to illustrate this book. These are black and white illustrations and there are not really very many of them. To me a fully illustrated book should be fully illustrated. Nonetheless, this is not a book just for children. In fact, I see this more as a book which should be read to children by their parents. In this way parents and children can discuss items of interest. This book on its own would most likely not appeal to a child, due to the lack of pictures. It is meant to be read to them as far as I can tell. I also would recommend it to adults who remembered these stories as I did and want to read them again.

Perhaps I also remember the story about the tinder box very well. It is a magical story of a soldier who goes into a hollow tree and finds a passage with doors which lead to chambers. It sounds frightening at first but has a lovely happy ending.

Books can take us to another world and this one will take a child to many places they will never forget. And so the first story begins: "Far down in the forest, where the warm sun and the fresh air made a sweet resting place, grew a pretty little fir-tree; and yet it was not happy, it wished so much to be tall like its companions¯the pines and firs which grew around it. The sun shone, and the soft air fluttered its leaves, and......."

2-0 out of 5 stars Expected Better Quality
Andersen and Grimm are supposed to be classics. While I like having the collection and while the illustrations are very nice - the pages themselves are much closer to newspaper-stock than what I'd expect from a durable, long-lasting book. Very thin, gritty, and easily tearable. It was kind of disappointing. This also applies to the Grimm book from the same editor. ... Read more


2. The Book Without Words : A Fable of Medieval Magic
by Avi
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786808292
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: Hyperion
Sales Rank: 6352
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Book Description

In the ancient Northumbrian town of Fulwich, there is an old man whom nobody knows. This man, Thorston by name, has lived a secret life so that he may stay alive--forever. Call him an alchemist but his posession of The Book Without Words contains the secret of immortality.  But to make this secret a reality, he must sacrifice his minion, Odo, a coal-black raven, and Sybil, his thirteen-year-old servant.  Just as Thorton is on the brink of imortality, Sybil decides she wants to live her own life, and Odo wants the gold he believes Thorton as made.  Who then will live, and who will die?  And who will get the gold? ... Read more


3. Crispin : The Cross of Lead
by Avi
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786816589
Catlog: Book (2004-06-01)
Publisher: Hyperion
Sales Rank: 16855
Average Customer Review: 3.97 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The 2003 Newbery Award Winner and New York Times Best-seller. "Avi's latest novel is superb combination of mystery, historical fiction, and a coming-of-age tale... Breathlessly paced, beautifully written, and filled with details of life in the Middle Ages, this compelling novel is one of Avi's finest."-Book Report ... Read more

Reviews (62)

5-0 out of 5 stars Surviving in Medieval England: Crispin, The Cross of Lead
The book Crispin, The Cross of Lead can be defined as a "good book" due to the high literary merit used by Avi. In the book, Avi presents the developed theme of survival. A thirteen-year-old boy, who never knew his father, is alone in the world when his mother dies. All he really knew about himself and his past was that everyone called him Asta's son. He is proclaimed a "wolf's head" and must escape the place he's only ever known and find a way to endure. Before he leaves though, Asta's son discovers his real name is actually Crispin. Through his journey, he meets a man named Bear, and he must also learn to survive as his servant. Both the characters and setting are portrayed in such a way that is realistic for the time period they are representing. The vocabulary Avi utilizes describes how fourteenth century England really existed, especially with the social aspects of the period. Avi's pacing and style of the book is appropriate for the content also. Due to the fact that the book is set during Medieval England, most of the book seems to have a slow steady pace to it, especially when Crispin is walking through the forest. As the story grows with more action the pace quickens for the reader, especially where Crispin becomes stuck in some interesting situations, such as when Crispin is running away from his steward, John Aycliffe, in order to stay alive. Even the dialogue offers insight into the characters and their points of view. For example, Bear at the one point in the story gives Crispin the "freedom to choose" if he will join Bear or not on his journey. All Crispin can say is that he has no choice to decide because Bear is his master. Bear says, "Should not every man be master of himself?" Crispin responded with, "You made me call you master," and so Bear chose for him once again. As the plot thickens however, the reader is always wondering what the outcome will be and try to answer the two main dramatic questions of the story--Will Crispin survive in this harsh era? If so, will he ever find out about his past?

Crispin, The Cross of Lead is an excellent book for grades 4 through 7. Children who appreciate history, especially Medieval England, and value religion would find this book to be extremely enjoyable. Teachers who would like to use this book in their classroom should consider doing a thematic unit on Medieval England. One idea would be that the students could learn about the time period and make food and play games from the 1300's. Another thought would be that the teacher could incorporate math by teaching the students about a number line and have them make time line about Medieval England. The teacher could also teach the students about how the world was different back then in order to integrate science. For the summative assessment, the students could put together a Medieval fair in their classroom or for even the whole school and write an article for their school newspaper about the fair. Also, in a parochial school, teachers could incorporate this book into a theology lesson, especially because of the characters moral beliefs.

5-0 out of 5 stars JD's Book Review
I loved this book, I couldn't put it down.I think that Avi outdid himself."Asta's son" is what he's been called all of his life, but the town's priest tells him that his name is Crispin.One of the most important things to Crispin is that his mother, that is deceased now, had a cross of lead that she gave to him.Well the book goes on to tell that Crispin has been declared a "wolf's head", so this steward named John Aycliffe and his men try to catch Crispin.But he escaped just to a village where he meets a man called Bear.Bear takes Crispin in as an aprentice.They were looking for a town named Great Wexly and they find it.They go to a place called Green Man's Tavern to stay for a while.But if you want to know more about you will have to read it.

3-0 out of 5 stars crispin
The beginning started off slow and boring. Then little by little it got better and better. When Crispin finds out Cerdic lead him into the trap is when the book started to get better. Next Crispin starts is wandering away. Then Crispin finds Bear. Bear was scary in the beginning and nice, father like towards the rest of the book. it starts to get boring until Bear teaches Crispin to play the recorder and performs in the first town. The best part is when they enter Great Wexly. Read the book to find out the rest. The book over all has a good concept. p.s.- The boring parts don't last very long.

3-0 out of 5 stars Crispin
The book Crispin is a great book! It is good because, it keeps you thinking what's going to happen next. Crispin is about a boy named Crispin who is on his own because his mom dies. Throughout the book Crispin tries to figure out who he is. He meets people who help him figure out who he is. One of their names is Bear . He is a big help to Crispin. The author Avi wanted to keep you reading. This book was a little slow in the beginning, but it got really good! I recommend this book to anyone who likes adventure and mystery.

1-0 out of 5 stars Crispin crisping in the fire, by Mark Prior
Crispin could have possibly been the worst book and most boring book that I've ever read. Crispin, a wolf's head, runs away from his town to avoid being executed. He meets a man named Bear who teaches him an instrument so they'll work as a team to earn a few pennies. Then, when the book gets good, it gets boring again. As religious as this book is, God was certainly not with the author when he was writing this book. ... Read more


4. The End of the Beginning : Being the Adventures of a Small Snail (and an Even Smaller Ant)
by Avi
list price: $14.95
our price: $10.47
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0152049681
Catlog: Book (2004-10-01)
Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books
Sales Rank: 9478
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Book Description

Avon the snail has never had an adventure. And adventure, he has heard, is the key to a happy life. So with his new friend Edward the ant, Avon sets out on a journey to find the excitement his life has been missing.

The travelers meet all manner of wise, weird, and intriguing creatures--including a dragon!--and it's not long before their adventures begin.

In the tradition of such classics as The Little Prince, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Winnie-the-Pooh, this completely original story--a modern fable for our time--brims with wit, wisdom, and profound insights about the meaning of things . . . great and small.
... Read more

5. The Jolly Postman
by Allan Ahlberg
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.21
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0316126446
Catlog: Book (2001-09-01)
Publisher: Little, Brown
Sales Rank: 2269
Average Customer Review: 4.95 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Fifteen years ago, long before anyone else thought of tucking actual letters and notes inside a book, Little, Brown published The Jolly Postman by Allan and Janet Ahlberg.This wonderful book gave children a chance to read letters sent from one fairy tale or Mother Goose character to another.Among the funny notes was one from Jack, who lolled on a sun-drenched island, thanking the Giant for the gold that let him afford such a nifty vacation.All this amusing correspondence was deftly illustrated and the book attracted hordes of eager readers. ... Read more

Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Ever wonder what type of junk mail a wicked witch gets?
In this book, the Jolly Postman is delivering the mail to the residents of a quaint fairy tale village, and you get to read all the letters -- even the junk mail! Every other page is an envelope with some type of correspondence tucked inside. The Three Bears get a handwritten apology from Goldilocks, complete with misspellings and invitation to a birthday party. The occupant of Gingerbread Bungalow in The Woods, who happens to be the Wicked Witch, gets an advertising circular from Hobgoblin Supplies Ltd. A certain snout-nosed grandma gets a demand letter addressed to Mr. B.B. Wolf from Miss Riding-Hood's attorney, who also states, "On a separate matter, we must inform you that The Three Little Pigs Ltd. are now firmly resolved to sue for damages. . .all this huffing and puffing will get you nowhere." Some of the funniest moments in this book come from the illustrations of the Jolly Postman stopping for tea with each mail delivery. At the Wicked Witch's cottage, he peruses the newspaper, the Mirror Mirror, while the witch reads her mail and her black cat does the dishes. At Cinderella's castle, he enjoys a glass of champagne poured by Prince Charming, who is still in his honeymoon Hawaiian print shirt and white slacks. This book is perfect for sharing one on one with a child, but if there aren't any children available, it's also amusing for solitary adults.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Jolly Postman or some funny letters
This was one of my favorite books when I was very little. I remember that there was a lot of funny letters, one having to do with a witch. A good book for kids just learning to read or for someone reading to a little kid, I remember my second grade teacher reading this to us.

5-0 out of 5 stars Just impressed!!!
I admit - Im 15 years old, and i just fell in love with this book! It's an original piece, using stories that are familiar to every child. This could be one of the best presents you can give someone.
Very reckmended!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars The BEST book to grow up with
I had this book when i was little and i really liked it! on every page there was some sort of package or letter to a different fairy tale. i believe humpty dumpty had a puzzle and the giant (jack and the beanstalk) had a lot of tiny letters from jack. i would totally reccomend it for any little kid who likes fairy tales!

5-0 out of 5 stars a simple joy
I remember receiving this book for my eighth birthday and fifteen years later the novelty of removing the little letters to all the fairytale characters hasn't worn off.I recently rediscovered the book when a young friend was given it for his birthday and it was wonderful to experience The Jolly Postman through the eyes of a child once again.
This book is an absolute treasure to be enjoyed by children and adults alike,take the opportunity to read this fun creation. ... Read more


6. The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle
by Avi
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0380728850
Catlog: Book (1997-04-01)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 21710
Average Customer Review: 4.54 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A vicious captain, a mutinous crew --
and a young girl caught in the middle

Not every thirteen-year-old girl is accused of murder, brought to trial, and found guilty. But I was just such a girl, and my story is worth relating even if it did happen years ago. Be warned, however: If strong ideas and action offend you, read no more. Find another companion to share your idle hours. For my part I intend to tell the truth as I lived it.

... Read more

Reviews (266)

4-0 out of 5 stars The book was great, I loved it
I have just read the book "The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle" by Avi. This book was both an adventure novel and a mystery. There are three main characters in this book; Charlotte, Captain Jaggery, and Mr. Zachariah. Charlotte is thirteen years old. Before she went on her voyage she attended the Barrington School for girls in Liverpool, England. Captain Andrew Jaggery was a brutal captain to his crew. He also befriended Charlotte in the beginning of the story before she accidentally whipped him in the face. Zachariah was the cook on the ship for awhile until he faked death and lived in the steerage. He also became good friends with Charlotte throughout the whole book. The story takes place in 1832, on a ship called the Seahawk that left Liverpool, England and sailed for Providence, Rhode Island. The book was very interesting. It was about a girl, named Charlotte, who had just finished school and was ready to come home. Her parents got her a boat ride so she could get back to Rhode Island. When she got on the ship everyone seemed very nice, until the crew decided to take avenge on the captain. This is where it started getting hectic. Zachariah faked death they found a stowaway and Charlotte decided to become on of the crew. When she was blamed for murder and found guilty, I got scared. Well, if you want to no the ending read the book yourself. Some of my favorite scenes were with Zachariah in the steerage, because they were talking mostly about what was happening in the book and I could understand it more. I Also liked the scenes because Zachariah was my favorite character. The book was exiting. I would rate it an eight out of ten. I think you would like the book if you like adventures and aren't afraid of reading

5-0 out of 5 stars The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle/a must read
Sahana Rajan 11/23

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle By: Avi
0-53105-893-X

Join Charlotte Doyle on a historical fiction voyage across the Atlantic on the "Seahawk". Piloted by the murderous, yet cunning Captain Jaggery, the "Seahawk" has all of its ups and downs with Miss Doyle on board. During the summer of 1832, Charlotte is to return to America from England in what her father thinks is a posh way. Yet, to his unknowing, there is a huge plot forming in which Charlotte must lose her fancy ways and join as a sailor. At the same time she is accused of murder.
The reason I like this book is probably because the suspense keeps you reading. I would recommend this to any young teen who likes to read. Charlotte is always making puzzles and putting them back together and it's fun to do it with her. Your mind wanders while you read this book- but not off of the book. It wanders to parts of your brain where you can tap into to discover what's happening.

4-0 out of 5 stars Live vicariously through Charlotte!
I first read this book at age 11 when I received it as a birthday present. That was 12 years ago, and I've re-read it many times since then. To a sheltered, suburban kid, the idea of a young girl being thrown into a difficult situation on her own and then making a success of it was thrilling. I loved escaping into the adventure. Unlike most children's books, this one wasn't afraid to throw in some real danger and suspense ... along with important lessons about finding out who your real friends are and being true to yourself.

1-0 out of 5 stars dis book sux
this is the dumbest book i have ever read in my entire life besides the secret garden that book is even dumber the rating that i gave this book is too high. I would have liked to have given it negative stars. If you read this book be prepared to be bored out of your mind for approximately 210 pages. Enjoy! (not really) lol

5-0 out of 5 stars Thrilling High Seas Adventure
The year is 1832, and thirteen-year-old Charlotte Doyle is excited to make an interesting voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, being transported from Liverpool, England, home to her family in Providence, Rhode Island by way of ship. She is lead to believe that other families with children her age will be accompanying her on this trip, as it is improper for a girl of her age to be traveling with a group of men, but when they never show up, she is forced to board by herself, and is soon thrown into a tailspin. Before Charlotte even knows what is going on, she is not only accused of murder, but brought to trial, and found guilty, as well. This is her story. The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, as she lived it.

THE TRUE CONFESSIONS OF CHARLOTTE DOYLE is an amazing work of literary fiction, that will stay with the reader for years and years to come. Charlotte is an intelligent, strong willed, strong minded, and brave young girl, who makes the best of all of the challenges she faces on her journey. She is not afraid of a little hard work, and even enjoys it to a certain extent. Through her adventures she keeps her head up and a smile on her face, just to prove to everyone around her that she can do anything that a man can, and sometimes she can even do it better. A must have book for anyone interested in historical fiction, as this is one of the best.

Erika Sorocco ... Read more


7. The Book of Three (Chronicles of Prydain (Paperback))
by LLOYD ALEXANDER
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440407028
Catlog: Book (1999-01-12)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 3981
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

The tale of Taran, assistant pig keeper, has been entertaining young readers for generations. Set in the mythical land of Prydain (which bears a more than passing resemblance to Wales), Lloyd Alexander's book draws together the elements of the hero's journey from unformed boy to courageous young man. Taran grumbles with frustration at home in the hamlet Caer Dallben; he yearns to go into battle like his hero, Prince Gwydion. Before the story is over, he has met his hero and fought the evil leader who threatens the peace of Prydain: the Horned King.

What brings the tale of Taran to life is Alexander's skillful use of humor, and the way he personalizes the mythology he has so clearly studied. Taran isn't a stick figure; in fact, the author makes a point of mocking him just at the moments when he's acting the most highhanded and heroic. When he and the young girl Eilonwy flee the castle of the wicked queen Achren, Taran emotes, "'Spiral Castle has brought me only grief; I have no wish to see it again.' 'What has it brought the rest of us?' Eilonway asked. 'You make it sound as though we were just sitting around having a splendid time while you moan and take on.'" By the end, Alexander has spun a rousing hero's tale and created a compelling coming-of-age story. Readers will sigh with relief when they realize The Book of Three is only the first of the chronicles of Prydain. --Claire Dederer ... Read more

Reviews (181)

5-0 out of 5 stars Just the beginning....
Like all great fantasy series, the Prydain Chronicles will resonate with you for a long while after you put them down. The Book of Three begins the legendary adventure of Taran, Eilonwy, Fflewddur Flam, Gurgi, Doli, and Gwydion. The heroes are witty, warm, and wise; the villains are frightening, chilling, and insidious. You will laugh and shudder by turns as Taran faces the Death Lord's minions on his search for the cute and prophetic pig, Hen Wen.

Lloyd Alexander's writing is first-rate and grand, like listening to a superb storyteller. His paints a vivid landscape peopled with truly unique characters. There is some argument about similarities with Tolkien, Star Wars, C.S. Lewis' Narnia, etc. Actually, you can take any epic about the battle of good and evil and point fingers, but isn't a good story worth another excellent retelling? This is one those rare treasures you read as a child, and rediscover as an adult again and again.

Why? Besides the lovely writing, the characters aren't simple bystanders or perfect people caught up in the action. They make choices (and mistakes), face consequences, and struggle through personal challenges. It's reality in an unreal setting. In this first book, Taran, in a rush to grow up, leaves his post as Assistant Pig-keeper to become a Hero. Everyone who has ever been an adolescent can relate to wanting to break away. Finding yourself is the hard part, and one aspect of the series is about this universal phase.

But it isn't all Serious and about Learning A Lesson. There is cheeky humor, poked at our valiant, though sometimes too earnest Taran. Things can't go according to the great Hero Plan with Eilonwy cutting him down to size, Doli scoffing at the young 'uns, and Gurgi wanting "munchings and crunchings" all the time. This is one of those books that you will feel ends too soon. Be sure to have the next one close at hand, because The Book of Three is just the beginning once you have tasted Alexander's magic.

5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant fantasy
I have often jokingly told people to read this before reading JRR Tolkein because it's "Hobbit"-lite. But my jest is with all affection. "The Book of Three" is the first of five books (not including the 6th of short stories) involving the fantasy world of Prydain. Lloyd Alexander borrows heavily from Gaelic and Welsh mythology to create the tale of Taran, Assistant Pig-keeper for the enchanter Dallben. In this book we are introduced to Taran, a boy on the cusp of manhood eager to take part in the adventures of the world. Dark forces under the direction of Awran, the Death-Lord threaten the lives of all in Prydain, and none is more feared that the gruesom "Horned King". After leaping "headfirst into a thorn bush" young Taran finds himself face to face with this dreaded champion of darkness who has come from Annuvuin in search of Hen-wen, the oracular pig under Taran's charge. I won't spoil any more of the story except to say that this book introduces many of the characters that appear later on in the rest of the series: the stubborn and lovely Princess Eilonwy, the king-who-wants-to-be-a-bard Fflewder Flam, the cantankerous Doli of the fairfolk, Coll- the warrior turned farmer, and more. Lloyd Alexander's fantasy tale, in my opinion, rivals that of Tolkein as a richly crafted work with wonderful images and a deep understanding and appreciation for the thoughts and feelings of a young man like Taran. The text is easy to read, and the story flows smoothly along. Each book can stand alone, but together create a magnificant epic tapestry. The names of the characters are a little hard to get used to, but not impossible. This is the kind of book you can read out loud at bed-time to young childern. The plot is engaging enough for the little ones and deep enough for adults to appreciate. I recommend this book to just about anyone, and especially for children who are old enough to be reading completely on their own and have reached that point where they are "into" adventures. The best thing about this book (and the series) is that what little violence there is is not glorified, there is no gratuitous sex, and there are morals espoused without sounding preachy. And its the kind of story that girls and boys can enjoy and its perfect for pre-teens and early teens. As the books progress, young teens can "grow" along with Taran, and understand some of his angst. All around, a most excellent novel, and only the begining of a fantastic story...

5-0 out of 5 stars It's Gurgi that sold me, with his crunchings and munchings
Never have I read a series of books that has commanded as much of my attention or affection as Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles. I was a fan before I even read the books, having been told about them by my older brother whose third grade teacher would read them to her class every day after lunch. At the mention of Gurgi's name, and hearing the phrase "crunchings and munchings," I HAD to read this book, and soon thereafter swiped a copy from an aunt.

And the book itself didn't disappoint! Taran leaves the safety of his home to find his runaway pig, only to encounter his hero, Prince Gwydion, and the most terrible warlord in all the land, the Horned King. After he and Gwydion are captured by the evil queen Achren, Taran is joined by the Princess Eilonwy, bard Fflewddur Fflam, and simple-minded creature Gurgi on a quest to warn Gwydion's people of the Horned King's threat.

The excitement continues all the way to the end, Taran becoming older and wiser with each new experience he faces and person he meets. Entertaining for all ages, and a perfect introduction to the land of Prydain. I can't recommend this highly enough.

4-0 out of 5 stars A quality start to a classic series
Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles are one of the key series in children's fantasy literature, walking the fine line between being accessible to young readers and being appealing and engaging enough for adults to enjoy.

The five wonderful books in this series feature an interesting cast of reoccurring characters, all centering on Taran, a pig keeper destined for great things. Others, including a stereotypical spoiled princess, a crazed Gollum-like creature, and a hapless bard, take part in a series of increasingly epic adventures.

Because Alexander drew his stories from ancient myths and legends, the themes and situations always feel familiar. These will feel like stories you've read many times before, but never in a tiresome way. They're "comfortable." And that's a welcome trait, especially when so many books try so hard to be different.

This first volume if five, "The Book of Three," is probably the weakest of the series (though it is by no means bad, or even average). Taran seems to get caught up in his adventure rather too easily, and initially, before we become comfortable with the characters, some of them are a little grating. Gurgi is almost a downright annoyance.

But then the story really kicks into gear and develops into a nice adventure tale, setting the stage for the better Prydain books to come later. What "The Book of Three" does best is put in place the pieces of the great big puzzle that is put together throughout the next four books.

And who couldn't love the delightful early stages of Taran and Eilonwy's relationship? Delightful and funny is every way. Children will relate to the characters and the way they pick on each other, while adults will smile knowingly as Alexander winks and nods.

The writing is direct and lively throughout, and the pacing absolutely perfect. Just when one suspects a lull in the action is looming, Alexander races us forward and advances the adventure some more. Things are always progressing, always pushing forward, offering a tale that one is hard-pressed to put down.

One of the great joys of this series is the steady progression from pure children's fantasy to more adult themes and a grimmer, more mournful tone, allowing the reader to grow along with the characters. The first book does not well reflect the last. What begins as a light fantasy becomes very serious. And that is a good thing.

"The Book of Three" and the rest of the Prydain Chronicles are recommended reading for anyone who enjoys fantasy, especially classic children's fantasy.

1-0 out of 5 stars this book is a literary bomb
Ok, just because the Lord of the Rings is the definitive fantasy novel DOES NOT mean that all of the fantasy books have to be just like Lord of the Rings. Theoretically, Lloyd Alexander took a great book, changed a few names, a few words, cut out 1,000 pages, and called it The Book of Three, which he, then, made x amount of dollars in.
here i will compare Alexanders "dark pond" or gloomy, or whatever it was, with Tolkiens entrance to Moria scene-
now come on, how pathetic can you get, and I know both came from mythology, but if your writing with a line of mythology ITS OK to stray from the myths once and a while! though having not read mythology, i do not know the roots of this particular article in question, but do know that Alexander could have done something to interest us, and to keep us from wanting to pick up The Felloship ... Read more


8. The High King (Chronicles of Prydain (Paperback))
by LLOYD ALEXANDER
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440435749
Catlog: Book (1999-01-12)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 8421
Average Customer Review: 4.81 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Since The Book of Three was first published in 1964, young readers have been enthralled by the adventures of Taran the Assistant Pig-keeper and his quest to become a hero. Taran is joined by an engaging cast of characters that includes Eilonwy, the strong-willed and sharp-tongued princess; Fflewddur Fflam, the hyperbole-prone bard; the ever-faithful Gurgi; and the curmudgeonly Doli--all of whom become involved in an epic struggle between good and evil that shapes the fate of the legendary land of Prydain.

Released over a period of five years, Lloyd Alexander's beautifully written tales not only captured children's imaginations but also garnered the highest critical praise. The Black Cauldron was a Newbery Honor Book, and the final volume in the chronicles, The High King, crowned the series by winning the Newbery Medal for "the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children."

Henry Holt is proud to present this classic series to a new generation of young readers. Jackets have been handsomely redesigned while retaining the original art of Caldecott Medal-winning artist Evaline Ness. Each retypeset volume now includes a pronunciation guide prepared by Lloyd Alexander. A companion book of short stories, The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain, is also available in hardcover for the first time in twenty years.

In their more than thirty years in print, the Chronicles of Prydain have become the standard of excellence in fantasy literature for children.
... Read more

Reviews (106)

5-0 out of 5 stars The ending of the Prydan Chronocles
The High King is a Newbery award winner in a series of 5 books (The High King is last book in the series). Starting with the mystical and astonishing book The Book of Three, this series builds over time and forces the reader to read these books again after time. The book starts off with Taran, once a cowardly assistant pig keeper. After the other books he develops the skills needed for a warrior, and is now grown up into a majestic character with the other characters met and discovered in the other books. The saddest and dreadful book in the series, the story must end, and main characters that played an important role are enforced in this book, ending the series once and for all. This book is the final attack made towards the Death Lord, and seals the paths for epilogues, but leaves room for the past to be revealed. The series read together make a great connection towards each other, and answers all unanswered questions that remain in the readers' head. This adventure plots all the characters from previous journeys, and makes a perilous excursion for the fantasy readers. Just like any series, what happens in the past controls the future. This book, read with the series or alone, provides adventure for any age. The fantasy based book implanted on the fundamentals of a welsh legend shows how people can react sometimes, or how much their customs make notice in front of intelligence and common sense.

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful conclusion to an excellent series

I've loved Lloyd Alexander's classic series ever since I read "The Book of Three" in elemantary school. A well-chosen Christmas gift from my parents ensured that I got my hands on the next four books, concluding with "The High King".

One of the strengths of this series is that the characters learn and grow from one book to the next; it's great to see Taran from "The Book of Three", who reminds me rather of myself at that age (*grin*) grow up to take the responsibilities he has earned by the end of "The High King".

Alexander's use of Welsh mythology is excellent and for the most part right on target, though Arawn isn't quite as malevolent a figure in myth as he is in the Chronicles of Prydain, and the Gwydion of the Mabinogion is as much a trickster as he is a hero. (This isn't really a criticism; these are books for children, and I know that making Arawn and Gwydion more ambiguous characters would have confused me when I was younger.) The Triple Goddess, the people of Twylyth Teg, the people of Llyr--they're all here, forming a seamless and very real-feeling backdrop to the main characters' adventures.

Older readers may be interested in checking out the Mabinogion, the main body of Welsh myth that has survived the ages, after finishing this series. Gwyn Thomas and Kevin Crossley-Holland's "Tales from the Mabinogion" is an excellent edition to try, with beautiful illustrations.

Overall, the Chronicles of Prydain remain among my favorite stories, with "The High King" the best of the lot. I highly recommend them.

5-0 out of 5 stars I'm waiting for this to become a movie...
Others have summed up how good this book, and indeed, the whole Chronicles of Pyrdain series is -- I heartily agree. What I would like to see is the series translated into film. It would be marvelous -- kind of like a combination of Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings!

5-0 out of 5 stars Not just the best of the series, but my favorite book ever
This book is it. The climax. The payoff. The ultimate battle between good and evil, with a conclusion that moves me more than any other I've ever read.

The story starts with Taran and Gurgi reuniting with Eilonwy, Rhun, Fflewddur and Gwydion, only to learn that Gwydion's enchanted sword has been stolen by Arawn Death-Lord himself. They set out to find it, but soon realize that not only the sword, but all of Prydain is at stake.

Armies are rallied by both sides, battles are fought on a scale never seen in the previous books, and all the characters previously introduced return to take sides in the conflict.

Betrayal, greed and defeat are countered with courage, loyalty and sacrifice (watch Fflewddur in particular) time and time again. The price required to destroy the powers of evil is never higher, everyone loses something dear to them, many don't survive, and the land of Prydain will never be the same again.

When I re-read this in college I was surprised to learn that this was considered children's literature; the book's power only grows with the passage of time, and while it can be understood by children, its mark of greatness lies in its ability to resonate with readers of all ages.

This book could conceivably stand on its own, though reading the previous four books first is highly recommended. Doing so only adds to the power of this, the capstone of a beautiful series.

5-0 out of 5 stars Among the best fantasies ever
If ever there was a closing volume of a series that never failed to disappoint, and in fact was so good it raised the quality of every book that came before it, it is "The High King," the last book in Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles.

The Prydain Chronicles is a key series in children's fantasy literature, walking the fine line between being accessible to young readers while being appealing and engaging enough for adults to enjoy. Here in "The High King," that shows itself in spades. This is a serious work comparable to anything the fantasy genre has to offer. While appropriate for children, this is hardly "children's fantasy."

The action here is epic, larger in scope than anything seen in the series before. Sprawling armies clash. Wars are fought. People die. Its grim and serious stuff - but amazingly wholly suitable for readers of all ages.

All of our favorite characters come back for their final appears in this last volume. Taran, now grown and brave and confident, is among those to lead the charge in the final clash between ultimate good and ultimate evil. The fate of all of Prydain hangs in the balance as Arawn Death-Lord prepares to lay siege to all. The others return, too, including Eilonwy, the stereotypical spoiled princess, Gurgi, the crazed Gollum-like creature, and Fflewddur Fflam, the hapless bard who is prone to exaggeration.

One of the great joys of the Chronicles is the progress from lighthearted fantasy to adult themes and a grim tone. By the end, you feel as if the characters have taken a lifetime of journeys, learning from them as they went. It all culminates here, with joy, sadness, pain, death, and sacrifice mixing together to form a classic adventure tale.

Because Alexander draws his stories from ancient myth, these feel like stories you've read many times before - yet that never comes across in a tiresome way. It's a story that operates in a welcome comfort zone, nice in a time when so many books try so hard to be different solely for the sake of being different.

The Prydain Chronicles, and "The High King" especially, is recommended reading for anyone who enjoys fantasy, especially classic children's fantasy. Classic stuff in every way. ... Read more


9. The Black Cauldron (Chronicles of Prydain (Paperback))
by LLOYD ALEXANDER
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440406498
Catlog: Book (1999-01-12)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 5728
Average Customer Review: 4.87 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Peace reigns in Caer Dallben, where Taran works as Assistant Pig-Keeper, but evil threatens the rest of Prydain.The diabolical Arawn's army grows every day, and his terrible warriors never die.They are born in the Black Cauldron from the stolen bodies of slain soldiers.If evil is to be defeated, the cauldron must be destroyed.Taran volunteers to travel to Arawn's stronghold and assist in the destruction of the dreaded cauldron.With his faithful friends reassembled, Taran marches off to facegreat danger with a courageous heart. ... Read more

Reviews (84)

4-0 out of 5 stars Hi pot? It's kettle. You're black.
The best known title of any of the books in the Prydain Chronicles (owing, probably, to that horrendous Disney movie from the 1980s). In this beautifully woven tale, we return once more to meet Taran the Assistant Pig-Keeper of Caer Dallben. With his faithful crew in tow (Eilonwy, Gurgi, Fflewddur Fflam, Doli, etc.) as well as new companions, Taran sets off to find and destroy the legendary Black Cauldron.

Unlike the first book in this series, this story is beset by some small inconsistencies that hurt its storytelling. At the end of the first book, Taran's hot head had been cooled by actual battle. He understood what it meant to go to war, and was happy to return and stay at Caer Dallben once more. Unfortunately, Taran goes right back to square one in this newest adventure. Again he is the same rambunctious unthinking adolescent he was before. I'm not saying this is necessarily an inaccurate portrait of an adolescent. Just disappointing. It would be nice to see Taran growing a little wiser with each book.

Still, there is much to love in this story. Taran finally meets a boy that rivals and beats him in quick thoughtless action. Flewddur the bard is still abandoning his kingdom to go fight and play the harp. Princess Eilonwy is just as feisty as ever. It's a wonder to think that even though this series was written at the same time as Britain's "White Mountains" chronicles, this particular group of books stands out for its far-sighted take on women and their abilities. Eilonwy may not be invited to the men's war councils, but she objects heartily to the fact. She fights as well as any (considering her circumstances) and is always of great help to others. It's funny, but you can't help wondering how Taran keeps ending up in the company of so many members of royalty (Eilonwy, Fflewddur, Gwydion, etc.). They seem to be as numerous as the leaves of spring.

In the end, "The Black Cauldron" (why wasn't it named "The Black Crochan" as the book calls it?) is a worthy, if slightly less impressive, successor to "The Book of Three". Readers who decide to start the series with this book will have little difficulty catching up with the action at hand. It is an enjoyable story that deserves to be remembered in the hearts and minds of fantasy lovers everywhere.

5-0 out of 5 stars Facing fate(s) in the Marshes of Morva
This is one of the best of Alexander's Prydain series--definitely an improvement over _The Book of Three_, which was pretty good itself. Once again, Taran has to make tough choices between seeking fame as a hero or just trying to get the job done. His quest for the Black Cauldron, which can be used to reanimate the bodies of slain warriors to create an army of invulnerable zombies and thus must be destroyed if the power of Arawn Death-Lord (i.e., Sauron) is to be broken, takes him and his companions to the Marshes of Morva for a rendezvous with Alexander's offbeat version of the three Fates, one of whom, Orgoch, has some disturbing culinary tastes. As so often happens in Alexander, Taran can win the Cauldron only by giving up his most precious possession. Will he make the sacrifice? And what will he choose? Read this exciting, moving, and thought-provoking adventure to find out.

5-0 out of 5 stars The movie can't be compared to this masterpiece
After getting a taste of adventure in "The Book of Three," Taran once again has an appetite for going out and doing heroic things. And the timing couldn't be better, for his childhood hero Prince Gwydion has invited him to help in stealing a bewitched cauldron from Arawn Death-Lord.

Along with the feisty Princess Eilonwy, impetuous bard Fflewddur, simple-minded Gurgi, and gruff dwarf Doli, Taran is joined by two new and very opposite characters: Adaon and Ellidyr. Both have very different ideas about honor, and Taran is forever changed by what he learns from them.

Rounding out the cast of new characters are the delightful enchantresses Orddu, Orwen and Orgoch, as well as the melancholy Gwystyl and proud King Morgant. There's more to all of them than meets the eye.

Taran's quest teaches him more about honor, goodness, sacrifice and loyalty than he ever bargained for. Next to "The High King," I consider this to be the most powerful book in all the Prydain Chronicles.

5-0 out of 5 stars Young fantasy has never been better
Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles are one of the key series in children's fantasy literature, walking a fine line: They are both accessible to young readers and appealing and engaging enough for adults to enjoy.

The five wonderful books in this series feature an interesting cast of characters. Most of the action centers on Taran, a pig keeper destined for great things. Others, including a stereotypical spoiled princess, a crazed Gollum-like creature, and a hapless bard, take part in a series of increasingly epic adventures.

"The Black Cauldron" is probably the best known of the series (in part due to Disney's unfortunate film of the book). In this volume, Taran and friends return, this time to face a terrible evil that can spread lifeless hordes across the land. Old faces return, new bad guys appear, and the world of Prydain is further expanded in this classic addition to a classic series.

Because Alexander draws his stories from ancient myth and legend, the themes and situations always feel familiar, like stories you've read many times before - but never in a tiresome way. They're "comfortable." And that's a welcome trait, especially when so many books try so hard to be different.

The writing is direct and lively throughout (though darker in tone that the first book), and the pacing absolutely perfect. Just when one suspects a lull in the action is looming, Alexander surges us forward and advances the story some more. Things are always pushing forward, offering a tale that one is hard-pressed to put down.

One of the great joys of this series is the steady progression from pure children's fantasy to more adult themes and a grimmer, more mournful tone, allowing the reader to grow along with the characters. The first book does not well reflect the last. What begins as a light fantasy becomes very serious. That is a good thing and is very much on display here.

"The Black Cauldron" is hailed as a classic of young fantasy for a reason. It and the rest of the Prydain Chronicles are recommended reading for anyone who enjoys fantasy, especially classic children's fantasy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellente!
Except the fact that was pretty slow at times, I still loved it! ... Read more


10. A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography)
by David A. Adler, Samuel Byrd, Holiday House Paper
list price: $6.95
our price: $6.26
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0823412059
Catlog: Book (1995-10-01)
Publisher: Holiday House
Sales Rank: 142740
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Not just for Elementary School Students
This text is geared toward an elementary audience. It is a quite comprehensive look at Douglass' life. It could easily be used to illustrate that slaves did not only work on plantations in the south, but in cities hired out as laborers. It would be an excellent introduction for the abolitionist movement and other events leading to the U.S. Civil War. Students enjoy being read to from these types of texts, but remember to give them something to do while listening. Have students complete an undated timeline of his life. Then utilize these timelines to discuss the main ideas of the text with students. (Possibly using the timeline notes graphic organizer from Jim Burke's Tools for Thought

5-0 out of 5 stars A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass
A great book with which to incorporate children's literature with social studies instruction. Political Science is just one discipline of the social studies and as such can be taught effectively in early childhood classrooms. Books like this one about Frederick Douglass demonstrate how individuals sought to secure rights for all people and were willing to violate unjust laws in the process. ... Read more


11. Hug
by Jez Alborough
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0763615765
Catlog: Book (2001-10-01)
Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
Sales Rank: 6213
Average Customer Review: 4.81 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (37)

5-0 out of 5 stars My daughter knows how to give a HUG!
I am a mother of 1 year old. My daughter likes the book very much. She hands it to me at least 2 or 3 times after I read several times to her. THere is only one word HUG in the book and I have to make up a story for her. I enjoy doing so. Every time after saying HUG I give her a hug. After trying a few times, she knows how to give me a HUG! The feeling is wonderful! Also, the pictures in the book is beautiful. Must buy!

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect for Preschool
Once again, Alborough does a fantastic job with his child-friendly illustrations. This simple one-word picture book invites preschoolers to read ALONE and takes them on a baby monkey's adventure to find his own mother's 'hug.' Sweet, inviting, and most importantly, an independent read for pre-emergent readers, I highly recommend it to teachers and parents of young children.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sweet, simple story with precious illustrations
Parents wil find this a more interactive book to read w/ their children, because most of the text just says "Hug!" but it's the illustrations of this baby chimp and other African animals that tell the story.

The little ape sees other animals (esp. mommy animals and baby animals) hugging, and wants a hug, too.

There will be a lot of pointing, "look at the hippos! look at the zebras!" and lots of hugs when this story is read. Very sweet, and a great goodnight story to read to your kids.

5-0 out of 5 stars THIS BOOK IS AWESOME
I read this book to my 2 year old every night & she loves it. In fact, when it's time to go to bed we say, "Are you ready to go see Bobo?" and she runs to the door yelling "BOBO BOBO". She knows the whole story I have made up to go along with it and says it along with me. The illustrations are clear and she loves picking out the animals and telling me the sounds they make. Most of all, she loves it when Bobo and his mommy are reunited.

5-0 out of 5 stars totally loveable
I love this book. We checked it out at the library and my little 14 month old won't let me put it down. Since there are only three words that are repeated through the whole book, my 4 and 5 year olds love to "read" it, also. The story line is simple and sweet. We've already had to renew this book three times from the library and I've decided to just buy it. ... Read more


12. Snowflake Bentley (Caldecott Medal Book)
by Jacqueline Briggs Martin
list price: $16.00
our price: $10.88
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0395861624
Catlog: Book (1998-09-28)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Sales Rank: 1620
Average Customer Review: 4.54 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Most children are captivated by snow, but how many go on to make it theirlifework? This beautiful biography, winner of the 1999 Caldecott Medal, tells the true story of a Vermont farm boy who was mesmerized by snowflakes. Wilson Bentley was fascinated by the six-sided frozen phenomena, and once he acquired a microscope with a camera, his childhood preoccupation took on a more scientific leaning. Bentley spent his life taking countless exquisite photographs (many that are still used in nature photography today), examining the tiny crystals and their delicate, mathematical structures. Jacqueline Briggs Martin tells this tale with simple, graceful prose that will engage children's imaginations. Edifying and snowflake-scattered sidebars offer more information about Bentley's methods and snowflake science. The artwork of Mary Azarian, whose 19th-century hand-press illustrations decorate the charming Barn Cat,shines once again in Snowflake Bentley, with woodcuts that reveal an appreciation for detail as well as for the man who loved snow. The lovely illustrations and equally fresh text will inspire and comfort youngsters (and grownups too) who wish they could capture snowflakes all year long. (Ages 4 to 8) --Brangien Davis ... Read more

Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Review of Snowflake Bentley
I really enjoyed reading the story of Snowflake Bentley. Jacqueline Briggs Martin does an excellent job of telling the accomplishments of Willian Bentley in a way that is exciting and entertaining to children. Snow brings much excitment to all children, they love playing in it and sledding so to read about a man who dedicated his life to snowflakes is fascinating. This story shows how hard Wilson Bentley worked to show the world what he loved. This story gives a great example to children, the kids see that with hard work you can accomplish whatever you want. Snowflake Bentley is not like any biography I have read before, it gives justice to William Bentley's accomplishments but written in a story like form that will interests the children. The facts on the side of each page are a great additive of information as well.

5-0 out of 5 stars The story of Wilson Bentley and snowflakes.
This children's book, illustrated by Mary Azarian, won the 1999 Caldecott Medal for best illustrations in a book for children. It is the story of Wilson A. Bentley (1865-1931) of Jericho, Vermont, who had a passion for studying snowflakes. Having developed a technique for photographing snowflakes, he spent years collecting and giving lectures in the midst of running his farm: a true farmer-scientist. He even wrote a text called Snow Crystals. He noted the six sidedness of most crystals and a few three-sided. One wonders what he would have said upon hearing that some researchers in the late 1990s had found two identical snowflakes since he had never been able to find two that were alike. This book is a celebration not only of the man but of our love and interest in the natural world. Children will enjoy this book with its magnificent woodcuts immensely.

4-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book & idea -- throw a Snowflake Bentley party!
My son (7) thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was his first biography and he was very interested to learn about the farmer-scientist who loved snow. We were lucky enough to attend a Family Day at the National Museum of American History (Wash DC) where the author read the story and told the gathered families about writing, editing and publishing a book. The museum staff then had snowflake & microscope activities for children to enjoy.

My son was so inspired and excited by the story and the day's events that he suggested, when reading the book in mid January, that we throw a "Snowflake Bentley" party. We picked Feb 9th, Wilson Bentley's birthday, and invited all the neighborhood kids over. A couple of parents read the book and then kids either cut out or painted snowflakes. We had a copy of Wilson Bentley's book available so they could see all the different snowflakes he photographed. We ate cake decorated in a snowflake pattern.

It was a great way to share this wonderful book. Many of the kids requested to borrow the book afterwards.

4-0 out of 5 stars Snowflake Bentley
...I chose Snowflake Bentley for my Caldecott Presentation in Childrens Literature. This book gives children a rich history lesson in a personal and meaningful way. It helps children to become better acquainted with a important person and learn the reasoning behind what he was interested in. The book also gives little facts on the sides of every page which are interesting to look over. I recommend this book for children and parents to read to their children.

2-0 out of 5 stars How do they figure the Caldecott Award?
Of all the children's books I have borrowed/read, this has to be one of the best bedtime stories. I was yawning by page two, and I wasn't even tired. My daughter was looking around the room & sighing while I read it. Do the Caldecott judges keep children in mind when they award these books?

While I can appreciate the idea of living your dream, no matter the cost, the "tale" itsself was drawn out, boring and choppy. The story could have been told & illustrated with *much* more whimsy, for such an interesting fellow/life. I can imagine what a great book this could have been. ... Read more


13. Fairy Tales
by Hans Christian Andersen, JackieWullschlager
list price: $27.95
our price: $19.01
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0670033774
Catlog: Book (2005-03-24)
Publisher: Viking Adult
Sales Rank: 21353
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A gawky, dreamy boy, Hans Christian Andersen grew up to become a profoundly imaginativewriter and storyteller who revolutionized literature for children. Andersen gave us the nowstandard versions of some traditional folk tales as well as original stories that have enchantedgenerations of readers. To commemorate the bicentennial of his birth, Viking will publish a newtranslation of thirty of his extraordinary tales, illustrated with Andersen’s own paper cuts. From theexuberant early stories such as "The Tinderbox" and "The Emperor’s New Clothes" throughpoignant masterpieces such as "The Little Mermaid" and "The Ugly Duckling," to darker, moresubversive later tales written for adults, the stories here are endlessly experimental, humorousand irreverent, sorrowful and strange. Tiina Nunnally’s sparkling new translation captures—for thefirst time in English—the vibrancy of Andersen’s voice. Compiled by Andersen’s biographerJackie Wullschlager, who also contributes notes and a captivating introduction, this volume will bea major literary event that will dazzle readers young and old. ... Read more

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars The stories sparkle!
We just got this book for my 8 year old daughter and I've been reading the stories to her.This book shows what a truly great story teller Hans Christian Anderson was!His stories sparkle!When I first got the book I was disappointed because the pictures are not at all spectacular.Upon reading the stories, the pictures don't matter at all.Anderson paints the pictures in your mind and you are just transported into his stories.The words are the pictures.My daughter and I are both enjoying this wonderful literature!I highly recommend the book to anyone wanting to introduce their child to truly wonderful classics.

5-0 out of 5 stars This really is the best!
I've read several versions of many of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales; since I also read Danish, I can confirm that this is definitely the closest to his style of any translation I've ever seen. Nothing is added, nothing is omitted, and all his unique strangeness shines through in English at last.

Andersen was the first Danish author to break out of the mold of both neoclassicism and romanticism which preceded him, and his genius lay in writing as if he were telling the stories out loud to a group of children -- in the earlier, simpler tales -- and in capturing all the sorrow and joy of life in his later tales for adults. You may think you know these stories (no, there are no singing crabs in "The Little Mermaid," one of the more painful stories you will ever read), but you're in for a big surprise. Finally a translator who dares NOT to rewrite, explain, and simplify Hans Christian Andersen! Truly a magnificent edition in celebration of the author's bicentennial on April 2, 2005. (Read the biography by Jens Andersen too, it's a real eye-opener.) ... Read more


14. Poppy (rpkg) (Poppy Books)
by Avi
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0380727692
Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 33812
Average Customer Review: 4.55 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

King of the Night

At the very edge of Dimwood Forest stood an old charred oak where, silhouetted by the moon, a great horned owl sat waiting. The owls name was Mr. Ocax, and he looked like death himself. With his piercing gaze, he surveyed the lands he called his own, watching for the creatures he considered his subjects. Not one of them ever dared to cross his path. . .until the terrible night when two little mice went dancing in the moonlight. . . ... Read more

Reviews (80)

5-0 out of 5 stars Very interesting story with lots of action.
The book we were reading in class was Poppy. The author of Poppy is Avi. This book was about a mouse and her family who are trying to get to New House because where they live now there is not enough food left. A big owl named Mr.Ocax is stopping them by telling them lies about New House and chasing them away. I enjoyed this book because presonification is when a non real thing plays a human role. I also enjoyed this book because Avi used personification and made it more real to read than if it was written with real animals . My most favorite part was when poppy killed Mr.Ocax because he is a cruel mean Owl and he ate Ragweed. I would give this book 5 stars because It has a lot of action and presonification. I would recommend It to third grade and up because it has a lot of big words.

4-0 out of 5 stars Review of Poppy
Do you like exciting adventure books? Well if you do, the book Poppy would be a great book for you.

This book is about a little mouse named Poppy who is trying to save her family from starving to death. She has all sorts of adventures like when she goes in to the forest where very few mice have come back alive to tell about it. Also, she almost gets eatin by a flesh eating owl named Mr. Ocax and when she was trying to cross a river she fell in and almost drownd to death. Mr. Ocax made a deal with the mice that he will protect them from other dangerous creatures if he becomes the ruler of their town and they have to ask him if he can cross the land. Poppy didn't and this is why she almost ended up being dinner for the owl.

Poppy's family has over 100 mice and they are running out of food so Poppy has to go through all sorts of danger just to find a new home for her family.

I liked this book because once the chapter was done I wanted to read the next chapter. The first night I read it I ended up reading half the book. Also, this book kept my attention all the way through and that is very unlikly to happen with books.

This book is a easy finder and I got it for a low $5.99. If you want to know what ends up happening to Poppy and her family go get this book at the nearest book store.

4-0 out of 5 stars Poppy
There is a mouse called Poppy. She and her boyfriend, Ragweed go up to a hill to dance. An owl called Mr.Ocax and he says that he owns the lands which the mice live on and that he protects them from porcupines. Mr.Okax is really a big fat liar. Poppy and Ragweed don't ask for permission so Mr. Okax flys out of the tree that he's in and comes down and trys to take poppy. He misses and skraches her nose...........

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book ever
The Best Book Ever

If you want funny, thrilling, and exciting all at once, well I can give you it all in the book Poppy. It was thrilling because when Poppy the mouse fought with the mean old owl Mr. Ocax I was sure he was going to when, but she did. When she fell into the river I was sure she would drown, but she didn't. She stabbed the quill into Mr.Ocax and hung from it in the air I thought he would pull it of, but he didn't I think it was funny because Ragweed never talk normally and the lazy Tom Cat was so tired that he didn't eat Poppy witch mot cats do! It was exciting when Poppy killed Mr. Oacx, and when he thought the fake owl was real. You really should read Poppy because when you open the book fun and adventure

5-0 out of 5 stars The Greatest Book
The book Curse of the Mummy is thrilling funny and a little quirky. Odie the dog gets called Dodo Dog by two boys and sir droll by Garfield. One mummy came to life and almost killed Garfield and Odie. A fake mummy wears a clownish mask with a gold nose that has power. This book will make you learn a bit of Egypt and if you have a test you'll do well. Also, it will make you go to the history museum. ... Read more


15. My Five Senses (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 1)
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 006445083X
Catlog: Book (1989-09-21)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 24272
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

How do you learn what the world is like?

Through your five senses! Each sound and taste, each smell, sight, and touch helps you to discover something new. So find out more about your senses-what they are and what you can learn through them about the exciting world.The world awaits!

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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Straightforward, engaging introduction to the 5 senses
My 5 year old son absolutely adores this book. He asks me to read it repeatedly, and has fun pointing out when he's using his senses just like the (adorably illustrated) child in Aliki's book does. It's a lively, fun introduction to an important scientific concept.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not to be confused with Aliki's "My Five Senses"
Margaret Miller's book is a simple introduction to the five senses which young children can easily understand and relate to. I use it in teaching the concept of the five senses to my English as a Second Language kindergarten students. Miller presents each sense with the related body parts, which makes it easier for children to understand the sometimes complicated idea of what a "sense" is. For example, "With my eyes, I see..." and then she gives examples. The book is illustrated with Miller's photos of children of different ethnicities, and the items they are seeing, smelling, etc are relevant to most children's experience. My students used this book as a starting point to make their own books about the five senses. As a teacher, I recommend this book to anyone looking for a way to introduce some science content to little ones.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Five Senses
Appealing pictures accompany a straight forward text. "Sometimes I use all my senses at once...When I laugh and play with my puppy, I use four senses. I see, hear, smell and touch...each sense is very important to me because it makes me aware. To be aware is to see all there is to see...hear all there is to hear...[etc]." I like the progression from simple statements to more complex ideas, especially the use of the word 'aware'. How many early readers are aware of the word 'aware' and connect it to their senses? After reading this book, they all will! ... Read more


16. More Parts (Picture Puffins)
by Tedd Arnold
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0142501492
Catlog: Book (2003-10-01)
Publisher: Puffin Books
Sales Rank: 24434
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Give me a hand . . . hold your tongue . . . scream your lungs out . . . what's a kid to do if he wants to keep all his body parts in place?Well, one thing is for sure, he'll have to be creative.Like, if you want to keep your heart from breaking, just make sure it's well padded and protected by tying a pillow around your chest.Want to keep your hands attached?Simple-stick them on with gloves and lots of glue.Just be careful not to laugh your head off! ... Read more

Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic for both kids and parents
For kids (5 years old and up), it helps them to understand how language/idioms/cliches/phrases can be used. For parents, it's one of the funniest kids' books I've read.

One thing to note, though: you'll probably have to explain what's going on to your kids. I have a very bright 5-year-old, and she didn't get what was happening (although I was ROTFL). But once I explained it, the book made more sense and she really enjoyed the book. So don't expect to simply read it to your kids and think that they'll "get it", unless your kids are much older.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dealing with pain and confusion
This book tells the story of a small boy who is quite confused over the things people say- -everyone around him always seems to be saying the scariest things, and it's making him upset. One day, he accidentally breaks his red truck, and his mother tells him that it must have broken his heart. He takes his mother's words literally, and then sets to worrying about all the other upsetting things that people say, like hold your tongue, and cry your lungs out. Finally, his mother explains the meanings of these phrases so that the boy can find something else to worry about. The story is quite cute and may provoke a lot of thought in young minds about words and language. The book might also be a good one to read to youngster who is bereaved over breaking something. It has about 450 words.

5-0 out of 5 stars Continued Greatness!
This book continues the wonderful, simplistic animation the original delivered if not better. The first and this one a must for any child.
A funtastic read!

5-0 out of 5 stars Idioms for Fifth Graders
This rollicking story is a great way to reinforce the meaning and use of idioms in a fifth grade classroom. My English Language Learner students really appreciated the humor and identified with the problems faced by the boy in the story. Mrs. Power's fifth graders give this book 5 stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars Way Too Funny!!!
If you have a child in the 4-6 year old range you must read this book! My son read it in pre-K last year and borrowed it so often from his teacher that we just bought one. It shows how literally children can take everything we say. And if you like the one be sure to read "More Parts"! ... Read more


17. Goodbye House (Moonbear Books)
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0671679279
Catlog: Book (1989-05-01)
Publisher: Aladdin
Sales Rank: 81959
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

2-0 out of 5 stars Cute but incomplete book about saying goodbye
The little bear says goodbye to his old house. But the book is about an ENDING in life, and doesn't talk about the BEGINNING of what's to come. This book is sad, I think.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!
When we planned our cross country move I purchased several children's books that dealt with the subject to read to my two children. This was our favorite. It is a heart warming story about saying goodbye to the house but not to the happy memories. We even walked around our empty house after the moving van had left to say goodbye just as the bear family does in Goodbye House. I am filled with happy memories of our old home every time I read it.

5-0 out of 5 stars simple plot, but it hooked my 2-year old
The plot of _Goodbye House_: Baby Bear and his parents have packed up the moving van. Baby Bear realizes he has forgotten something, so Baby Bear, Mama Bear, and Papa Bear venture back inside.

But the house is empty! Father bear then says, "But what about the memories?" Papa then carries baby bear around the house, and they say goodbye to each room, to the walls and ceilings, and in the back yard they say goodbye to the fence, and other objects.

After they leave the house and lock the front door, they get back in the moving van and drive away. Baby bear exclaims that he realizes he forgot to say 'goodbye.'

It's a touching book, and it's easy to animate your voice a little bit to make the book funny and playful.

I know you're thinking there's not much to the plot, but my 2 year old son (he was 20 months when we first started reading this book) just LOVES it. When I tell it, I give papa bear's voice a really rough edge, a deep sound, and a New York accent. My son now joins in with me when I bust out with "What about the memories" like an actor in a gangster film. He roars with laughter. And when we're done reading the book, he usually wants me to read it one more time.

I heartily recommend _Goodbye House_ to any families with toddlers, 18 months to 3 years. I also recommend it to any families with children aged 18 months to 5 years who are moving to a new house.

The paperback version is SO inexpensive. For a few dollars more you can add this to your amazon book order. You won't be disappointed.

ken32. ... Read more


18. The Castle of Llyr (Chronicles of Prydain (Paperback))
by LLOYD ALEXANDER
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440411254
Catlog: Book (1999-01-12)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 8828
Average Customer Review: 4.88 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Since The Book ofThree was first published in 1964, young readers have been enthralled by the adventures of Taran the Assistant Pig-keeper and his quest to become a hero. Taran is joined by an engaging cast of characters that includes Eilonwy, the strong-willed and sharp-tongued princess; Fflewddur Fflam, the hyperbole-prone bard; the ever-faithful Gurgi; and the curmudgeonly Doli--all of whom become involved in an epic struggle between good and evil that shapes the fate of the legendary land of Prydain.

Released over a period of five years, Lloyd Alexander's beautifully written tales not only captured children's imaginations but also garnered the highest critical praise. The Black Cauldron was a Newbery Honor Book, and the final volume in the chronicles, The High King, crowned the series by winning the Newbery Medal for "the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children."

Henry Holt is proud to present this classic series to a new generation of young readers. Jackets have been handsomely redesigned while retaining the original art of Caldecott Medal-winning artist Evaline Ness. Each retypeset volume now includes a pronunciation guide prepared by Lloyd Alexander. A companion book of short stories, The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain, is also available in hardcover for the first time in twenty years.

In their more than thirty years in print, the Chronicles of Prydain have become the standard of excellence in fantasy literature for children.
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Reviews (41)

4-0 out of 5 stars Eilonwy has to learn to behave as a lady on the Isle of Mona
The Princess Eilonwy has to go to the Isle of Mona to learn how to behaeve as a young lady. When she arrives she is captured by Achren, an evil enchantress. Her friends, Taran, Assistant Pig-Keeper, Fflewddur Fflam, A bard, Prince Rhun, and Lord Gwydion set out on a mission to rescue her from Achren. This is the third book in the Prydain Chronicals.

4-0 out of 5 stars A pleasant side adventure in Prydain
The third volume of Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles, "The Castle of Llyr," is something of a diversion. The action leaves Prydain, and the adventures have less to do with the larger struggle against evil in the wider lands.

That doesn't mean this isn't a fun and humorous book. It is. Consider it something of a side adventure.

One of the great joys of this series is the steady progression from lighthearted children's fantasy to more adult themes and a grimmer tone, allowing the reader to grow along with the characters. What begins as a light fantasy becomes very serious, and it works well. By the end, you feel as if the characters have taken a life's worth of journeys, learning from them as they went.

The five wonderful books in this series feature an interesting cast of characters. Most of the action centers on Taran, a pig keeper destined for great things. Others, including a stereotypical spoiled princess, a crazed Gollum-like creature, and a hapless bard, take part in a series of increasingly epic adventures.

In this volume, the cast find themselves in another kingdom, where Eilonwy is busy learning to be a lady. A conspiracy of sorts appears, and our hapless heroes find themselves caught up in it. They encounter another batch of odd and interesting creatures, including a giant stuck in a cave too small for him and a giant cat, and grapple with corrupt (or simply irritating) nobles. By the end, we have some new and welcome cast members.

While on the surface this volume is not wholly essential for the broader Prydain story, "The Castle of Llyr" advances Taran and Eilonwy's relationship and introduces some characters who will appear again later. The writing is direct and lively throughout, frequently using humor to disarm serious situations, though the pacing is not as perfect as other volumes.

The Prydain Chronicles, including "The Castle of Llyr," are recommended reading for anyone who enjoys fantasy, especially classic children's fantasy. This series is among the best of children's fantasy literature, walking the fine line between being accessible to young readers and being appealing and engaging enough for adults to enjoy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful middle volume
Taran has matured a little since the first two books; he's now less eager for a fight and also more aware of his feelings for the Princess Eilonwy. However, she's sent to the Island of Mona, the homeland of her ancestors off the coast of Prydain, to learn about becoming a proper young lady.

Taran escorts her there with the loyal creature Gurgi and the foolish Prince Rhun as company. Once on the island Taran learns that Eilonwy's alleged aunt, Achren, has intentions for Eilonwy's magical powers that would be disastrous for all, and when one of Achren's sinister agents kidnaps the princess Taran leads a rescue mission to save her.

Along the way they meet a harp-fancying cat in the forest and a midget named Glew in a cave, though both cat and midget have become giant-sized from Glew's magical meddlings, and the delays they cause make Eilonwy's plight all the more urgent.

The themes of the book become ever more mature, as Taran sees in Rhun some of himself at a younger age--much to his irritation. And though I missed it as a child, the romantic tension between Achren and Gwydion is very much there (as it is in the first and last book, as well), adding greater nuance to a story in which Taran can't quite express his feelings for Eilonwy the way he'd like her to understand them. Not unlike most people in love, actually.

The locations and plot may suggest that this story is a sideshow from the rest of the books, though the observant won't fail to notice certain characters and plot elements that lead directly up to the conclusion of the series.

5-0 out of 5 stars A crow, a fool, and a big ole cat
The continuing epic story of Taran the Assistant Pig-Keeper and his rag-tag motley crew of kings, princes, and furry ape-like creatures. This book in the Prydain Chronicles is, truth be told, far more usual than its predecessors. While the first two books in the series were fairly new and different adventure tales, this one falls back onto the standard rescue-the-princess-from-the-evil-enchantress mode. Eilonwy is in trouble, and we learn much more about her background and history than ever before. Added to the usual mix of characters for spice (the dwarf Doli fails to make an appearance in this tale and, I assume, leaves a gap) is another unwanted Prince. This time it's Prince Rhun, a good-hearted if completely incompetent young man. His betrothal to Taran's beloved Eilonwy does nothing to make our hero love him more, but the prince's sweet nature and good spirits eventually win everyone over. Also introduced by the cat loving Alexander (remember, this is the author of the interesting "Time Cat") is Llyan, an over-sized mountain cat that has taken quite a liking to bard Fflewddur Flan's harp playing. All in all, it's a pleasant mix of lovable characters. As you might be able to tell, this is not a good book to begin the series with. At this point, we know these people (and animals) fairly well and nothing they do will come as much surprise to anyone. It still amazes me to no end how prolific kings and princes are in this land. Though I understand that much of the point of these books is to show how little birthright counts when it comes to being good and strong. And it is quite a relief to see Taran doing something other than hot-headedly rushing into danger as he's done in the previous two books. Alexander's characters are growing, slowly but surely. It is with glee that I look forward towards reading yet another installment in this enjoyable series.

4-0 out of 5 stars gnome
I beleve that the book could have been better but unfortuneatly the author decited not to make it quite so exicting and have eilonwy fight and defete the dark enchantiss. I also think theat glew should have ended up as a small gnome but how can I decide how the book ends up turning out. ... Read more


19. Little Women (Illustrated Junior Library)
by Louisa May Alcott, Ann M. Magagna, Louis Jambour
list price: $19.99
our price: $13.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0448060191
Catlog: Book (1983-06-01)
Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap
Sales Rank: 3824
Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

(Abridged.) One of the most popular books ever written about childhood charmingly recounts the homelife of four sisters: literary-minded Jo March; Meg, the older sister who marries a young tutor; fashionable and artistic Amy; and gentle, musically inclined Beth. An unforgettable depiction of mid-19th century New England life.
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Reviews (246)

5-0 out of 5 stars A timeless classic and my all time favorite
When people ask me how I became such an avid reader, my answer is because I read Little Women in High School. This timeless classic of four sister growing up during the Civil War is my all time favorite book and I do not even know how many times I have read it. I treasure my copy of this book and it is one I could never part with.

Little Women is a coming of age story about four sisters Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, and it always amazed me how Marmee would sit back and let them learn life's lessons and always find the right words to say to each of them afterward. Family values and morals as well are hard lessons to teach but through love and understanding they all learn.

Jo is my favorite character, she is so vibrant and full of life and the character based on Louisa May Alcott herself. My favorite movie version of this movie is the 1933 version with Katherine Hepburn as Jo, she truly captured Jo's spirit.

This story has been read by many generations and I'm sure that there will be many more generations enjoying the story of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy for many many years to come.

4-0 out of 5 stars Home Sweet Home
Louisa May Alcott's novel, Little Women, is truly a classic story of family love. The novel chronicles the life of the four March sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, during the time of the civil war.

Each girl has her own unique characteristics and traits which Ms. Alcott does a brilliant job bringing each of them to life. Meg, the oldest, womanly, beautiful and proper; Jo, the author and tomboy; Beth, the frail gentle caring soul; and Amy, the youngest, the vain artist.

Each of the girls lean on each other for support while their father is away at war and their mother taking care of the sick. The girls entertain each other by putting on plays in their attic that Jo has written. The girls also befriend their neighbor, Laurie, who falls in love with Jo.

Throughout the years the girls experience Meg's courtship and marriage to Laurie's tutor, John; Beth's sickness and brush with death; Amy's venture overseas to study and travel with Aunt March; and Jo's travel to New York to "escape" and further her passion for writing. It is there that Jo meets Fridrich.

This classic novel of home, family and love, inspired by the author's own life, will linger in your heart long after you have turned the last page.

3-0 out of 5 stars An Overlong Soap Opera!!!
An adorable book that may seem long at times.

The story is about a family with four daughters,Meg,Jo,Beth and Amy. The book opens when the father is away at war. It is Christmas time and the girls and their mother, whom they call Marmee, haven't much to live on but love. This book is a diary
of their lives, until three of them get married and have babies
of their own.

The book ends with them all attending a birthday party, and each
realizing that they couldn't be happier for they all have what
they always dreamed of.

As I said before, this book is overlong at places. I
prefer to watch my soap operas on tv. And some of the words were British, and I never did find out what they meant. Other than those faults, it was a grand book, and I give it a rating of 3.5 stars:)

5-0 out of 5 stars I Wish The Jamie Lee Curtis Audiobook was Unabridged!
I regret that I never read Louisa May Alcott's Little Women when I was a kid and I still haven't read the book yet but I just finished listening to this audiobook read by Jamie Lee Curtis and I liked the story and I liked all of the characters, Jo, Beth, Meg, Amy, Marmee, Laurie (AKA Teddy), Mr. March, Mr. Brook, Professor Bhaer, etc, but my favorite characters are Jo, Beth, Marmee and Laurie and I think Jamie Lee Curtis did a superb reading and did great with all of the different characters and making her voice sound different for each characters and I just wish she had recorded an unabridged audiobook intstead of abridged. This was a very heartwarming story with both happy and sad times and I found myself at times smiling and laughing, and crying at the sad times like with what happened to poor sweet Beth and I'm going to look for both the paperback edition and the unabridged audio recording and hopefully I will find both in a used book store but unfortunately the unabridged audio recordings aren't read by Jamie Lee Curtis and I hope the readers are good like her and I very highly recommend this book in any edition audio, paperback, hardcover, etc! BTW: I have decided that even though it's abridged that this audiobook is a keeper because Jamie Lee Curtis really did a spendid job reading it and even if I eventually get the paperback or hardcover books and an unabridged audio recording that this is just too good to get rid of so it is going on my keeper shelf in my closet and I could definitely listen to it again. I have the old out of print audiobook from Dove Audio which either went out of business or had a name change because the new in print edition of the Jamie Lee Curtis audio recording is now offered by New Millennium Audio.

3-0 out of 5 stars An Overlong Soap Opera!!!
An adorable book that may seem long at times.

The story is about a family with four daughters,Meg,Jo,Beth and Amy. The book opens when the father is away at war. It is Christmas time and the girls and their mother, whom they call Marmee, haven't much to live on but love. This book is a recounting of their lives, until three of them get married and have babies of their own.

The book ends with them all attending a birthday party, and each
realizing that they couldn't be happier for they all have what
they always dreamed of.

As I said before, this book is overlong at places. I
prefer to watch my soap operas on tv. And some of the words were British, and I never did find out what they meant. Other than those faults, it was a grand book, and I give it a rating of 3.5 stars:) ... Read more


20. The Classic Treasury of Aesop's Fables
by Aesop, Don Daily
list price: $9.98
our price: $9.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0762404132
Catlog: Book (1999-09-01)
Publisher: Running Press Book Publishers
Sales Rank: 9648
Average Customer Review: 3.75 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (4)

3-0 out of 5 stars a great book, but not for my classroom
While I appreciate this book for its beautiful, large illustrations, I wish I had browsed the table of contents before purchasing it. I had intended to use this book with my first grade class because we are studying Aesop's Fables. However, since two of the fables in this book contain the word "ass," this book is not appropriate for my classroom. I have no problem using it with my own children, however, so I'm not sorry that I bought it!

3-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, but not what I expected
It is true - the drawings in this book are beautiful. However, I was hoping that the telling of the fables would have more of the original flavor. The stories have been updated to at least the 20th century. I am sure that when Aesop told the stories, the Country Mouse and the City Mouse didn't have to dodge automobiles and miss stepping in bubblegum. It was misleading that Aesop is listed as "editor" because the stories are not as he told them.

The overall messages (ie morals) are there. I just was disappointed that it was so updated. I'm sure that serves its purpose, but it wasn't what I wanted.

4-0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book
I am starting my collection of children's books for my son. He is still a baby, but he loves to look at the big, interesting, and colorful pictures in this book. It is nice because there are very short stories for times when baby is particularly wriggley and it is time for bed, and longer stories for a growing attention span. He just likes the pictures right now. He tries to touch the animals on the pages. I like the fables because they teach good morals. This is one of those books that stays high on the bookshelf and can be a treasure for generations.

5-0 out of 5 stars Classic Fables with Classic Illustrations
This is a beautiful classic book you'll want to give to your children and your grandchildren. There is at least one large beautiful illustration for each fable. The text size could be a bit larger, but the illustrations more than make up for it. The moral of each fable is at the bottom of the page. ... Read more


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