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$6.29 $3.50 list($6.99)
1. The Pigman
$12.91 $5.99 list($18.99)
2. The Wheels on the Bus
$5.39 $0.80 list($5.99)
3. Dear Mr. Henshaw (Cleary Reissue)
$12.23 $6.95 list($17.99)
4. Rapunzel (Caldecott Medal Book)
$8.06 $5.61 list($8.95)
5. Gilgamesh the King (Epic of Gilgamesh
$10.87 $4.50 list($15.99)
6. Harry the Dirty Dog
$12.91 $7.98 list($18.99)
7. Knick-Knack Paddywhack: A Moving
$4.99 $0.79
8. The Pigman and Me (Bantam Starfire
$11.55 $7.50 list($16.99)
9. Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present
$11.55 $4.95 list($16.99)
10. Rumpelstiltskin
$6.29 $3.94 list($6.99)
11. No Roses for Harry!
$8.06 $5.64 list($8.95)
12. The Last Quest of Gilgamesh (Gilgamesh
$8.06 $5.60 list($8.95)
13. The Revenge of Ishtar (Epic of
$5.39 $3.60 list($5.99)
14. Harry by the Sea
$5.85 $2.74 list($6.50)
15. The Gadget
$11.55 $4.94 list($16.99)
16. Swamp Angel (Caldecott Honor Book)
$3.99 $1.44
17. Harry and the Lady Next Door (I
$10.87 $9.95 list($15.99)
18. The Little Mermaid
$16.89
19. Over and Over
$5.39 $3.83 list($5.99)
20. William's Doll (Jp 067)

1. The Pigman
by Paul Zindel
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060757353
Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 4828
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

For sophomores John and Lorraine, the world feels meaningless; nothing is important. They certainly can never please their parents, and school is a chore. To pass the time, they play pranks on unsuspecting people. It's during one of these pranks that they meet the "Pigman"--a fat, balding old man with a zany smile plastered on his face. In spite of themselves, John and Lorraine soon find that they're caught up in Mr. Pignati's zest for life. In fact, they become so involved that they begin to destroy the only corner of the world that's ever mattered to them. Originally published in 1968, this novel by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Zindel still sings with sharp emotion as John and Lorraine come to realize that "Our life would be what we made of it--nothing more, nothing less." ... Read more

Reviews (304)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Book I've Ever Read!
The Pigman is the best book I have ever read (along with The Pigman's Legacy and The Pigman And Me). John and Lorraine are best friends who are in highschool. John smokes and drinks, while Lorraine admits that she is a little paranoid. John and Lorraine switch back and forth from typing each chapter, and it really makes the reader get to, kind of know them.

While doing prank phone calling, Lorraine ends up calling Mr. Pignati. John and Lorraine first lie to him, saying that they are part of a charity company. At first, John just wants the Pigman's money, but after they get to know him, they start to really care about him.

The first few chapters are very funny, espcecially the ones that are told by John. The entire book is a great fiction story. I would suggest to anyone who reads The Pigman, and likes it, should read the sequal to it, The Pigman's Legacy. After that, I would also suggest to read The Pigman And Me. It's about Paul Zindel's teenage years, and what he based The Pigman on.

5-0 out of 5 stars Pigman Great Book
For me The Pigman was by far one of the best books I have ever read.This book was assigned to me from my english class.At first I thought it was a little slow but once I read to chapter 4 I was hooked.I read the whole book in 4 days.This book is so interesting because it shows 2 perspectives.Lorraine is more conservative and a good girl while John is all out.John at first just wants Mr. Pignati's money but once they both spend time with the Pigman they are great friends.The book is sad at the end, but I think it is a great ending."Friends stick with friends"That is what the ending is saying.

I hope you read this book!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Understanding of Teenagers
I believe this book was an excellent well spoken book. It is about to ordinary kids and is somewhat different in the ways they were brought up. These two kids like normal teens do decided to play some pranks on random people and see which of them can keep the random person on the phone the longest. This ends up to be a way to introduce/ bring in, a character called Mr. PiƱata (The Pigman). As it turns out the kids make Mr. Pignati believe that they are calling him on behalf of a donation. The Pigman is a nice man so he believes the children and invites them over his house to give them there money. I won't give out the rest because I believe this will be a good book for you to read if you're a 14 year old or an adult. I believe people 13 and below would have a hard time understanding the books message. This book is a crazy adventure that you would enjoy with hilarious conversations and plots. I don't no if you'll actually life but you'll have a smile on your face. This book has two narrators, John and Lorraine. The switch being the narrator after each chapter and will talk about the scenes and how the felt in each one. You'll also catch a glimpse of the parents and like all Paul Zindel Books the parent have problems of there own. We'll I highly encourage you guys to read this book. Or maybe you have and just wanted some insight on how other people felt. That's why I read the reviews.

4-0 out of 5 stars A pleasure to read the voices of these two teens
This is probably the first book that I ever read as a teenager (or thereabouts) that made me feel like I could really identify with the characters contained therein.

The Pigman is told in the words of John and Lorraine, two high school sophomores who have decided to write down the story of Mr. Pignati, an old man who they wind up befriending. John is a handsome, overly-confident prankster, while Lorraine is a shy, brainy girl. They both have family problems, and the book is really as much about them as it is about "the Pigman."

Teenaged readers will enjoy reading about kids who are somewhat like themselves, and reading the book in their own voices. The pranks that John pulls are really funny, even if they eventually get him into trouble, and seeing Mr. Pignati through their initially distrustful eyes makes us get to know him by degrees, and appreciate who he is.

Overall, this is a fun book that may spark an interest in reading. Zindel has a real knack for getting inside the heads of his young protagonists, and he has a very authoritative anti-authoritarian voice, if that makes any sense.

4-0 out of 5 stars comunication's class review; by nick

Paul Zindel wrote a book called The Pigman; This is about two sixteen-year-olds that take advantage of an old man (with an interesting secret!); by asking him to give money to a nonexistent charity.
When they come to Mr. Pignati's house to collect his check, they find a lonely and slightly eccentric retiree who greets them warmly and with respect. A friendship grows, and John and Lorraine are trusted with their friend's house (alone!).
When this trust is betrayed, the teenagers must reflect the meaning of their actions and the effect their actions have on other people. My opinion of this book. It's a great book that really makes you think about what life has to offer you and maybe just think about what your actions do to others and how it makes them feel. Everyone should read this book it's received many awards.
I can relate to this because I used to go to my grandma's house and keep her company. She was always so excited to see me; just like Mr. Pignati she loved my company!
... Read more


2. The Wheels on the Bus
by Paul O. Zelinsky
list price: $18.99
our price: $12.91
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525446443
Catlog: Book (1990-10-01)
Publisher: Dutton Children's Books
Sales Rank: 2006
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

"The wheels on the bus go round and round.... All over town." Thistraditional song, a favorite of children everywhere, is adapted and illustratedby Paul O. Zelinsky, winner of the Caldecott Medal for his lush version of Rapunzel, and Caldecott honorsfor Rumpelstiltskin,Hansel and Gretel, andSwamp Angel. Fantasticpaper engineering with movable parts, flaps, and wheels that spin makes this aninteractive book that young readers will love to pieces (maybe literally!). Pullone tab to make the "wipers on the bus go swish swish swish," and another to seethe "babies on the bus cry Waah! Waah! Waah!" On closer inspection, childrenwill be tickled to discover several subtle and humorous subplots, as well as afull-circle finale: the last stop on the bus is at the Overtown public library,where the day's program includes a folk singer. Guess what he's singing!

Zelinsky's warm, inviting illustrations are a perfect match for this classicplay rhyme. Children who have learned the hand motions to the song will enjoyhelping the characters in the book enact their own roles. The back coverincludes the musical notation for "The Wheels on the Bus," so everyone can singalong. (Ages 3 to 7) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (42)

5-0 out of 5 stars a great pop-up and lift-the-flap version of a classic song
Our two-year-old loves this book. It is colorful, interactive and fun fun fun. It is one of those gems among children's books that is actually bearable the 500th time you read (or sing) it. The artistry is exceptional -- clever manipulatives and delightful illustrations help bring this classic song to life. You will open the doors, swish the windshield wipers, ssshh the babies, and yes, you will make the wheels go round. Manipulatives are generally lift-the-flap or tab.

The material is not very thick, so we also save this book for use with an adult. We have had to tape the wheels back on though, and have lost functionality on one or two pop-ups. Nevertheless, this is a delightful book that will bring smiles to your child -- and not drive *you* crazy!

5-0 out of 5 stars Two thumbs up for this little cute masterpiece
I learned that this book is number 174 on the list of most popular children's books ever sold. This threw me a little since, prior to discovering it, I had never even heard of "The Wheels on the Bus". The book is not particularly overwhelming in any literary sense. Anyone who has long since forgotten the words to the song will immediately remember them when confronted with scenes of children crying and their mothers hushing them. Zelinsky has added his own little touches to each scene, showing various background storylines continuing from page to page. In one sequence a little dog escapes its owner and chases the bus in a mad attempt to reach the kittens on board. In another scene, the aforementioned kittens are flung hither and yon on the bus, one of them making a near escape. Kids will love pulling the tabs and seeing everything from the window wipers "whooshing" to the mothers rolling their eyes as their babies cry. I can't imagine the book would work after long hours of tab pulling, however. Even for an adult, some of the pop up sections require a steady gentle hand (a thing some youngsters lack). Still, this is a great book for large group or individual child presentations. The sections are inventive and the song, no matter how people complain about it, is catchy. On the whole, an inventive and enjoyable creation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!
I first bought this book when my older son, who is now 12, was a toddler. Although it has many moving parts (all great fun), it lasted through his brother's use as well. I have since bought it for several nieces and nephews as a gift for each one's 2nd birthday. All of them have loved it, and read it for many years. The story is true to the song, but the illustrations have small side stories running through them, allowing older children to enjoy as well. Definitely a great purchase!

5-0 out of 5 stars My daughter loves it - 16 months old
I bought an older version of this book at a thrift shop - (...) My daughter loves it, and when I left her a few minutes ago she was moving the baby's arms singing "wah, wah, wah" (the baby on the bus goes wah wah wah...)

She tore out the mother on the bus, so I am keeping the book up high except to read.

(...). It's a great gift book. The pages are sturdy, too.

5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely delightful
Without a doubt, my 2 yr. old's favorite book. Over and Over and Over again. The illustrations are wonderful. Another one of our favorites is AWAY WE GO! Illustrated by Dan Yaccarino.
Just pops with fun and brightness. Transportation, cars, etc. is
quite big at this age! ... Read more


3. Dear Mr. Henshaw (Cleary Reissue)
by Beverly Cleary
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0380709589
Catlog: Book (2000-06-30)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 27305
Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

When, in second grade, Leigh writes to an author to tell him how muchhe "licked" his book, he never suspects that he'll still be writing to him four years later. And he never imagines the kinds of things he'll be writing about:

Dear Mr. Henshaw, I am sorry I was rude in my last letter... Maybe I was mad about other things, like Dad forgetting to send this month's support payment. Mom tried to phone him at the trailer park where, as Mom says, he hangs his hat.
It's not easy being the new kid in town, with recently divorced parents, nodoganymore, and a lunch that gets stolen every day (all the "good stuff," anyway). Writingletters, first to the real Mr. Henshaw, and then in a diary to a pretend Mr. Henshaw, may be just what he needs.

This Newbery Medal-winning book, by the terrifically popular and prolific Beverly Cleary (Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Runaway Ralph), exhibits a subtlety and sensitivity that will be appreciated by any youngster who feels lonely and troubled during the transition into adolescence. Winner of numerous other awards, including two Newbery Honors, Cleary teams up with Caldecott winner Paul O. Zelinsky, who creates a quiet backdrop for the realistic characters. (Ages 8 to 12) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (94)

4-0 out of 5 stars Pretty Good
A classic story that many children in today's society can really relate to with the rising divorce rate. Leigh speaks on their level, simply looking for some one to reach out to.

Dear Mr. Henshaw is a great book for kids that are having troubles with their life, like everyday children. Reading this book as an adult I associated it with my personal life. Leigh has problems with his parent's divorce, he hates not being able to see his dad. This leads him to a lot of emotional stress. Through this mess one of his teachers makes him write a letter to his favorite author. Leigh writes Mr. Henshaw a letter that asks him all sorts of questions about himself. After this the two of them write back and forth for a couple of years. This relationship gives Leigh confidence in himself when Mr. Henshaw tells Leigh that he should keep a journal. This journal allows Leigh to get his feelings out. Things stop bothering Leigh so much and by the end of the book he starts to enjoy his life more. This book is really good for an upper elementary child, and can even for an adult. Simplistic artwork for the cover, which demonstrates that this story is about an average boy.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Young Student Copes With Life By Writing Fan Letters
"Dear Mr. Henshaw" is mostly a collection of letters a young boy, Leigh Botts, sends to his favorite author, Mr. Boyd Henshaw, over a four-year period. By the 6th grade, Leigh is a regular fan. In his letters, Leigh describes his confusion at home over his parent's divorce and being friendless and picked on at his new school. After receiving some tips about writing from Mr. Henshaw, Leigh soon begins his own diary and learns how cathartic writing can be for him. He even wins a writing contest and meets "a real live author" who congratulates him and encourages him to keep writing.

It's no wonder "Dear Mr. Henshaw" won the Newbery Award in 1984. Although an entire book devoted to fan letters and diary entries might not excite some younger readers, Mrs. Cleary somehow makes this book very appealing and relative to children. There are also several illustrations done by Paul O. Zelinksy for those who enjoy drawings and not just writing. I remember reading "Dear Mr. Henshaw" when I was a kid and would highly recommend it to other children around seven and up.

5-0 out of 5 stars How I felt about this book
I am a student at West Virginia State University, and read this book for my Children's Literature class. Our assignment was to select a Newbery winner and report on it. When I selected this book I wasn't aware it was going to have such an affect on me. I am from a divorced family and if I would have had something like this to read when I was younger I may have learned ways to cope with what I was going through. I recommend this book to all children whether their parents are divorced or not. This book will also prepare them with what is going on in others lives. Sometimes children aren't as considerate with their peers as they should be. I enjoyed this book, and I know you will too!

4-0 out of 5 stars A Perfect Book For 5th Graders
Wow, what a great book for fifth Graders! The book "Dear Mr. Henshaw" by Beverly Cleary is about a boy named Leigh Botts. Leigh moves to a new town with his mother. His parents are divorced and he is lonely. Leigh writes a letter to his favorite author Mr. Henshaw. He askes Mr. Henshaw lots of questions and Mr. Henshaw writes him back. Leigh begins to write to Mr. Henshaw all of the time because it helps him figure out his own feelings. He becomes a better writer for this. Leigh enters a writing contest and the winner gets to meet a famous writer. Do you think he will win the contest? Do you think that famous writer could be Mr. Henshaw? Do you think that Leigh will make new friends at his new school? Will Leigh's parents get back together? All of these questions can be answered by reading this great book.

3-0 out of 5 stars this book was ok
Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary was an ok book. Its all about an 11 year old boy named Leigh Botts and what he writes in his letters and journal. The letters are to Mr. Henshaw an author of "Ways to Amuse a Dog." Leigh is having a tough time because his parents are going through a divorce and he needs someone to talk to. Leigh finds out that someone is stealing his lunch every day. So he makes an alarm for his lunchbox. Leigh also has a dog named bandit who stays with his dad who is a trucker. and Leigh stays with his mom. this book was ok. I would not recommend it. ... Read more


4. Rapunzel (Caldecott Medal Book)
by Paul O. Zelinsky
list price: $17.99
our price: $12.23
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525456074
Catlog: Book (1997-10-01)
Publisher: Dutton Books
Sales Rank: 6437
Average Customer Review: 4.48 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

In older versions of the classic tale Rapunzel, it always seemed improbable that a grown man could scale a tower using only his beloved's hair.Not so in Paul O. Zelinsky's Caldecott Medal-winning version of Rapunzel. Here, Rapunzel's reddish-blonde mane is thick with waves and braids, and cascades like a waterfall down the walls of her isolation tower. In Zelinsky's able hands it's easy to believe that a prince would harbor no hesitations about scrambling up our fair heroine's hair.

Of course, this is not the work of an amateur--Zelinsky's lush versions of Hansel and Gretel, Rumpelstiltskin, and Swamp Angel all earned him Caldecott Honors. His gorgeous, Italian Renaissance-styled illustrations are characterized by warm golden tones and the mesmerizing sensation of trompe l'oeuil. Not only does he have the touch of a world-class illustrator, Zelinsky has also proven himself a master storyteller. We are frightened when the sorceress demands to take the baby Rapunzel, we are alarmed when the flowing locks are cruelly shorn, and we rejoice when the prince and his now modest-haired love are reunited. The notes at the back of Rapunzel reveal his careful scholarship regarding the long history of the story (tracing its origins and transformations from Italy to France and finally to Germany and the Grimm brothers)--work that no doubt contributed to his clean, compelling version of the age-old tale. Children will be captivated by the magical story and evocative pictures and adults will delight in the fresh feel of a well-loved legend. (Click to see asamplespread. Illustration © 1997 by Paul O. Zelinsky, published by Dutton Children's Books, a division of Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers.) (Ages 4 and older) ... Read more

Reviews (27)

5-0 out of 5 stars A visually beautiful rendition of a timeless tale
"When I was a young girl, I had long braids, and always wanted to be Rapunzel," confided a colleague at a recent meeting. Paul Zelinsky's Caldecott award-winning retelling of this age-old tale of a mother-to-be's craving for the forbidden rapunzel, a possessive sorceress, a beautiful girl with an unending cascade of silky hair shut away in a remote tower, and a handsome prince just might reawaken those desires. In his informative "Note About Rapunzel ," Zelinsky relates how he drew on elements from the early French and Italian sources as well as from the better known Grimm version of this tale to create his own compelling version. Thus, some details of the story are less familiar. Rapunzel naively reveals that she has had a visitor in the tower when she asks the sorceress to help her with her dress for, "It is growing so tight around my waist, it doesn't want to fit me anymore." Other elements, retold in their familiar spare rhythm, such as "Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair!" retain ther original power. Zelinsky uses the formal beauty of Renaissance art to evoke both the physical beauty of the characters and the Italian landscape. His large oil paintings overflow with softly muted colors, billowing folds of finely detailed period costumes, ornate architecture, and majestic landscapes. His masterful use of glinting and filtering light illuminates every page. Zelinsky's Rapunzel is a book to be treasured by anyone who appreciates a timeless tale and delights in an object of visual beauty.

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful illustrations and a traditional retelling
Paul O. Zelinsky's "Rapunzel" is a delight of renaissance-like oil paintings depicting a delicately beautiful girl, a frightening witch, and a handsome prince. The illustrations are truly superb, and each page features a beautifully rendered painting rich with color and detail.

Zelinsky's retelling of the story is traditional yet satisfying, but the illustrations really steal the show. Children will get caught up in the fairytale landscapes and the magical locales. Readers will also appreciate the additional information provided by Zelinsky about his retelling of the story and his study of Italian Renaissance art. It's always nice to know why artists choose to illustrate stories in a certain way.

This book won the Caldecott Medal for its fantastic illustrations.

4-0 out of 5 stars Provacative story line with beautiful illustrations.
"Rapunzel" retold and illustrated Paul O. Zelisky is a version of the fairytale more closely relating to its original form dating back to 1635 called "Petrosinella". The story of "Rapunzel" has been found all over the world and has transcended time and culture, with few minor changes in the detail of the story for instance Rapunzel's hair color. The most distinctive difference between Zelisky's version and more modern interpretations, beginning with the Brother's Grimm is whether or not Rapunzel's pregnancy is mentioned. I think the story is for a more mature audience but children are not likely to catch the fact that Rapunzel is pregnant because they will be enchanted with the illustrations. The illustrations are reminiscent of the Italian Renaissance and will transport any reader into the fantasy world. Having researched several versions of Rapunzel, I have found that Zelisky's version is the most real to life because it does raise issues of sex, the inability for some parents to take care of their children, stealing, and cruelty to others. This book is provocative and will make readers of all ages asked questions; I would recommend this book for both children and adults. I think that both age groups could learn from each other by reading this book together, just be ready to answer your child's questions honestly.

5-0 out of 5 stars The rare non-Disneyfied fairy tale
The winner of the Caldecott Medal, "Rapunzel" is one of the most lush and beautiful stories ever created for children. Carrying many of the distinctive Zelinsky elements (staggered perspectives, reoccurring background characters, gorgeous lighting, etc.) the book is a joy to look at. Each picture evokes the spirit of the Renaissance, from the first tableau (the husband and wife feeling her pregnant stomach in contentment) to the last (the loving family poses with the cherubim-like children). The text is a little more racy than your average children's picture book. Zelinsky doesn't shy away from the fact that Rapunzel is pregnant when the witch learns of her illicit relations, though he does legitimize the girl's newfound glow with a hasty "marriage" of the prince to Rapunzel in her tower. Sans priest, no less. The book is also remarkable for the dramatic shift that occurs in the character of the witch. A scowling ghoul in one picture, she transforms into an almost nunlike character when receiving the little Rapunzel baby. One might well ask what happens to the witch after she casts Rapunzel and her prince into the desert, but Zelinsky doesn't feel this is worth discussing. A perfect book for storytelling, as the pictures are colorful and easy to see from a distance. Would pair well with his other oil painted fairy tale "Rumplestiltskin".

5-0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous book
This book has a great story, but above all: the illustrations are AMAZING. They are like oil paintings, full of colour and detail. Very young and older child both will really enjoy this book. This book is essential to any home or school library.
Slight warning- Rapunzel gets pregnant with twins after 'letting down her hair' for the prince.....i was asked 'how did that happen?' :) Some parents might not want their kids to read that part. ... Read more


5. Gilgamesh the King (Epic of Gilgamesh (Paperback))
by LUDMILA ZEMAN
list price: $8.95
our price: $8.06
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0887764371
Catlog: Book (1998-04-25)
Publisher: Tundra Books
Sales Rank: 43284
Average Customer Review: 4.89 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Gilgamesh, half-god and half-man, in his loneliness and isolation becomes a cruel tyrant over the citizens of Uruk. To impress them forever he orders a great wall to be built, driving his people to exhaustion and despair so that they cry to the Sun God for help. In answer, another kind of man, Enkidu, is sent to earth to live among the animals and learn kindness from them. He falls in love with Shamhat, a singer from the temple, and he follows her back to Uruk. There, Enkidu, the “uncivilized” beast from the forest, shows the evil Gilgamesh through friendship what it means to be human. ... Read more

Reviews (9)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!
Gilgamesh the King, The Return of Ishtar, and The Last Quest of Gilgamesh are exceedingly well-written and show many different themes and life lessons. The themes of friendship, revenge, good vs. evil, ambition, and immortality. But I think the most essential, underlying message is about love. Enkidu shows love to Shamhat and Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh shows love to Enkidu and his city, Shamhat shows love to Enkidu, and the city shows love to Gilgamesh, Enkidu and Shamhat! Love is woven into the theme of eternal life. I think these stories would be fabulous for anybody but recommended for 5-12. I am in middle school and we are reading these stories in class. I enjoyed these stories tremendously. So if you want to teach your children about death or love or friendship, these would be the ultimate choice.

5-0 out of 5 stars BUY all three books in this series, you gotta HAVE them all!
I received all three books in this series this afternoon and just finished reading them. Ludmila Zeman has done a wonderful job in retelling the Epic of Gilgamesh. This series is a great introduction into one of the oldest legends in the world. Children and adults will both loooove to read these books over and over. The artwork is first class and you will find yourself looking through this book just to soak up these beautiful images.
The words Ludmila Zeman used with each one of the pictures is rich but still to the point. So, don't wait any longer and buy buy buy all three! I am an elementary school teacher and I can't wait to share these stories with my students!

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written and illustrated!!
I bought this book for son and ended up reading all of Zeman's books to my 12th grade honors History seminar. They enjoyed it tremendously and drew comparisons between Gilgamesh and President Bush in their search for the destruction of the evil Humbaba ....after 9/11 it was appropiate for the circumstances....
The illustrations are rich and the text is ajoy to read to all age groups...we will keep these books for years to come.

5-0 out of 5 stars Gilgamesh the King by Ludmila Zeman
This is a fantastic version of the Epic of Gilgamesh -- for children, ages 4 - 12. The illustrations are colorful and very similar to the Sumerian/Babylonian style of art. The recounting is easy for children to follow. I bought it for my 7 year old but my four year old was riveted. There are other more thorough versions around but this is a great one for a beginner. Make sure you buy all 3 books in the series to get the whole epic, the other two being The Revenge of Ishtar and The Last Quest of Gilgamesh.

5-0 out of 5 stars Expuisite marriage of words and pictures
Many of the great children's illustrators working today should really get someone else to write the text. But Ludmilla Zeman retells the epic of Gilgamesh in a way that is delightful and accessible to the ears of both children and adults. The art is astoundingly good. As well as providing an introduction to the earliest Western cultures in the written record, her choice of focus in her retelling provides an opportunity to discuss social justice and the destructiveness of violence. And did I mention the tasty art? ... Read more


6. Harry the Dirty Dog
by Gene Zion, Margaret Bloy Graham
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060268654
Catlog: Book (1956-10-31)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 4432
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

"Harry was a white dog with black spots who liked everything, exceptgetting a bath." Taking matters into his own paws, he buries his family'sscrubbing brush in the backyard and runs away from home before they can wranglehim into the tub. Harry gets dirty playing in the street, dirtier at therailroad, and dirtier still playing tag with the other dogs. When sliding downthe coal chute, he actually changes from a white dog with black spots to a blackdog with white spots! Of course, by the time he gets home he is completelyunrecognizable to his family--even when he does all his clever flip-floppingtricks. In a stroke of doggy genius, he unearths the bath brush, begs for abath, and the rest is history. Youngsters will completely relate to the urge torebel, the thrill of getting dirty, and, finally, the reassurance of family.Gene Zion and Margaret Bloy Graham's Harry the Dirty Dog, first publishedin 1956 and now rereleased with splashes of color added by the artist herself,is one of those picture books that children never forget. (Ages 3 to 8)--Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (20)

5-0 out of 5 stars Harry the dirty dog is a classic kid's story
I remember reading this book when I was in school and I always enjoyed it.

Harry takes off from his family, and gets so dirty they don't recognize him. He has a fun time around town, but when he realizes his family does not know him, he needs to have a bath to prove that he is their dog.

This is a cute story, which my 7 year old loves to read over and over. A five star read for kids of any age.

3-0 out of 5 stars To wash him is to know him
The book I read was Harry the Dirty Dog. I like this book because of the illustrations. The dog in the story is cute. I also like the plot of the story. The dog doesn't like to have baths. He runs away and gets dirty. He is so dirty his family does not recognize him. Finally he begs for a bath and gets one. His family realizes it is him.

5-0 out of 5 stars Adventure and Drama
Harry runs away to avoid a bath, sending the reading along for a journey through all the dirtiest (and most fun) places in the nearby city streets. Of course all adventurers eventually have to come home. Here the story does a wonderful parody/reversal on the recognition scene in the Odyssey, where it is Harry who can't be recognized for his "disguise" of a black sooty coat with white spots. Eventually though the power of the dreaded bath, he's finally revealed and reunited with his family.

4-0 out of 5 stars In the bawth, in the bawth
A trip back in time to 1956. Let it never be said that fantastic female illustrators are a new phenomenon. Margaret Bloy Graham's attention to detail and delightful characters back in the day resulted in this lovely tale of a filthy dog. Perusing the pages of 'Harry the Dirty Dog', the reader is drawn into a delightful story that encompasses all times and all places. It is a story that has stood up well over the years.

Harry is a white dog with black spots who is NOT fond of baths. After hiding his scrub brush and hi-tailing it away from his home, Harry becomes so terribly dirty that he resembles a black dog with white spots. When his own family doesn't recognize him, Harry must take drastic measures to make his way back into the family's heart.

Harry's an adorable little mutt. The book isn't making any intentional social commentary, but I did love the variety of places Harry got into. Look, he's playing near the construction workers! Look, he's down at the railroad! Look, he's sliding down a coal shoot! It's nice to see jobs in a kids book that aren't all posh upper middle class desk occupations. Admittedly, sometimes the book's published date is obvious. Where, after all, are all the black people? Any minority at all? This is a world full of white white whites. Still, how much do you hold a book accountable for such things when it is thoroughly lacking in any other problems?

Harry's family members look like nothing so much as early prototypes of Harry Bliss (the New Yorker cartoonist), by the way. Those big black Orphan Annie eyes. Altogether, this is a good book for any adult that wants to remember a time tinged in nostalgia. Kids will feel for Harry, just as they are relieved that he makes back home okay in the end. Any child that loves doggies will adore this book. It may even serve those adults that want a story that applauds the virtues of keeping clean. A fine piece of work.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Terrific Story!!!
This is a very simple, but powerful little tale, with the dog taking the part of the teacher. The dog hides the bathtub brush because he doesn't want a bath and then he runs away from home. Then he goes on an adventure and gets dirty and even dirtier as the tale goes. Then he comes to his senses and returns home, only to have the family not recognize him, until...he finds the brush he hid and then it all turns out alright. The artwork is pretty basic and wonderful and it communicates the story so well. A very well done book. Kudos to the writer and illustrator!!! ... Read more


7. Knick-Knack Paddywhack: A Moving Parts Book (New York Times Best Illustrated Books (Awards))
by Paul O. Zelinsky
list price: $18.99
our price: $12.91
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525469087
Catlog: Book (2002-10-01)
Publisher: Dutton Books
Sales Rank: 14042
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Caldecott Medal winner Paul O. Zelinsky's first moving-parts book since the best-selling Wheels on the Bus is a beauty. To the verses of "This Old Man," an ingenious visual narrative follows a young boy as he ventures outside. Along the way, children can push tabs, turn wheels, or lift flaps to see ten different old men pop out of hiding to play Knick-Knack. Children (and critics) agree that Knick-Knack Paddywhack! takes the interactive book to a new level of imagination.

€ Smithsonian magazine Notable Book for Children 2002
€ Parenting magazine Book of the Year
€ Newsweek magazine Top Pick for Kids
€ New York Times Best Illustrated Book for 2002
... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Always something new
My three year old son loves this book and we read it every night. He is constantly finding new things to open, close, move, etc. After about 2 months of constant use, one of the tabs finally broke, which is much better than other lift/move books he has. Highly recommend this book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Buy one for yourself
This is far and away the best movable I have ever seen. The attention to detail and the unbelievable quality of the book is amazing. There is a new something I see everytime I open the book. Wait until you read it through a few times and you find a new detail or creative way for the movement to happen. My daughter and I love this book so much I am buying another one to put away for her child.

4-0 out of 5 stars not as toddler friendly as his classic wheels on the bus
This IS a beautiful book like all of his books, but while I love it, I can't let my 2 year old read and handle it with me. Now, my son CAN handle and work all of the various flaps and tabs on the Wheels on the bus book, and has been doing that since 10 months. These are just too tiny and somewhat delicate for daily handling like well loved books should have. I have to admit that I do have tape on my second copy of wheels on the bus, but that book did not attempt to fall apart at the very beginning.

ITs a gorgeous book with stunning effects and illustrations so go ahead and buy it! ... Read more


8. The Pigman and Me (Bantam Starfire Books)
by PAUL ZINDEL
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553564560
Catlog: Book (1993-10-01)
Publisher: Starfire
Sales Rank: 350660
Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars The book was very interesting, and fun to read.
This was a book about Paul Zindel's childhood and the problems that he had to face with his family and friends. Luckily Nonno Frankie was able to help him out and become his "pigman", or a person that helps someone out when they need it the most. Nonno Frankie helped liven up Paul's life, and he helped him through some tough times. This was an excellent book!!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is the book for you.
The book is about Paul Zindel's teenage years in Travis Town. The book is a funny book because a lot of funny things happen to Paul. This book is the book for you because it might happen to you. I like this book because it is an interesting book to read.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Pigman & Me by: paul zindel
My book is called the Pigman and Me, Written by: Paul Zindel. The book is about a boy that lives with his mother and sister. They constantly move from homes. Finally, they moved to a house in Travis, Staten Island. They buy a house with Connie. Connie was a friend of Paul's mother, her husband abandoned her and she was going to all houses to see if she could sleep in one, at last she got to their house and stayed there. She had twins, their names where Nicky and Joey, they were fresh kids, five year old and loved to do crazy things. The book talks about a boy named Paul that meat Nonno Franki, his pigman. Nonno Franki was an Italian man, father of Connie that came and cooked to all. He planted potatoes and beans in the house's garden. He gave Paul helpful advice and solutions to all problems. He meats his neighbor, named Jennifer he becomes best friends with her and went to school with her. They usually sat under an apple tree located on Paul's garden. At school Paul has good and bad times, but always with excellent grades. In the end Paul's mother lives the house and moves away from Travais.He was told by his pigman that he was going to be a writer.

1-0 out of 5 stars boring and confusing
This book was so boring. Sorry, but it was. It just wasn't like a "normal" book. It was very confusing. In the beginning it sounded nice and good but as you got further it was soooo boring. And it's not a funny book. (to me I think it isn't). I mean, it's just out of place! It's not like a real story where it goes in order and something happens and you continue on and on. It's not like that. But, I think this was boring. real boring.

4-0 out of 5 stars ogha bugah
hi my name is not bob and im here to tell you about the pig man and me. It is about the funnyest and coolest book i have ever read.It is an autobiography about young paul zindal.
one reson i liked this book is becouas its by my favirite autherp.anuther reson is becous it is funny and one more reson is becouse the moral is rellay cool i cant tell you or else i would tell you mommy.
in conclustion this book has 100 some pages.its by paul zindal.and this is not bob this is not arin this is not lorry this is not bobby and this is not me.goodbye ogha bugha boohahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha im still not bob ... Read more


9. Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present
by Charlotte Zolotow
list price: $16.99
our price: $11.55
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060269456
Catlog: Book (1962-09-26)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 71295
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Any collaborative effort by the esteemed Charlotte Zolotow and the illustrious Maurice Sendak is bound to be a success. These beloved creators of countless children's favorites outdo themselves with this 1963 Caldecott Honor-winning classic about a little girl in need of assistance. Finding a birthday present for her mother is no easy task for our heroine. Luckily, she happens upon the avuncular Mr. Rabbit, whose heart is in the right place, even if he doesn't always have the best ideas. Ultimately, his suggestions do come in handy, and between the two of them they determine the ideal birthday tribute: the gift of color. Children will join the protagonists in contemplating how to make the abstract tangible, and all readers will be delighted to see yellow translate to bananas, as green is given in pears, and blue takes the shape of grapes.

The soft, muted colors of Sendak's illustrations are reminiscent of a Monet landscape--utterly appealing and dreamy. And the reflective, sing-song dialogue between Mr. Rabbit and the girl is as deliciously lulling as a shady swing in a hammock. This quiet, peaceful book is a treasure for any shelf. (Ages 4 to 8) ... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars A lovely bedime story
As a student at West Virginia State College I was required to view a Calecott honor award winning book. I chose this book because of the beautiful illustrations. A little girl asks the assistance of Mr. Rabbit in deciding what to get her mother for her birthday. Mr. Rabbit suggests some rather foolish gift for each of the colors the little girl says her mother likes. He suggests such things as a red roof and a blue lake. Each time he also suggest a fruit of that color. The little girls says her mother likes that fruit but she needs something else. After they go though a few colors the little girl relizes she could make a fruit basket. Mr. Rabbit says he has a basket.

5-0 out of 5 stars The perfect picture book for bedtime or rainy days
This was my favorite book when I was little. The dialogue, which follows a clearly-defined pattern without being repetitive, and the gorgeous illustrations are calming without being boring. Now that I am expecting my first child, I am thrilled to see that this classic is still in print.

5-0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book - both the idea and the illustrations!
This book has been a favourite in my family for about 30 years! The central idea of the book is simple and heart-warming, and is demonstrated in an almost hypnotic formula throughout the text. This means that, after just a few pages, the child being read to can join in and have the satisfaction of guessing correctly part of what is coming next. The theme is one which can be applied in the child's own life, and from my own experience, I can promise that it stays with you for a very long time. The illustrations are beautiful; as far as I know, they are quite unique in Mr Sendak's output. They add meaning to the text, and help to make this a classic. I would recommend reading this to anybody from 3 to 7 (and any adults who happen to be around!). ... Read more


10. Rumpelstiltskin
by Paul O. Zelinsky
list price: $16.99
our price: $11.55
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525442650
Catlog: Book (1986-10-01)
Publisher: Dutton Children's Books
Sales Rank: 4820
Average Customer Review: 4.65 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Paul O. Zelinsky, 1998 Caldecott medalist for Rapunzel, also has three Caldecott Honor Books under his belt: Hansel and Gretel, Swamp Angel, and this fine edition of Rumpelstiltskin. Zelinsky's oil paintings are perfectly suited to the strange saga of the little man with the secret name who knows how to spin straw into gold. The golden light infusing the late medieval setting subtly reinforces the theme.

The visual characterization of Rumpelstiltskin is a triumph: an odd elfin man with bulbous eyes, a gigantic, flat black hat, impossibly skinny arms and legs, and long, pointed black shoes. This Rumpelstiltskin is not scary or horrid, but rather mischievous and weird. When the young queen finally guesses his name, and thus is able to keep her baby, he flies off on his huge cooking spoon (with a pout), true to the Grimms's 1819 version of the story. (Zelinsky provides notes on his text in the back of the book, indicating his careful research into various editions of the original Grimm tale.) Zelinsky's retelling is straightforward and smooth, with only a few lines of text on each page to complement the truly magnificent full-page illustrations. A delightful book worth its weight in gold! (Ages 3 to 7)

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Reviews (17)

5-0 out of 5 stars Zelinsky Paints a Beautiful Picture of Rumpelstiltskin
The Grimm Brothers wrote one of their most famous tales,"Rumpelstiltskin", over a century ago and others havetranslated and retold it many times since. Paul O. Zelinsky retold"Rumpelstiltskin" based on one of the Grimms' earliest versions of the story. He was also the illustrator. The illustrations in Zelinsky's version are oil paintings. This allows him to create an exceptional antique setting for the story, as well as striking characters. There is such detail in each illustration that there is almost an individual story with in each picture. The intense use of shadowing combined with a kaleidoscopic amount of colors also makes this story's pictures peculiarly realistic. Zelinsky clearly portrays a distinct and more exciting way of seeing the classic tale, "Rumpelstiltskin". The first thing that makes these illustrations so life-like was the individual characters combined with the ornate and detailed backgrounds. The expressions on the characters' faces are drawn in such detail that the reader can easily see what they are feeling at a glance. The reader can also predict whether a character is good or bad from the detail of his/her face. The queen's (miller's daughter) large, gentle eyes and delicate, ivory skin demand the reader's compassion, even though she broke her promise to Rumpelstiltskin that saved her life. Rumpelstiltskin's tiny body accented by his pointy nose and chin gives off a sinister aura. The little details with in each picture make them all unique. An example is when the king is walking into the room where the miller's daughter is with all the spools of gold. There are rays of sunlight coming throughout the window reflecting off the spools that it hits. The colors used makes the room look warmer and more comfortable than when she had entered into it the night before. You can see some of the gold thread unraveling off various spools. The wrinkles in the miller's daughter's clothes shows that she is not in a very comfortable position as she sleeps one of the piles of gold. These are all such minor details that you might not even notice in a photograph. The title page and end papers even include detailed artistry. They show a petite village that is surrounded by a range of mountains and an ocean. The narrow, dirt road winding down to the tiny community gives out the idea that the village is relatively secluded from the rest of the world. I think that the title page and the end papers are a great way to covey the setting and atmosphere to the reader right away. The component of Zelinsky's illustrations in, "Rumpelstiltskin", that made them seem so life-like was his use of shadowing. A good example of this is when the queen sent her servant into the woods to look for Rumpelstiltskin. In this picture the only light the reader can see is from the servant's lantern and the few feet it shines on around her. The reader can also see the moon's reflection in the ocean. This use of shadowing makes these illustrations look not only life-like, but like photographs too. In Zelinsky's version of "Rumpelstiltskin", the illustrations were very realistic, because of his use of shadowing, complex use of colors, and phenomenal detail. Zelinsky's pictures are so effective that the words are practically unnecessary to tell the classic tale of "Rumpelstiltskin".

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, Complicated Tale with Magnificent Illustrations
As previous reviews have noted, the illustrations are exquisite and quite out of the ordinary; instantly captivating and magical at first glance. My daughter is 3 and 1/2 and is riveted by the book. I feel confused at how strongly some of the readers feel about the book's "message." Yes, many of the characters are "bad" and it is morally ambiguous, but the sheer flight of fancy and imagination captured by the tale has intrigued and fascinated readers and listeners since the early 1800's. It's like a child's version of a scary movie without the macabre details, and even though Rumpelstiltskin himself is ugly and frightening even though he is actually "saving" the queen, the book and story's power coem from the fact that he is such an unusual character; not whether he is good or bad. Furthermore, the additional magical ideas of straw into gold, being locked up in a castle, servants running off in the middle of the night, and a little elfen man riding around on a spoon are bizarre and fanciful and elements like these fill much of the fairy tale genre for centuries. I say, get over the p.c. messages and concetrate on the fantasy and magic of the story that is so compelling to readers, especially with Zelinsky's magnificent pictures. Life is complicated, and so is the story - it doesn't try to answer all the questions and make everybody good/bad/punished/redeemed. That is not the point of this particular story. If you only want a story with a moral, it's true that this is not the book for you. If creative ideas and concepts that you could never think of yourself are what your looking for in a book, then it is the book for you!

5-0 out of 5 stars The most technically correct spinning wheel in kiddie lit
A rare book. Zelinsky tells the story of "Rumpelstiltskin", evoking a story most American children will know. Especially impressive is his tiny details. A good example of this is his spinning wheel. Many illustrated Rumpelstiltskin stories show the spinning wheel as something that Rumpelstiltskin throws straw towards, causing golden coins appear. In this edition the spinning wheel is technically correct. The miller's daughter is given empty bobbins, onto which Rumpelstiltskin spins golden threads. Zelinsky's accomplished paintings show the golden bobbins gleaming, one on top of another. The portrayal of Rumpelstiltskin himself was described in one review I read as "Rackhamesque". I don't know if this was the illustrator's intent, but he certain does seem culled from a classic European fairy tale book from the early twentieth (or even nineteenth) century. The oil paintings look Southern European, and though a story with an odd moral (if you can outwit your opponent by cheating, you're in the clear) it is an excellent book for children. Like its companion book, "Rapunzel", this too would be a promising book for storytelling.

2-0 out of 5 stars Nice pictures, twisted story
This is a nearly verbatim rendition of the Grimms' story, and it's hard to understand why Zelinsky would use his talent to illustrate it for children. Even harder to figure out is how the American Library Association could award its Caldecott Medal for distinguished American picture book for children to any rendition of this dreadful tale: The king threatens to kill the miller's daughter if she can't spin gold from straw. Rumpelstiltskin saves her life by spinning gold for her, but extracts a necklace, a ring and, on the third night of spinning, a promise of her firstborn. She then marries the king, whom Zelinsky depicts as young and handsome. When it comes time for the queen to hand over her newborn, Rumpel agrees to relent if the queen can discover his name. She sends a servant to follow him into the woods and discover the name. So the king, though he looks good, is greedy and brutal. The queen is a victim who agrees to give over a future infant to save her own life, and then depends on an anonymous, unrecognized "servant girl" to save the child. And Rumpelstiltskin, shown as physically unattractive and (the message seems to be) therefore bad, is the one who saved the future queen from execution and then relents on the payment he bargained for. A weird, twisted story that offers nothing for kids, illustrated with Renaissance-style pictures that accentuate the perversity by making the bad guy look good and the guy who saved the damsel in distress look bad.

4-0 out of 5 stars A great classic
The illustrations helped support and great tale. My daughter loves it. I know that there are many different versions but I was slightly disappointed that the ending was different from the version I remembered as a child. In this version Rumpelstiltskin flies off on a spoon. The version from my childhood is where Rumpelstiltskin is so mad that he jumps so hard he goes through the floor. Even w/the slightly updated version it's still a classic and must have for nay household. ... Read more


11. No Roses for Harry!
by Gene Zion
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064430111
Catlog: Book (1976-10-06)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 29308
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The popular hero of Harry the Dirty Dog does his best to be rid of Grandmother’s birthday present—a silly green sweater with yellow roses. ‘Will bring laughter and sympathy. Recommended for all picture book collections.’ —SLJ.

... Read more

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars I love Harry! and his sweaters too!
This is one of the best stories ever.
Simple, funny, well constructed, satisfying,
It's also my favorite of all the "harry" stories.

Wish there were more books like these instead of today's pretentious, shallow, and expensive kids books.

4-0 out of 5 stars Delightful
Children will find this series of books delightful! Like many of the writers of the reviews I to grew up with "Harry The Dirty Dog". Recently I came across "No Roses For Harry." I couldn't resist purchasing it for my son. He loved the book so much that I came to Amazon.com to find some of the other "Harry" books. I recently read it to my niece and nephew. They couldn't wait to see what creative way Harry was going to try to get rid of the flowered sweater. Little kids and "Big" kids alike will enjoy this wonderful book. You like this one? Try "Harry By The Sea."

5-0 out of 5 stars My favorite Harry Book
Of all the Harry Books, this one is my fave. Harry, a white dog with black spots, gets a present from Grandma--a sweater with big roses all over it. He hates it. He gets laughed at when he wears it, so he tries losing it...several times. He is finally rid of the sweater in an imaginative plot sequence that involves a mother bird. It's a sequence that also spares Grandma's feelings, thank goodness! The story ends with Harry receiving a new sweater from Grandma, one he likes very much. It's a white sweater with black spots. The ending is no doubt a reason why the book is a favorite of mine. My two-year-old likes all the Harry Books. The stories contain wonderful twists of plot but are written in simple language. Also, there are only a couple of sentences on each page and the illustrations correspond beautifully to the text (a rare treat, given that the author was not the illustrator), so even though they are recommended for young schoolchildren, toddlers will be able to enjoy these books.

4-0 out of 5 stars A very original story line of a dogs dilemma.
I remember this story fondly from my own childhood. The different strategies that Harry tries to rid himself of the sweater he does'nt like are still very amusing to me today. I'm going to share it with my classroom.

4-0 out of 5 stars A memorable book from my childhood
I love everything about Harry. The illustrations are wonderful and the pallet is unmistakable. The story is sweet and entertaining. Even though it has been years since I last read it, I remember it clearly & fondly. I intend to buy a copy & keep it for my own children. ... Read more


12. The Last Quest of Gilgamesh (Gilgamesh Series)
by LUDMILA ZEMAN
list price: $8.95
our price: $8.06
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0887763804
Catlog: Book (1998-04-25)
Publisher: Tundra Books
Sales Rank: 158754
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In his final quest, Gilgamesh, still mourning the death of his dear friend Enkidu, sets out to find the key to immortality. His journey is perilous. He must fight ferocious serpents and wild lions. He travels through bitterly cold caves, across scorching deserts, and over the fatal waters of the Sea of Death. Finally he arrives at the palace of Utnapishtim, the only human who knows the secret of immortality. Utnapishtim sets Gilgamesh a test to stay away for six days and seven nights, but Gilgamesh fails. His last hope, a flower of eternal youth, is eaten by the goddess Ishtar, who exacts her revenge. Finally, Enkidu comes from the underworld to show Gilgamesh true immortality: the king will be remembered for his good deeds, courage, and love for his people. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Buy all three
My children and I are beginning a study of ancient civilizations and I bought the three Gilgamesh books to expand our coverage of ancient Sumer. These books are just amazing! The story itself is powerful but I wondered how the author was going to tone down some of the violence; not to mention the fact that Shamat was a prostitute in other versions. Ludmilla Zeman has brought this story to children with intensity and grace that comes as a complete surprise. I especially liked her painting of the chaste kiss between Shamat and Enkidu with the explanation that Shamat taught Enkidu to speak and together they explored the ways of love. Very tender.

In her illustrations, Ludmilla Zeman has made an attempt to incorporate actual historical artifacts. These are all high-quality books in every sense and I cannot recommend them highly enough. ... Read more


13. The Revenge of Ishtar (Epic of Gilgamesh (Paperback))
by LUDMILA ZEMAN
list price: $8.95
our price: $8.06
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0887764363
Catlog: Book (1998-04-25)
Publisher: Tundra Books
Sales Rank: 169303
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In this second volume in the Gilgamesh trilogy, Enkidu joins Gilgamesh in the quest to slay Humbaba, the monster who has attacked the city and caused great destruction, including the death of the beautiful singer, Shamat. Gilgamesh and Enkidu successfully slay the monster and in so doing, Gilgamesh attracts the attention of the goddess Ishtar. In rejecting her advances, he incurs her revenge and an attack by the Bull of Heaven. Enkidu manages to kill the bull, but is slain by Ishtar, striking at the bond between the two friends. Shattered, Gilgamesh vows he will destroy the last monster: death. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Buy all three
My children and I are beginning a study of ancient civilizations and I bought the three Gilgamesh books to expand our coverage of ancient Sumer. These books are just amazing! The story itself is powerful but I wondered how the author was going to tone down some of the violence; not to mention the fact that Shamat was a prostitute in other versions. Ludmilla Zeman has brought this story to children with intensity and grace that comes as a complete surprise. I especially liked her painting of the chaste kiss between Shamat and Enkidu with the explanation that Shamat taught Enkidu to speak and together they explored the ways of love. Very tender.

In her illustrations, Ludmilla Zeman has made an attempt to incorporate actual historical artifacts. These are all high-quality books in every sense and I cannot recommend them highly enough. ... Read more


14. Harry by the Sea
by Gene Zion
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064430103
Catlog: Book (1976-10-06)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 17611
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Harry, a friendly little dog on a visit to the seashore, is mistaken for a sea serpent when a big wave covers him with seaweed. ‘Very few children can resist [the stories about] Harry. The ridiculous but somehow plausible situations capture even the most reluctant reader.’ —SLJ.

Chidlren's Books of 1965 (Library of Congress) ... Read more

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Harry the sea monster
Harry gets into another of his adventures, this time turning into a seaweed monster at the beach. The illustrations are delightful and it's a fun read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Story!
I have had this book since 1969 when I was 6 years old. It is a treasured part of my childhood! It tells the story of a lovable dog Harry and his family spending an eventful day at the beach. Children and adults alike will love this cuddly tale.

5-0 out of 5 stars An adorable dog, kids, beach, adventure. 'nuff said!
This book instantly became a bedtime favorite with each of my kids (boy and girl). Harry is adorable, and just enough mischief and adventure (and smelly seaweed!) to keep the little one's attention, and to keep young readers turning the pages. You'll love it too.

5-0 out of 5 stars Highly recommend this book!
This was my favorite book as a child. Great story and fun pictures. ... Read more


15. The Gadget
by PAUL ZINDEL
list price: $6.50
our price: $5.85
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Asin: 0440229510
Catlog: Book (2003-02-11)
Publisher: Laurel Leaf
Sales Rank: 336552
Average Customer Review: 3.85 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Near the end of World War II, scientists in Los Alamos, New Mexico, are working on a project that will alter the fate of the world. Thirteen-year-old Stephen Orr is living at a top secret military base with his father who is a leading physicist building the atomic bomb. Stephen realizes the dangers involved when one of the scientists becomes hospitalized as a result of working with the project. The scientist alerts him to disasters that could come from The Gadget. Stephen feels it is up to him and his friend Tilanov
to find the answers that lie behind this veil of secrecy.
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Reviews (20)

5-0 out of 5 stars the sunglasses
The book that I read is the gadget by: paul zindel. It all stared when stephen and his cousin where on the roof when the war was going on and the japines came and bombed london and his cousin stared to run and when all of the smoke clered he went to see where his cousin was and he said that he was on the ground like a torwn bleeding doll. Then he had to go live with his dad in new mexico so he could be procted. Then he went to go find some friends where he lived then he staterd to go to school he started to get more friends and that is where he begin to be friends with aliex. If you like to read then you would probley wantto read this book I liked this book alot maby you will like it to.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Gadget
Stephen, his mother, and cousin were living in London when the Germans bombed their home city of London. Stephen?s father, a physicist, had been in Los Alamos on a top-secret military base. After the German bombing raid, Stephen was sent to stay on the base with his father. At the base Stephen met a boy named Alexei, and they soon became good friends. Since Stephen had arrived at the base he felt something was going on and he took many chances to find out the truth. He narrowly escaped from an attempted kidnapping with the help of his friend Alexei. They eventually follow military trucks to a bomb testing area and experience the base?s secret first hand, an atomic bomb that the base physicists were working on. When Stephen heard that the war ended, he ran to Alexei?s house, which was off base, he accidentally finds out that Alexei and his family were spies. A chase ensues between Stephen and Alexei and his father; in the end Stephen is safe, Alexei is hit by a train and killed, and his father and associates are taken away. Stephen learned more than he bargained for in his quest for answers.
I enjoyed this book from the first page to the last. I found it interesting because it related to topic we were studying in school. The book, The Gadget, is a great story about a boy in search for answers and the struggles and hardships he faced along the way. The book is very descriptive and allowed me to visualize the events and settings. I felt the tension, worry, and other emotions along with the main character.
I would definitely recommend The Gadget, to anyone because it was suspenseful from the beginning to the end; I had a hard time putting it down. This book grabbed my attention and never let go. The story of Stephen and the chances and adventures he took to find the secret of the base fascinated me. The answers he found shocked me; the base secret was a hidden atomic bomb, and Alexei and his family being spies. If you are looking for adventure, suspense, and surprise in your reading, you should definitely consider reading The Gadget.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Gadget
This book is about a boy sent to an army with his dad, but his dad is already there. Sthepen (boy) os only sent there to keep his dad company. But wierd things start happening to Stephen while he is there. You'll just have to read thebook to find out the wierd stuff. This book has alot of action in it and a great WW II.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Gadget
The Gadget is a verey good book.It's adout this kid Stephen and his friend Jackson one night they were on the roof top playing around like kids do and then they heared a loud siren so harried to the door but they never made then there was this loud exelosion then there was nothing left besiades a huge dark black cloud filled with smoke.I think this book is good for peole who like adventures.

3-0 out of 5 stars Paul Zindel dropped the bomb
The year is 1945, WWII tears through Europe, and America fears it will spread to the US. This is wear we meet Steven, a 13 year old boy who is the son of a physicist. Steven lives with his father in a town that does not exist, Los Alamos, NM. This is wear the USA plans to stop the war, it is also wear Steven and his new found friend Alexia find out how.

I thought this was a good book, especially for those who are reluctant to sit down and take the time to read. Like most of Zindel's books, the chapters in The Gadget are short, but catchy. I found that this seemed to make the book more suspenseful, and flow much better. The shorterr chapters make more sense in this book to, since each chapter is equal to a day or two in Steven's life at Los Alamos. I also discovered that the author does not spice his writing with uneeded ingritents. The writing is simple,crisp, and two the point.

As you read this story, you notice how two of the main chracters change. Steven seems to drift away from his father, as Steven's father wants to become closer to his already distant son, but can't due to his work. I found this predictable because his father was never home.

I found that this book was inticing, and did not contain any major flaws. The only flaw that seemed to bother me wasthat in moved extemely fast, but this may suit different readers. I also found how historicly accurate this book was even though it was historical fiction.

While i was reading this book it reminded me of the movie Pearl Harbor, because of it's connection to WWII. It also reminded me of the movie starring Nicholas cage, but iI cant remember it's title. This movie is almost exactly like the book except for the abcense of Steven.

Overall I thought that this was a good book for young readers who are afraid to read. ... Read more


16. Swamp Angel (Caldecott Honor Book)
by Anne Isaacs, Paul O. Zelinsky
list price: $16.99
our price: $11.55
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525452710
Catlog: Book (1994-09-01)
Publisher: Dutton Books
Sales Rank: 41899
Average Customer Review: 4.64 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

On the day of her birth, nothing about Angelica Longrider suggested that she would one day become the greatest woodswoman of Tennessee. In fact, the newborn was "scarcely taller than her mother and couldn't climb a tree without help." It's not long, though, before Angelica is vanquishing varmints such as Thundering Tarnation, a huge bear with a taste for settlers' winter rations, and swallowing entire lakes in a gulp.

This tallest of tall tales is an original from an intriguing newcomer to children's books, Anne Isaacs. In the tradition of Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill, the story of a self-sufficient, tornado-wielding, unflappable heroine lopes along at a perfect pace. Paul O. Zelinsky's folksy oil illustrations are painted on cherry, maple, or birch veneers, with old-fashioned frames; the extravagant and fanciful paintings have garnered the distinguished illustrator yet another Caldecott Honor. (Zelinsky has already received one Caldecott Medal for Rapunzel and two Caldecott Honors for Hansel and Gretel and Rumpelstiltskin.) The dry and fantastically far-fetched humor of the author-illustrator team will make readers of all ages feel as though Angelica herself has tossed 'em in the air so high that they are still on the way up at nightfall. (Ages 4 and older) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars A story of mythical proportions told with great humor.
Swamp Angel is charming and hilarious. Words and pictures blend together to tell a wonderful tall tale of mythical proportions. It demands to be read out loud, preferably to a group of children or family and friends, with as much of an exaggerated hillbilly twang as the narrator can muster. Angelica Longrider, aka Swamp Angel, is reminiscent of Paul Bunyon in size and accomplishments, but is also feminine and feminist, making her a suitable heroine for impressionable young girls. Swamp Angel's conquest of the fierce, marauding giant bear, Thundering Tarnation, strikes one as a metaphor for the conquest of the wilderness by the pioneers of America. At the height of her conquest of the bear, Angelica praises its strength and tenacity. Above all, this book is a hoot to read, beautifully illustrated, and heralds an exciting new author on the childrens' book scene.

5-0 out of 5 stars A modern day tall tale
Angelica Longrider is known to the settlers of Tennessee as "Swamp Angel". She is a giant girl-turned-woman who helps settlers in need. A giant bear is eating all of the settlers' food and they cannot stop him. Swamp Angel grabs the bear and throws him into the sky, where his imprint can still be seen today as a constellation. He does not come back down, so Swamp Angel grabs a tornado and lassos the bear from the sky. The bear and Swamp Angel wrestle for many days and many nights. They even wrestle in their sleep. Swamp Angel snores so loudly that a tree falls down, killing the bear. The people rejoiced and ate many foods made from bear, including bear cake. Swamp Angel took the bear hide to Montana and lay it down like a rug. We now call that area Shortgrass Prairie. This story reminds me of a modern day Paul Bunyan. It is nice to have a tall tale with a female hero. The illustrations are unique and they add a lot to the story, showing things that Swamp Angel did that were not in the text. I recommend this book to all readers.

5-0 out of 5 stars What's not to like?
A truly enjoyable folktale. With Paul Zelinsky's inventive and endlessly amusing illustrations, the book tells as well as it views. With sentences like, "Varmint, I'm much obliged for that pelt you're carryin'", Swamp Angel's showdown with the bear Thundering Tarnation is of epic proportions. Zelinsky has truly outdone himself in his portrayals of their fight. There are thousands of tiny illustrations hidden on each page for kids to discover and delight in. The fight itself is about good old-fashioned wrassling, and it's a joy to watch. Zelinsky painted his illustrations on actual wood veneer, hoping to give the book a folk-art feel of some sort. The result is a beautiful story that adults and kids will both enjoy. As I might have given away, I'm a fan. book could easily be paired with another tall tales, possibly that of the other gigantic hero Paul Bunyun or the great John Henry. Both would fit in well with this story, though Swamp Angel owes perhaps most of her telling to Pecos Bill more than anyone else.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful tale, beautiful illustrations.
"Swamp Angel" by Anne Isaacs is adorable. It is written in the tradition of Paul Bunyan and Babe, the Blue Ox, only featuring Swamp Angel and Thundering Tarnation, the Bear, who are not exactly best friends, as she feeds him to every citizen in Tennessee. However, it is appropriate for grade-school children, and the illustrations are wonderful.

2-0 out of 5 stars Overrated
I only give this two stars for the illustrations and suspect that the main reason this book is bought is because of the Caldecott Honor. While I look for books that have strong female characters, I cannot recommend this story. There are many violent images -- a man caught in a bear trap, a multi-day wrestling match with a bear -- which, IMHO, are too much for young children. We shouldn't be teaching our girls or our boys that to be a giant and wrestle bears is how girls get to be the equal of boys. ... Read more


17. Harry and the Lady Next Door (I Can Read Book 1)
by Gene Zion
list price: $3.99
our price: $3.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064440087
Catlog: Book (1978-04-19)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 67013
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Harry's had it!

The lady next door sings too loudly and too often, but every time Harry tries to stop her he gets in trouble. Can Harry solve the neighborhood's problem before he's sent to the doghouse?

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Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars As Much Fun Now As When I was a Kid
I grew up with this book and never knew of the others in the series. Seeing as my daughter loves dogs I had to buy this when I saw it in this new edition.

An opera singer has moved into the house next to Harry's. The singer practices all day long, singing loud and high. Harry does not like this sound. Harry tries a number of ways to get her to stop. These do not please his family. But finally, a good way is found and everyone is happy.

As a parent, one of the things I like about this book is that it is clear that Harry is not being good when he howls, leads cows or a marching band, or other tricks. Although we want Harry to succeed, we also want it to be in the right and good way. This book knows the difference.

I loved this book as a kid and I still do. My daughter loves it (hopefully my son will too).

4-0 out of 5 stars harry and the lady next door
I like Harry and the lady Next Door because Harry doesnt like her sining. I also like this book because Harry brings all these animals. home and the lady sings louder than them. These are reasons why you should read these books.

5-0 out of 5 stars Harry the Wonder Dog!
Harry goes to desperate lengths to silence the lady next door - her singing is too high and loud. He howls, bits piano legs, steals music, chases cows and bands, but finally succeeds, to everyones' relief. Even the lady next door is happy.

I read this as a child, as did my brothers. This is the first story that my 5 year old has shown an interest in reading by himself. Thanks Harry! ... Read more


18. The Little Mermaid
by Hans Christian Andersen, Lisbeth Zwerger, Anthea Bell
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0698400011
Catlog: Book (2004-09)
Publisher: Minedition
Sales Rank: 57725
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Book Description

Once there was a little mermaid who fell in love with a human boy .. . The story may be familiar, but Lisbeth Zwerger's art makes this fairytale seembrand-new. This Jubilee edition, celebrating 200 years of Hans ChristianAndersen, is superbly illustrated in Zwerger's signature style. Known for herpopular and award-winning editions of classics such as The Wizard of Oz andAlice in Wonderland, Zwerger is herself the recipient of the Hans ChristianAndersen Medal for lasting contributions to children's literature. The LittleMermaid is sure to win her new fans, and to delight her old ones.

The text is an all-new translation by Anthea Bell, and includes many lovely andpoignant details that may be new to even those who think they know the littlemermaid's story well. ... Read more


19. Over and Over
by Charlotte Zolotow
list price: $16.89
our price: $16.89
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060269561
Catlog: Book (1957-01-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 374204
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

‘The year’s seasonal changes and festivities that are important in a little child’s life are imaginatively [described]. . . . The story ends with the happy realization that it will all come round ‘over and over’ again.’ —H.

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Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Wheel of the Year
This book was created by a true dream team, beloved author Charlotte Zolotow and gifted illustrator Garth Williams. It begins with a little girl who is too little to know about time. She is so young, we learn, that she doesn't know the days of the week yet, or the months, or even the seasons in order.She has memories of things like a crocus in bloom, a snowman, Valentines, a turkey dinner, and a Christmas tree but they're jumbled up in her head in no particular order.
One morning when the little girl wakes up to find that snow has fallen during the night she excitedly wants an explanation.After her mother explains about snow and winter, the little girl wants to know, "What's next?"As her mother continues throughout this delightful story to explain what season or holiday comes next, Zolotow's story gives us charming details that Williams transforms into pure magic.We eventually traverse the whole wheel of the year and return to the little girl's winter birthday where she makes a wonderful wish.This is a beautiful book in every way and is certainly the best I know of for teaching the traditional American/Christian holiday cycle and the flow of the seasons in northern America. It's lovely.

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written and illustrated
Charlotte Zolotow's Over and Over is a wonderfully worded story, and the pictures are engaging! My children love how the story begins during the first snow of winter, and comes full circle ending with the little girl'sbirthday in early December. We feel happy and excited seeing the littlegirl travel through her year, defining the seasons and sharing in the joyof each holiday and special occasion. This is one of our favorites!Weread it over and over and never grow tired of this enchanting story.

5-0 out of 5 stars Vivid illustrations!
I found this book again in the library the other day after not having seen it since I was a little girl.I must have studied the illustrations in perfect detail because I remember them as if it were yesterday and not 20years ago.Definitely, one of my favorite books as a child!

5-0 out of 5 stars Special story for sharing with children
A lovely story to read with young children.Superb illustrations.Also good as a primer for reading, as you will read this over and over....

5-0 out of 5 stars A sweet ,magical look at the seasons and holidays.
I loved this book as a child and the beautiful illustrations have always stayed with me.They capture the wonder and joy of a child celebrating lifes special occasions throughout the year.I look forward to sharing this bookwith my sons. ... Read more


20. William's Doll (Jp 067)
by Charlotte Zolotow
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064430677
Catlog: Book (1985-05-01)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 44095
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

More than anything, William wants a doll. "Don't be a creep," says his brother. "Sissy, sissy," chants the boy next door. Then one day someone really understands William's wish, and makes it easy for others to understand, too.

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Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Book Every Daddy Should Read
I have been a teacher of young children for 15 years and I have yet to find a story that better illustrates the need our little boys have to love and cuddle a baby of their own than "William's Doll". All William wants is a baby doll like the little girl next door has, but when he tells his father he gets everything but. Then William's Grandmother comes to visit and as she says, "He can learn how to be a good father". I get this book as a baby shower gift for everynew father I know!

5-0 out of 5 stars A doll that other fellows cannot steal
An oddly tender tale about a boy and his desire to own a doll of his own. Books that break stereotypes rarely do it as intelligently and simply as Charlotte Zolotow's remarkable, "William's Doll". Usually if a picture book has something to say, it'll announce the fact to you with great pomp and flair, and maybe a little more pomp. It'll take its message and shove it down your throat, attempting to cram every little bit of lesson into you. This is not the case with this book. In "William's Doll" you've a delicate tale told in such a way that its message, while remaining very powerful, is spoken in a small quiet voice.

William is a boy who wants a doll. He wants to play with it and hug it. He wants to tuck it into bed at night and wake it up in the morning and pretend that it's his own child. Needless to say, this plan is met with not a little bit of derision by his peers. His brother thinks it's creepy and the boy next door even goes so far as to call William a sissy. As for William's father, he decides to stem the boy's desires by purchasing manly toys for him. Basketballs, and trains, and tools. The only one who understands William is his grandmother, a wise woman who gives William his heart's desire and patiently explains to his father that there is nothing odd or abnormal about a boy wanting a doll. After all, if girls play with dolls to be good mothers why shouldn't boys play with dolls to be good fathers?

There's a bit of a satirical bite to the end of this picture book that I enjoyed. When the grandmother explains why Williams needs a doll, she tells his father that he needs it so that he'll know how to take care of his own baby, "and bring him the things he wants, like a doll so that he can practice being a father". Which is basically her way of saying to William's pop, "Obviously you never had a doll as a child, so you're not as prepared a father as William someday will be". Nice. The book treads a delicate line as well. Many families today may recognize the fact that it's perfectly possible that William is just as likely to be a boy who wants to be a good father as it is that he may someday be gay (obviously his father's big worry). And there's nothing wrong with that. But whatever William's reasons for wanting a doll, this book makes it plain that gender stereotypes are wrongdy wrong wrong. So I was very taken with the story. The illustrations are rather nice as well. The book was written in 1972, and as such there are some incredibly 70s children here. William looks half a step away from joining the Partridge Family on their bus. His brother and brother's friend look normal enough, but they're fans of wearing tennis sweaters and white shorts, something seen rarely today. Illustrator William Pene Du Bois conveys the tender feelings William wishes to lavish upon his doll perfectly. His pictures are just as adept at placing a sly look into the protagonist's eyes when he beats his brother and pal at basketball as when William stares longingly at the neighbor girl's doll. The result is a perfectly written little work that stands to be remembered today.

It's a little sad that the idea of boys playing with dolls is just as scoffed at today as it was in 1972. Not much progress has been made in that area, I'm afraid. If you don't believe me, just check out the section of Toys R Us labeled "Boys" and the section labeled "Girls". Gender stereotyping is prevalent in our society, and will likely remain so for a long long time. That alone is reason enough for books like "William's Doll" to remain in circulation. As long as a book is capable to teaching both kids and adults an important lesson, it will remain an influential work. So a tip of the hat to "William's Doll". We still have a lot to learn from it.

5-0 out of 5 stars William's Doll
This is an excellent book!! If only more people could see things from William's grandmother's perspective, the world would be a better place! This book is about accepting and trying to understand differences. William is a boy who really wants a doll, and his father and brother ridicule him. Read this book and see how his grandmother has a positive impact!

5-0 out of 5 stars 2nd generation!
This was helpful for me when I was a little boy who liked to play with dolls and got teased for it. My mom bought it and read it to me and it was just the thing. Now I'm pleased to be able to read it to my 3 yr old daughter.

4-0 out of 5 stars Mrs. B's class reviews "William's Doll"
We think this book is great for all children, but especially for boys. We think this book is great for all parents, but especially for parents of boys. We know that all kids need someone to love! ... Read more


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