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41. Five Children and It (Puffin Classics
$5.39 $4.00 list($5.99)
42. Where Is Baby's Belly Button?
$8.06 $4.50 list($8.95)
43. The Period Book: Everything You
$9.71 list($12.95)
44. Daddy Hugs 1 2 3
$9.71 $8.47 list($12.95)
45. Harry Potter Schoolbooks Box Set:
$8.09 $3.95 list($8.99)
46. Speak
$10.87 $9.64 list($15.99)
47. Knuffle Bunny : A Cautionary Tale
$12.23 $10.56 list($17.99)
48. Tale of Despereaux: Being the
$32.97 $30.20 list($49.95)
49. Harry Potter and the Chamber of
$6.00 $2.00
50. Half Magic
$8.96 list($11.95)
51. Carnival at Candlelight (Magic
$86.60 $75.00
52. World History: Connections to
$21.59 list($35.99)
53. The Situation Worsens: A Box of
$8.96 list($9.95)
54. Eragon
$73.11 $59.00 list($94.95)
55. Cullinan and Galda's Literature
$9.71 $5.99 list($12.95)
56. The Red Book
$6.50 $3.11
57. The Phantom Tollbooth
$5.95 $1.99
58. Tuck Everlasting
$25.15 $20.99 list($41.93)
59. The Chronicles of Narnia Boxed
$4.95 $2.40
60. Brian Wildsmith's Animals To Count

41. Five Children and It (Puffin Classics - the Essential Collection)
by E. Nesbit, H. R. Millar
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0140367357
Catlog: Book (1996-12-01)
Publisher: Puffin Books
Sales Rank: 87506
Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

To Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother, the house in the country promises a summer of freedom and play.But when they accidently uncover an accident Psammead--or Sand-fairy--who has the power to make wishes come true, they find themselves having the holiday of a lifetime, sharing one thrilling adventure after another.

Asleep since dinosaurs roamed the earth, the ill-tempered, odd--looking Psammead --with his spider-shaped body, bat's ears, and snail's eyes --grudgingly agrees to grant the children one wish per day.Soon, though the children discover that their wishes have a tendancy to turn out quite differnetly than expected. Whatever they wish whether it's to fly like a bird, live in a mighty castle, or have an immense fortune --something goes terribly wrong, hilariously wrong.

Then an accidental wish has horrible consequences, and the children are faced with a difficult choice: to let an innoncent manbe charged with a crime or to lose for all time their gift of magical wishes.Five Children and It is on of E. Nesbit's most beloved tales of enchantment.This deluxe gift edition, featuring twelve beautiful watercolor paintings by Caldecott medalist Paul O. Zelinsky, is sure to be treasured addition to every family's library.

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Reviews (16)

4-0 out of 5 stars My review of "Five Children and It"
This book is about Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother who discover a Psammead,
or Sand-fairy, who agrees to grant the children one wish per day.
Soon, their wishes start to turn quite unlike what they expected.
Then, an accidental wish has terrible consequences, and the kids
are faced with a hard choice: to let an innocent man be charged
with a crime, or to lose their gift of magical wishes.

I read this book in one day, and I thought it was pretty good.
This book turned out to be fairly interesting.
I would probably read "Five Children and It" again.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sandy delight
This 1902 fantasy, a gift from my parents when I was in fourth or fifth grade, features an irritable Psammead whom Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother dig up in a sand pit. Then the magic begins. The sand-fairy does not like granting wishes, and his misshapen body with bat's ears and snail's eyes bloats when he does. The wishes, lasting only until sunset, all take unexpected, funny turns.

The sand-fairy and other personalities and Victorian details render the magic entirely real-world, believable. This was my favorite children's book and I relived the delight when I found a copy to share with my own children. That this volume is illustrated by one of my favorite people from one of my favorite families triples the delight.

The book is too challenging for independent reading for children under 10, but it's a great read-aloud for small children, as are the classics of Frank Baum, E.B. White and C.S. Lewis.

Edith Nesbit was like J. K. Rowling a single mother in need of a means to support her children. Her books in their era were as popular as Harry Potter in this one. Some of her observations are surprisingly humane. Nesbit's treatment of a clan of Gypsies, for example, transcends the deep prejudice of her time. Not to worry, the book is not preachy or teachy. It's just grand, eloquent fun. Alyssa A. Lappen

5-0 out of 5 stars Be careful what you wish for...
E. Nesbit's classic story of about some Edwardian children who find a sand fairy one summer is an unsentimental delight. Each day the odd fairy grants them one magic wish, be it beauty, wealth, great size, etc. which will only last until sunset. Somehow each wish they make turns into a disaster, but through their own cleverness and a bit of luck, the children are able to make each problem work out in the end. Nesbit's writing is particularly full of amusing asides and offbeat humor in this one. Her turns of plot are inventive, and as the plucky children face their outlandish predicaments, it becomes clear that Nesbit has her finger on the pulse of the way real children might think. Her work has held up quite well considering it is over a hundred years old. This novel would be suitable for kids in about fourth or fifth grade.

3-0 out of 5 stars sadly, this classic does not stand up to the test of time
Edith Nesbit is a charming writer. She tells her story with wit and humour, and interjects sly digs that engender a wink and a smile, but while the premise is timeless and interesting, the prose is extremely dated, making the book a bit tedious to read for any length of time. Also, the ideas and prejudices exhibited by the characters date the material.

The five siblings of the title, who have found a Sand-fairy willing to grant them one wish a day, continually make silly wishes that get them into trouble. Their first wish is to be "as beautiful as the day". Right there you get a sense of the book's outdated charm. This is of interest more as a tribute to a talented children's writer of a bygone era rather than for its own sake.

I wanted to enjoy this classic, but I found it hard slogging through. That is just my opinion, however, but I'd suggest you read a bit of the text before purchasing it unless you're already familiar with, or particularly interested in, author Nesbit.

Caveat: The occasional black-and-white line drawings are by H.R. Millar, not the Paul Zelinsky watercolors promised in the Editorial Reviews section.

3-0 out of 5 stars A cynic's delight
I doubt I would have liked "Five Children and It" even as a child: an ordinary child's troubles are so much more troublesome than the challenges these kids face, it's almost (but not quite) funny. Cyril, Robert, Anthea, and Jane live in a countryside mansion replete with servants, they take trips to toy stores where they can buy whatever their hearts desire (the author informs us that this is the way children ought to be brought up), and inside a gravel-pit they have found a prehistoric sand-fairy that grants them wishes, one each day, but all their wishes have been turning out rotten so far. Well, boo hoo.

It isn't the concept that bothers me; it is the execution. Baum's and Carroll's heroines face comparable situations, but neither authors' books evoked such negative reactions from me. The reasons why the children's wishes fail I found especially abominable: when peerless beauty is wished for, the maid won't let them in since they look like "eyetalian monkeys"; when wealth is asked for and antique guineas appear by the bushel, the kids are arrested for thieves; when stolen jewellery magically reappears, it is Beale, the gameskeeper, who is immediately and incontrovertibly the chief suspect; when the four wish (accidentally) for the baby to grow up, the Lamb (Or Devereuz, or Hilary, or St Maur, as he should be rightly called) becomes a snappish fop. Nesbit draws miscellaneous moralistic lessons from her tale ("I cannot pretend that stealing is right"), but what use are these lessons when you are arrested whether or not you tell the truth? I would much rather Nesbit turn a cynical eye on the people she is describing, instead of using her keen powers of observations to weave an antithetical yarn.

At least her prose is reasonable enough. Nesbit's language is lucid, and while her sentence structure is rather sophisticated, it is not unduly so. Sadly, the same cannot be said of her characters. The four children who are the novel's protagonists are essentially the only developed characters, and while they are developed rather well, with plausibility and realism, they are bland. They are honest, noble, polite, friendly, sociable, and well-off; they treat the servants and people of lower station as functionaries, tools, ways of getting from A to B, and so does the author. Thus, there is little desire on the reader's part to come to know them better. They allow little conflict, little empathy. I'm probably the first to levy the charge that they have little wit and, if not for the fact that the wishes disappear at sundown, they would have great difficulty dealing with ther wishes.

But more about those wishes: it is quite surprising how many of them are accidental. In fact, there is little premeditated wishing going on past chapter six: otherwise, Nesbit would have been hard-pressed to find a reason for the children to wish for marauding Indians. What lesson are we, as readers, to draw from this? "Word your wishes carefully?" I'm reminded of the movie "Big," in where a twelve-year-old wishes to be grown-up to impress an older girl, and instead becomes Tom Hanks and scares the heck out of everybody. Just once I'd like a book where the characters get their hearts' true desires and have to come to terms with THAT. ... Read more


42. Where Is Baby's Belly Button?
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689835604
Catlog: Book (2000-09-01)
Publisher: Little Simon
Sales Rank: 37
Average Customer Review: 4.72 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Where are Baby's hands?
Under the bubbles!

Where are baby's eyes?
Under her hat!

Karen Katz's adorable babies play peekaboo in this delightful interactive book. The sturdy format and easy-to-lift flaps are perfect for parents and children to share. ... Read more

Reviews (64)

5-0 out of 5 stars This adorable interactive book teaches body parts and more!
Every once in a while, I come across a book that appeals to the adult in me, because it's educational, artistic, amusing or perhaps all of the above, but what fascinates me is when my son discovers the real value in a work, and teaches me a thing or two along the way. To adults "Where is the Baby's Belly Button" written and illustrated by Karen Katz appears to be a simple 14-page book that teaches body parts, but to children it's much more.

This nifty little board book is essentially a peek-a-boo book with flaps. It measures approximately 8 ¼" x 7 ½" x ½ ", and is constructed of cardboard with heavy card stock for the flaps. The images are simply illustrated, yet brightly colored with creatively contrasted backgrounds that produce interest. The text appears on the left side of the book with bold, solid colored backdrops that emphasis the large black printing, and compliment the illustrations on the opposing page. The writing consists of short, four or five word sentences, such as, "Where are baby's eyes?" The reader lifts the flap and it says, "Under the hat." The picture shows a baby hiding under a hat, and when the flap is lifted the baby's face is revealed. She is pointing to her eyes.

"Where is the Baby's Belly Button" has been one of my son's most requested books for a year now; he's nearly two-years old. He lovingly refers to this book as the "baby" book, and he has taught me that he has learned where his eyes, mouth, belly button, feet, and hands are, in addition to understanding the meaning of the words, hat, cup, shirt, cat, bubbles and WHERE. The question, "Where?" comes out of his mouth probably 20 or 30 times everyday, and I am certain it's because of this book. I wish the flaps were made of a heavier card stock as they have become creased over time, which is expected with use, but also preventable with a heavier stock. This book has been a huge hit, and one I haven't gotten tired of reading over and over again. I recommend this book for one-year olds and up as the interactive feature, (lifting of the flaps) is too advanced for younger babies, however an infant would probably find the images fascinating all the same.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great fun for baby and parents!
This is a nice sturdy book with colorful drawings of babies with some part of their body hidden. Each page asks, "Where is baby's ...?" Toddlers delight in lifting the flaps to find the hidden pictures. The pictures are bright and cute with eye-catching fabric and wallpaper patterns. A very attractive book, and perfect for that stage when toddlers become fascinated with their belly buttons! My 17 month old has really enjoyed this book. It can be very helpful in getting kids to name body parts, and it's fun for both the baby and the parents to read. Highly recommended.

3-0 out of 5 stars Keep book out of baby's reach
My 16 mo old daughter has loved this book since she was 12 mo., but I have to keep it out of her reach . She loves to lift the flaps but has now been tearing the flaps off when she reads the book on her own. She is only allowed to read it in my lap where I can stop her from ripping the flap off.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best book
This was one of the first books given to our son. We loved the cute pictures and wording of the book. Our son is now 15 months old and still loves to find the different things on the baby. He especially likes Where are baby's hands....under the bubbles...maybe it is the way I change my voice when reading to him. This is a must have...along with all the other books by Karen Katz

5-0 out of 5 stars great
My 8 month old daughter laughs everytime we read this book. I bring it with us when we go out - I know that it will make her happy! ... Read more


43. The Period Book: Everything You Don't Want to Ask (But Need to Know) (But Need to Know)
by Karen Gravelle, Jennifer Gravelle, Debbie Palen
list price: $8.95
our price: $8.06
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0802774784
Catlog: Book (1996-04-01)
Publisher: Walker & Company
Sales Rank: 1060
Average Customer Review: 4.48 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (25)

5-0 out of 5 stars WONDERFUL BOOK
I BOUGHT THIS BOOK FOR MY DAUGHTER WHEN SHE WAS 5 YEARS OLD. SHE HAS ALWAYS BEEN CURIOUS ABOUT HER BODY AND I HAVE ALWAYS EXPLAINED IT TO HER THROUGH A MEDICAL ASPECT. WHEN I WAS GROWING UP I HAD NO INFORMATION WHATSOEVER ABOUT MY BODY AND WHAT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. I FELT WHEN I HAD MY GIRL SHE SHLD BE PREPARED FOR THE CHANGES. THIS BOOK WITH IT'S WONDERFULLY INFOMATIVE AND PLAIN LANGUAGE WAS JUST WHAT WE NEEDED. NOW THAT SHE IS 11 AND ON THE VERGE OF STARTING HER PERIOD, SHE ISN'T IN THE DARK ABOUT IT AND SHE SEEMS MUCH MORE CONFIDENT WHEN WE DISCUSS IT.
I'M AM VERY GLAD THERE ARE BOOKS OF THIS TYPE ON THE MARKET FOR YOUNG GIRLS TODAY. I WOULD RATHER MY GIRL TALK TO ME ABOUT THIS SUBJECT THAN TO GO TO GIRLFRIENDS OF HER OWN AGE WHO DON'T HAVE THE EXPERIENCE OR INFORMATION.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, Wonderful However you want to put it.
Every young girl who is worried or just curious about her period should have this book. It explains what happens to your body during puberty, the what ifs and freaquently asked questions from many girls.Parents- if you are looking for a book on this type of thing, this is the book you are looking for. "It's A Girl Thing" by Mavis Jukes is great, too.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great for teens and pre-teens
This book has definitely helped me understand and feel comfortable with having my period. I didn't find this book inappropriate at all. It tells you about normal stuff that should be happening. I, personally, would recommend it to all pre-teens and teens!

2-0 out of 5 stars Wow! Too Much!
My mom bought this book for me when I turned 12, and we looked through it together. Wow, I could not believe what I had read! It was way too innapropriate for pre-teens. I would reccomend "The Care and Keeping of You". By American Girl.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best Book For Girl's Afraid To Ask!
I went to the library today, and my mom picked up this book. I read it today, and it answered all the questions that I was always afraid to ask! Every mom out there should get this for their daughter, no matter what they say! ... Read more


44. Daddy Hugs 1 2 3
list price: $12.95
our price: $9.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689877714
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry
Sales Rank: 179931
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45. Harry Potter Schoolbooks Box Set: Two Classic Books from the Library of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry
by J. K. Rowling
list price: $12.95
our price: $9.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 043932162X
Catlog: Book (2001-11-01)
Publisher: Scholastic
Sales Rank: 352
Average Customer Review: 4.42 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Now, the classic books from the library of the Hogwarts School ofWitchcraft and Wizardry--Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them andQuidditch Through the Ages--are available in hardcover in a sturdy boxedgift set. (These books are written by J.K. Rowling herself under the pseudonymsNewt Scamander and Kennilworthy Whisp.) Finally, Muggles will have the chance todiscover where the Quintaped lives, what the Puffskein eats, and why it is bestnot to leave milk out for a Knarl. The Quidditch textbook explains where theGolden Snitch came from, how the Bludgers came into existence, and why theWigtown Wanderers have pictures of meat cleavers on their clothes. Both books,designed to look like Harry Potter's actual, used Hogwarts textbooks, featuresilly scribblings from Harry, Ron, and Hermione. Proceeds from the sale of thisgift set will go to improving and saving the lives of children around the world.Harry Potter fans, rejoice! (All ages) ... Read more

Reviews (308)

5-0 out of 5 stars If you cannot go to Hogwarts, let Hogwarts come to you
Although not a necessary addition to everyone's personal Harry Potter library, these two little books are quite interesting and a lot of fun to read. They are both quite short, totaling less than sixty five pages apiece, but they are wonderfully put together and made to look like copies of real books from the Hogwarts library. None other than Albus Dumbledore himself writes the introduction to each book, explaining how and why these books are being made available to Muggles for the first time and explaining how proceeds from each book go directly to a fund, set up in Harry Potter's name by Comic Relief UK and author J.K. Rowling, which is dedicated to help children in need throughout the world.

Quidditch Through the Ages, penned by Quidditch expert Kennilworthy Whisp explains the ultimate sport of wizards from top to bottom, giving the centuries-old history of the game as it has evolved. First and foremost, he explains why wizards and witches employ brooms to fly on in the first place, and then he proceeds to give an account of the changing rules of the game from its early days of primitive baskets set atop poles to the standardized and world-sweeping format of today. Of most significance and interest is the story of how the Golden Snitch was introduced into the sport. Different strategies and maneuvers are named and explained, the thirteen Quidditch teams of England and Ireland are identified, some of the seven hundred types of fouls are explained, and some of the most memorable games and individual performances are detailed (including the Tutshill Tornados' Roderick Plumpton's amazing snag of the Golden Snitch only three and a half seconds into a game back in 1921).

Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them by Newt Scamander is a compendium of all the fantastic beasts currently known, from the Acromantula to the Yeti. Prior to the actual listings, Scamander explains the criteria by which some beings have come to be labeled beasts (it's more complicated than you might think) and devotes some time to the obvious question as to why Muggles seem to spot such creatures only rarely. Each listing also carries the classification assigned each beast by the Ministry of Magic, which is important information given that these beasts range from the harmless to the controllable to the incredibly dangerous. Along with fascinating descriptions of the animals we have already encountered in the Harry Potter books, there are some real jewels of information included here, solving several Muggle mysteries such as that of the true identity of the Loch Ness Monster. Fantastic Beasts is a copy of Harry Potter's own personal copy of the book, and its margins are dotted with little notes ranging from the mundane to the bitingly funny written by Harry, Ron, as well as Hermione. Now, if we could only get our hands on A History of Hogwarts; I'm sure Hermione has a copy they can use for the printing of a Muggle edition.

5-0 out of 5 stars Get your Harry fix and support a great cause!
Although the wait for 2002 and "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" is going to be a hard one for a lot of people, these two brief but fun books should fill the gap admirably as well as supporting a great cause. Released for the first time (well, to the general Muggle public), here's two of Harry Potter's schoolbooks, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and "Quidditch Through the Ages."

Slim and quick reads, these books nevertheless are a great deal of fun. "Quidditch" provides us with a brief evolution and history of everyone's favorite broomstick-riding sport, with rules of play, focuses on top world teams, and the revelation that Americans don't really play Quidditch on the world-class level, preferring an American variation called "Quodpot." "Fantastic Beasts" is a brisk and humorous guide to mythical, er, totally real monsters and magical creatures from the Acromantula (giant spider) to the Yeti. This book is Harry Potter's own personal copy, and is enlivened with Harry and Ron's writing and jokes in the margins of the book. Both books feature a wonderfully dry-humored introduction by Albus Dumbledore. Both books are written with a friendly and light sense of humor that's delightful to read and makes great background for the serious Harry Potter fan. Quidditch team Chudley Cannons' motto is said to have been changed from "We shall conquer" to "Let's all just keep our fingers crossed and hope for the best."

The most important reason to buy these books, however, is to support Comic Relief UK, the British relief organization set up to help children in the disadvantaged countries of the world. Although we can't save the world from manticores or score the winning goal in a Quidditch World Cup match, we can still be heroes by supporting this great cause.

4-0 out of 5 stars Warning
If your children are Harry Potter fans and read these books the odds are very good that they will throw quotes and 'facts' from these books at you at every opportunity.

These books are very short and filled with information that fills in and enhances the novels of the Harry Potter series. I have found that the information within them rounds out Rowlings magical universe.

If you are looking for a novel however these are not for you. They are reference books describing some of the magical creatures in the Harry Potter series or explaining the origns and rules of Quiddich. Good easy fun.

I would also like to add that these books would be ideal for a child who does not like to read but likes the H.P movies. They just might entice the non reader to pick up the H.P novels.

5-0 out of 5 stars Two words? Must have.
Harry Potter is a very popular series, and for any fan of the series, this is a must have. It will give you more information about the world of "Hogwarts" and you will feel good about yourself since it's also for a good cause, i only hope J.K. Rowling will write more of these. Books, Movies, and these schoolbooks i consider the official harry potter merchandise, and then Harry Potter themed candy, figures and such is nice also. I have both of these books, and i read them all the time. It's a good price too. I hope you purchase them, have fun reading!

5-0 out of 5 stars While You Wait.
This is a great "While you wait for book 6" collection. It has the spirit of the Harry Potter books.

The writing is as good as the harry potter books. but the content is not.

For breaif looks into the history of the Harry Potter boos they are great. Particularly for the history of monsters. Hoever id you are looking for a solid READ this is not the book collection for you. ... Read more


46. Speak
by Laurie Halse Anderson
list price: $8.99
our price: $8.09
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 014131088X
Catlog: Book (2001-04-01)
Publisher: Speak
Sales Rank: 2044
Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Melinda Sordino busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops. Now her old friends won't talk to her, and people she doesn't even know hate her from a distance. The safest place to be is alone, inside her own head. But even that's not safe. Because there's something she's trying not to think about, something about the night of the party that, if she let it in, would blow her carefully constructed disguise to smithereens. And then she would have to speak the truth. This extraordinary first novel has captured the imaginations of teenagers and adults across the country.

Awards for Speak

A 2000 Printz Honor Book
A 1999 National Book Award Finalist
An Edgar Allan Poe Award Finalist
A 1999 Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist
Winner of the SCBWI Golden Kite Award
An ALA Best Book for Young Adults
An ALA Quick Pick
A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year
A Booklist Top Ten First Novel of 1999
A BCCB Blue Ribbon Book
A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
A Horn Book Fanfare Title
... Read more

Reviews (721)

4-0 out of 5 stars Emily's Speak Book Review
Laurie Halse-Anderson's novel, Speak, is a riveting story about a teenage girl starting her high school days as an outcast. The main character, Melinda, had called the cops on the end-of-the-summer bash and everyone is busted. The reason for calling the cops is something Melinda keeps deep inside and does not reveal until the end. This novel shows Melinda as she struggles with many difficult aspects of high school and her home life. She has trouble speaking to people and expressing her true emotions. Though she's still very apprehensive, one person she starts to open up to is Mr. Freeman, her art teacher. He has taught her how to express her feelings through art and also told her he'd always be there to listen. Will Melinda finally open up to him or anyone, and find her voice?
I enjoyed this novel because it was realistic and detailed. It is a book that brings forth a mixture of emotions. It will make you laugh, cry, and yell out in anger. I definitely recommend this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Very touching novel
Laurie Halse Anderson's novel, Speak, is very well written. It's an entertaining, riveting tale about a girl who calls the police to a party which results in several of her peers getting busted. Something happened at the end-of-summer party that changed her life forever.
Upon returning to school in the fall, the main character, Melinda Sordino, is blackballed by her classmates. She chooses to deal with her problem and those around her by silencing herself. There is an internal battle going on inside Melinda's head throughout the novel. She finally finds refuge in one of her classes, art. The art instructor is a very caring individual who notices that Melinda is acting strangely and that she is different and withdrawn. He wants to help her so he shows empathy toward her. She begins to use art as an outlet and finds meaning and symbolism in it.
Anderson does an extraordinary job using symbolism throughout the novel. She deals with a very serious subject, yet her writing is extremely witty and funny. I found myself laughing aloud while reading it.
School can be a very negative experience for many young people. The life of a ninth grade student is told from Melinda Sordino's point of view. She is unpopular and berated. The cruelty displayed by her peers, comfortable in their cliques, is something many young adults will be able to identify with. By the end of the novel, Melinda finally speaks! She tells why she called the cops that night. At first no one believes her, then another event happens that turns her life around. You have to read this book!

4-0 out of 5 stars Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
I really liked this book. I just finished it a few weeks ago, because in English we had to do literature circles and this was the book three other people and I read. I thought that the book was really good and so did two of the other people in my group they rated it 8 out of ten and 10/10 and I rated 9/10 but the other person in the group gave it 1/10. He said that all Melinda did in the book was whine about things but I don't think that's true.

4-0 out of 5 stars Whatever you say can and will be used against you
Speak is an amazing read for anyone. While it is targeted towards Young Adults, I think it would be a good book for parents to read as well. Perhaps parents could read more YA books and it might actually give them a better understanding of their own teenagers. This gives the reader a good insight into the theory that there are two sides to every story. Not only does the unspoken character have to deal with the horrid aftermath of rape pulling at her emotional soul, but she can't talk about it to anyone. Fear of rejection, peer pressure, and teen angst play a major part in this powerful coming-of-age story

4-0 out of 5 stars speak
I recommend Speak for ages 13 and up, especially, if you are going into high school. It talks about first experiences in high school, the struggles with her classes and teachers, and includes her experiences on the bus. "The bus picks up students in groups of four or five. As they walk down the aisle, people who were in my middle-school lab partners or gym buddies glare at me. I close my eyes. This is what I've been dreading. As we leave the last stop, I am the only person sitting alone." She met a new girl named Heather. "Another wounded zebra turns and smiles at me. She's packing at least five grand worth of orthodontia, but has great shoes. 'I'm Heather from Ohio', she says. 'I'm new here. Are you?' I don't answer. The lights dim and the indoctrination begins." This book gave me a heads up on what high school will be and some of the experience that an ordinary student would go through. ... Read more


47. Knuffle Bunny : A Cautionary Tale
by Mo Willems
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786818700
Catlog: Book (2004-09-01)
Publisher: Hyperion
Sales Rank: 1148
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Book Description

Trixie, Daddy, and Knuffle Bunny take a trip to the neighborhood Laundromat. But the exciting adventure takes a dramatic turn when Trixie realizes somebunny was left behind… Using a combination of muted black-and-white photographs and expressive illustrations, this stunning book tells a brilliantly true-to-life tale about what happens when Daddy's in charge and things go terribly, hilariously wrong. ... Read more


48. Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread (Newbery Medal Book)
by Kate Dicamillo, Timothy B. Ering
list price: $17.99
our price: $12.23
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0763617229
Catlog: Book (2003-09-01)
Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
Sales Rank: 155
Average Customer Review: 4.13 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Kate DiCamillo, author of the Newbery Honor book Because of Winn-Dixie, spins a tidy tale of mice and men where she explores the "powerful, wonderful, and ridiculous" nature of love, hope, and forgiveness. Her old-fashioned, somewhat dark story, narrated "DearReader"-style, begins "within the walls of a castle, with the birth of a mouse." Despereaux Tilling, the new baby mouse, is different from all other mice. Sadly, the romantic, unmouselike spirit that leads the unusually tiny, large-eared mouse to the foot of the human king and the beautiful Princess Pea ultimately causes him to be banished by his own father to the foul, rat-filled dungeon.

The first book of four tells Despereaux's sad story, where he fallsdeeply in love with Princess Pea and meets his cruel fate. The secondbook introduces another creature who differs from hispeers--Chiaroscuro, a rat who instead of loving the darkness of his homein the dungeon, loves the light so much he ends up in the castle& in thequeen's soup. The third book describes young Miggery Sow, a girl who hasbeen "clouted" so many times that she has cauliflower ears. Still, allthe slow-witted, hard-of-hearing Mig dreams of is wearing the crown ofPrincess Pea. The fourth book returns to the dungeon-bound Despereauxand connects the lives of mouse, rat, girl, and princess in a dramaticdenouement.

Children whose hopes and dreams burn secretly within their hearts willrelate to this cast of outsiders who desire what is said to be out oftheir reach and dare to break "never-to-be-broken rules of conduct."Timothy Basil Ering's pencil illustrations are stunning, reflectingDiCamillo's extensive light and darkness imagery as well as the sweet,fragile nature of the tiny mouse hero who lives happily ever after.(Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (77)

5-0 out of 5 stars Enchanting Fable
A few months ago, I read a little blurb about this novel, and I couldn't wait to read it. Then, it won the Newberry Award, and I finally got hold of a copy. It didn't disappoint. The Tale of Despereaux is one of the most enchanting little stories I've ever read, and I have a feeling it's going to go down as a true children's classic.

The story is so entrancing. It centers around a mouse named Despereaux who just doesn't fit in with the other mice. He is born with his eyes opened. He sees a beautiful world that the others are blind to, and he is shunned because of it. He is able to hear music, and he is able to love creatures of other races. For instance, this tiny mouse falls in love with the human Princess Pea, and that begins quite a chain of events.

Of course, not everything in the story is happy. There is also a dark world that the novel doesn't hide from. There are characters who have had little chance in life and have been harmed because of it. There are characters here who have lead dark lives and are trying to destroy Princess Pea and Despereaux. But, ultimately, this isn't a dark novel but one proclaiming a message about love and hope and the possibility of redemption. It is a beautiful little novel about having the courage to bring some light into the world. The Tale of Despereaux is an amazing novel for people of every age which will be read for an oftly long time.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Magical New Classic
I have read The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo, and liked it much better than her Newbery Honor book, Because of Winn-Dixie. This fairy-tale adventure about a mouse, a rat, a princess, and a servant girl is told in a measured, mannered voice that's a departure for DiCamillo's usual casual style. There are frequent appeals to the "dear reader," which work for me as they do in so few other books.

Despereaux is the youngest mouse in his family. He is runty, with huge ears, and prefers reading books to eating them. We're given glimpses of his family -- his faithless father, his very proper sister, his loutish brother whose favorite word is "Cripes!," and his French mother, whose English is slightly stiff and very amusing. Before long, Despereaux's non-mousely behavior gets him banished to the dungeon, where the castle rats will presumably eat him.

He escapes, of course, only to cross paths with a vengeful rat who has taken a slow-witted palace maid into service, to help him carry out his plan to punish Princess Pea, the object of his hatred and Despereaux's devotion.

Forgiveness, second chances, embracing the light, being who you are, the importance of stories, and the restorative properties of a hot bowl of soup all come into play to create a delicate, magical book that I suspect may have more longevity than the celebrated but ultimately somewhat ordinary Because of Winn-Dixie.

1-0 out of 5 stars awful, reader, just plain awful
Please do not read this book, reader!!! Reader, I had just finished reading Because of Winn-Dixie, and I found it to be a wonderful book and story. But, reader, Tale of Despereaux did not come anywhere close to what I expected a good, or worthy of reading children's book, should be. I also, reader, feel that anyone who has to tell a child what is going on without letting them think for themselves or create their own meanings should not bebale to get their books published. I have always felt the point of getting children to read is to, get them to read! Then the stories and meanings can be discussed later. Children always bring something new the table, and this book ruins a childs creative and imaginative mind.

5-0 out of 5 stars Teachers, here is your book!
You can get the storyline from the excellent reviews on this page. If you are looking for a terrific read-aloud or book study or novel for your literature circles, this is it. Are you teaching literary elements? This book has it all, character, plot, setting, theme, motivation, point-of-view, genre, voice, elaboration, foreshadowing, word choice...

The wonderful thing is your students will just think you are reading them the BEST story ever. I read chapters 1-3 aloud and then stopped. The kids sent up a chorus of "Nooo, Don't Stop!!!"

We sold so many hard cover copies of the book at our school book fair that we had to reorder several times. Parent were remarking, "He has never begged me for a book before..."

Dust off your French accent and have fun. You will enjoy reading this book aloud as much as your students will enjoy listening to it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome
A very good book, to say the least. I was recomended this by my librarian and read it, along with Olive's Ocean (another good read, check it out). It deserved the award it got, definitly. ... Read more


49. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2 Audio CD)
by J.K. ROWLING
list price: $49.95
our price: $32.97
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0807281948
Catlog: Book (1999-12-01)
Publisher: Listening Library
Sales Rank: 1284
Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Dursleys were so mean that hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry.But just as he's packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

And strike it does.For in Harry's second year at Hogwarts, fresh torments and horrors arise, including an outrageously stuck-up new professor, Gilderoy Lockheart, a spirit named Moaning Myrtle who haunts the girls' bathroom, and the unwanted attentions of Ron Weasley's younger sister, Ginny.

But each of these seem minor annoyances when the real trouble begins, and someone--or something--starts turning Hogwarts students to stone.Could it be Draco Malfoy, a more poisonous rival than ever?Could it possibly be Hagrid, whose mysterious past is finally told?Or could it be the one everyone at Hogwarts most suspects...Harry Potter himself?
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Reviews (2308)

5-0 out of 5 stars PERHAPS THE FUNNIEST ONE SO FAR
Potter 2, THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS (1998), may be the funniest one so far. Strangely, I think it is also the one that includes the greater number of physically unpleasant or revolting details, scattered all along the story.
In spite of it, the reading was pleasing to me (I must add I read the Spanish translation first: an eloquent one, but the translators should have probably saved a lot of words). There is a good deal of suspense in the book. Gilderoy Lockhart can make you fall off your chair with laughter. Dobby the house-elf is another brilliantly comic character (we'll meet him again in The Goblet of Fire). Mrs Rowling developes her characters in a way consistent with the 1st book (look up the Weasley twins or Snape, for instance, in Potter 1, since their first appearances until now, and you'll see what I mean). Though the adventurous fever that hits Hermione Granger came as a surprise to me: even her friends Ron and Harry (not half as well-balanced as she is) feel it's strange.
Like in Potter 1, Harry is the less remarkable character in the story, in a way. He's not specially funny or wise or a good student or anything (unlike Malfoy, he's not even specially nasty). Actually, if it wasn't for his scar and his quidditch skills (well, his desperate courage at deadly situations too), JK would have had to choose Mr Filch or that Norris cat to play the hero: Potter would have been as invisible as his cloak. Yet after reading up to the 5th title in the "saga", I think there is some purpose by the author: JK works hard on her books, she's a careful (even too careful) story-maker and character-painter: it cannot be a coincidence that inconspicuousness about Potter's personality. To those having read The Order of the Phoenix this fact is even more urgent, because Potter becomes "remarkable" there -but in the most unfortunate way!! But this lines are not about that book.
Sometimes one can even feel -say, angry with Potter, in this book. He seems to think (erroneously!!) that the best way towards sorting out problems is keeping them hidden from the people who can help solve them: that is Dumbledore in the first place. If Potter's side wins the battle in the end in this book is in spite of him rather than due to him... which is true also about the rest of the series so far. BR>
Finally, that McGonagall's idea, no exams for the pupils because of the hard events they've lived, I think it's foolish: no serious school in the world, even in the fiction world, would ever do such thing!

5-0 out of 5 stars "There is more than one way to burn a book"
The above quote was from the Coda of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. I quote it because while looking through all the one star quotes you see a lot of 'Don't let your children read it, it should be banned ect...' In other words they want to ... burn the book 'cos of their frail mind and 'idea's.' What also irritates me is the large amount of fellow Christians here bashing it and calling it 'Satanic' I am a strong Christian, and guess what? It's not. Witch's magic? Oh dear if a kid can't handle that however will they handle the real world? The point of a Fairy Tale is to prepare kids for the real evil in our world! No these books aren't The Narnia. The Chronicles Of Narnia is my favorite series, and these books o course are not supposed to be anything like them so don't expect them to be. Harry Potter isn't allegory (well according to Lewis's idea neither was Narnia) so don't expect the same level of skill or style. He had witches and goblins as well, will you ban him next? (Oh I forgot some "Christians" think Lewis is evil as well.) Besides "The Last Battle" was more horrific on a psychological level and in its vivid description of battle and mayhem then anything in this book (remember the horses and dwarfs?). There you have the destruction of lands, and all hell (literally) being rained down upon them. Here they have people in a state of shock and a villain getting killed. True the purpose behind the events in Narnia were different, all I'm saying is that the 'disturbing for children' was even more in "The Last Battle". These books are in no way evil; they are however entertaining, un-offensive and fine for kids. Don't worry about polluting minds, being sent to hell or comparing it to a completely different style of writing, just sit and read them for what they are. The ironic this is I never even intended to read a Harry Potter book, I made a promise I would in order to get someone to read Bradbury and here I am defending it, so... don't pre-judge and just get and enjoy them!

5-0 out of 5 stars Oh how fun! What an adventure!
Year two at Hogwarts has a rough start for Harry, who misses his train and has to make his own way to Hogwarts, breaking every rule in the book along the way. He's in a lot of trouble, yet he still manages to hold his head high and trudge along through school.

Draco doesn't let up as he taunts Harry and tries to cause even more trouble for our hero. We are introduced to new characters that we'll see later in the series. While we don't learn much about Harry's past in this sequel, we learn much more about Hogwarts, the teachers, and the students.

If the HP series were a journey "Chamber of Secrets" would be the bridge from "Sorcerer's Stone" to "Prisoner of Azkaban" where we learn much more about the hows and whys.

It's truly a thrill to read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book to follow the first!
This book was enjoyable, but it was a little slow in how it finally present the clues to discover the final showdown, I think it gives the good lesson in good things are worth waiting for. I didn't like how the characters were acting like total incompetents in seeking help and basically acting like airheads, but I guess that should be expected at 12 years old and only second years.

For a small summary: see the movie!

5-0 out of 5 stars So Silver
Harry Potter two, didn't have as much going on as the first book, but had much more suspense. Action: amazing. Writing: great. Illustrations: beautiful. All what I call a five star book! ... Read more


50. Half Magic
by Edward Eager
list price: $6.00
our price: $6.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0152020683
Catlog: Book (1999-03-31)
Publisher: Odyssey Classics
Sales Rank: 16910
Average Customer Review: 4.72 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Since Half Magic first hit bookshelves in 1954, Edward Eager’s tales of magic have become beloved classics. Now four cherished stories by Edward Eager about vacationing cousins who stumble into magical doings and whimsical adventures are available in updated hardcover and paperback formats. The original lively illustrations by N. M. Bodecker have been retained, but eye-catching new cover art by Kate Greenaway Medalist Quentin Blake gives these classics a fresh, contemporary look for a whole new generation.
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Reviews (98)

5-0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite childhood books
There are some memories from childhood that I can never quite place specifically. Things that linger in memory, but are so faint that they are like a sniff of fresh apple pie from down the street that you can't determine which house it is coming from. I recall reading some "magic" children books--at one time, I thought they were Andre Norton, who had several young adult novels with the word magic in the title, but I was never able to find the exact one. Until I ran across this book in the store, and realized a chapter into it that I was eating apple pie.

I love this book, but it may be because I remember it so fondly. I've been trying to catch up on children's fantasy the last couple of years--reading E. Nesbit, Norton Juster, P.L. Travers, E.L. Konigsburg--and, of them all, Eager is my favorite. In Half Magic, fantasy is rolled with some of the logic of science fiction, in that the wishes that the magic coin gives the children only occurs in halves, and they must figure out how to use it. As children, they are quite believable--maybe not as realistic as Nesbit, but not the Bobsey Twins either.

I should note that Eager was himself a fan of Nesbit's, and his stories do resemble her's in some ways. His affinity for her is clearly laid out here, where the children visit the library and one of their favorite books is The Enchanted Castle.

5-0 out of 5 stars A jumping-off point for years of fantasy enjoyment
I first read this book at the age of 10. I am now 45 and have not changed my opinion that it is one of the most delightful books for children ever written. It involves four fatherless children and a magic charm, which brings many forms of magic to enrich and improve their lives. The story is written with humor and enormous imagination. I couldn't wait to get back to the library to read all the other Edward Eager books it had. Noting that Mr. Eager always gave credit to Edith Nesbit as his inspiration, I also read all the Edith Nesbit books available. I have continued to re-read them throughout my life; I have read them to my kids, and intend to read them to my grandkids. The Bodecker drawings carry the stories beautifully. I now work at a public library and recommend Half Magic to any child who wants stories about real children and magic, because this book opened such a magical dimension to my own reading life.

5-0 out of 5 stars MAGICALY ENCHANTED
Half Magic
This novel, is about 4 children looking for an adventure. One day the oldest of the children jane finds what she thinks is a nickel. It turns out to be a magical coin. this takes them on the adventure they have been looking for. It takes them to visit sir lancelot, a desert, and turns the littlest one into a ghost. Their mother feels like she is having a nervous breakdown and is becoming mentally ill. Will they get through all these adventures without getting killed by three knights and a half statue, half dog? I give this book 2 thumbs up. It is a marvelous book for children.

4-0 out of 5 stars Magic divided by two= A Great Fantasy
Half Magic

Half Magic is a magical fantasy by Edward Eager. Edward Eager has written several books about magical adventures.
Half Magic begins when four children find an interesting looking coin in a crack in the ground. Soon they find out that if you wish something while holding the coin it comes half true. The children go on many magical adventures by wishing everything twice. After awhile the magic starts wearing down. The children decide to give the coin to another child so the magic can go on forever and ever.
I liked this story because it has lots of different settings. If you don't like fantasy very much you could enjoy this book because it travels into history and takes you through some historical events. I would recommend this book to a third grader up to a sixth grader who likes magic and adventures.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Magical Book
A Magical Book
Half Magic
By: Edward Eager

Half Magic is about 4 children, Jane, Mark, Martha, and Katharine who get a magical coin that only works by halves. Jane the oldest always seems to be different from her siblings. Because she doesn't appear to agree with them much. Mark the only boy and is the second oldest child, doesn't mind much about being the only man around the house and doesn't become annoyed with his sisters much theat often although he wishes to have a dad. Martha the middle child is always ignored by her family. But she is let to say her opinions and ideas very often in necessary times. And Katharine the youngest does mostly annoying things to her siblings that might explain for being shoved under a movie theater seat! But Katherine doesn't mind she just choose to sleep through it.
So these creative children's adventure takes time long ago when movies didn't have any sound and had to be written down. The 4 children's adventures include many things put back in history into Camelot and in the desert. There are man more places that journeys have been taken. Now the old charms to only be worked by halves. The children at first had the coin and coincidently made a wish. But they had not known that the coin had given there wish but only half of it. Then one day when there mother had the coin, she thought it was a nickel and made a wish that she would be home, and only got half of it. She than found herself in the road halfway from home. And there she found a very nice gentleman who gave her a lift there home . Then the children got suspicious and knew what it was now. They had also find out theat you had to wish more than its value to get what you really want. Like " I wish I was twice as far from here.
They had many more adventures then that besides being half invisible . The nice gentleman got to know the family even more on this incredible journey. I believe the theme is " never make a wish without making it worth twice more than what you really want". As my opinion this book is one of the best book I 've picked up on the library's shelf not even knowing what great things were in the book. ... Read more


51. Carnival at Candlelight (Magic Tree House #33)
by MARY POPE OSBORNE
list price: $11.95
our price: $8.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375830332
Catlog: Book (2005-03-08)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 11684
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52. World History: Connections to Today : The Modern Era
by Elisabeth Gaynor Ellis, Anthony Esler
list price: $86.60
our price: $86.60
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0130628018
Catlog: Book (2002-10-01)
Publisher: Pearson Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 468499
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Human History in Brief
This is one of the best book on global history, you can find every religion from east to west, north to south. You can read about all empires and kings, you can know all cultures and traditions. There is no other book which have reviewed and presented true picture of three major religions; Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

3-0 out of 5 stars Book Review
The book was not the best textbook.....there is no study guide

5-0 out of 5 stars Pounds and Education
My daughter have to carry tree of these size books. Her school bag is 18 lbs. Why not divide all of these schoolbooks on two parts and make our kids happy. I believe school(elementary, middle and high) is not militarytraining base.

Gregory Yamin ... Read more


53. The Situation Worsens: A Box of Unfortunate Events, Books 4-6 (The Miserable Mill; The Austere Academy; The Ersatz Elevator)
by Lemony Snicket, Brett Helquist
list price: $35.99
our price: $21.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060095563
Catlog: Book (2002-11-05)
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Sales Rank: 30
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

What could be worse than a book by Lemony Snicket? Three books by Lemony Snicket—all in one foul package. This second Box of Unfortunate Events, contains The Miserable Mill, The Austere Academy, and The Ersatz Elevator. ... Read more

Reviews (20)

5-0 out of 5 stars Books 4-6: Hitting the stride....
I feel its easier to review the box set then three seperate books in three seperate reviews... So this is what I am doing.

I had a 1yr hiatus between books 3 & 4. I became disinterested in the series, but for some odd reason I decided to pick the series up again. I never stopped thinking about the books or liking them, I just felt they were'nt good enough to continue reading. And maybe you've felt the same about the first 3 books as well. If you have, I encourage you to continue to read on.

In book for, though its the lowest rated on Amazon.com at 4stars, I wouldn't say its the worst, this is the book that got me hooked, the book where I really appreciated Snicket's humor and morbid writing style. Maybe it had to do with me being older, or the old saying "Absence makes the heart grow fonder.", who knows? So anyways, onto the book reviews.!

Book Four: The Miserable Mill - I have a feeling that the reason this book is rated so low because of the Child Labor issue. I mean the person whom is in charge of the Mill is disqusted at the idea that some 14,12, and 1yr children should do normal children things. No, he believes that they are loafers and must make a a living for him in the Mill living on nothing but a stick of gum for lunch and a small dinner. We're talking about machines that could very easily kill children, especially babies. Not to say everyone supports this, but none of the adults are willing to oppose him so, that's how it is. I think that this book handles the issues very well. I enjoyed the book despite the touchy issue because it still had humor and such. But just be aware what you're stepping into. Also, in my opinion this boomk has Count Olaf's best disquise.

Book Five: The Austere Academy - This book deals with bullies. In the form of Carmelita Spats and Mr. Nero. They both despise orphans, and this is why any orphans are forced to live in the orphans shack. Right now, that is where the Baudelare's are residing. The former residents were the Quagmire triplets. A brother and sister whom lost their brother and parents. Sunny is forced to be an administrative assistant and the Baudelare's have to learn in classes with moronic teachers who make them memorize dumb stories and exact measurements of things. Nero also makes all students listen to his HORRIBLE violin playing in a nightly madatory 6hr concert, whoever doesn't must give him a big bag of candy. ;P Its quite absurd, is it not? But that's the joy of these books. Book 5 is the place where the books begin to take a new turn in a events. But of course I wont give that away.! But trust me, they get better here.!

Book Six: The Eratz Elevator - This book has them placed in the care of Jerome and Esme Squalor, a couple whom lives on the top of a HUGE apartment complex in a room with 70some odd rooms(Boy I wish I lived there, hehe). This book deals with the the obsession of being fashionable or as Esme would say "In". haha She is OBSESSED with being the MOST in person possible, which includes such things as going with electricity, wearing pin-stripe suites(Actually I like pin-stripes, ;P). Well, many other ridiculous things like eating at a cafe that serves only salmon dishes(including dessert). HAHA There many more things to be revealed here, but I don't want to give anything else away. Its just a lot of fun(and annoying) watching Snicket make fun of people obsessed with fashion. :D

All in all, I'd say this is a strong set. The books only get stronger after these three, so if you love these 3, you'll love the next three even more. :D So *enjoy*!!!!

God Bless ~Amy

5-0 out of 5 stars Hooked on these books...
I've read several books in this series, and they seem to be addictive. The incredible perils of the Baudileare children, the incessantly evil imagination of Count Olaf (WHERE will he turn up next?!), and, of course, the hilarious place names (Lake Lachrymose! Curdled Cave!) combined with a very droll writing style make these a fun read over the course of an evening or two. The books themselves are very attractive, with deckle edged pages and a nice binding. The illustrations are just right. If you're having a bad day, just read a few chapters of this series of unfortunate events and your life will look much brighter!

4-0 out of 5 stars Another Great Series
I like buying series such as these for my kids as they are more eager to read the next book and to keep up the love of reading.

I'd also recommend the new series by RT Byrum - the first being Mystery of Shrieking Island. You dont have to worry about witchcraft, evil or gore in any of his books.

5-0 out of 5 stars The story continues
If this series was categorized into box sets by plot formula, for Snicket is a lover of parallelism and symmetry in his writing, "The Miserable Mill" would likely be placed with the novels found in books one through three, "The Trouble Begins" box set. This book has much in common with its two precursors. In its pages, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are given to yet another guardian, the foreman of a lumber mill, but a man who takes no effort to parent the children, leaving them emotionally on their own more than in either "The Reptile Room" or "The Wide Window." Additionally, this book begins the childrens' requirements of hard physical exertions to protect themselves and satisfy their caretakers, a theme that will repeat itself in future novels and testify to the growing strength of the protagonists under hardship and comardery. But not to confuse potential readers - these children's lives are described most houndingly in terms more negative than positive, and Snicket's threats of misfortune are most real.

When the orphans' legal representative runs out of living relatives after book four, the children are sent to a most unequal boarding school, where two new characters are introduced. This development resumes an active dynamism between novels, lost between the second and fourth books, where one could theoretically skip one or all of these narratives without losing a bit of the larger plot. Somewhere between these two books, Snicket appears to have found a new way to add depth and interest in his books - here only slightly, but later on with increasing strength. The author has perfected his style of adding completeness to a single novel: placing the characters in a strikingly different environment, reinforcing particular themes of vocabulary and diction, and forming each story to a blueprint which gives the reader a clear indication of position within the story's plot. Now, and finally, Snicket can work on creating a larger and slowly-revealed mystery surrounding the Baudelaires.

Book six, "The Ersatz Elevator," appears at first to continue simply with Snicket's guardian blueprint, but unresolved elements of the previous novel quickly appear and grow, rather than conclude. Book six is the first of A Series of Unfortunate Events which never felt slow to me as a reader, even as the books slowly increase in volume. Features of the grander mystery - V.F.D., the Baudelaire house fire - now begin to increase curiosity regarding questions that remain unanswered, propelling interest in the series as a whole. Though Snicket seems to be doing an awful lot of ad-libbing as he goes, readers who think his teasing won't go anywhere will later find themselves disproved. Snicket is indeed inventing a story of shifting character and escalating tension, and he continues to get better at it the more he writes.

5-0 out of 5 stars THE BAD BEGINNING
SOME PEOPLE WROTE THINGS LIKE THIS BOOK IS NOT FOR KIDS. BUT I THINK IT IS ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS EVER. I LIKE THESE BOOKS BECAUSE IT TEACHES LESSONS FROM TIME TO TIME. I CAN'T WAIT TO READ THE OTHER NINE BOOKS. ... Read more


54. Eragon
by CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
list price: $9.95
our price: $8.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375826696
Catlog: Book (2005-04-26)
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 123358
Average Customer Review: 3.89 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This deluxe edition of Eragon includes an excerpt from Eldest, the next volume in the Inheritance trilogy; an exclusive foldout map of Alagaësia; never-before-seen art by the author depicting Zar’roc, Eragon’s sword; and an expanded pronunciation guide to the Ancient and Dwarf languages.

Fifteen-year-old Eragon believes that he is merely a poor farm boy—until his destiny as a Dragon Rider is revealed. Gifted with only an ancient sword, a loyal dragon, and sage advice from an old storyteller, Eragon is soon swept into a dangerous tapestry of magic, glory, and power. Now his choices could save—or destroy—the Empire. ... Read more

Reviews (860)

5-0 out of 5 stars Eragon
<br />Eragon is a wonderful book about a boy named Eragon who discovers a dragon egg, and soon finds himself in a world of magic, wars, and adventure. He travels with his dragon to safety, while seeking revenge on the evil king, Galbatorix, for killing his uncle. With elves, dwarves, and warriors, Eragon and his friends help defeat the orcs sent by Galbatorix. <br />I highly recommend this book to anyone ages 9 and up.

5-0 out of 5 stars An enchanting and heroic battle between two forces
This is one of the greatest books of all time. One might call it good against evil, but the good aren't that heroic. It is a coming of age story where the main character struggles with himself and his own feelings as well as his enemies. A great epic novel much like The Lord Of The Rings, except it is not as hard to follow.

5-0 out of 5 stars It doesn't matter if you like fantasy or not. Eragon RULES!!
The suspencful and thrilling story of Saphira and Eragon is amazing, detailed, beautiful, and everything else. It was so(...)etc. GREAT and possibly the best book I have ever read!!! Why? I can't name them all but I can name a few. 1. It talks about dragon in a positive way and I love dragons alot. I'm obssessed. 2. The style of writing is great. 3. The descriptions are amazing. 3.PLEASE do yourself a favor and read this book! I can't wait for Eldest to hit the stores!!!!!!!!!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars TOTALLY 100% FANTASTICLY AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This book is definantly the best I've read since Lord of the Rings! It's totally full of action with just a hint of some romance, but it definantly does not overdo it so you will not get bored. It's filled with everything a good story needs, dragons, elves, dwarves, a little bit of magic, a totally evil villian, and a hero you will just fall in love with. You would never be able to tell that he was only 15 when he started to write it. Whoever reads it will not be able to put it down, and those who haven't, YOU HAVE TO GET IT. Can't wait for the other two books in the series. They ROCK!

5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome!
When Eragon finds a "stone" in the Spine mountains, he never imagines that it might be a dragon egg. When it hatches, Eragon must either raise the baby dragon in hiding, or leave the creature to fare for its own. Then, Eragon's uncle is killed, and Eragon searched revenge. Joined by Brom, Carvahall's storyteller, and his dragon, Saphira, Eragon tracks the Ra'zac (the non-human culprits of his uncles death). On the way he learns how to use his magic, and...well, I let you read the book and find out the rest on your own. ... Read more


55. Cullinan and Galda's Literature and the Child (with InfoTrac)
by Lee Galda, Bernice E. Cullinan
list price: $94.95
our price: $73.11
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0534246834
Catlog: Book (2001-06-27)
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing
Sales Rank: 105687
Average Customer Review: 3 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Since this book's debut, LITERATURE AND THE CHILD has become a popular choice in the children's literature market. The book covers the two major topical areas of children's literature-genres of children's literature (e.g., picture books, folklore, etc.) and the use of children's literature in the classroom. The book is beautifully written and illustrated to reflect the tone and feel of children's books. Extensive booklists are provided for the student to use as an ongoing resource. This book now comes with a four-month subscription to InfoTrac College Edition to introduce related children's literature journals. A new CD-ROM linked to a powerful Web site includes many valuable resources, such as continually updated booklists and access to an online community of instructors and students where you can share teaching ideas, lesson plans, book reviews, and much more. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

3-0 out of 5 stars not the best
This book was the required text for my Children's Lit class. I found it to be very dull and boring to read. Very little coverage is given to the different kinds of awards. Series books are shunned by Galda and Cullinan. The sections on the various genres do a very poor job of explaining each genre in a concise way. The section on Historical fiction is the worst of the lot. The lists at the end of the book have a tendency to be somewhat confusing, and the milestones section left off way too many good books. I also felt that the authors paid to much attention to Harry Potter and not enough attention to other children's literature. The authors need to realize that not all children want to read classics. Overall, this is a boring, dry textbook that spends to much quality time on Harry Potter. The authors need to broaden thier horizons. ... Read more


56. The Red Book
by Barbara Lehman
list price: $12.95
our price: $9.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0618428585
Catlog: Book (2004-09-27)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Sales Rank: 5285
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Book Description

This book is about a book. A magical red book without any words. When you turn the pages you"ll experience a new kind of adventure through the power of story. In illustrations of rare detail and surprise, The Red Book crosses oceans and continents to deliver one girl into a new world of possibility, where a friend she"s never met is waiting. And as with the best of books, at the conclusion of the story, the journey is not over. ... Read more


57. The Phantom Tollbooth
by NORTON JUSTER
list price: $6.50
our price: $6.50
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394820371
Catlog: Book (1988-10-12)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 730
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Illustrated in black-and-white. This ingenious fantasy centers around Milo, a bored ten-year-old who comes home to find a large toy tollbooth sitting in his room. Joining forces with a watchdog named Tock, Milo drives through the tollbooth's gates and begins a memorable journey. He meets such characters as the foolish, yet lovable Humbug, the Mathemagician, and the not-so-wicked "Which," Faintly Macabre, who gives Milo the "impossible" mission of returning two princesses to the Kingdom of Wisdom. ... Read more

Reviews (363)

4-0 out of 5 stars Take an adventure inside your own imagination
I read this book as a child, and very happily reorded it when a memory of it surfaced. The plot is as excellent as I remembered it. A young boy named Milo finds the entire world to be completely uninteresting, and he's already bored, cyncial and jaded, despite the fact that he can't be more than 12 years old. Somebody gives him a way to explore, and he's off to a fantastic land of imagination in his little electric car. Once there, he finds that knowledge and thought have become personified. He encounters cities of words and numbers, a woman who guards and saves sounds, he literally jumps to Conclusions, takes a swim in the sea of knowledge. The main plot involves Milo and some assorted friends (my favorite is the watch-dog Tock, who has a real watch on him, but then I've always loved dogs) rescuing two princesses who are trapped in the Mountains of Ignorance. Milo must battle all of the demons that plauge goodness and knowledge to accomplish his goal. Along the way, he discovers that he and the world are much more interesting and exciting than he thought. Besides that, another little gem is hidden in here. Life is not just about learning and pursuing knowledge. There are many varities and experiences out there. Math, science, art, history and so on. The key is not just learning about them, but learning how to balance them so that they all work together to make us better people. Milo got the message in the end, and I hope that more follow in his footsteps. This book is written on a children's level, but the author never talks down to kids or patronizes them. It's a pleasant read for all ages. Enjoy!

5-0 out of 5 stars It doesn't get better than this
My father read this book to me the first year it was published. I was nine and it has been on my bookshelf since. I can't tell you how many copies of this I have purchased for people.

This is a great book to encourage thinking, not simply memorizing. Each page contains new language, new ideas, new ways to play with learning. It also happens to be a wonderful story. I may have been too young at nine to read it on my own, but certainly it is a great read-aloud for children nine or a bit younger. At nine, I didn't understand all the fancies, but like the Wizard of Oz or Alice in Wonderland, this book succeeds on many levels.

The Phantom Tollbooth encourages a child's love for language. It paints wonderful pictures (with the help of Feiffer's charming line drawings). It is as perfect a thing as can be written.

Oh, and if you're an adult without any children at home - buy the book for yourself. It will take you away from the Doldrums and into the Kingdom of Wisdom where your spirit can be renewed.

5-0 out of 5 stars Classic wordplay!
This book is fun for all ages, one of the handful of great children's books that will still be fun to read 50 years from now. It's like Dr. Seuss for older children. Buy it. You won't be disappointed.

5-0 out of 5 stars What a wonderful book
This book is just so clever. I mean the word play in this book never ends. I love all the ideas in this book, but my favorite ideas are that sounds are made and that someone plays the color in the world. I will most likely allways remember when Milo claps his hands and all the paper surrounds him. This is my third time reading this book and I highly recomend it to anyone and everyone.

5-0 out of 5 stars REALLY REALLY GREAT!
this book is so so good. I really like the spelling bee.I think this book is the funniest book I have ever read in my life.this book should get all the awards. ... Read more


58. Tuck Everlasting
by Natalie Babbitt
list price: $5.95
our price: $5.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0374480095
Catlog: Book (1985-11-01)
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
Sales Rank: 4697
Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Doomed to - or blessed with - eternal life after drinking from a magic spring, the Tuck family wanders about trying to live as inconspicuously and comfortably as they can. When ten-year-old Winnie Foster stumbles on their secret, the Tucks take her home and explain why living forever at one age is less a blessing that it might seem. Complications arise when Winnie is followed by a starnger who wants to market the spring water for a fortune
... Read more

Reviews (817)

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book!!!
In the book Tuck Everlasting a girl named Winnie wonders into the woods and sees a boy drinking from a spring.But she can't have any of the water.There is something mysterious about the water.The family the boy lives with is very secretive.He takes her to his house to explain why she can't have any.She has to keep their secret or else....
In this book the author is trying to make you think about the book.She is trying to tell you that some people really do live differently and sometimes you have to accept them for who they are.Winnie had to keepthe Tucks secret for their safety.Babbit makes this book adventurous and suspenseful.
This book has very good partsto it.Babbit has everything set up the way it should be.People come in at the right time and things will happen that will change the story.It is exciting to read something so clear and concise.She created a plot full of twists and turns for young readers.The first three chapters took a while to get good, but after that it was awesome.If you are looking for a book to read you want Tuck Everlasting.You will enjoy it!

5-0 out of 5 stars Lovely and Timeless
Tuck Everlasting is a beautifully written fantasy that will appeal to both children and adults. The prose is spare yet descriptive, moving quickly through a young girls life as she stumbles upon a secret known only to a few, but one that will change her outlook on life, and living, forever.

This gentle yet ultimately poignant story begins before the turn of the century as 10 year old Winnie Foster dreams of running away from her well-ordered life, as most children do. She would never act upon this impulse, of course, but a brief excursion into the enchanting woods owned by her family, which sit invitingly just outside her fence, will alter the coarse of her life in ways she could not have imagined.

Winnie will discover the Tuck family in these woods. They have lived there ages, guarding the water which stops time, and gives all those who drink of it immortality. As Winnie is sort of kidnapped, in a friendly way, she gets to know each of the Tucks, and forms a bond so close she will be tempted to join them one day.

Natalie Babbitt does a wonderful job making this fantasy real to the reader. Winnie's reactions to this family and especially young Jesse, who will be 17 forever and wants her to join him when she can, has the ring of truth. But there is a price to pay for this stoppage of time, and Jesse's father eloquently conveys to Winnie the joy of actually living and changing, like the water as it flows, and the unexpected anguish of living as the Tucks do.

Her second family will be in harm's way when a mysterious stranger who wants to prosper from this secret tracks down Winnie and the Tucks, and the adventure that follows will bring forth decisions for Winnie Foster about how she wants to live.

There is humor and sweetness to this tale. It is an injustice to call this a children's classic. It is a classic, period, and should be taken to the heart of every reader. There is a message here for us all.....

4-0 out of 5 stars Still Great!
Read it as a child and loved it, so I had to read it again as an adult and still fully injoyed it

3-0 out of 5 stars Freaky, but boring
Winnie is a girl who finds a family who lives in the woods, and they drank from a well that makes you immortal and they can't get older or die and they are bored! Was I the only kid who was forced to read this in 5th grade?

4-0 out of 5 stars Good Book.
I love thiss book.
It's about a small town girl, in the early 1900's, who is bored with life. One day she is walking through the woods when she spys Jeese Tuck, who is drinking from the "Fountain of Youth." Winnie, the girl, wants a drink of it and getting scared that she would end up like his whole family, Jesse takes her home with him. The Tuck family keeps her until they are accused of kiddnapping her. The older Tucks go to jail, and then, with some help from winnie, escape. When the Tucks are leaving, Jesse gives a bottle of the special water to winnie, asking her to drink it when she is 17.... or somewhere around that age. One day Winnie sees a frog out in the middle of the road, and figures that he needs the bottle of water more than she does..... scince she can always get more from the spring. So she pours it on the frog, so the frog will never get hurt and won't die..... then the forest where the spring is burns down.... and then Jesse returns almost a hundred years later.... ... Read more


59. The Chronicles of Narnia Boxed Set
by C. S. Lewis, Cliff Nielsen
list price: $41.93
our price: $25.15
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064471195
Catlog: Book (1994-07-08)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 64
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Collection includes all seven of the novels in the series. ... Read more

Reviews (563)

5-0 out of 5 stars Truly Fantastic
Clives Staples Lewis has created a mythical world which absolutely captures the human mind. The Chronicles of Narnia contain exciting plots, which all converge upon each other at the finally of the series: The Last Battle. Through out the books weaves the morals and beliefs of Christianity. These books do a wonder job of telling the story of the Bible, from the instantaneous creation of the world to the death of Aslan (Jesus). The way God cares about every one and desires us to enjoy life through Him, to the last battle and final days at the end of the world (of course Lewis did not know what was going to happen, yet it is still an interesting idea). In one of the best written books of all time, the land of Narnia comes alive with lovable and evil characters. The battle between good and evil is made abruptly apparent in this book as a small country goes through its history fighting for what is right. Light and darkness collide in the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe as four kids explore the land which they will rule. For a time it appears as though the evil side emerges victorious; but it is found that the White Witch as not the ability to peer far enough back into the depths time. This book it one of the most important of the set, because contained in it is the most important message of all time. My father used to read the Chronicles of Narnia to me when I was younger, now I read them on my own. When he did this he stressed, Christianity is having the relationship with God, like the youths had with Aslan. I think these are very well written books and I would encourage any one to read. I uphold C.S. Lewis as a great writer of the centuries and I praise his books (all of them) as magnificant.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best fantasy series ever!
If I could I would give The Chronicles of Narnia 500 stars. The story is fresh and fascinating. The world of Narnia is how our world should be with humans and animals and other fantstical creatures joing together for the greater good.

The series starts with "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe." Very accurate title because these are the important magical objects in this book. The shell of the story is set during WWII when the children of London are evacuated to the countryside in order to protect them from the air raids. Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy are sent to a country manor where they discover a wardrobe that transports them to the Magical world of Narnia where it is always winter, never Christmas, and even time flows different. We meet Mr. Tumnus the fawn and a kindly beaver couple who help the children escape the dreaded White Witch. Finally there is the incredible Aslan, the lion ruler of Narnia.

With seven books in the series it is impossible to sum up them all here, but they are all worth reading. My recommendation is to buy the series and read it to your children (that way you don't have to feel guilty that you are enjoying the books as much as they are). Or just buy it for the magical feeling of being young and full of imagnination.

5-0 out of 5 stars This boxed set is the BEST way to get this CLASSIC
Over the last century, C.S. Lewis' Narnia Chronicles have become among the most beloved works of children's literature ever published, and with good reason. The seven volumes of this series offer stories that are absolutely timeless, fairy tales mixing adventurous journeys, marvelous characters, mythical creatures, terrible evils, and moral lessons. That they are well told only helps them stand the test of time.

This boxed set is simply gorgeous, with attractive covers and nice layouts - plus you get the books individually, which is good for children who may not have the stamina to hold up that giant collected edition.

Each of the seven volumes can be read as an independent story, yet each are linked together by reoccurring themes and characters. Together the separate books form a unified whole, the grand and epic tale that is the Narnia Chronicles. Only "The Horse And His Boy" stands alone as a tale outside the core story arc, though there are cameos by core characters. Over the course of the six core volumes, the interwoven story of Narnia is told from that magical land's creation to its glorious end.

The books are not always of consistent quality, but a strong book always follows the weaker volumes. Such was the case when the Homeresque "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" followed the forgettable "Prince Caspian," for instance.

Of course, calling the seven-book series a single epic brings into mind a long-running debate. In what order should the books be read; chronologically or in published order? In truth, either order will work because the stories are strong enough to withstand any amount of juggling.

The Narnia Chronicles are classics because they offer rich and rewarding stories, glimpses of far off and magical lands, and present entertaining characters to the reader. They stand the test of time because they contain age-old moral lessons, are written in an eminently readable way that just begs to be read aloud, and are simple enough for kids while deep enough for adults. The cliché holds true here: the books are great for young and old alike.

No fan of young adult or juvenile literature should pass up on the Narnia Chronicles. Neither should any fan of fantasy, either. And probably nor should any reader at all, period. Recommended classics and near essential reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars The second best fantasy series ever written...
...after Lord of the Rings, and easily the best children's series ever written. 'Nuff said!

5-0 out of 5 stars CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER IS FOR ADULTS!!!
If you are new to this series, especially if you are going to read it to a child, DO NOT READ THEM IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER! A child will lose interest after a few chapters. Few great stories are told strictly in chronological order and the hook for Narnia is "The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe".

Many of these other reviews done by people saying that they like reading these books in chronological order are adults who fell in love with the series years ago, and now see this new order as making better grown-up sense. Reading it this way for the first time will leave you with many details that shouldn't be discovered until after reading the first few books in the original order, and won't keep a child interested the way I and so many others were as kids.

So please, if you are an adult familiar and returning to this series, feel free to read it in any order you choose, (I certainly do) but if this is your first time, read it in the order below...cheers

1) The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, 2) Prince Caspian, 3)The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, 4) The Silver Chair, 5) The Horse and His Boy, 6) The Magician's Nephew, and 7) The Last Battle ... Read more


60. Brian Wildsmith's Animals To Count (Spanish edition)
by Brian Wildsmith
list price: $4.95
our price: $4.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1887734171
Catlog: Book (1998-02)
Publisher: Star Bright Books
Sales Rank: 1432859
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Spanish edition of Brian Wildsmith's Animals to Count. Asexuberantly colored animals cavort across the pages, children learn to count andalso learn the names of the animals. Ages 6 mo-3 yrs. ... Read more

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!
A beautiful little book, great fun for my kids and me. Has held up over 4 children.

3-0 out of 5 stars Good Pictures, Binding poor
Illustrations are excellant. Manufacture of book is poor quality ... ... Read more


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