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    $17.99 list($29.99)
    1. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood
    $13.57 list($19.95)
    2. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
    $72.95 list($115.79)
    3. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set
    $45.00 $12.63 list($75.00)
    4. Harry Potter and the Order of
    $11.19 $5.77 list($15.99)
    5. Al Capone Does My Shirts
    $44.07 $40.70 list($69.95)
    6. Harry Potter and the Goblet of
    $10.87 list($15.99)
    7. Cirque Du Freak #9: Killers of
    $11.16 $10.68 list($15.95)
    8. Alex and the Amazing Lemonade
    $6.29 $1.90 list($6.99)
    9. Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)
    $64.99 list($85.80)
    10. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set
    $16.50 list($35.99)
    11. The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate
    $8.10 $5.56 list($9.00)
    12. The Little Prince
    $32.97 $28.65 list($49.95)
    13. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's
    $10.87 list($15.99)
    14. Warriors: The New Prophecy #1:
    $8.79 $5.49 list($10.99)
    15. Guys Write for Guys Read
    $4.99 $1.80
    16. Five Children and It (Puffin Classics
    $8.06 $4.50 list($8.95)
    17. The Period Book: Everything You
    $9.71 $8.47 list($12.95)
    18. Harry Potter Schoolbooks Box Set:
    $12.23 $10.56 list($17.99)
    19. Tale of Despereaux: Being the
    $32.97 $30.20 list($49.95)
    20. Harry Potter and the Chamber of

    1. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Book 6)
    by J. K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré
    list price: $29.99
    our price: $17.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439784549
    Catlog: Book (2005-07-16)
    Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
    Sales Rank: 1
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Potter News You Can Use

    J.K. Rowling has revealed three chapter titles from Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to be:

    • Chapter Two: "Spinners End"
    • Chapter Six: "Draco's Detour"
    • Chapter Fourteen: "Felix Felicis"
    A Few Words from J.K. Rowling
    "I am an extraordinarily lucky person, doing what I love best in the world. I’m sure that I will always be a writer. It was wonderful enough just to be published. The greatest reward is the enthusiasm of the readers." --J.K. Rowling.

    Find out more about Harry's creator in our exclusive interview with J.K. Rowling.

    Why We Love Harry
    Favorite Moments from the Series
    There are plenty of reasons to love Rowling's wildly popular series--no doubt you have several dozen of your own. Our list features favorite moments, characters, and artifacts from all five books. Keep in mind that this list is by no means exhaustive (what we love about Harry could fill five books!) and does not include any of the spectacular revelatory moments that would spoil the books for those (few) who have not read them. Enjoy.

    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
    • Harry's first trip to the zoo with the Dursleys, when a boa constrictor winks at him.
    • When the Dursleys' house is suddenly besieged by letters for Harry from Hogwarts. Readers learn how much the Dursleys have been keeping from Harry. Rowling does a wonderful job in displaying the lengths to which Uncle Vernon will go to deny that magic exists.
    • Harry's first visit to Diagon Alley with Hagrid. Full of curiosities and rich with magic and marvel, Harry's first trip includes a trip to Gringotts and Ollivanders, where Harry gets his wand (holly and phoenix feather) and discovers yet another connection to He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named. This moment is the reader's first full introduction to Rowling's world of witchcraft and wizards.
    • Harry's experience with the Sorting Hat.

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    • The de-gnoming of the Weasleys' garden. Harry discovers that even wizards have chores--gnomes must be grabbed (ignoring angry protests "Gerroff me! Gerroff me!"), swung about (to make them too dizzy to come back), and tossed out of the garden--this delightful scene highlights Rowling's clever and witty genius.
    • Harry's first experience with a Howler, sent to Ron by his mother.
    • The Dueling Club battle between Harry and Malfoy. Gilderoy Lockhart starts the Dueling Club to help students practice spells on each other, but he is not prepared for the intensity of the animosity between Harry and Draco. Since they are still young, their minibattle is innocent enough, including tickling and dancing charms.

    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    • Ron's attempt to use a telephone to call Harry at the Dursleys'.
    • Harry's first encounter with a Dementor on the train (and just about any other encounter with Dementors). Harry's brush with the Dementors is terrifying and prepares Potter fans for a darker, scarier book.
    • Harry, Ron, and Hermione's behavior in Professor Trelawney's Divination class. Some of the best moments in Rowling's books occur when she reminds us that the wizards-in-training at Hogwarts are, after all, just children. Clearly, even at a school of witchcraft and wizardry, classes can be boring and seem pointless to children.
    • The Boggart lesson in Professor Lupin's classroom.
    • Harry, Ron, and Hermione's knock-down confrontation with Snape.

    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    • Hermione's disgust at the reception for the veela (Bulgarian National Team Mascots) at the Quidditch World Cup. Rowling's fourth book addresses issues about growing up--the dynamic between the boys and girls at Hogwarts starts to change. Nowhere is this more plain than the hilarious scene in which magical cheerleaders nearly convince Harry and Ron to jump from the stands to impress them.
    • Viktor Krum's crush on Hermione--and Ron's objection to it.
    • Malfoy's "Potter Stinks" badge.
    • Hermione's creation of S.P.E.W., the intolerant bigotry of the Death Eaters, and the danger of the Triwizard Tournament. Add in the changing dynamics between girls and boys at Hogwarts, and suddenly Rowling's fourth book has a weight and seriousness not as present in early books in the series. Candy and tickle spells are left behind as the students tackle darker, more serious issues and take on larger responsibilities, including the knowledge of illegal curses.

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

    • Harry's outburst to his friends at No. 12 Grimmauld Place. A combination of frustration over being kept in the dark and fear that he will be expelled fuels much of Harry's anger, and it all comes out at once, directly aimed at Ron and Hermione. Rowling perfectly portrays Harry's frustration at being too old to shirk responsibility, but too young to be accepted as part of the fight that he knows is coming.
    • Harry's detention with Professor Umbridge. Rowling shows her darker side, leading readers to believe that Hogwarts is no longer a safe haven for young wizards. Dolores represents a bureaucratic tyrant capable of real evil, and Harry is forced to endure their private battle of wills alone.
    • Harry and Cho's painfully awkward interactions. Rowling clearly remembers what it was like to be a teenager.
    • Harry's Occlumency lessons with Snape.
    • Dumbledore's confession to Harry.

    Begin at the Beginning
    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

    Hardcover
    Paperback

    If You Like J.K. Rowling, You'll Love These Authors…

    • Cornelia Funke
    • Eoin Colfer
    • Garth Nix

    New Novels to Keep You Busy

    Cry of the Icemark

    The Dark Hills Divide

    Singer of All Songs

    The Game of Sunken Places

    Children of the Lamp

    Dragon Rider

    Authors Younger Potter Fans Should Try…

    • Geronimo Stilton
    • Andy Griffiths
    • Dav Pilkey

    While You Wait
    Hot New Series for Potter Fans

    Charlie Bone

    Guardians of Ga'hoole

    Keys to the Kingdom

    Underland Chronicles

    Dragons of Deltora

    A Few Words from Mary GrandPré
    "When I illustrate a cover or a book, I draw upon what the author tells me; that's how I see my responsibility as an illustrator. J.K. Rowling is very descriptive in her writing--she gives an illustrator a lot to work with. Each story is packed full of rich visual descriptions of the atmosphere, the mood, the setting, and all the different creatures and people. She makes it easy for me. The images just develop as I sketch and retrace until it feels right and matches her vision." Check out more Harry Potter art from illustrator Mary GrandPré.

    Did You Know?
    The Little White Horse was J.K. Rowling's favorite book as a child. Jane Austen is Rowling's favorite author. Roddy Doyle is Rowling's favorite living writer.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars poem for
    on your forehead
    tere is a scar
    but where you live
    is very very far.
    hogwart is the place
    you like the most
    and in this place
    live many ghosts. ... Read more


    2. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
    by CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.57
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 037582670X
    Catlog: Book (2005-08-23)
    Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1770
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    3. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set (Books 1-5)
    by J. K. Rowling
    list price: $115.79
    our price: $72.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439705525
    Catlog: Book (2004-10-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Press
    Sales Rank: 1394
    Average Customer Review: 4.68 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (38)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Why collect halfway?
    Mixed emotion here, firstly I would like to say that I love the Harry potter books. Each one is intelligently written, and the later books just leave you desperate to read the next volume.

    As for this set however I really don't see why anyone would buy it.

    If you haven't read the books (shame on you), buy or borrow the paperbacks.

    If you are a true Hary Potter fan, then buying a set with the terrible american covers, and the idiotic american title for the original novel (it's the PHILOSOPHER'S stone, not the sorcerer's stone), seems a little heretical to me. If you want a collector's item surely the original covers and the proper titles are more worth collecting?

    The main issue I have with this set though is the same issue I have with DVD box sets that come out when you KNOW there will be more titles available (Star Wars episode 1&2 for example). Why do it? You know that you'll only end up buying a box set with all 9 novels in, and you'll never be able to sell the 5 novel set afterwards.

    This is expensive and pointless.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Hogwarts or Bust!
    My only beef with the Harry Potter books is that they end! I read the entire first five in a week-and now I'm seriously hooked-they're worse than crack!

    They're wonderful reading for children, a classic show-down between good and evil. The message of love, friendship, courage and loyalty shines throughout the series.

    Harry Potter will go down in history as a literary classic-for ALL ages.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wow!!!
    I love these books! Rowling is an author who follows in the footsteps of the best fantasy authors such as Tolkien and Lewis. These books will be cherished for genarations to come. I cant wait for the last two books! (and hopefully more!)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Wonderful!!
    These are the best books I've ever read in my entire life! There's something for everyone in them, whether it's the fantasy world at Hogwarts and Diagon Alley or any of Harry's amazing adventures, these books have a place in the hearts of people young and old. My grandfather owns the entire series and discusses them with enthusiasm! If you haven't already read these books, you need to, they're incrediable!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Book Set That All Harry Potter Fans Should Have
    First things first: The magical world of Harry Potter created by J.K. Rowling is the greatest journey that the imagination can take at Platform 9 and 3/4.

    Secondly: A little bit about the books- [So far, we are in book 5 of 7]. It is the story of a boy named Harry Potter who has a scar on his forehead in the shape of a lighting bolt and for ten years lived a miserable life with his aunt and uncle Dursley and spoil brat cousin, Dudley, but at age of elven learns that he is a wizard. The story takes from there. In each book, Harry has to confront evil, Lord Voldemort (or He Who Must Not Be Named or You Know Who) who is responsible for Harry's scar and the his parents death.

    Thirdly: The Theme(s)-At first glance, or a read at teh back of the book, the reader gets the impression that Harry Potter and his world is nothing but pure magic: wizards and withces; unicorns and trolls; spells and curses, etc. But there is more to these books. For instence, and the most easy theme to be capture, is good vs. evil: Harry and his frieds(the good force) and Lord Voldemort and this followers( the bad force) confronting each other. Another easy to get theme is friendship: Harry and Ron and Hermoine always counting with one another in tough times. But there are also those themes that are a little bit more deeper and intense. One of them is racism/intolerance: In Harry world there are those wizard characters (like the Malfoys) that belief that only pure-blood wizard and witches are worth something; also, there are non-magic folks (like the Dursleys) that despise the magical world and its people. Another theme is corruption and power: the ministry of magic thrying to keep some things hidden from the normal-and-nest-door wizard. As the books are unfold, these and many more themes that can be apply to real life can be found.

    Lastly: This collection should be in every Harry Potter Fan Book Collection, and those that have not taken the Hogwart Express train to take a tour at Harry Potter's wordl should do it now. ... Read more


    4. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Book 5 Audio CD)
    by J. K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré, Jim Dale
    list price: $75.00
    our price: $45.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0807220299
    Catlog: Book (2003-06)
    Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
    Sales Rank: 596
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    As his fifth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry approaches, 15-year-old Harry Potter is in full-blown adolescence, complete with regular outbursts of rage, a nearly debilitating crush, and the blooming of a powerful sense of rebellion. It's been yet another infuriating and boring summer with the despicable Dursleys, this time with minimal contact from our hero's non-Muggle friends from school. Harry is feeling especially edgy at the lack of news from the magic world, wondering when the freshly revived evil Lord Voldemort will strike. Returning to Hogwarts will be a relief... or will it?

    The fifth book in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series follows the darkest year yet for our young wizard, who finds himself knocked down a peg or three after the events of last year. Somehow, over the summer, gossip (usually traced back to the magic world's newspaper, the Daily Prophet) has turned Harry's tragic and heroic encounter with Voldemort at the Triwizard Tournament into an excuse to ridicule and discount the teen. Even Professor Dumbledore, headmaster of the school, has come under scrutiny by the Ministry of Magic, which refuses to officially acknowledge the terrifying truth that Voldemort is back. Enter a particularly loathsome new character: the toadlike and simpering ("hem, hem") Dolores Umbridge, senior undersecretary to the Minister of Magic, who takes over the vacant position of Defense Against Dark Arts teacher--and in no time manages to become the High Inquisitor of Hogwarts, as well. Life isn't getting any easier for Harry Potter. With an overwhelming course load as the fifth years prepare for their Ordinary Wizarding Levels examinations (O.W.Ls), devastating changes in the Gryffindor Quidditch team lineup, vivid dreams about long hallways and closed doors, and increasing pain in his lightning-shaped scar, Harry's resilience is sorely tested.

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, more than any of the four previous novels in the series, is a coming-of-age story. Harry faces the thorny transition into adulthood, when adult heroes are revealed to be fallible, and matters that seemedblack-and-white suddenly come out in shades of gray. Gone is the wide-eyed innocent, the whiz kid of Sorcerer's Stone. Here we have an adolescent who's sometimes sullen, often confused (especially about girls), and always self-questioning. Confronting death again, as well as a startling prophecy, Harry ends his year at Hogwarts exhausted and pensive. Readers, on the other hand, will be energized as they enter yet again the long waiting period for the next title in the marvelous, magical series. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (5092)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Most Anticipated Book Lives up to Its Hype
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a marvelous edition to J.K. Rowling's library, and well worth the long, long wait and the number of pages. Although the book is the darkest novel yet in the Harry Potter saga, it reads like one of the earlier editions, happy and light with plenty of humor thrown in compensate for the overall dark tone of the novel. The plot is complex and involved, but never difficult as Rowling takes time and trouble to make certain everyone understands the mystery before moving to the next part.

    Many characters in this book become more well-rounded, and their actions are better justified. Professor McGonagall becomes a much more likable character, and we get more insight into the reason behind Professor Snape's hatred of Harry. We also see Harry's love life blossom somewhat as he ages, and he goes through typical teenage strife with his friends, Ron and Hermione.

    The ending is an exciting, heart-in-your-throat adventure that is sure to delight Harry Potter fans old and new. My only advice for reading this book: Don't make this your first Potter foray. Read the other books first. Rowling doesn't explain every detail from the first ones; she just assumes you've read them and doesn't bog you down with details you already remember (if you've read the first four).

    Basically, this is a very exciting book that well lives up to the Harry Potter saga and is sure to delight the many legions of fans who have waiting with bated breath for the newest edition.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Book Five: My Fondest Dreams Realized.
    At the end of book 4, I like most others found myself wishing one thing: the fifth book. It was a far greater delay than i wanted, but it was worth it. This is the Best Book in the Series.

    I shall endeavor to avoid spoilers of any kind. Do Yourself a Favor. Dont wait for it to be out on Paperback. Read it now. If you havent read 1-4, start now so you can read book 5

    Harry is finally growing up and his questions are finally getting answered. HP5 really made me wonder what happened to JK Rowling to make her paint the Ministry of Magic as such dangerously and willingly ignorant fascists.

    The disjointed often poorly paced book 4 was full of a lot of passages where i wanted to slap Harry around for being such a whiner. Not So Book 5. The conflict is shaping up beautifully. It feels like this is the "Empire Strikes Back" of the Harry Potter Book: grim and full of white-knuckle tension, and not the funniest or easiest episode, but its the finest crafted and most important episode.

    I thought Maybe JKR wouldnt beable to keep up the passion, angst and beautiful craftmanship of the first few books since they were written when she wasnt rich and famous etc. I thought fame might pull the spark out of the books, but i was wrong. If anything she's honed her craft even more.
    What always struck me about the Harry Potter boos was that there was a legitimate, tangible sense of horror underlying the bad events. Often in children's books the bad stuff is contrived to give the main character something to Do, not so Harry Potter. Book 5 makes it clearthat death is very real, and it affects everyone, and that evil is real and present, And OFTEN done in the name of good.
    Book 5 ups the ante, making it even more important to read. It is not so much a 'children's book' and more a book about universal struggles that we in which all need to immerse ourselves.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Can't wait for the movie...
    I'm a huge fan of the horror genre and am a huge King fanatic, but I couldn't resist reading this book after seeing the Third film. I'm 17 and I found unbelievable that these books are aimed at 9-12 yr olds. The vocabulary is fantasic and Ms Rowling is quite an inticing writer.
    I should have read the fourth book first, that's a little advice for the rest of ye, because now I know the general outcome of that book - so I think I'll wait for the fourth film rather than read it.
    Anyway, being such a huge King fan, I can't help comparing different writers to him. He is - to me - the best writer in the world, just just at horror but at everything, and I found J.K Rowling right up his alley. She's brilliant, the book's brilliant, cant wait for the film!!! :-)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good, but dark
    There's a good reason most of us cannot recall being 15 very well and the latest Harry Potter book will show you why: his heroic behavior is being marred by hormones that make him confused, angry, and irrational. The blue cover should give you an idea of the darkness of this 5th and darkest year of Harry's schooling at Hogwarts. I was so enraptured by reading book #4, Goblet of Fire, that I paid the $30 to get an advanced hardback copy of this book. I would advise against that; it's not worth it, but is worth reading. It's nearly as long, about 700 pages, but you'll find yourself wizzing through them. The author balances action with description and lets her imagination run wild with this fantasy world. The dark tone of this book and the surprising twists will have you anxiously reading to find a good place to stop, but the evil does not let up until the final pages. Phoenixes, like the human spirit, rise perpetually, and in this book we get some long overdue explanations, but at the cost of someone's life. In this book, Harry has a complete reversal of fortune and becomes the laughing stock of the school. New characters are introduced, there is some serious espionage in this book, and the book mainly centers on the war between the Ministry of Magic and Hogwarts. We learn much in this book and even get to see Harry's dad who is less the saint then Harry has been told. The book also seems to be a scathing social commentary, in typical English style, against the government and the media. In this episode, they suddenly become unthinkably evil, twisting facts, commiting gross injustices, physically hurting people, and manipulating public sentiment. In this novel, the good guys get put on trial for crime, and it is mindboggling.

    Overall, a very imaginative book, different in tone from the rest, that both captures teenage angst and the disruption to daily life caused by the Dark Lord. If you love the series, buy it but don't rush to do so. It's not as good a read as the other books, and is very dark, almost depressing. It's all bad news until the last few pages, and the kids cause some terrible trouble this time.

    I have always taken issue with these stories as "childrens literature" for their moral content and bad role models. These kids break rules, lie, sneak around, and singlehandedly confront the dark lord on a regular basis. Perhaps this is why China has banned the books. Well, I think that Rawling has simply put aside these moral issues to tell a good, compelling, imaginative story. Harry is not every man, he is a very special kid, a sort of christlike lowliest child. If the kids were constantly telling Dumbledore what was going on, the story would get dull. In this book, you get a good sense of how annoying it is to constantly have adults intercede. And of course the overall moral tale is that good always triumphs over evil. In the end, it is for parents, not books to teach values.

    5-0 out of 5 stars worth the wait
    Harry's back and so is the others, well harry is having a crudy summer and when he goes back to school things dont seem to lighten up because the new teacher has the personality like a poisend beehive with a rabid badger and throw in a couple of 50 seperate posions and you get Dolores umbridge. however there are som good stuff, like ron becoming keeper, a secret program, and Harry might have a shoot at Cho but Voldemort is still out there and Harry is having this dream about a door at the end of a hallway but he wakes up. you got to read the book. ... Read more


    5. Al Capone Does My Shirts
    by Gennifer Choldenko
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $11.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0399238611
    Catlog: Book (2004-03-01)
    Publisher: Putnam Publishing Group
    Sales Rank: 11629
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Moose Flannagan moves with his family to Alcatraz so his dad can work as a prison guard and his sister, Natalie, can attend a special school.But Natalie has autism, and when she’s denied admittance to the school, the stark setting of Alcatraz begins to unravel the tenuous coping mechanisms Moose’s family has used for dealing with her disorder.

    When Moose meets Piper, the cute daughter of the Warden, he knows right off she’s trouble.But she’s also strangely irresistible. All Moose wants to do is protect Natalie, live up to his parents’ expectations, and stay out of trouble.But on Alcatraz, trouble is never very far away.

    Set in 1935, when guards actually lived on Alcatraz Island with theirfamilies, Choldenko’s second novel brings humor to the complexities of family dynamics and illuminates the real struggle of a kid trying to free himself from the "good boy" stance he’s taken his whole life. ... Read more

    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars "Al Capone Does My Shirts"
    "Al Capone Does My Shirts" is about a 12-year old boy named Moose, whose family moves to Alcatraz in 1934 for his dad's job as a prison guard there. If you don't know, Alcatraz is a maximum-security prison on a rocky island across the bay from San Francisco. Although it is no longer in use, in the 1930's, Alcatraz was prison sweet prison to such notorious gangsters as Al Capone and Machine Gun Kelly. You could understand why Moose isn't excatly thrilled to live there. But the other reason they moved is so his sister, Natalie, could go to the Esther P. Marinoff school. Natalie has a disease that is today called autism, but was unidentified in the 30's. Moose, wanting his sister to be "normal", agrees to move for her sake. Still, he isn't happy about living on what he calls "a 12-acre rock covered with cement, topped with bird turds and surrounded by water". But the other families that live on Alcatraz might change his mind.
    This book is both funny and sad, and Moose is very easy to relate to. Other very dynamic characters make "Al Capone Does My Shirts" interesting. You'll finish it quickly and wish it were longer.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Every 10-12 year old should read this book
    My 10 year old daughter read this book in just over 2 days! She could not put it down!!! After reading Choldenko's "Notes from a Liar and her Dog" she could not wait for this to be published. We are buying them as gifts for many summer birthdays. I am now reading it and am thrown right back into my childhood of many years ago. Well written (as was the first), gets right into a 10-12 year olds way of thinking. Children between these ages will be able to totally relate. We can't wait for next one!

    5-0 out of 5 stars a sensational read
    Twelve-year-old Moose Flannagan doesn't know how to feel about his new home. Sure, it's neat to live right in San Francisco Bay, but the neighbors leave something to be desired. You see, Moose and his family live on Alcatraz Island, where Moose's father has a new job as electrician and prison guard. At school on the mainland, Moose is a bit of a misfit. Not only do the other guys think living on Alcatraz is a little weird, they also don't understand why Moose can't stay after school to play baseball.

    Instead, Moose has to head home to watch his sister Natalie. Natalie has autism, a condition that had not even been identified in 1935, when this novel is set. No one is quite sure how to deal with Natalie. Most "experts" tell the Flannagans to put her in an institution, but the family would rather try a variety of experimental therapies, which yield mostly disappointing results. Moose is the only one who can really reach Natalie, and he constantly clashes with his mother about the best way to work with her.

    Moose and Natalie discover a new kind of community among the several families who live on Alcatraz Island, including bossy seven-year-old Theresa and the warden's manipulative, sneaky (but also kind of cute) daughter Piper. In the end, the kids cooperate --- with a little help from Al Capone himself --- to find a place where Natalie can finally belong.

    Believe it or not, this novel's unusual setting is based on fact --- the families of Alcatraz prison guards actually did live on the island. The author includes a helpful note explaining the historical facts behind the story, as well as a brief note about autism.

    What really makes this a winning novel, though, is not the setting but its main character. Moose, who narrates the story, is responsible and trustworthy in spite of himself. The love he feels for his sister despite the frustrations she causes him shines through all his words. The relationships among Moose, his hardworking father and his well-meaning mother are also rich and dynamic. Even without its connection to the famous mobster, AL CAPONE DOES MY SHIRTS would still be a real hit.

    (...)

    4-0 out of 5 stars You and Your Students/Children Should Read This!
    This is a beautiful story that mixes all the elements of great fiction. Historical setting and characters, emotional involvment with genuine characters, laugh-out-loud humor, and a fresh writing style combine to form a unique and sensitive story. Highly reccomended for anyone interested in Alcatraz, Autistic children, or anyone looking for well-done modern kids lit piece. Also reccomended: Notes From a Liar and Her Dog(same author).

    5-0 out of 5 stars A fascinating read.
    This novel worked for me on many levels. First, it was a gripping, fast-paced character study of a teenage boy. The author developed a sympathetic, interesting, flawed character. I kept turning the pages to see what would happen to him and how he would respond.

    Second, the book was quite poignant in showing what it was like to live with an autistic child, especially in an era when autism hadn't been diagnosed and no one was sure how or if it could be treated.

    Third, the setting was so interesting. It takes place on Alcatraz island when prison workers and their families lived there. I learned a lot, but I didn't feel like I was being instructed as I read.

    I highly reccommend this novel. ... Read more


    6. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Book 4 Audio CD)
    by J.K. ROWLING
    list price: $69.95
    our price: $44.07
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0807282596
    Catlog: Book (2000-07)
    Publisher: Bantam Books-Audio
    Sales Rank: 970
    Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Read by Jim Dale

    Running time:20 hrs., 30 mins. 12cassettes

    Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts for his fourth year of magical adventures in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.This year Harry turns 14 and becomes interested in girls -- one in particular.And with Dark Magic comes danger, as someone close to Harry dies.You'll have to listen to learn more!The audio is available on July 8th.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4706)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Darkness Reborn.
    HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE is the fourth installment of the Harry Potter series and (so far) is also the longest and most dark. I had enjoyed the previous three books immensely, but had heard so many conflicting reviews about GOBLET OF FIRE, that I didn't know what to expect. After finally finishing the novel, I found that it was a most intriguing read and has become my favorite in the series so far.

    The book begins during the summer before the fall term starts at Hogwarts. Harry joins the Weasley family and Hermione for a trip to the World Quiddich Cup. The tournament is marked by strange events which foreshadow the dark horrors and adventures that lie waiting for Harry and friends back at school.

    The book builds from the opening, sinister and puzzling chapter to it's conclusion (over 700 pages later) when a line in the sand is drawn and the forces of good unite to stand against the resurrected Lord Voldemort. Whereas the previous three novels seemed self-contained and concluded in themselves, GOBLET OF FIRE ends on a cliffhanger, merely hinting at the huge struggle facing the forces of good. I have a feeling things are only going to become more dark and depressing for Harry and the gang.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not just for kids!
    Ages 9-12 shouldn't get to have all the fun! "The Goblet of Fire" is a terrific story for anyone who has ever wanted to fly or gazed longingly at a poster of a favorite athlete, wishing that athlete could come to life. JK Rowling makes it happen and if your imagination hasn't been too stifled and trodden down by the concerns of everyday life, then this book might be for you, no matter what your age. "The Goblet of Fire" is exciting, funny, frightening and impossible to put down. I kept telling myself "just one more chapter" until I had finished the final 450 pages in one fell swoop! The hype and hyperbole proved to be fully justified and Ms Rowling has shown herself to be a wonderfully creative and insightful writer. As a junior high and high school English teacher, one of my main frustrations is the fact that my students don't want to read for pleasure, even when given time to do so in class. However, the Harry Potter series has renewed the hope with which I began my career 15 years ago, that books and good, old-fashioned story-telling and imagination weren't yet out of style. Thanks, Ms Rowling, for Harry Potter, Hermione, Ron and the rest of the Hogwarts gang, yes, even Draco Malfoy, the kid we all love to hate! And thanks, too, for bringing back my own junior high memories after all these years with your refreshingly honest and accurate portrayals of young boys and girls discovering new experiences and getting to know each other again for the first time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome!
    I definitely think JK Rowling has honed her craft. I did not like the original Potter book, because I thought there wasn't much depth to the characters and everthing was predictable. As of the Prisoner book, I think she has definitely improved. I liked this so much I could barely put it down.

    The thing that separates this book out from her first two novels is that as the characters age, the plots have become much darker and much less predictable, and this one, in particular, reads almost like a mystery novel, because there is so much left up in the air.

    The ending also sets the stage for future novels.

    I think kids and adults (myself included) will find this to be the best Potter book yet (I have not yet read the Order of the Phoenix)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pushing it to the next level
    I'm a thirty-something woman and I am a Harry-a-holic. Why should this fantastic series be just for kids? Obviously I'm not the only person who feels this way. I see adults riveted by this series everywhere I go. And the best thing is kids love it too! This series opens the door that many of us need, something in common with our children. It really helps us to identify with each other. Thank you J.K. Rowling!

    "Goblet of Fire" shows us that it is not written reverently for the little ones, however. I must warn you, there is a tragic death. I'm sure most children can deal with it, but I personally was shocked. I'm not sure I'm old enough for where this series is going, but I'll let it take me there just the same.

    By opening that doorway to the sad inevitability we all face, Rowling has pushed the boundaries of how we view children's adventures. We realize now that Voldemort means business and that anything could happen as he continues his quest for power. Can Harry stop him? Voldemort continues to get more powerful with every novel and Harry is only just able to stop his nemesis from succeeding with his ingenious plots to take over all the witching world and quite possible the muggle world as well.

    This book left me waiting almost too eagerly for "Order of the Phoenix," which I read with my 9-year-old niece who seems to cope with the terrors in this series better than I am.

    If you're all growed up, read this with some kids, they can comfort you when it gets scary.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Real Emotion
    The Goblet of Fire is the first time that Harry really deals with hard problems, and dark emotions. This is also the first time the book every brought out real emotion, such as sadness. J.K. Rowling really knows how to make each book better and better. Although this isn't my favorite of the serious, it's a very close second. There were many times in which I just bursted out into laughter, and others when i cried. Every emotion is provoked in this book. I really recommend that every one read Harry Potter, even if it to read this one book in the series. ... Read more


    7. Cirque Du Freak #9: Killers of the Dawn : Book 9 in the Saga of Darren Shan
    by Darren Shan
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0316156264
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-11)
    Publisher: Little, Brown
    Sales Rank: 32690
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    8. Alex and the Amazing Lemonade Stand
    by Alex Scott, Liz Scott, Jay Scott
    list price: $15.95
    our price: $11.16
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0975320009
    Catlog: Book (2004-05)
    Publisher: Paje Publishing Co.
    Sales Rank: 12032
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Using rhymes and bright, whimsical pictures, Alex and The Amazing Lemonade Stand tells a sweet, true story of a little girl named Alex.

    Faced with a problem she comes up with a plan----she will sell lemonade from a lemonade stand.

    This story shows how the small act of one person can have an impact on many people. ... Read more

    Reviews (7)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Must-Have Summer Reading for Children
    As a professional librarian, I highly recommend the purchase of this book for all school and public libraries. With its whimsical drawings and rhyming prose, this beautiful book is the story of how through sheer will and tenacity, one determined child inspired a nation. This book teaches children to help others when faced with situations where the natural inclination is to only help oneself. It conveys a hopeful message of finding joy in life by focusing on possibilities in spite of limitations. Alex and the Amazing Lemonade Stand is a must-have for any child's summer reading list.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Every house and school should have one!
    Alex and the Amazing Lemonade Stand should be in every home and school because it teaches so many life lessons--in a fun and light way. Although it deals with serious issues such as pediatric cancer, it is not scary for children at all. The rhymes and themes center around helping others and making the best out of a bad situation! A must-read for a household with children--or adults!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A lesson for all ages - what a wonderful story!!!
    From the moment we ordered this book my kids waited daily for its arrival. We received it today and read it the minute we walked in the door from school! What a touching story and such an easy, wonderful read. Alex is an amazing young lady who can teach us all a thing or two about selflessness and making a difference in the world. This book will make for a great birthday gift because of its positive message and also because the proceeds support Alex's cause. ALEX SCOTT - you are our hero!!! Thank you for all that you and your family have done and continue to do for those in need.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing Alex Shines Though in a Wonderful Book for All Ages.
    This book is an incredible testament to the power of one person with an extraordinary spirit and enormous heart. Four-year-old Alex decides to hold a lemonade stand to raise money for pediatric cancer research. Through persistence, hard work and the strongest will imaginable, her idea eventually takes an entire nation by storm. Authored by Alex's talented parents, Alex and the Amazing Lemonade Stand is beautifully written and illustrated. It appeals on many levels to people of all ages. To the very young, the rhyming prose and whimsical pictures give a sense that this book has a happy and simple message about helping other people. To older children, there is a sense of inspiration: the promotion of the idea that it IS possible for one person to make a difference. To adults, the message is profound: how can we complain about our trivial problems when this child, who has such a difficult road to walk, has managed to turn her hardship into a desire to produce good for the world. We all have something to learn from Alex's book. Indeed, Alex, her Lemonade Stand, and her message are Amazing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Inspiring book shows "child power"
    This book, written by the parents of child cancer patient Alex Scott (with Alex's help), helps to raise awareness about the need for predaitric cancer reassec. AT he same time, it provides an upbeat message to childen about how they can help other children. The book recounts how Alex, as a cancer patient herself, decides to help others, by raising money to support cancer research. Aimed at an elementary school audience, the book is extremely appropriate for schools and libraries that want to provide students with opportunities for community involvement in support of good causes. ... Read more


    9. Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)
    by E. B. White
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0064400557
    Catlog: Book (1974-05-15)
    Publisher: HarperTrophy
    Sales Rank: 5936
    Average Customer Review: 4.66 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Beloved by generations, Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little are two of the most cherished stories of all time. Now, for the first time ever, these treasured classics are available in lavish new collectors' editions. In addition to a larger trim size, the original black-and-white art by Garth Williams has been lovingly colorized by renowned illustrator Rosemary Wells, adding another dimension to these two perfect books for young and old alike.

    Whether you are returning once again to visit with Wilbur, Charlotte, and Stuart, or giving the gift of these treasured stories to a child, these spruced-up editions are sure to delight fans new and old. The interior design has been slightly moderated to give the books a fresh look without changing the original, familiar, and beloved format. Garth Williams's original black-and-white line drawings for the jacket of Stuart Little have also been newly colorized by the celebrated illustrator Rosemary Wells. These classics return with a new look, but with the same heartwarming tales that have captured readers for generations.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (306)

    5-0 out of 5 stars among the best in children's literature
    As we all know, there are those certain books in the world that literally every single child in the world should read, and "Charlotte's Web" is a perfect example of must-read literature. It's such a classic story, not to mention a beautiful one. E.B. White creates such memorable characters and describes them very well. When a little girl named Fern hears that some baby pigs have been born in the barn, she is terrified to hear that her father plans to kill the littlest one, the useless "runt." Fern talks her father into letting her adopt the pig. She names it Wilbur and treats it as her own. Then the time comes for the pig to be more on its own, so Fern is forced to sell him to her uncle, who owns a farm. Wilbur feels lonely and out of place until he meets Charlotte, a kind spider who befriends him and, eventually, saves his life. Beautiful, beautiful story of friendship and courage. It contains characters and a fun plot that any child can enjoy. I read this book for the first time when I was in fourth grade, and I recently helped a little second-grader that I baby-sit for with her "Charlotte's Web" comprehension questions. It brought memories back. This is one of those books that you remember for the rest of your life once you've read it. It's excellent, and well worth the money.

    5-0 out of 5 stars 'O best beloved'
    This is a book which should have ten stars, not just five.

    Faced with the impending slaughter of Wilbur, the runt piglet she has saved and nursed to health, Fern is appalled that she has fattened him for the axe, and commits herself passionately to save her beloved animal. So, too, is Charlotte, the spider who inhabits the barn with him, and woh turns her web into a sort of billboard/oracle which astonishes (and admonishes) the community by weaving words that inform them that this is no ordinary pig! She recruits Templeton the Rat and the rest of the animals in her battle for Wilbur's life...will they succeed? or will Wilbur be a nine-days' wonder? and what will be the ultimate cost?

    This is the best present I can imagine to inspire a young reader; it's a wonderful tale of courage against the odds; it's warm, sad, and delightfully funny, and 30 years after I read it in fourth grade, I still get a lump in my throat thinking about it. A special, special book. (With wonderful original illustrations!)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Book about Friendship
    I must confess that having just read "Animal Farm" shortly before reading this book, I was a little hesitant about excepting this as a pure children's story without any hidden political agenda. I kept expecting the talking animals to rise up behind the pig and take over the farm. Rest assured however there was none of that, as E.B. White does a good job of keeping the story at a purely kids level.

    Wilber is the runt in a litter of pigs, and Mr. Arable the farmer is going to take him out back and have him slaughtered since as he says, "He is small and weak and will never amount to anything." His young daughter Fern who is eight, hears this and requests that her father give the pig to her to raise instead. The father wishing to prove a point to her, allows this so long as she promises to do all the work to take care of it. To Mr. Arable's surprise Fern does an excellent job of raising Wilber and he turns out to be "Some Pig", proving that even though he was very small he still could amount to something.

    As Wilber grows bigger the Arable's can no longer support feeding him, so Mr. Arable has Fern sell Wilber to her uncle Mr. Zuckerman who has a farm down the road. There she goes and visits Wilber every day. Being young I guess gives you the ability to sit and listen to the animals more intently than adults, and by doing so Fern is able to hear that the animals can actually talk and she understands them. (Being the father of two girls who are 7 and 5, I'd have to disagree somewhat with this logic as my girls never sit still, and certainly have a hard time listening at times, but for the sake of the story we'll just give them the benefit of the doubt.)

    Anywise Wilber meets all the other animals in the barn who are very nice, but none of them are really his close friend. He becomes lonely and wishes for a friend. A gray spider named Charlotte answers his prayers and after introducing herself, she becomes Wilber's best friend.

    When the other animals tell Wilber that Mr. Zuckerman is just fatting him up to eat him for Christmas, this makes him greatly disturbed. Charlotte being a great friend promises to do all she can to make Wilber so important to Mr. Zuckerman that he would change his mind. She sets a plan in action to weave messages into her web proclaiming how great the pig is, and by doing so she hopes to trick the adults into believing it as well. With the help of Templeton the rat she obtains some newspaper clippings and begins her work.

    Each new message in the web is looked upon as miracle, but rather than looking for any religious connection, the folks in the town just believe they have a very famous pig on their hands and accept it at face value.

    The suspense builds as Zuckerman takes Wilber to the Fair. If he can just win an award there, Charlotte knows his life will be saved. Charlotte and Templeton have to stow away in Wilber's crate just to accompany him to the Fair, and then when they get there the pig in the stall next to Wilber is twice as big and looks to be a shoe in for first prize.

    This book was obviously written at a much simpler time in history. At the Fair grounds the adults send the kids off on their own. Besides Fern who is 8, she has a little brother Avery who is only 5. After giving them all kinds of warnings such as not to eat too much, and to stay out of the sun, to not get dirty, and to be careful on the rides, the mother stops and says to the husband, "Do you think they'll be all right?" and he responds, "Well they have to grow up sometime." (None of the warnings were about staying away from strangers.) Of course when the kids returned they hadn't stayed out of the sun and were hot, and completely dirty, but they had fun.

    Fern meets a boy at the Fair, and starts to grow up a bit as playing with him starts to seem like more fun than talking to bunch of animals.

    It is a great book about overcoming obstacles even though you are very small, growing up, and most of all friendship. My girls loved the book as well, and especially seemed to like the illustrations by Garth Williams.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Quality literature for children
    A spider saves the life of a friendly pig by spinning accolades about him in her web, thereby producing a miracle that impresses people for miles around. This is a beautifully written little story for children that has real literary quality. The prose is excellent. Note in particular the simple but lovely descriptions of the passing seasons that Mr. White writes. The themes include friendship, coping with the loss of loved ones, and the realization that life goes on, changed but still worth living.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best book ever
    I think this is a really good book.It was about a pig and a spider who were vary good friends. My favorite part of the story was when they went to the Fair. The book was great. ... Read more


    10. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set (Books 1-4)
    by J. K. Rowling
    list price: $85.80
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439249546
    Catlog: Book (2001-11-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 51056
    Average Customer Review: 4.64 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Young wizard-in-training Harry Potter has had his hands full during hisfirst four years at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. As if excellingon and off the Quidditch field isn't enough, Harry has heard evil voices in thewalls, saved lives, and fended off convicts. Only time will tell how Harry willmanage the certain dangers in store for him over the next few years. The firstfour titles of J.K. Rowling's magical, witty, exciting adventures are nowavailable in a gift set, perfect for the legions of children whose big brothersand sisters (and parents) have made off with their copies. These grippingfantasy novels are on the road to becoming classics--don't wait to collect theselovely hardcover editions, illustrated by the talented Mary GrandPré.Each boxed set includes Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, HarryPotter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner ofAzkaban, and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. (Ages 8 and older)--Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (397)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Spellbounding
    I remember when I was a child reading books that I found unable to put down, every page full of intrigue and excitement, my imagination would run wild and I was transported into other worlds; as I got older books became something I read for exams and no longer fun, I rarely picked up a book for light entertainment and it was a few years before I started to read books again purely for pleasure. Once I had time to rekindle my love of books I discovered I still got lost in a good novel but never felt involved the way I had as a child.

    A few weeks ago one of my sons bought himself J.K.Rowling's Harry Potter set of books and enjoyed reading them, well he is twenty-five and more into Graham Greene, so I thought if he found them an enjoyable light read I would give them a go. I picked up the first book, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, from the eye catching brightly coloured, shinny box holding the set of four books and settled down with the intention of reading a couple of chapters, four hours later I was still there engrossed, unable to put the book down.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This may sound cliched, but the books are magical.
    I admit that I had never heard of Harry Potter until the huge fuss over the release of the fourth book. I didn't buy into the hype until a friend of mine dragged me to the movie... I admit that I became a Harry believer after the first 10 minutes of the film and wanted more. I immediately asked to borrow her books and read all four over the next two days. After reading her set, I decided that I had to have my own copies.

    The Harry Potter books are wonderfully imaginative and great for children of all ages (I myself am a 31 year old child!!) I loved being taken out of the real world and submersed in a world of fantasy and magic. Some say the stories and events are derivative of other classic "good vs. evil" stories; I don't happen to feel that way. The attention to detail of both the Muggle (non-magic folks) and the Wizard worlds is staggering and fascinating and unique. The J.K. Rowling style is also very refreshing and accesible to everyone even with the immense attention to specifics and details.

    These books are great and I highly recommend them. They are so unassuming and pleasant and can teach kids a lot about acceptance, forgiveness, and the true meaning of goodness.

    5-0 out of 5 stars AMAZING
    I have been a true Harry Potter fan for 6 years now. These books are GREAT. Harry Potter books are fantasy books about wizards and their wonderful world and about a young boy who falls into a world of magic and adventure. Harry Potter is full of bravery and is one of the best characters I have ever had the pleasure of running into. He is surrounded by good and the bad but he faces it all with courage in his heart and love by his side. Harry Potter Books have turned millions of children into readers and never fail to be exciting, sad, and funny. I have fallen in love with the characters that J.K. Rowling presents in Harry Potter Books and envy them for their unique and realistic personalities. If you haven't read these books you are positively insane and you must immidiately read them or be shot. These are the greatest books ever written and I applaude J.K. for her writting that always ceases to fall past perfection.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great!
    This is the best way to get all the Potter Books to keep and read forever! This is a great idea for gifts for people of all ages.

    5-0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC!
    This series is without a doubt the best books I have ever read. J.K Rowling sure knows how to write fantasy. I can realte to all the characeters and get lost in a magical world where anything can happen. These books have inspired me to write my own fantasy series.Wyhen I read Harry Potter, I feels happy, sad, excited, anxuious,scared and in suspense the whole time. Trust me, this sries is worth buying and is going to be around for a long time. J.K Rowling and Harry rock! ... Read more


    11. The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate Events, Books 1-3 (The Bad Beginning; The Reptile Room; The Wide Window)
    by Lemony Snicket
    list price: $35.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 006029809X
    Catlog: Book (2001-10-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
    Sales Rank: 16
    Average Customer Review: 4.21 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Fans of Lemony Snicket and newcomers to his gleefully ghastly Series ofUnfortunate Events will be elated to discover this boxed gift set of the firstthree books in hardcover: The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, andThe Wide Window. While it's true that the events that unfold in Snicket'snovels are bleak, and things never turn out as you'd hope, these delightful,funny, linguistically playful books are reminiscent of Roald Dahl, CharlesDickens, and Edward Gorey. After they get their paws on this boxed set, there isno question that young readers will want to read the continuing unluckyadventures of the three Baudelaire orphans. (Ages 9 and older) --KarinSnelson ... Read more

    Reviews (100)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Box of Unfortunate Events: The Trouble Begins (Books 1-3:
    Dear Reader,
    This series is about three children: Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Bauldiare. The books are filled with misery and woe, the children are always followed by misfortune and a crook by the name of Count Olaf. He is always after the Bauldiares enormous fortune, and somehow never seems to get a firm grip, just like you couldn't grab a stick of melting butter with your bare hand. The children (orphans, which we are bound to call them) always find a way to escape the scraggly grip of Count Olaf... The first book started as the three soon to be orphans were walking along the beach examining strange specimens that got washed up on the shoreline. When a strange figure came up to them, it turns out that it was Mr. Poe, the Bauldiares bank manager. This started all of the childrens' misery: the fact that an enormous fire had destroyed their home, and their parents... This has been just the beginning of the first book. There are currently 13 books, where misfortune and Count Olaf follow the poor Bauldiares, trying to get control over the fortune and the their lives.The books are very negative, so I personally don't recommend them for smaller children, but they are good, if your heart doesn't melt in the midst of them. Do the orphans escape Olaf, or do they lose their fortune, and their lives. To find out, read the Series of Unfortunate Events.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Teacher's Review
    As a teacher, I am constantly looking for the newest and biggest book to read to my students. During my travels, I came across a book entitled "The Bad Beginning" by Lemony Snickett. I decided to take a chance and purchase the book. I sat down at home and read the entire book in about two and a half hours, and it was one of the most enjoyable stories that I had read in a long time! I tried the book out on the kids, and they just ate it up. The students couldn't get enough of Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire....and to be quite honest, neither could I!! Soon after reading the first book, I purchased books two and three, and not to my surprise they were just as good! I again read these books to the students, and they again ate them up!!! Unfortunately, by the time we had finished the third book, the school year was over. However, I went on to finish my collection by getting books four through nine. I love these stories! The black humor that they contain should be that of a Coen Brothers film. The kids got every joke, and they totally fell in love with Snickett's radically original storytelling - explaining things in detail, translating Sunny's baby talk, and giving hilarious backstory. My peers often make fun of me because I read so much children's literature, but I have recommended these books to all of my friends. I even believe that these books are more interesting and fun to read than the Harry Potter series...but thats just me! I would recommend this book to parents of third and fourth grade students (it might be a little unfullfilling to the fiercly loyal fifth grade Harry Potter crowd) and also to adults who are unfamiliar with the series. A truly remarkable find and the most entertaining children's novels since Roald Dahl. Summer's the perfect time to pick these up!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Books!
    I've bought these books, and I've recieved them in a short period of time. They are interesting to read. It's hard to see these children struggle, and face all the sorrow that comes their way. I thought I would not like these, because they were supposed to be depressing. If you want a series you really get involved in, try these. This collection is by far entertaining, and detailed. I can't wait to buy the next box set!

    4-0 out of 5 stars From Bad to Worse: The Story of the Baudelaire Orphans
    When I first started reading this series of books I was set back a little because these stories are not written in the style of typical children's books. These stories are dark, and the evil characters are truly evil. A number of reviewers have panned this series because they are dark, and because they often push the boundaries of what some of us may find acceptable for children to read. It is because of the dark imagery that I have typically recommended that age 9 be a minimum age. Some children may be unprepared for these books until later.

    In the first three books in this series we learn that the three Baudelaire children, Sunny, the baby, Klaus, her brother, and Violet, a young teen, have lost their parents in a terrible fire. The children are sent to live with their evil uncle Olaf, who has ulterior motives yet to be revealed in later books. The children quickly learn how evil he is, and ultimately escape. They next go to live with their uncle Montgomery Montgomery in "The Reptile Room," only to be forced to move on again. In "The Wide Window" the children live with an aunt who is afraid of everything, only to ultimately be forced to move on again, continually chased by the evil Count Olaf in a variety of disguises.

    Book 11 in this series is soon to come out, and the original plan was for there to be 12 books. These books are like potato chips. Once you start one and find it intriguing, you will want to keep reading. If you do not like the first book, plan to stop with the first.

    This series is highly creative and many children 9 and older find them enjoyable. My children read them as teens and loved them. They did think they were different and unusual, and since they could not explain why I read them myself. They are different and unusual, but they also introduce children to situations that have occurred to children in the real world. A good way to introduce scary subjects.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The first three books = Set-up....
    Well, I'll admit its been a while since I've read the first three books of the series. They are are my least favorite in the series. Because in my opinion they get much better after those three. Especially after book 5. However, since this is a 1-3 box set, I MUST review these specific ones right now, so here goes.

    Book One: The Bad Beginning - Well in book one we our introduced to the Baudelaire's, they are quite happy children that live with their parents in a large house, and are very rich. These children include: Violet, a 14 year old whom is a genius inventor, and will tie her up when in the midst of inventing, Klaus, her 12 year old brother whom is a genius of books, hecan't get enough of them, and is quite often a well of imformation, and last but not least Sunny, a small baby whom is still crawling, can't really talk yet except with made up words, but she has for EXTREMELY long & sharp teeth.

    Now, so the story goes, the Baudelare children were playing on the beach, when they became orphans(wont tell you how), this is where there misfortunes began, because they must live with a gardian now, a relative or something. Well, they end up living with Count Olaf, and really I don't want to tell you more of that book.

    NOTICE: If you DON'T want ANYTHING in the books after book one spoiled DON'T the next to descriptions of the books, skip them and read my summary.

    Book Two: The Reptile Room - In this book the Baudelaire's have escaped Count Olaf and Mr. Poe has placed them in the care of Dr. Montgomery Montgomery, or their Uncle Monty. He is a man whom studies reptiles and has many interesting and dangerous reptiles. The Baudelaire's begin to feel that they will actually enjoy living there too. But is it safe for them to get comfortable?

    Book Three: The Wide Window - After they had to leave Uncle Monty's house(I wont say why), Mr. Poe has placed them in their care of their paranoid grammar obsessed Aunt Josephine. A woman who's husband died a couple years back and wont use stoves in fear that she set the house on fire or something like that. Her house "barely" sits on a ledge next to lake Lachreymose by Domocles Dock. The Baudelaire's don't enjoy living there very much, but how long will it last anyways?

    Well, I would say that "The Series of Unfortunate Events" is for those who are morbid at heart. These books have an extremely morbid sense of humor. But it is a great sense of humor, may take some time to get used to. And even though book 4 is the lowest rated on Amazon.com, I'd say that is where the books really hit their stride, in book for. That's where I really began to enjoy the books and their unique sense of humor. So whether you are young or old, though I think older people may enjoy these a little more cause they can understand them better(and most the people I know who've read them have been at least my age, 19yrs), you'll probably still enjoy them, they're fun books. And they have some things to teach, even though they don't seem like it.

    God Bless & *enjoy* ~Amy ... Read more


    12. The Little Prince
    list price: $9.00
    our price: $8.10
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0156012197
    Catlog: Book (2000-05-15)
    Publisher: Harvest Books
    Sales Rank: 1637
    Average Customer Review: 4.55 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry first published The Little Prince in 1943, only a year before his Lockheed P-38 vanished over the Mediterranean during a reconnaissance mission. More than a half century later, this fable of love and loneliness has lost none of its power. The narrator is a downed pilot in the Sahara Desert, frantically trying to repair his wrecked plane. His efforts are interrupted one day by the apparition of a little, well, prince, who asks him to draw a sheep. "In the face of an overpowering mystery, you don't dare disobey," the narrator recalls. "Absurd as it seemed, a thousand miles from all inhabited regions and in danger of death, I took a scrap of paper and a pen out of my pocket." And so begins their dialogue, which stretches the narrator's imagination in all sorts of surprising, childlike directions.

    The Little Prince describes his journey from planet to planet, each tiny world populated by a single adult. It's a wonderfully inventive sequence, which evokes not only the great fairy tales but also such monuments of postmodern whimsy as Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities. And despite his tone of gentle bemusement, Saint-Exupéry pulls off some fine satiric touches, too. There's the king, for example, who commands the Little Prince to function as a one-man (or one-boy) judiciary:

    I have good reason to believe that there is an old rat living somewhere on my planet. I hear him at night. You could judge that old rat. From time to time you will condemn him to death. That way his life will depend on your justice. But you'll pardon him each time for economy's sake. There's only one rat.
    The author pokes similar fun at a businessman, a geographer, and a lamplighter, all of whom signify some futile aspect of adult existence. Yet his tale is ultimately a tender one--a heartfelt exposition of sadness and solitude, which never turns into Peter Pan-style treacle. Such delicacy of tone can present real headaches for a translator, and in her 1943 translation, Katherine Woods sometimes wandered off the mark, giving the text a slightly wooden or didactic accent. Happily, Richard Howard (who did a fine nip-and-tuck job on Stendhal's The Charterhouse of Parma in 1999) has streamlined and simplified to wonderful effect. The result is a new and improved version of an indestructible classic, which also restores the original artwork to full color. "Trying to be witty," we're told at one point, "leads to lying, more or less." But Saint-Exupéry's drawings offer a handy rebuttal: they're fresh, funny, and like the book itself, rigorously truthful. --James Marcus ... Read more

    Reviews (335)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Magical, mystical, majestical
    This review refers to the T.V.F Cuiffe translation which I was unable to find on Amazon. I don't know anything about the Howard translation.

    This amazing book was written supposedly for children and it reads like a children's story. It's also beautifully illustrated. However, it meant much more to me when I reread it as an adult than as a child. I could say the book is an alegory and that it contains much symbolic value but it would debase it's melancholy beauty to attach academic terms to it.

    The story is about the narrator, a pilot just like the author, being stuck in the Sahara waiting to repair his plane. He meets the little prince who hails from a tiny planet that's not much bigger than him. The book relates his solitary existence at his home, his travels through the other asteroids, inhabited by single individuals such as the Geographer (which can be seen as archetypes) to his arrival on earth culminating in the relationship with the pilot.

    Again, saying that the book is about life, loneliness, love, friendship and finding one's true nature would be missing the point (one which the book beautifully mentions through the mouth of a fox) that the most important things are not said in words. The book has no "themes" as such but it's a fully integrated work. The pictures are as important as the text and contain so much kindness, humour and irony (as does the work itself) that this work is an absolute must.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If you tame me...
    Something confuses me about "The Little Prince". Here we have a small simple tale that takes about half an hour to read. It is quiet and philosophical. The plot, such as it is, follows a the Little Prince and his petite adventures. The Little Prince loves a rose very much, but he must travel about the planets to better understand this love. The book is so lyrical in its simplicity that it's no wonder that it's often given to graduating students each and every year. More so than "Winnie-the-Pooh" or "Oh the Places You'll Go", this book encapsulates the world with pinpoint precision.

    My confusion? Why has this book been repeatedly ruined for kids? Am I the only one who remembers that catastrophe that was, "The Little Prince", an anima television show that played on Nickelodeon in the 1980s? How about the movie, starring Bob Fosse as the snake and Gene Wilder as the fox? How does a book this perfect become so exploited? I can only liken it to other books of its caliber. Like "Alice In Wonderland", the absurd plot elements make the story poignant. And like "Alice" (or the aforementioned Pooh) the book's simple writing is easily "improved" by the adults of the world.

    I don't think "The Little Prince" is ideal children's literature, mind you. Kids may humor their parents by listening to it, but when you sit right down and read the book, it is not gripping stuff. The patronizing tone taken about "grown-ups", the Peter Pan-like elements, etc. all combine to make this a book that is ideally for children without actually saying anything to them directly. This is a book for adults but ostensibly for kids. Few children are going to be fooled by this. They'd rather sink their fangs into something a little more along the lines of "Harry Potter" or Lemony Snicket. But it is a piece of children's literature that will last beyond all our lives. This is a classic for the 20th century, and "The Little Prince" fully deserves to take his place amongst the other classic kid characters encompassed in the cannon. It is an outstanding tale of simply loving small.

    5-0 out of 5 stars nothing is lost with time.
    One of my absolute favorites.

    This book is something you read as a child; it was magical and it held you in ways you could not understand. And there were so many things in it that seemed above your young head. But you think you get them at the time.

    You read it again when you're older....

    and it's all the more magical.

    You understand - completely.

    Everyone should read this book at least twice.

    5-0 out of 5 stars ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS EVER!!!!!
    I read this book in my 5th grade class last year, and I loved it!!! It was so wonderful and really made you think about life, death, and that the things that are really impoortant are invisable! I REALLY SUGGEST YOU READ THIS BOOK!!! It brings you to thinking about imaginary things that everyone dreams about (that are extremely real in this book). So live your biggest dream and READ THIS BOOK!

    2-0 out of 5 stars The Little Prince...I Don't really like it.
    This books is just not my type of book. I did not really get anything from this book because I have to go over the metaphors before I can understand it. Anyways, this book tells the grown ups all over the world that they can still use their imaginations even though they have matured and have a job. This is some connections I heard from Einstein. Einstein said that Imaginations are more important than knowledge because Imagination creates knowledge. This book made me read it even though I wasn't very interested to it because it makes me think deeply of some words that are hard to understand and while I read the book, it reminded me of my childhood because I use to use my imaginations, ofcourse, probably all the kids use their imaginations. Now that I have grown, I forgot about imagining because I've grown up a lot. Just like in the book, when the little prince was growing up, he is losing his imaginations. ... Read more


    13. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Book 1 Audio CD)
    by J.K. ROWLING
    list price: $49.95
    our price: $32.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0807281956
    Catlog: Book (1999-12-01)
    Publisher: Listening Library
    Sales Rank: 903
    Average Customer Review: 4.78 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Read by Jim Dale
    8 hours 17 minutes, 6 cassettes

    Harry Potter has no idea how famous he is.That's because he's being raised by his miserable aunt and uncle who are terrified Harry will learn that he's really a wizard, just as his parents were.But everything changes when Harry is summoned to attend an infamous school for wizards, and he begins to discover some clues about his illustrious birthright.From the surprising way he is greeted by a lovable giant, to the unique curriculum and colorful faculty at his unusual school, Harry finds himself drawn deep inside a mystical world he never knew existed and closer to his own noble destiny.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4768)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great kids' book that appeals to all ages.
    I'm not much into kids' books but when my mom brought home Harry Potter, I remembered it from the NY Times bestseller list. In bed one night I flipped open to the third chapter and after five minutes, reverted back to chapter one. After 11 years of torture living with his foster family (Uncle Vernon, Aunt Petunia and cousin Dudley), Harry is shocked to learn that he is actually a world famous wizard! When he was only an infant, a powerful, evil sorcerer killed his parents but was unable to destroy him. All that's left of the encounter is a lightening shaped scar on his forhead. The incident having driven the sorcerer into exile, Harry is a celebrity everwher he goes, from diagon alley(for school supplies) to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. At Hogwarts, Harry befriends other schoolmates as they learn the arts of magic. While trying to keep his grades in check, Harry learns of a plot to undermine the scools headmaster. Harry risks his reputation and life as he does his best to get to the bottom of the situation. A captivating read, The Sorcerer's Stone contains the imagination of Roald Dahl, the magic of J.R.R. Tolkien, and the humor and suspense J.K. Rawling throws in to even it out.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An exciting,mysterious fantasy...
    I strongly encourage people to read this wonderfully written fantasy. When I first started to read the Harry Potter books,I just loved it so much,I had to read more. I'm now through the fourth book (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire) and waiting for the fifth book in the Harry Potter series. This particular book (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) is fantastic.It is about a boy called Harry Potter who lives with his aunt and uncle(Petunia and Vernon)...also with his huge (fat) cousin , Dudley. He starts to get letters from Hogwarts, but, his uncle Vernon refuses Harry to open the envelope which contains Harry's Hogwarts letter. One day letters start pouring inside the house. Harry grabs one but fails to open it.Soon Harry,Petunia,Vernon,and Dudley are in an old house on the sea.The game keeper of Hogwarts comes and takes Harry to Diagon Ally to buy his Hogwarts school supplies. Then Harry takes the Hogwarts express to Hogwarts.He then gets sorted into Gryffindor House(out of Hufflepuff,Ravenclaw,and Slitherin houses).Then he sets off on the most thrilling adventure you could ever imagine.This book will make you sweat as you read it.It is the best book you could ever read!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The One Book that Started It All: the Harry Potter-Mania
    Harry Potter, a fatherless and motherless boy, has never seen a unicorn, has never heard of wizards or witches, and has not a clue what Quidditch means. The only thing that Harry has ever experience is the miserable life that the Dursley's have given him for the first ten years of his life. But everything changes when letters from no one start arriving at the Dursleys addressed to him. Also on the same day that Harry turns eleven years old, a giant of a man arrives at the place where Harry and the Dursleys are staying and tells Harry that he is a wizard and that him, Harry, has been accepted at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.
    At Hogwarts, Harry does not only meet new friends like Ron Weasly or Hermoine Granger, or enemies like Draco Malfoy, or learns about magic and how to fly on a broom. He also come face to face with Lord Voldemort, his life-time enemy and the person that killed his parents and tried to killed him but only managed to give him a scar on his forehead in the shape of a lighting bolt. But is Harry ready to survive this new life that has been hidden for him for a long time, and is he ready to take hold of the destiny that awaits for him...from now on?

    And once "The Sorcerer's Stone" is picked up, can it be put down? Well, I know I could not do it. The world created by JKR is the most amazing and fantastical trance. I loved every single word found in this amazing tale of modern fantasy. Harry Potter is a true hero because is he not only a wizard but a teenager with human characteristics.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great for kids, teens, geezers and fogies
    It's not often that a new series comes out that captures its audience in such a magnificent way as Harry Potter. This series has influenced many other writers, including Stephen King! It has helped children to bond with adults in a fun and magical way. It has introduced a new world to all who read.

    In the first book of this series, we are introduced to many of the main characters that play a crucial role in Harry's life. We travel to Hogwarts, a school of Magic where truth be told, I think many of us would like to attend. We meet deep characters, some good and some bad and we learn of magical villages that can be accessed only by those "in the know."

    If you haven't done so already, make the HP series part of your library and share it with your children, friends and family.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Thrilling (Broomstick) Ride
    It's not often that a new series comes out that captures its audience in such a magnificent way as Harry Potter. This series has influenced many other writers, including Stephen King! It has helped children to bond with adults in a fun and magical way. It has introduced a new world to all who read.

    In the first book of this series, we are introduced to many of the main characters that play a crucial role in Harry's life. We travel to Hogwarts, a school of Magic where truth be told, I think many of us would like to attend. We meet deep characters, some good and some bad and we learn of magical villages that can be accessed only by those "in the know."

    If you haven't done so already, make the HP series part of your library and share it with your children, friends and family. ... Read more


    14. Warriors: The New Prophecy #1: Midnight (Warriors: The New Prophecy)
    by Erin Hunter
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060744499
    Catlog: Book (2005-06-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins
    Sales Rank: 91235
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    15. Guys Write for Guys Read
    by JonScieszka
    list price: $10.99
    our price: $8.79
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0670060275
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-21)
    Publisher: Viking Juvenile
    Sales Rank: 2321
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    What is a typical guy moment, anyhow? Daniel Pinkwater remembers the disappointment of meeting his Lone Star Ranger hero up close and personal. Gordon Korman relishes the goofy ultra violence of the old Looney Tunes cartoons. Stephen King realizes that having your two hundred- pound babysitter fart on your five-year-old head prepares you for any literary criticism. And that's just a sampling from Guys Write for Guys Read, a fast-paced, high energy collection of short works: stories, essays, columns, cartoons, anecdotes, and artwork by today's most popular writers and illustrators. Guys Write will feature work from Brian Jacques, Jerry Spinelli, Chris Crutcher, Mo Willems, Chris Van Allsburg, Matt Groening, Neil Gaiman, the editors and columnists from Sports Illustrated, The Onion and Esquire magazines, and more. Selected by voters at the Guys Read Web site and compiled by Jon Scieszka, this wide-ranging collection of authors and illustrators shows that guys do read . . . and will read more if given things they enjoy reading. ... Read more

    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars What a delightful surprise!
    I purchased this on a whim for my son's 13th birthday after receiving an Amazon recommendation.My son does not read voluntarily unless you count video game cheat sheets and Garfield cartoon books. The book arrived yesterday.I grabbed it along with the day's mail and headed out to pick up my son at school. I started reading the book in the middle, with Gary Paulsen's electric fence adventure, to amuse myself in a very slow carline.I was hooked and began racing through the selections picking out the authors of the stories our family has enjoyed over the years sometimes laughing out loud, othertimes recognizing all too well the growing pains of adolescence.My son finally arrived. I relenquished the book to him and asked him to indulge me and read the Paulsen story outloud.He did and was hooked as well.He read several selections to me outloud then took the book to bed with him, had it with him through breaksfast, and carried it to school as it is the last days of the school year so he will have extra time to read it.This from a boy who has never read anything over 100 pages in his life.

    I will wait patiently for my chance to finish the book and will encourage Dan to write his own review but wanted to share the fun this book had brought us.I can see that we will be sharing this with Dad, Grandfather, and my young adult son and that this will be a college graduation gift for my daughter's boyfriend.What a great summer reading book for the whole family. ... Read more


    16. Five Children and It (Puffin Classics - the Essential Collection)
    by E. Nesbit, H. R. Millar
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0140367357
    Catlog: Book (1996-12-01)
    Publisher: Puffin Books
    Sales Rank: 87506
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    To Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother, the house in the country promises a summer of freedom and play.But when they accidently uncover an accident Psammead--or Sand-fairy--who has the power to make wishes come true, they find themselves having the holiday of a lifetime, sharing one thrilling adventure after another.

    Asleep since dinosaurs roamed the earth, the ill-tempered, odd--looking Psammead --with his spider-shaped body, bat's ears, and snail's eyes --grudgingly agrees to grant the children one wish per day.Soon, though the children discover that their wishes have a tendancy to turn out quite differnetly than expected. Whatever they wish whether it's to fly like a bird, live in a mighty castle, or have an immense fortune --something goes terribly wrong, hilariously wrong.

    Then an accidental wish has horrible consequences, and the children are faced with a difficult choice: to let an innoncent manbe charged with a crime or to lose for all time their gift of magical wishes.Five Children and It is on of E. Nesbit's most beloved tales of enchantment.This deluxe gift edition, featuring twelve beautiful watercolor paintings by Caldecott medalist Paul O. Zelinsky, is sure to be treasured addition to every family's library.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (16)

    4-0 out of 5 stars My review of "Five Children and It"
    This book is about Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother who discover a Psammead,
    or Sand-fairy, who agrees to grant the children one wish per day.
    Soon, their wishes start to turn quite unlike what they expected.
    Then, an accidental wish has terrible consequences, and the kids
    are faced with a hard choice: to let an innocent man be charged
    with a crime, or to lose their gift of magical wishes.

    I read this book in one day, and I thought it was pretty good.
    This book turned out to be fairly interesting.
    I would probably read "Five Children and It" again.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Sandy delight
    This 1902 fantasy, a gift from my parents when I was in fourth or fifth grade, features an irritable Psammead whom Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother dig up in a sand pit. Then the magic begins. The sand-fairy does not like granting wishes, and his misshapen body with bat's ears and snail's eyes bloats when he does. The wishes, lasting only until sunset, all take unexpected, funny turns.

    The sand-fairy and other personalities and Victorian details render the magic entirely real-world, believable. This was my favorite children's book and I relived the delight when I found a copy to share with my own children. That this volume is illustrated by one of my favorite people from one of my favorite families triples the delight.

    The book is too challenging for independent reading for children under 10, but it's a great read-aloud for small children, as are the classics of Frank Baum, E.B. White and C.S. Lewis.

    Edith Nesbit was like J. K. Rowling a single mother in need of a means to support her children. Her books in their era were as popular as Harry Potter in this one. Some of her observations are surprisingly humane. Nesbit's treatment of a clan of Gypsies, for example, transcends the deep prejudice of her time. Not to worry, the book is not preachy or teachy. It's just grand, eloquent fun. Alyssa A. Lappen

    5-0 out of 5 stars Be careful what you wish for...
    E. Nesbit's classic story of about some Edwardian children who find a sand fairy one summer is an unsentimental delight. Each day the odd fairy grants them one magic wish, be it beauty, wealth, great size, etc. which will only last until sunset. Somehow each wish they make turns into a disaster, but through their own cleverness and a bit of luck, the children are able to make each problem work out in the end. Nesbit's writing is particularly full of amusing asides and offbeat humor in this one. Her turns of plot are inventive, and as the plucky children face their outlandish predicaments, it becomes clear that Nesbit has her finger on the pulse of the way real children might think. Her work has held up quite well considering it is over a hundred years old. This novel would be suitable for kids in about fourth or fifth grade.

    3-0 out of 5 stars sadly, this classic does not stand up to the test of time
    Edith Nesbit is a charming writer. She tells her story with wit and humour, and interjects sly digs that engender a wink and a smile, but while the premise is timeless and interesting, the prose is extremely dated, making the book a bit tedious to read for any length of time. Also, the ideas and prejudices exhibited by the characters date the material.

    The five siblings of the title, who have found a Sand-fairy willing to grant them one wish a day, continually make silly wishes that get them into trouble. Their first wish is to be "as beautiful as the day". Right there you get a sense of the book's outdated charm. This is of interest more as a tribute to a talented children's writer of a bygone era rather than for its own sake.

    I wanted to enjoy this classic, but I found it hard slogging through. That is just my opinion, however, but I'd suggest you read a bit of the text before purchasing it unless you're already familiar with, or particularly interested in, author Nesbit.

    Caveat: The occasional black-and-white line drawings are by H.R. Millar, not the Paul Zelinsky watercolors promised in the Editorial Reviews section.

    3-0 out of 5 stars A cynic's delight
    I doubt I would have liked "Five Children and It" even as a child: an ordinary child's troubles are so much more troublesome than the challenges these kids face, it's almost (but not quite) funny. Cyril, Robert, Anthea, and Jane live in a countryside mansion replete with servants, they take trips to toy stores where they can buy whatever their hearts desire (the author informs us that this is the way children ought to be brought up), and inside a gravel-pit they have found a prehistoric sand-fairy that grants them wishes, one each day, but all their wishes have been turning out rotten so far. Well, boo hoo.

    It isn't the concept that bothers me; it is the execution. Baum's and Carroll's heroines face comparable situations, but neither authors' books evoked such negative reactions from me. The reasons why the children's wishes fail I found especially abominable: when peerless beauty is wished for, the maid won't let them in since they look like "eyetalian monkeys"; when wealth is asked for and antique guineas appear by the bushel, the kids are arrested for thieves; when stolen jewellery magically reappears, it is Beale, the gameskeeper, who is immediately and incontrovertibly the chief suspect; when the four wish (accidentally) for the baby to grow up, the Lamb (Or Devereuz, or Hilary, or St Maur, as he should be rightly called) becomes a snappish fop. Nesbit draws miscellaneous moralistic lessons from her tale ("I cannot pretend that stealing is right"), but what use are these lessons when you are arrested whether or not you tell the truth? I would much rather Nesbit turn a cynical eye on the people she is describing, instead of using her keen powers of observations to weave an antithetical yarn.

    At least her prose is reasonable enough. Nesbit's language is lucid, and while her sentence structure is rather sophisticated, it is not unduly so. Sadly, the same cannot be said of her characters. The four children who are the novel's protagonists are essentially the only developed characters, and while they are developed rather well, with plausibility and realism, they are bland. They are honest, noble, polite, friendly, sociable, and well-off; they treat the servants and people of lower station as functionaries, tools, ways of getting from A to B, and so does the author. Thus, there is little desire on the reader's part to come to know them better. They allow little conflict, little empathy. I'm probably the first to levy the charge that they have little wit and, if not for the fact that the wishes disappear at sundown, they would have great difficulty dealing with ther wishes.

    But more about those wishes: it is quite surprising how many of them are accidental. In fact, there is little premeditated wishing going on past chapter six: otherwise, Nesbit would have been hard-pressed to find a reason for the children to wish for marauding Indians. What lesson are we, as readers, to draw from this? "Word your wishes carefully?" I'm reminded of the movie "Big," in where a twelve-year-old wishes to be grown-up to impress an older girl, and instead becomes Tom Hanks and scares the heck out of everybody. Just once I'd like a book where the characters get their hearts' true desires and have to come to terms with THAT. ... Read more


    17. The Period Book: Everything You Don't Want to Ask (But Need to Know) (But Need to Know)
    by Karen Gravelle, Jennifer Gravelle, Debbie Palen
    list price: $8.95
    our price: $8.06
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0802774784
    Catlog: Book (1996-04-01)
    Publisher: Walker & Company
    Sales Rank: 1060
    Average Customer Review: 4.48 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (25)

    5-0 out of 5 stars WONDERFUL BOOK
    I BOUGHT THIS BOOK FOR MY DAUGHTER WHEN SHE WAS 5 YEARS OLD. SHE HAS ALWAYS BEEN CURIOUS ABOUT HER BODY AND I HAVE ALWAYS EXPLAINED IT TO HER THROUGH A MEDICAL ASPECT. WHEN I WAS GROWING UP I HAD NO INFORMATION WHATSOEVER ABOUT MY BODY AND WHAT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. I FELT WHEN I HAD MY GIRL SHE SHLD BE PREPARED FOR THE CHANGES. THIS BOOK WITH IT'S WONDERFULLY INFOMATIVE AND PLAIN LANGUAGE WAS JUST WHAT WE NEEDED. NOW THAT SHE IS 11 AND ON THE VERGE OF STARTING HER PERIOD, SHE ISN'T IN THE DARK ABOUT IT AND SHE SEEMS MUCH MORE CONFIDENT WHEN WE DISCUSS IT.
    I'M AM VERY GLAD THERE ARE BOOKS OF THIS TYPE ON THE MARKET FOR YOUNG GIRLS TODAY. I WOULD RATHER MY GIRL TALK TO ME ABOUT THIS SUBJECT THAN TO GO TO GIRLFRIENDS OF HER OWN AGE WHO DON'T HAVE THE EXPERIENCE OR INFORMATION.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, Wonderful However you want to put it.
    Every young girl who is worried or just curious about her period should have this book. It explains what happens to your body during puberty, the what ifs and freaquently asked questions from many girls.Parents- if you are looking for a book on this type of thing, this is the book you are looking for. "It's A Girl Thing" by Mavis Jukes is great, too.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great for teens and pre-teens
    This book has definitely helped me understand and feel comfortable with having my period. I didn't find this book inappropriate at all. It tells you about normal stuff that should be happening. I, personally, would recommend it to all pre-teens and teens!

    2-0 out of 5 stars Wow! Too Much!
    My mom bought this book for me when I turned 12, and we looked through it together. Wow, I could not believe what I had read! It was way too innapropriate for pre-teens. I would reccomend "The Care and Keeping of You". By American Girl.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Book For Girl's Afraid To Ask!
    I went to the library today, and my mom picked up this book. I read it today, and it answered all the questions that I was always afraid to ask! Every mom out there should get this for their daughter, no matter what they say! ... Read more


    18. Harry Potter Schoolbooks Box Set: Two Classic Books from the Library of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry
    by J. K. Rowling
    list price: $12.95
    our price: $9.71
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 043932162X
    Catlog: Book (2001-11-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 352
    Average Customer Review: 4.42 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Now, the classic books from the library of the Hogwarts School ofWitchcraft and Wizardry--Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them andQuidditch Through the Ages--are available in hardcover in a sturdy boxedgift set. (These books are written by J.K. Rowling herself under the pseudonymsNewt Scamander and Kennilworthy Whisp.) Finally, Muggles will have the chance todiscover where the Quintaped lives, what the Puffskein eats, and why it is bestnot to leave milk out for a Knarl. The Quidditch textbook explains where theGolden Snitch came from, how the Bludgers came into existence, and why theWigtown Wanderers have pictures of meat cleavers on their clothes. Both books,designed to look like Harry Potter's actual, used Hogwarts textbooks, featuresilly scribblings from Harry, Ron, and Hermione. Proceeds from the sale of thisgift set will go to improving and saving the lives of children around the world.Harry Potter fans, rejoice! (All ages) ... Read more

    Reviews (308)

    5-0 out of 5 stars If you cannot go to Hogwarts, let Hogwarts come to you
    Although not a necessary addition to everyone's personal Harry Potter library, these two little books are quite interesting and a lot of fun to read. They are both quite short, totaling less than sixty five pages apiece, but they are wonderfully put together and made to look like copies of real books from the Hogwarts library. None other than Albus Dumbledore himself writes the introduction to each book, explaining how and why these books are being made available to Muggles for the first time and explaining how proceeds from each book go directly to a fund, set up in Harry Potter's name by Comic Relief UK and author J.K. Rowling, which is dedicated to help children in need throughout the world.

    Quidditch Through the Ages, penned by Quidditch expert Kennilworthy Whisp explains the ultimate sport of wizards from top to bottom, giving the centuries-old history of the game as it has evolved. First and foremost, he explains why wizards and witches employ brooms to fly on in the first place, and then he proceeds to give an account of the changing rules of the game from its early days of primitive baskets set atop poles to the standardized and world-sweeping format of today. Of most significance and interest is the story of how the Golden Snitch was introduced into the sport. Different strategies and maneuvers are named and explained, the thirteen Quidditch teams of England and Ireland are identified, some of the seven hundred types of fouls are explained, and some of the most memorable games and individual performances are detailed (including the Tutshill Tornados' Roderick Plumpton's amazing snag of the Golden Snitch only three and a half seconds into a game back in 1921).

    Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them by Newt Scamander is a compendium of all the fantastic beasts currently known, from the Acromantula to the Yeti. Prior to the actual listings, Scamander explains the criteria by which some beings have come to be labeled beasts (it's more complicated than you might think) and devotes some time to the obvious question as to why Muggles seem to spot such creatures only rarely. Each listing also carries the classification assigned each beast by the Ministry of Magic, which is important information given that these beasts range from the harmless to the controllable to the incredibly dangerous. Along with fascinating descriptions of the animals we have already encountered in the Harry Potter books, there are some real jewels of information included here, solving several Muggle mysteries such as that of the true identity of the Loch Ness Monster. Fantastic Beasts is a copy of Harry Potter's own personal copy of the book, and its margins are dotted with little notes ranging from the mundane to the bitingly funny written by Harry, Ron, as well as Hermione. Now, if we could only get our hands on A History of Hogwarts; I'm sure Hermione has a copy they can use for the printing of a Muggle edition.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Get your Harry fix and support a great cause!
    Although the wait for 2002 and "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" is going to be a hard one for a lot of people, these two brief but fun books should fill the gap admirably as well as supporting a great cause. Released for the first time (well, to the general Muggle public), here's two of Harry Potter's schoolbooks, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" and "Quidditch Through the Ages."

    Slim and quick reads, these books nevertheless are a great deal of fun. "Quidditch" provides us with a brief evolution and history of everyone's favorite broomstick-riding sport, with rules of play, focuses on top world teams, and the revelation that Americans don't really play Quidditch on the world-class level, preferring an American variation called "Quodpot." "Fantastic Beasts" is a brisk and humorous guide to mythical, er, totally real monsters and magical creatures from the Acromantula (giant spider) to the Yeti. This book is Harry Potter's own personal copy, and is enlivened with Harry and Ron's writing and jokes in the margins of the book. Both books feature a wonderfully dry-humored introduction by Albus Dumbledore. Both books are written with a friendly and light sense of humor that's delightful to read and makes great background for the serious Harry Potter fan. Quidditch team Chudley Cannons' motto is said to have been changed from "We shall conquer" to "Let's all just keep our fingers crossed and hope for the best."

    The most important reason to buy these books, however, is to support Comic Relief UK, the British relief organization set up to help children in the disadvantaged countries of the world. Although we can't save the world from manticores or score the winning goal in a Quidditch World Cup match, we can still be heroes by supporting this great cause.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Warning
    If your children are Harry Potter fans and read these books the odds are very good that they will throw quotes and 'facts' from these books at you at every opportunity.

    These books are very short and filled with information that fills in and enhances the novels of the Harry Potter series. I have found that the information within them rounds out Rowlings magical universe.

    If you are looking for a novel however these are not for you. They are reference books describing some of the magical creatures in the Harry Potter series or explaining the origns and rules of Quiddich. Good easy fun.

    I would also like to add that these books would be ideal for a child who does not like to read but likes the H.P movies. They just might entice the non reader to pick up the H.P novels.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Two words? Must have.
    Harry Potter is a very popular series, and for any fan of the series, this is a must have. It will give you more information about the world of "Hogwarts" and you will feel good about yourself since it's also for a good cause, i only hope J.K. Rowling will write more of these. Books, Movies, and these schoolbooks i consider the official harry potter merchandise, and then Harry Potter themed candy, figures and such is nice also. I have both of these books, and i read them all the time. It's a good price too. I hope you purchase them, have fun reading!

    5-0 out of 5 stars While You Wait.
    This is a great "While you wait for book 6" collection. It has the spirit of the Harry Potter books.

    The writing is as good as the harry potter books. but the content is not.

    For breaif looks into the history of the Harry Potter boos they are great. Particularly for the history of monsters. Hoever id you are looking for a solid READ this is not the book collection for you. ... Read more


    19. Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread (Newbery Medal Book)
    by Kate Dicamillo, Timothy B. Ering
    list price: $17.99
    our price: $12.23
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0763617229
    Catlog: Book (2003-09-01)
    Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
    Sales Rank: 155
    Average Customer Review: 4.13 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Kate DiCamillo, author of the Newbery Honor book Because of Winn-Dixie, spins a tidy tale of mice and men where she explores the "powerful, wonderful, and ridiculous" nature of love, hope, and forgiveness. Her old-fashioned, somewhat dark story, narrated "DearReader"-style, begins "within the walls of a castle, with the birth of a mouse." Despereaux Tilling, the new baby mouse, is different from all other mice. Sadly, the romantic, unmouselike spirit that leads the unusually tiny, large-eared mouse to the foot of the human king and the beautiful Princess Pea ultimately causes him to be banished by his own father to the foul, rat-filled dungeon.

    The first book of four tells Despereaux's sad story, where he fallsdeeply in love with Princess Pea and meets his cruel fate. The secondbook introduces another creature who differs from hispeers--Chiaroscuro, a rat who instead of loving the darkness of his homein the dungeon, loves the light so much he ends up in the castle& in thequeen's soup. The third book describes young Miggery Sow, a girl who hasbeen "clouted" so many times that she has cauliflower ears. Still, allthe slow-witted, hard-of-hearing Mig dreams of is wearing the crown ofPrincess Pea. The fourth book returns to the dungeon-bound Despereauxand connects the lives of mouse, rat, girl, and princess in a dramaticdenouement.

    Children whose hopes and dreams burn secretly within their hearts willrelate to this cast of outsiders who desire what is said to be out oftheir reach and dare to break "never-to-be-broken rules of conduct."Timothy Basil Ering's pencil illustrations are stunning, reflectingDiCamillo's extensive light and darkness imagery as well as the sweet,fragile nature of the tiny mouse hero who lives happily ever after.(Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

    Reviews (77)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Enchanting Fable
    A few months ago, I read a little blurb about this novel, and I couldn't wait to read it. Then, it won the Newberry Award, and I finally got hold of a copy. It didn't disappoint. The Tale of Despereaux is one of the most enchanting little stories I've ever read, and I have a feeling it's going to go down as a true children's classic.

    The story is so entrancing. It centers around a mouse named Despereaux who just doesn't fit in with the other mice. He is born with his eyes opened. He sees a beautiful world that the others are blind to, and he is shunned because of it. He is able to hear music, and he is able to love creatures of other races. For instance, this tiny mouse falls in love with the human Princess Pea, and that begins quite a chain of events.

    Of course, not everything in the story is happy. There is also a dark world that the novel doesn't hide from. There are characters who have had little chance in life and have been harmed because of it. There are characters here who have lead dark lives and are trying to destroy Princess Pea and Despereaux. But, ultimately, this isn't a dark novel but one proclaiming a message about love and hope and the possibility of redemption. It is a beautiful little novel about having the courage to bring some light into the world. The Tale of Despereaux is an amazing novel for people of every age which will be read for an oftly long time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Magical New Classic
    I have read The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo, and liked it much better than her Newbery Honor book, Because of Winn-Dixie. This fairy-tale adventure about a mouse, a rat, a princess, and a servant girl is told in a measured, mannered voice that's a departure for DiCamillo's usual casual style. There are frequent appeals to the "dear reader," which work for me as they do in so few other books.

    Despereaux is the youngest mouse in his family. He is runty, with huge ears, and prefers reading books to eating them. We're given glimpses of his family -- his faithless father, his very proper sister, his loutish brother whose favorite word is "Cripes!," and his French mother, whose English is slightly stiff and very amusing. Before long, Despereaux's non-mousely behavior gets him banished to the dungeon, where the castle rats will presumably eat him.

    He escapes, of course, only to cross paths with a vengeful rat who has taken a slow-witted palace maid into service, to help him carry out his plan to punish Princess Pea, the object of his hatred and Despereaux's devotion.

    Forgiveness, second chances, embracing the light, being who you are, the importance of stories, and the restorative properties of a hot bowl of soup all come into play to create a delicate, magical book that I suspect may have more longevity than the celebrated but ultimately somewhat ordinary Because of Winn-Dixie.

    1-0 out of 5 stars awful, reader, just plain awful
    Please do not read this book, reader!!! Reader, I had just finished reading Because of Winn-Dixie, and I found it to be a wonderful book and story. But, reader, Tale of Despereaux did not come anywhere close to what I expected a good, or worthy of reading children's book, should be. I also, reader, feel that anyone who has to tell a child what is going on without letting them think for themselves or create their own meanings should not bebale to get their books published. I have always felt the point of getting children to read is to, get them to read! Then the stories and meanings can be discussed later. Children always bring something new the table, and this book ruins a childs creative and imaginative mind.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Teachers, here is your book!
    You can get the storyline from the excellent reviews on this page. If you are looking for a terrific read-aloud or book study or novel for your literature circles, this is it. Are you teaching literary elements? This book has it all, character, plot, setting, theme, motivation, point-of-view, genre, voice, elaboration, foreshadowing, word choice...

    The wonderful thing is your students will just think you are reading them the BEST story ever. I read chapters 1-3 aloud and then stopped. The kids sent up a chorus of "Nooo, Don't Stop!!!"

    We sold so many hard cover copies of the book at our school book fair that we had to reorder several times. Parent were remarking, "He has never begged me for a book before..."

    Dust off your French accent and have fun. You will enjoy reading this book aloud as much as your students will enjoy listening to it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome
    A very good book, to say the least. I was recomended this by my librarian and read it, along with Olive's Ocean (another good read, check it out). It deserved the award it got, definitly. ... Read more


    20. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2 Audio CD)
    by J.K. ROWLING
    list price: $49.95
    our price: $32.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0807281948
    Catlog: Book (1999-12-01)
    Publisher: Listening Library
    Sales Rank: 1284
    Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    The Dursleys were so mean that hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry.But just as he's packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

    And strike it does.For in Harry's second year at Hogwarts, fresh torments and horrors arise, including an outrageously stuck-up new professor, Gilderoy Lockheart, a spirit named Moaning Myrtle who haunts the girls' bathroom, and the unwanted attentions of Ron Weasley's younger sister, Ginny.

    But each of these seem minor annoyances when the real trouble begins, and someone--or something--starts turning Hogwarts students to stone.Could it be Draco Malfoy, a more poisonous rival than ever?Could it possibly be Hagrid, whose mysterious past is finally told?Or could it be the one everyone at Hogwarts most suspects...Harry Potter himself?
    ... Read more

    Reviews (2308)

    5-0 out of 5 stars PERHAPS THE FUNNIEST ONE SO FAR
    Potter 2, THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS (1998), may be the funniest one so far. Strangely, I think it is also the one that includes the greater number of physically unpleasant or revolting details, scattered all along the story.
    In spite of it, the reading was pleasing to me (I must add I read the Spanish translation first: an eloquent one, but the translators should have probably saved a lot of words). There is a good deal of suspense in the book. Gilderoy Lockhart can make you fall off your chair with laughter. Dobby the house-elf is another brilliantly comic character (we'll meet him again in The Goblet of Fire). Mrs Rowling developes her characters in a way consistent with the 1st book (look up the Weasley twins or Snape, for instance, in Potter 1, since their first appearances until now, and you'll see what I mean). Though the adventurous fever that hits Hermione Granger came as a surprise to me: even her friends Ron and Harry (not half as well-balanced as she is) feel it's strange.
    Like in Potter 1, Harry is the less remarkable character in the story, in a way. He's not specially funny or wise or a good student or anything (unlike Malfoy, he's not even specially nasty). Actually, if it wasn't for his scar and his quidditch skills (well, his desperate courage at deadly situations too), JK would have had to choose Mr Filch or that Norris cat to play the hero: Potter would have been as invisible as his cloak. Yet after reading up to the 5th title in the "saga", I think there is some purpose by the author: JK works hard on her books, she's a careful (even too careful) story-maker and character-painter: it cannot be a coincidence that inconspicuousness about Potter's personality. To those having read The Order of the Phoenix this fact is even more urgent, because Potter becomes "remarkable" there -but in the most unfortunate way!! But this lines are not about that book.
    Sometimes one can even feel -say, angry with Potter, in this book. He seems to think (erroneously!!) that the best way towards sorting out problems is keeping them hidden from the people who can help solve them: that is Dumbledore in the first place. If Potter's side wins the battle in the end in this book is in spite of him rather than due to him... which is true also about the rest of the series so far. BR>
    Finally, that McGonagall's idea, no exams for the pupils because of the hard events they've lived, I think it's foolish: no serious school in the world, even in the fiction world, would ever do such thing!

    5-0 out of 5 stars "There is more than one way to burn a book"
    The above quote was from the Coda of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. I quote it because while looking through all the one star quotes you see a lot of 'Don't let your children read it, it should be banned ect...' In other words they want to ... burn the book 'cos of their frail mind and 'idea's.' What also irritates me is the large amount of fellow Christians here bashing it and calling it 'Satanic' I am a strong Christian, and guess what? It's not. Witch's magic? Oh dear if a kid can't handle that however will they handle the real world? The point of a Fairy Tale is to prepare kids for the real evil in our world! No these books aren't The Narnia. The Chronicles Of Narnia is my favorite series, and these books o course are not supposed to be anything like them so don't expect them to be. Harry Potter isn't allegory (well according to Lewis's idea neither was Narnia) so don't expect the same level of skill or style. He had witches and goblins as well, will you ban him next? (Oh I forgot some "Christians" think Lewis is evil as well.) Besides "The Last Battle" was more horrific on a psychological level and in its vivid description of battle and mayhem then anything in this book (remember the horses and dwarfs?). There you have the destruction of lands, and all hell (literally) being rained down upon them. Here they have people in a state of shock and a villain getting killed. True the purpose behind the events in Narnia were different, all I'm saying is that the 'disturbing for children' was even more in "The Last Battle". These books are in no way evil; they are however entertaining, un-offensive and fine for kids. Don't worry about polluting minds, being sent to hell or comparing it to a completely different style of writing, just sit and read them for what they are. The ironic this is I never even intended to read a Harry Potter book, I made a promise I would in order to get someone to read Bradbury and here I am defending it, so... don't pre-judge and just get and enjoy them!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Oh how fun! What an adventure!
    Year two at Hogwarts has a rough start for Harry, who misses his train and has to make his own way to Hogwarts, breaking every rule in the book along the way. He's in a lot of trouble, yet he still manages to hold his head high and trudge along through school.

    Draco doesn't let up as he taunts Harry and tries to cause even more trouble for our hero. We are introduced to new characters that we'll see later in the series. While we don't learn much about Harry's past in this sequel, we learn much more about Hogwarts, the teachers, and the students.

    If the HP series were a journey "Chamber of Secrets" would be the bridge from "Sorcerer's Stone" to "Prisoner of Azkaban" where we learn much more about the hows and whys.

    It's truly a thrill to read.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great book to follow the first!
    This book was enjoyable, but it was a little slow in how it finally present the clues to discover the final showdown, I think it gives the good lesson in good things are worth waiting for. I didn't like how the characters were acting like total incompetents in seeking help and basically acting like airheads, but I guess that should be expected at 12 years old and only second years.

    For a small summary: see the movie!

    5-0 out of 5 stars So Silver
    Harry Potter two, didn't have as much going on as the first book, but had much more suspense. Action: amazing. Writing: great. Illustrations: beautiful. All what I call a five star book! ... Read more


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