Global Shopping Center
UK | Germany
Home - Books - Children's Books - Ages 9-12 Help

41-60 of 200     Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next 20

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

$90.00 list($129.99)
41. The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
$5.39 $2.98 list($5.99)
42. Gregor the Overlander (Underland
$10.85 list($15.95)
43. Among the Enemy (Shadow Children)
$9.74 list($12.99)
44. The Dragonology Handbook: A Practical
$6.99 $4.28
45. Chasing Vermeer
$7.77 $7.69 list($12.95)
46. Dragon Rider
$4.99 $2.38
47. Seedfolks (Joanna Colter Books)
$22.44 $21.78 list($34.00)
48. The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl,
$23.80 $23.45 list($35.00)
49. The New Way Things Work
$8.99 $4.10 list($11.99)
50. The Bad Beginning (A Series of
$7.19 $3.43 list($7.99)
51. A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea
$12.23 $10.09 list($17.99)
52. Peter and the Starcatchers
$5.99 $1.95
53. Bridge to Terabithia
$5.39 $3.62 list($5.99)
54. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs.
$8.39 $5.49 list($11.99)
55. The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate
$11.53 list($16.95)
56. Young Bond Series, The: Silverfin
$10.36 $7.64 list($12.95)
57. What's Happening to My Body? Book
$5.85 $3.11 list($6.50)
58. Where the Red Fern Grows
$24.48 $23.85 list($36.00)
59. Complete Anne of Green Gable Boxed
$8.96 $5.95 list($9.95)
60. Search of the Moon King's Daughter

41. The Lord of the Rings Trilogy Gift Set
by J. R. R. Tolkien
list price: $129.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1402516274
Catlog: Book (2002-01-01)
Publisher: Recorded Books Unabridged
Sales Rank: 30817
Average Customer Review: 4.58 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (50)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great performance by Inglis, but some quibbles
This reading of the entire Lord of the Rings is hard not to rate highly because of the quality of the performance. Mr. Inglis seems to have a whole world of different voices. I can't imagine how he managed to come up with so many or how he managed to remember what voice he picked for each character. He performs so well that this is really more a dramatization of the whole book rather than just someone reading it; even his voicing of the narration is perfect.

I've not listened to the whole yet, being about half-way through the Fellowship of the Ring. I assume that the quality of the performance will be just as good for the parts I've not listened to yet. However, I do have several quibbles (which are not enough to lessen my rating, but which I found surprising against the overall quality).

The first quibble has nothing to do with Mr. Inglis himself: Sometimes I can hear, faintly, another voice in the background. It sounds like this voice is also reading something. To the creators of this recording: get better sound-proofing. Mr. Inglis's voice and performance are so wonderful that it is a pity to have this distraction.

The second quibble has to do with Mr. Inglis: I happen to be listening to this recording while following along in my printed books of the trilogy, therefore it becomes obvious when Mr. Inglis departs from the text. I really don't mind the sometimes excessive use of contractions that are not in Tolkien's original (even though "don't use the ring" really does not have the same emphasis as "do *not* use the ring") and it's not so bad when he substitutes one word for another of the same meaning (possibly he may be reading from a different edition).

However, occasionally, Mr. Inglis makes boo-boos that change the meaning of the sentence being read. At least two come to mind (and these from the first half of the Fellowship): Near the end of the Tom Bombadil episode (when Frodo and Co. are taking leave of Goldberry) a "morning" is changed to a "misty morning". The word "misty" is not in the text and confuses the meaning of the passage as the sentences that follow imply that the morning is a clear one. The other most noticible change is that Sam's statement "How do *we* know that you are the real Strider..." gets read as "How do *you* know that you are the real Strider...", which makes no sense. These are the two errors of reading that first come to mind, but there were more. Enough, let's say, to surprise me in a performance that is almost pitch-perfect.

However, like I said previously, these quibbles don't reduce my rating and the set is well worth any amount of money.

5-0 out of 5 stars Super Fantastic!
Super fantastic! I have read the "Lord of the Rings" (LotR) trilogy eight times. I think that Peter Jackson's movies are the best to day. I think that the 13-hour BBC production is the best radio play to date. Although this 55-hour 46-CD set is the only unabridged audio book for LotR, I doubt that it could be surpassed.

Inglis does an excellent job at articulation and dramatization, giving different intonation and mannerisms to different characters. It really is as if you were reading the book.

The recording is very good. The CDs performed well. The packaging is excellent, in a cardboard case, with three cardboard boxes, each with three liners that can hold up to four CDs each.

One thing that I liked about this is that each track is around three minutes long. This is great for when you have to stop and pick up later -- especially if your portable CD player does not remember the track!

Another thing that I liked was the lack of dynamic range. Yes, the lack of it. The loudness is very even across a wine range of topics. This is especially important when listening in the car or with headphones, typically in noisy environment. With some other products, I was constantly turning the volume up and down. Not with this set. However, the performance of the reading did not suffer at all because of this. That is great!

This should be in every library of LotR fans, especially those that travel a lot and want to listen while on the go. Highly recommended!

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfection.
Inglis' delivery was very nearly flawless. He also has an excellent singing voice; I was astonished to find there were so many songs written down in the books. The only major problem I had with this set is that it was finite.

I had never heard of Mr. Inglis before listening to this set. He actually made me look forward to an hour-long commute. If someone were to publish his reading of the Zip code directory, I would purchase it immediately. He's that good.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantstic!
I checked this CD book (and The Hobbit CD Book) out of the local library. I recommend this to any and all, especially those with copies that are missing discs. This recording is everything one could wish for in a LoTR listening experience... outstanding feeling, correct pronunciation (after all, J.R.R. was a linguist... the whole purpose for the books, really), ease of use... just fantastic! Inglis does a great job.
The movies are great movies, but they are NOT The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien... they are The Lord of the Rings by Peter Jackson. These discs are The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien, and one can give no greater praise than that!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is the one!!!
This unabridged version is the way to go. I have heard the dramitization versions and they are OK if that is your thing. I prefer this simpler version. The entire story is there and Rob Inglis does a great job changing his voice and reading generally very dramatically. I really love this audio book! ... Read more


42. Gregor the Overlander (Underland Chronicles)
by Suzanne Collins
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439678137
Catlog: Book (2004-07-01)
Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
Sales Rank: 130495
Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

When Gregor falls through a grate in the laundry room of his apartment building, he hurtles into the dark Underland, where spiders, rats, cockroaches coexist uneasily with humans. This world is on the brink of war, and Gregor's arrival is no accident. A prophecy foretells that Gregor has a role to play in the Underland's uncertain future. Gregor wants no part of it -- until he realizes it's the only way to solve the mystery of his father's disappearance. Reluctantly, Gregor embarks on a dangerous adventure that will change both him and the Underland forever. ... Read more

Reviews (15)

5-0 out of 5 stars A breathtaking, unforgettable tale!
This is the best fantasy novel I've read in a long, long time. I found out about this book by chance and want to tell everyone I know about it because they might not see it at the bookstore. Everybody who likes fantasies MUST read this book. You absolutely have to. If you like suspense, prophecies, awesome fantasy, mysteries, battles, survival, reunions, friendships, heroism, and characters you will never forget, you will love, love, love this book. PLEASE Ms. Collins hurry up with the sequel!! I just have to know what happens to Gregor and his family and all the Underlanders. I HAVE to find out about The Prophecy of Bane. I think Gregor is such a great hero. The plot for this novel is so perfect. Every detail fits just right. Ms. Collins has thought of everything. The Underland is a very believable world. All of the characters are fascinating and very real. Aside from Gregor and Boots, my favorite characters are Tick and Temp, Solovet, and Ripred. Oh, most of all, I love Ares. I laughed and cried and shivered and lost my breath reading this book.

4-0 out of 5 stars SPECTRUM Children's Book Club GOOD READ!
Reading Level: 9-12

The adventure begins in an unlikely place: the laundry room of a New York apartment building where Gregor is washing the family clothes and babysitting his two-year-old sister, Boots. Gregor is doing laundry while most of the other kids in the neighborhood are at summer camp because, since his father disappeared, his mother works very hard to support the family, which includes another, younger sister and Gregor's grandmother.

When the curious Boots is discovered dangerously close to an open vent shaft, Gregor is horrified to see her sucked in. In his attempt to grab her, Gregor is himself propelled into the shaft and begins his long fall down to Underland. While the fall and the name of the topsy-turvy underworld are Collins' acknowledgement of the inspiration of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, that's where the similarity ends.

Gregor the Overlander, is a well-written, fast-paced, extremely entertaining read populated with likeable characters and fantastic creatures. Gregor and Boots are endearing protagonists and the fantasy elements are mostly exaggerations of real-life urban creatures like bats and roaches rather than dragons and such. The straight-forward, non-stop story, with its sense of family, hints of romance, and a few gross-outs, should appeal to both boys and girls. If you are looking for a good read-aloud family book, Gregor the Overlander will fit the bill superbly.

- KB Shaw, Publisher
SPECTRUM Children's Book Club
www.incwell.com

5-0 out of 5 stars Do not miss this book!
This is a terrific fantasy novel that will appeal to guys and girls. Giant cockroaches, bats to ride, and a prophecy to fulfill make this a very fun read. I loved Gregor's love and concern for his little sister. This book is going to have wide appeal to fantasy readers. I am a school librarian and have watched what kids read for many years. I cannot wait to introduce this book to them. Redwall fans will enjoy this series-to-be.

4-0 out of 5 stars Big Bugs
Gregor the Overlander, by Suzanne Collins, is a intense book about an eleven year boy who is pulled into the Underland. I was at first curious when he started to fall slowly downward towards the Underland and the currents sucked his little sister into the Underland he then was kidnapped by roaches. I thought that it was strange that the cockroaches thought that boots was a goddess and helped her all the way through the book. I thought that it was neat that the rats could smell everything extraordinarily well. The best part of the book was when the root beer hit the spider in the fangs causing it to drop Luxa the queen of the humans. I do not know which I disliked more the ending of the book or how the people die.

5-0 out of 5 stars Read this book! Now! Or giant rats will chase you!
If you don't love this book, then you are a nitwit! Gregor is a young boy who has had to assume many responsibilities since his father mysteriously vanished 2 years ago. When his baby sister falls down a chute in the laundry room, he goes after her. What he finds is a whole new world with gigantic roaches, evil rats, enormous spiders and an odd race of humans. Gregor's arrival is seen as a possible warrior who can save the Underland according to an prophecy written in stone hundreds of years ago. All he knows is his mom is going to be worried sick if he doesn't get home soon with his sister (as utterly charming a human as ever existed!) I loved this book. You will love this story. I can't wait for the next book in her series. Highly recommended to kids and moms, and everyone in between! ... Read more


43. Among the Enemy (Shadow Children)
by Margaret Peterson Haddix
list price: $15.95
our price: $10.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689857969
Catlog: Book (2005-06-01)
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Sales Rank: 57261
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

44. The Dragonology Handbook: A Practical Course In Dragons
by Ernest, Dr. Drake
list price: $12.99
our price: $9.74
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 076362814X
Catlog: Book (2005-05-31)
Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
Sales Rank: 30684
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

45. Chasing Vermeer
by Blue Balliett
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439372976
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
Sales Rank: 2443
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

In the classic tradition of E.L. Konigsburg’s From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, debut author Blue Balliett introduces readers to another pair of precocious kids on an artful quest full of patterns, puzzles, and the power of blue M&Ms.Eleven year old Petra and Calder may be in the same sixth grade class, but they barely know each other. It’s only after a near collision during a museum field trip that they discover their shared worship of art, their teacher Ms. Hussey, and the blue candy that doesn’t melt in your hands.Their burgeoning friendship is strengthened when a creative thief steals a valuable Vermeer painting en route to Chicago, their home town. When the thief leaves a trail of public clues via the newspaper, Petra and Calder decide to try and recover the painting themselves. But tracking down the Vermeer isn’t easy, as Calder and Petra try to figure out what a set of pentominos (mathematical puzzle pieces), a mysterious book about unexplainable phenomena and a suddenly very nervous Ms. Hussey have to do with a centuries old artwork.When the thief ups the ante by declaring that he or she may very well destroy the painting, the two friends know they have to make the pieces of the puzzle fit before it’s too late!

Already being heralded as The DaVinci Code for kids, Chasing Vermeer will have middle grade readers scrutinizing art books as they try to solve the mystery along with Calder and Petra. In an added bonus, artist Brett Helquist has also hidden a secret pentomino message in several of the book’s illustrations for readers to decode. An auspicious and wonderfully satisfying debut that will leave no young detective clueless. --Jennifer Hubert ... Read more

Reviews (53)

4-0 out of 5 stars Sometimes a coincidence is just a coincidence
Eleven-year-olds Calder Pilsay and Petra Andalee live three houses away from each other on a narrow street in Chicago's Hyde Park area. They are both unusually intelligent, Petra the sort of quirkily interesting kid whom others in her class consequently label as "weird," while Calder excels at patterning. He fidgets incessantly with the set of pentominoes he keeps with him at all times, fitting the Tetris-like shapes together to form rectangles of varying sizes. Both Calder and Petra, too, are unusually receptive to the idea that is a theme of this book, that apparent coincidences are not always coincidental. When the coincidences and various unexplained phenomena in their own lives begin piling up--many of them connected with the painter Vermeer--Calder and Petra come to believe that a particular Vermeer painting will be stolen. When it is, they believe themselves peculiarly suited to finding it.

While observing and recording suspicious activity in their own neighborhood, Calder and Petra put their considerable talents to use investigating the theft of the painting and tracking it down. The problem is, it's not intellect alone that they apply to the task: Calder believes that his pentominoes give him hints, while Petra finds herself communicating with the subject of the missing Vermeer painting. Led forward thus by their supernatural helpmates, Calder and Petra make implausible mental leaps that, for this reader at least, make suspension of disbelief impossible.

Though its plot is a disappointment, and it never packs any true suspense, Chasing Vermeer has much to recommend it: likeable characters, some nice writing, Brett Helquist's drawings, and the use of codes in the book, based on Calder's pentominoes. The story may also get kids thinking more about art, as the author surely intended. The inclusion of reprints of two of Vermeer's paintings is a nice touch.

Debra Hamel -- book-blog.com

4-0 out of 5 stars Good story
"Chasing Vermeer" is a good story-- very interesting with a compelling mystery and likable characters.I would love to see Petra and Calder, the two protagonists in more books-- they're very bright and persistent kids.And the writing is very strong.There's lots of interesting stuff about Vermeer, pentominos, the meaning of art, and the role of creativity in our educational system; despite all that, my 6 year old niece really enjoyed the book (and I enjoyed reading it to her.)

I do have a couple of complaints-- one, the book often seems like an ad for a pentomino company, and two, the plot relies to much on the kids' intuition to solve the mystery.Like I said, Petra and Calder are very resourceful; they could have solved the mystery using more logic and investigative techniques, but too often the plot twists revolve around something like, "Hey, the word 'snake' just popped into my head, must be a clue..."

Fortunately, the book is strong enough overall to surmount such shortcomings.Definitely worth the read, and hopefully there will be sequels.

P.S.Always, Brett Helquist's illustrations are wonderful.

4-0 out of 5 stars Really Good Ending and Content
I think that Chasing Vermeer was kind of boring at first, but the ending was so breath-taking, I couldn't put the book down.My favorite part is that it include a lot of different content along with the story; like Math (pentominos), Art (A Lady Wrting), History (Vermeer), and cool codes you can uncover.If it wasn't for these contents, good ending, and desription, this book would be a snor fest.

5-0 out of 5 stars Eliana's Book Review, By Eliana age 10
Dear readers,

Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliett is one of the best books I have read. The author had to have a lot of skill write this book. It probably took a long time to think of the main characters Calder and Petra. Calder and Petra both help solve an art mystery that is centuries old. I think Blue Balliett is a great author. The illustrator is great at drawing, too. I think the author should make a series of these books like the Hardy Boys. This book has a lot of interesting facts and clues; it is very amusing. It could have a little more about the thief, but otherwise it was good. At the beginning it was a little boring, but then it got good because you started to find more clues and coincidences. This book teaches you a lot of new things and words. For example, before I read this book I did not know what pentominoes were, now I know what they are. I recommend this book to mystery lovers.

2-0 out of 5 stars Jordan's Book Review on Chasing Vermeer
Chasing Vermeer was okay, but it took my reading group a long time to get to the climax. This book is about two kids who are 12 years old and who solve an art crime. The characters are Petra and Calder. The characters also figure out some wacky things like pentominoes and strange puzzles. Also, there are a lot of things happening in this book so be careful reading it. This book has a lot of clues and turns. I am going to give you a heads up the author will get you to think out of the box .I felt like the author didn't give me enough information to solve the art crime. That is why I gave it 2 1/2 stars.
By Jordan, age 11 ... Read more


46. Dragon Rider
by Cornelia Funke, Anthea Bell
list price: $12.95
our price: $7.77
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439456959
Catlog: Book (2004-08-01)
Publisher: Chicken House
Sales Rank: 102
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.co.uk

It's a fantasy, it's long, and it's got dragons in it. Dragon Rider is bound to be another hit book from Cornelia Funke! Ever since the popularity of bestselling fantasies The Thief Lord and Inkheart went global a few years ago, legions of fans have demanded more books from the German author than she can reasonably hope to write each year. So, re-discovering this hefty, earlier novel from 1997 was a logical development--and her keenest readers will devour it as before.

Aimed at slightly younger readers than her previous novels, despite its massive five hundred pages, Dragon Rider is about a brave young dragon called Firedrake who embarks upon a dangerous journey to the Rim of Heaven in the Himalayas--a magical place where silver dragons can rest easy, free from the threat of destruction by mankind and their only hope of sanctuary. The key to its location is a map rendered by a rat who is a master cartographer.

Firedrake is joined on his quest by Ben, an orphaned boy, and Sorrell--a wise-cracking Brownie that is an odd, but ingenious, grumpy kind of fairy. Their journey is not a straightforward one by any means. Created by an alchemist called Petrosius Henbane in 1424, Nettlebrand (a malevolent creature covered in impenetrable gold plates) is their biggest threat--he is intent on destroying them. Nettlebrand is aided by Twigleg, a homunculus who has stowed away in Ben's bag and who is feeding reports on their progress back to his master.

Their exciting encounters are many--and the colorful fold-out map in the book's centre is an added bonus. It is easy to forgive the narrative's excessive length when readers are gorging on such a wonderfully inventive and readable story from an author who has her readers in the palm of her hand on every page. (Age 9 and over) --John McLay ... Read more


47. Seedfolks (Joanna Colter Books)
by Paul Fleischman
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064472078
Catlog: Book (1999-04-30)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 73825
Average Customer Review: 4.19 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Common Ground

A vacant lot, rat-infested and filled with garbage, looked like no place for a garden. Especially to a neighborhood of strangers where no one seems to care. Until one day, a young girl clears a small space and digs into the hard-packed soil to plant her precious bean seeds. Suddenly, the soil holds promise: To Curtis, who believes he can win back Lateesha's heart with a harvest of tomatoes; to Virgil's dad, who seems a fortune to be made from growing lettuce; and even to Mariclea, sixteen and pregnant, wishing she were dead.

Thirteen very different voices--old, young, Haitian, Hispanic, tough, haunted, and hopeful tell one amazing story about a garden that transforms a neighborhood.

An old man seeking renewal, a young girl connecting to a father she never knew, a pregnant teenager dreading motherhood. Thirteen voices tell one story of the flowering of a vacant city lot into a neighborhood garden. Old, young, Jamaican, Korean, Hispanic, tough, haunted, hopeful'Newbery Medal winner Paul Fleischman weaves characters as diverse as the plants they grow into a rich, multi-layered exploration of how a community is born and nurtured in an urban environment.

00-01 Utah Book Award (Gr. 7-12)

... Read more

Reviews (54)

5-0 out of 5 stars seedfolks
Seedfolks by Pual Fleischman is a story of racial divide changed to community through the actions of a little girl. It all starts when she plants beans in honor of her dead father. People take notice, and one by one, people in the neighborhood begin to plant various crops from their native lands. Eventually they build a strong, protective, and friendly community that grows along side the garden.
The story is told through the eyes of 13 different characters each explaining their diverse background, what they've seen in the garden, and why they're now involved. The style makes the book a quick read, and because the characters are not directly revisited, it's not confusing.
Overall, this book's inspirational sense of true community is not only achieved in the fictional garden, but ideally in day-to-day life. Seadfolks leaves you with an uplifting, warm and fuzzy all over feeling, and a strong desire to make change.

4-0 out of 5 stars Seedfolks Review
Seedfolks is takes place in a diverse community in Cleveland, Ohio. It is basically a story about a young Vietnamese girl that plants lima beans in a vacant lot filled with garbage to please her dead father. An older lady sees the girl through her window. Expecting that the girl is up to no good, she sends one of her friends out to investigate. The friend comes back and reports that the girl had only planted beans and that they wouldn't grow if he didn't help her take care of them. Other members of the community see that someone has removed all of the garbage from the lot and notice that someone was growing plants. Slowly, everyone begins to plant things in their own section of the garden. People begin to talk and get to know each other and help to transform the neighborhood.
One of the strengths of the story is the way each of the characters tells their own personal story but it all ties back to the garden. Even though there are many different characters, you never get thrown off track. This book is short and to the point with a good message. One of the weaknesses of the story is the way it ended. You find out that once winter comes, the garden looks run down and no one is really taking care of it; their owners have dug up most of the plants. You're kind of left wondering whether the garden is ever rejuvenated after spring returns.
I really enjoyed this book. I like the way this story is put together and the way each of the characters is of a different ethnicity. The fact that this book can be read in one day is also a plus. Seedfolks shows how one simple act can bring a community together. I would recommend this story to anyone who is looking for something positive to read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Seeds of hope
I loved Seedfolks, with its way of bringing you to see other people's side of the story. It was amazing, the way Paul Fleischman used rich descriptions and amazing details to bring you into the hearts and thoughts of an entire neighborhood. I read this book when I was in fifth grade, and since, I have always remembered the characters and plots from this remarkable story. Every now and then, I find myself in a situation like one in this book, and I always find myself asking, "What would Virgil do here?" or "If I were Curtis, what would I do now?" This is one of the best books I have ever read. And I read quite a lot, so that's saying something!

1-0 out of 5 stars Not for MY 10-year-old!
After reading the entire book, I've concluded that one chapter doesn't belong--at least not for elementary school students: The Maricella chapter. In it, a 16-old-girl is considering abortion after realizing the baby she loathes is making her look fat. She hasn't been invited to any parties since she started to show. She wishes her baby would die. She talks about leaving its body in a dumpster.
This has NOTHING to do with culteral diversity. Okay, so she is a member of two minority groups. And sure, in the end she decides that she--like the garden they've planted--is part of a never-ending cycle of life and that maybe she'll keep her baby after all.
Why does a 10-year-old need to know about such a negative societal situation such as this? Please, parents, know what your child is reading. Middle school students would probably be fine with this. Anyone younger than 7th grade, no way.

4-0 out of 5 stars Intertwined lives
I enjoyed this story of a community that comes together because of the act of one little girl. The book celebrates the ability of a group to work with our strentghs to fill in the weaknesses of others. Also, it illustrates how people approach situations differently and bring new ideas and new approaches to others. I teach sixth grade and plan to use the book with my classes this school year in an effor to help celebrate diversity. ... Read more


48. The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl, Book 4)
by EOIN COLFER
list price: $34.00
our price: $22.44
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 030724332X
Catlog: Book (2005-04-26)
Publisher: Listening Library (Audio)
Sales Rank: 16950
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

The highly anticipated new addition to the #1 best-selling Artemis Fowl series.

Criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl is back... and so is his brilliant and dangerous enemy, Opal Koboi. At the start of The Opal Deception, Artemis has no memory of the fairy people and has returned to his unlawful ways. In Berlin, he is preparing to steal a famous Impressionist painting from a German bank. He doesn't know that his old rival, Opal, has escaped from prison by cloning herself. She's left her double behind in jail and, now free, is exacting her revenge on all those who put her there, including Artemis.

Meanwhile in the lower elements, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrechon fairy police is framed for a heinous crime, yet she manages to elude her captors and escape to the surface to rescue Artemis. But before Holly and Artemis can get away, Opal arrives and abducts them both, forcing Artemis to go head to head with an enemy who plans on destroying the fairy world forever. ... Read more

Reviews (55)

5-0 out of 5 stars Very Intense, Definately the Best in the Series
I am a huge fan of the Artemis Fowl series, and this one is in my opinion the best one yet. It is very intense, especially since it's supposed to be a kids book. All the main characters are back, and become closer together after the whole incident unfolds. I recommend it to everyone who loves fantasy books. This book will keep you on the edge of your seat. I couldn't put it down.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great
My literary choices do not normally include flatuent dwarves or evil 14 year old geniuses, but how could you not like this book?

I was very sceptical when I read the first book in this series but I love all the books now.

Artemis Fowl, the evil 14 year old genius has been mind wiped and can no longer remember his experiences with faeries...

ok, I'm a terrible reviewer, I don't want to summarize the book, I just want to give my opinion.

This book is a must read for any Artemis Fowl fan. I would recommend it to most audiences as it is highly entertaining no matter what your reading preference is.

I must say that the ending was a bit weak in comparision to the highly thought out intricate plots previously foiled in the series. Opal was a genius she shouldn't have been so easy to beat.

Anyway, this probably isn't a very informative review, but I enjoyed the book and I recommend it.

3-0 out of 5 stars Ok but not great (a bit fluff heavy)
An entertaining read to be sure but, still, you would think that for a plan that took over a year to formulate it wouldn't have fallen apart quite so quickly.

Essentially, 3/4ths of "The Opal Deception" is about Opal escaping from the hospital, Opal trying to get revenge and Artemis, Butler and Hollie trying to escape from Opal's traps. A measly 1/4th deals with the grand finale - Artemis et. al. thwarting Opal's scheme.

For my taste, I'd hoped for a more "balanced" book. Maybe half dealing with the escape and avoiding Opal's little traps and the other half dealing with actually stopping her grand plan. Better yet, reverse the ratio - 1/4th to the escape et. al. and 3/4ths on stopping Opal's scheme.

Just my 0.02 cents.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Artemis Fowl series
The Opal Deception is the fourth book in the Artemis Fowl series.In this book, Opal - the villain in the second book (The Artic Incident) - was captured and is in a self-induced coma. But, because her mind is still active, she figures out how to escape without being noticed. She also plots to kill Artemis, Holly, and everybody else who stood in her way on her last villainous attempt.
Meanwhile, mind-wiped Artemis Fowl is back to his criminal ways. He is preparing to steal a famous painting called "The Fairy Thief" . . . Little does he know that there is a lot more than a painting in store for him! And, in the Lower Elements, Captain Holly Short is up for a promotion to Major. Before she gets promoted she and her Commander investigate a jail breakout by a goblin, which is very strange because goblins are less intelligent than most humans. Then she gets accused of murder. Why? Read the book and find out! (...)

5-0 out of 5 stars a si fi fairy book
this book is filled with adventurs and tceongloy that any si fi kide would like. ... Read more


49. The New Way Things Work
by David Macaulay
list price: $35.00
our price: $23.80
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0395938473
Catlog: Book (1998-10-26)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books
Sales Rank: 400
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

"Is it a fact--or have I dreamt it--that, by means of electricity, the world of matter has become a great nerve, vibrating thousands of miles in a breathless point of time?" If you, like Nathaniel Hawthorne, are kept up at night wondering about how things work--from electricity to can openers--then you and your favorite kids shouldn't be a moment longer without David Macaulay's The New Way Things Work. The award-winning author-illustrator--a former architect and junior high school teacher--is perfectly poised to be the Great Explainer of the whirrings and whizzings of the world of machines, a talent that landed the 1988 version of The Way Things Work on the New York Times bestsellers list for 50 weeks. Grouping machines together by the principles that govern their actions rather than by their uses, Macaulay helps us understand in a heavily visual, humorous, unerringly precise way what gadgets such as a toilet, a carburetor, and a fire extinguisher have in common.

The New Way Things Work boasts a richly illustrated 80-page section that wrenches us all (including the curious, bumblingwooly mammoth who ambles along with the reader) into the digital age of modems, digital cameras, compact disks, bits, and bytes. Readers can glory in gears in "The Mechanics of Movement," investigate flying in "Harnessing the Elements," demystify the sound ofmusic in "Working with Waves," marvel at magnetism in "Electricity & Automation," andexamine e-mail in "The Digital Domain." An illustrated survey of significant inventions closes the book, along with a glossary of technical terms, and an index. What possible link could there be between zippers and plows, dentist drills and windmills? Parking meters and meat grinders, jumbo jets and jackhammers, remote control and rockets, electric guitars and egg beaters? Macaulay demystifies them all. (Click to see asample spread of this book, illustrations and text copyright 1998 David Macaulay, Neil Ardley, published by Houghton Mifflin Co.) (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (21)

5-0 out of 5 stars The New Way Things Work
This is the best book for childern and adults I have ever read. I recieved "The Way Things Work" When I was in 4th grade. Now I have this newer version. My classmates and I both used it during my College Mechanical Engineering Classes. Everyone can learn from this book it is not just for kids but really belongs on every childs bookshelf.

5-0 out of 5 stars This book really tells you how things work!
Do you think you know how a lot of things work? Yes? Well, you are probably wrong. I am a Physics Major in college and I thought I knew how a lot of things work. However, when I found this book in my physics professor's office, I fell in love with this book. I ordered for my copy on the same day. This book is good for the kids, but some of the stuff is hard to understand because there are some words like forces or angles. These are hard to understand for kids, but the pictures in this book are good for the curious kids. They may understand some of the stuff. But, I would rate this book for grownups. You will learn how locks work, how airplanes fly, how helicopters can go forward or backward. You will understand the mechanics just by looking at the pictures, but the reading the explanations also helps you understand. This is a nice book to keep at the corner of your bookshelf.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Absolute Need for Every Household
Few books can compare to "The Way Things Work" in the amount which they can teach the curious. Be they old or young, college educated engineers or preschoolers, everyone can pick something out of this book. Trust me; I've seen it from all ends.

When I was six, I loved the mammoths...and learned about simple machines and airplane wings. When I was in high school, I appreciated the mammoths' wit...and learned about automatic transmissions and transistors. Now that I'm in college, I've read the whole thing, and it's still a great reference book, just as entertaining and informative as it was so many years ago. And the mammoths are still funny.

For kids with insatiable curiosity, "The Way Things Work" can be a great and entertaining resource; for everyone who's ever wondered how their car drives, or why their computer works, or how satellite communications happen, it can be an immensely satisfying read.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good book, but not for the very young
I bought this book for a boy of the age of 8. He didn't seem very interested in the text explanations of how things work. Perhaps he's a little young, but like other reviewers said, this is a book that can most definately be put on the shelf for several years and still have relevance when a few years of knowledge is gained.

5-0 out of 5 stars BUY THIS BOOK!
My god, this has to be one of my favorite books. When I was a kid, I was FASCINATED (well, I still am) by mechanical things. I must have checked this book out of the library twenty times, and it never got old. It is PACKED with info, the drawings are great, and it is very educational. Well, I was at the library today checking out books for a mechanical engineering class, and there it was on the shelf. I checked it out again for old times sake, and here I am at Amazon.com (to buy my very own copy of course), writing a reveiew. Nuff said. Anyway, if you have a child, boy or girl, old or young, smart or not, it doesn't matter- this book ROCKS! ... Read more


50. The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1)
by Lemony Snicket
list price: $11.99
our price: $8.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064407667
Catlog: Book (1999-09-30)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 71
Average Customer Review: 4.01 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

Make no mistake. The Bad Beginning begins badly for the three Baudelaire children, and then gets worse. Their misfortunes begin one gray day on Briny Beach when Mr. Poe tells them that their parents perished in a fire that destroyed their whole house. "It is useless for me to describe to you how terrible Violet, Klaus, and even Sunny felt in the time that followed," laments the personable (occasionally pedantic) narrator, who tells the story as if his readers are gathered around an armchair on pillows. But of course what follows is dreadful. The children thought it was bad when the well-meaning Poes bought them grotesque-colored clothing that itched. But when they are ushered to the dilapidated doorstep of the miserable, thin, unshaven, shiny-eyed, money-grubbing Count Olaf, they know that they--and their family fortune--are in real trouble. Still, they could never have anticipated how much trouble. While it's true that the events that unfold in Lemony Snicket's novels are bleak, and things never turn out as you'd hope, these delightful, funny, linguistically playful books are reminiscent of Roald Dahl (remember James and the Giant Peach and his horrid spinster aunts), Charles Dickens (the orphaned Pip in Great Expectations without the mysterious benefactor), and Edward Gorey (The Gashlycrumb Tinies).There is no question that young readers will want to read the continuing unlucky adventures of the Baudelaire children in The Reptile Room and The Wide Window. (Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (675)

5-0 out of 5 stars a deliciously dark delight!
suspend your disbelief for a moment and imagine that tim burton, edward gorey, and charles dickens were locked in a room for a brainstorming session to create a new series of children's stories. this is what i can easily see when sitting down to read any of the books in lemony snicket's dark, humorous, and cleverly written series.

they are not harry potter. the comparisons alone are ridiculous. they're not even remotely similar. apparently, a "reviewer" can find two books in the same store, one of them being harry potter, and proceed to lambast the non-potter book solely on the fact that they co-exist. i just have to roll my eyes, shake my head, and write a review whenever i see this.

by now, you know the plot of these books. yes, they're pretty much the same, and yet they're different. i think you need to gauge your own child's sense of the morose before opting to read these to them. older children, i think, will delight in them, particularly those with a slightly twisted sense of humor.

i, personally, will continue to read each book in the series, if for no other reason than to see how count olaf will turn up next!

2-0 out of 5 stars Okay, I can't understand what all the hype is about!
First of all, I want to state that I am very passionate when it comes to 'good' children's books. The HARRY POTTER books are some of my favorite books of all time (my top twenty list). The Newbery Awards were all given to deserving books that I have adored. For a while everywhere I went, the Lemony Snickett books were being lauded as fabulous children's literature. After seeing a segment on CBS Sunday Morning, I went out and bought the whole 'shebang' (is that even a word?) at my school's book fair (I'm the counselor)! I was terribly disappointed with the first book. Yes, it is easy reading, and yes, it does introduce new words (even though my parents always said, "Go look it up, you'll remember it!"). But the content of the story is so depressing and so unhappy that I was miserable the entire time I was reading! Character development was so poor that I wasn't even sad when horrible things happened to these children. Normally I cry when a baby is kidnapped, bound with duct tape (even over her mouth) and put in a birdcage to hang from the top of a tower! Well, I didn't bat an eye (and I become a sprinkler when reading a Patricia Polacco book).
There are eight books left in my crowded library to read; I'll keep you posted if they get any better!

4-0 out of 5 stars Very Original!
A very interesting, original story about all the bad things that happen to the 3 Baudelaire children. I absolutely loved the way this book was written and seems to flow smoothly.

However, I think that some of the situations in the book were depressing, and may be scary for very young children. Otherwise this book was wonderful, and I found myself rooting for the Baudelaire children, and despising Count Olaf and his friends.

2-0 out of 5 stars pointless
Maybe if I hadn't heard so many wonderful things about this book (as well as the entire line of follow-ups) I wouldn't be reviewing it so harshly.
This book is nothing but pointless, weightless children's fluff. Amusing if you are under 10 years of age & looking for some light (ULTRA light) reading, but completely unsatisfying if you crack the cover expecting something more along the lines of 'Harry Potter'.
The plot is very thin, and I can only assume it's due to this being one of a series, and thus the overall tale of the Baudelaire orphans is spread over the 10+ novels that have since been released. But this left the first book with very little substance, and left me feeling like I didn't care enough to give it another go with the second installment.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Bad Beginning
I thought that this book was one of the best books I have ever read. Lemony Snicket's writing style is interesting as when there is a complicated word he tells you what it means. I thought that there was some humorous parts where he either tells you not to continue the book or he takes you away from the book and mentions some thing irrelevant to the story. ... Read more


51. A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea Trilogy, Book 1)
by URSULA K. LE GUIN
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553262505
Catlog: Book (1984-05-01)
Publisher: Spectra
Sales Rank: 249
Average Customer Review: 4.17 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

Often compared to Tolkien's Middle-earth or Lewis's Narnia, Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea is a stunning fantasy world that grabs quickly at our hearts, pulling us deeply into its imaginary realms. Four books (A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, and Tehanu) tell the whole Earthsea cycle--a tale about a reckless, awkward boy named Sparrowhawk who becomes a wizard's apprentice after the wizard reveals Sparrowhawk's true name. The boy comes to realize that his fate may be far more important than he ever dreamed possible. Le Guin challenges her readers to think about the power of language, how in the act of naming the world around us we actually create that world. Teens, especially, will be inspired by the way Le Guin allows her characters to evolve and grow into their own powers.

In this first book, A Wizard of Earthsea readers will witness Sparrowhawk's moving rite of passage--when he discovers his true name and becomes a young man. Great challenges await Sparrowhawk, including an almost deadly battle with a sinister creature, a monster that may be his own shadow. ... Read more

Reviews (284)

5-0 out of 5 stars Inexplicably entrancing
I swore I wouldn't read Ursula Le Guin for the longest time, but curiosity won out over other things. I picked up a copy of "Wizard of Earthsea" at my local library and settled down to read it.

This book follows the wizard Ged, who was born in a Earthsea (a grouping of many, many islands) village in Gont. The boy soon shows signs of great power, the ability to call animals and to laugh even when his tongue has been bound by a spell. But he surpasses the expectations when he saves the village from invaders.

A mage named Ogion apprentices Ged--who is known as Sparrowhawk, as knowledge of his true name would give anyone power over him. But Ogion's discipline and lessons are full of silence and self-examination, something which soon sends Ged to the school for mages in Roke. At the school, he meets two boys that will help shape his destiny: kind, easygoing Vetch, and arrogant Jasper who mocks Ged at every turn.

The boys all study and grow in their power, but Jasper's pride is unchanged. He finally mocks Ged into a magical duel, and Ged attempts a dangerous magic: to waken a long-dead woman. A monstrous creature made of shadow appears with the woman, and attacks Ged, nearly killing him. Ged remains within the school from then on, for the shadow is pursuing him.

But upon the completion of his studies, the now-wiser wizard sets off to an island, where the dread Dragon of Pendor is attacking the natives with its children. The dragon offers him a way to escape the shadow, but Ged refuses for the sake of others. Later, he is tempted again by an entranced queen and a magical Stone -- but again he refuses for the greater good. As the shadow closes in on Ged and his life becomes increasingly imperiled, he must discern what -- and who -- it is, to make himself truly whole.

I do not know WHY I liked this book as much as I did. It has many qualities that often annoy me in fantasy - several years are skipped over in a few pages; we know little of Ged's thoughts and emotions aside from "Ged felt this" and "Ged knew that"; it is also written in a spare mythologic style, which is occasionally broken for interludes of spellbinding nature description. It's a little difficult to visualize some scenes, such as Ged's battle with the dragons, but is relatively easy considering the lack of illustration. (I also liked the maps)

Ged is a classic hero of high SF and fantasy: he is talented and initially hot-headed, but through his misfortunes is tempered into a more selfless, albeit scarred person (both physically and emotionally). A little like Obi-Wan Kenobi of the Jedi Apprentice novels. I really fell in love with Vetch, though, that gave it an entire star. Vetch is such a DARLING, so kind and understanding toward his haunted friend.

I wouldn't qualify this book as being equal to Tolkien (NOTHING can match the Master!) but it definitely has a good place among the high fantasy books. Le Guin's mythologic style and Eastern philosophy tones may not be to everyone's taste, so I advise you to get a peek at a chapter of the Earthsea books before you decide whether or not to buy this.

I'll definitely read "Tombs of Atuan" and "Farthest Shore," but am not sure about "Tehanu" (though as a fifth book is reportedly forthcoming, I may read it anyhow). "Wizard of Earthsea" is not the best, but it is pretty high up there.

5-0 out of 5 stars Terse, mystical, profound
It is an insult to the genius of this book to try to describe it in layman's terms. Words just don't do justice. Le Guin always proves that she has a unique outlook on the world, and the Earthsea books are no exception.

The Wizard of Earthsea is the first part of a series of (now) four books. This part details the origins and youth of Ged - a boy from a backwater village in the great archipelago world of Earthsea. With a magical feat that saves his entire community from barbaric invaders, he shows himself to be greatly proficient in the Art. He is apprenticed to a sorceror (who nevertheless hides under the guise of a simple healer), and makes his way to the Academy on the Island of Roke. There, out of his great pride, he unleashes a shadow-thing in a contest of forbidden magics. Injured, scarred both physically and mentally, he now must flee the thing he brought into this world - or confront it.

One of the most surprising and masterful twists is the terse, epic writing: Le Guin does not spend time to write whole descriptive paragraphs; she sets the scenes with broad strokes of a few sentences, focusing on the most important events. This book is very quick reading.

Ged is an inspiring character. He can be crudely compared to Ender from Orson Scott Card's writings, or perhaps Taran from Lloyd Alexander's, in that he wields great power, by which he is burdened. The reader quickly becomes attached to his grim, brooding persona, as his quest takes him through the world. Ged is also a powerful role-model: he must acknowledge his undeniable talent and shed his fears of losing control of his powers.

The Wizard of Earthsea is undoubtedly a classic, a powerful work of high fantasy and spiritual development.

5-0 out of 5 stars There's More to Earthsea than the Trilogy
Reading the Earthsea Trilogy was one of the highlights of my childhood. Discovering that it had become the Earthsea Quartet and now Quintet is one of the highlights of life today. Why it's still being featured as a trilogy when there are two further books to be read, I don't understand!

Le Guin is the daughter of anthropologists and through all her fiction there is a deep, ingrained understanding of societies work and how they are built and evolve (or disintegrate). It's very interesting to see how her own interests have matured and deepened over the decades of writing this series - the latest Earthsea Title - The Other Wind is a fabulous rendition of concerns about gender/sexism/prejudice and the very nature of things. BUT that's for the grown ups, what really matters is that underneath all her incisive intelligence Ursula Le Guin tells a gripping, exciting and devastating series of stories that come at one in a rush of tight telling and delicately realised plots. She is simply one of the greatest writers for older children - or anyone! So start with the Wizard himself, then read on and on....

1-0 out of 5 stars Where Are The Negative Stars When You Need Them?
I give this book five stars. No, wait, I mean negative five. I cried when I read this book. Seriously, I ran and sobbed in the closet for about half an hour; that's how much I hated it.

There are much, much better fantasy stories out there. I'm very strict with myself about the integrity of my reading- that is, I don't allow myself to skip anything or skim over boring parts. Unfortunately, I realized after I was finished with AWoE, the whole novel was one enormous boring part and I should have flipped through the pages and called it a day.

The author has somehow managed to turn an archetypal journey into an over-reaching, unsubtle literary disaster.

5-0 out of 5 stars A VERY Inspiring Start into the Fantasy World
I read this book in about 3 days, on and off, and I was so inspired by it. It wasn't my first fantasy book, but it made me want to read more and more of the genre (despite my decision to read all fantasy series years ago). It is so exciting to read this book. I read it at age 13, and am saddened to think I hadn't read it earlier. It has all of the elements of a fantasy book, but is written better than most. It doesn't overkill with words like Terry Brooks (whose writing I do love, especially Shannara) or say too little. You love the technique (Le Guin is the best female fantasy/science fiction writer in the world, in my opinion). I can't describe the feeling you have towards Duny/Sparrowhawk/Ged, and are saddened when it ends after, what, 160 pages? That is the only downside: This book is so short. At least there are 5 others in the series, though. This is a piece of literature that every elementary school student should read. I am happy to say I will introduce this to my nephews/nieces when they grow up. It will be worth it for them.

Darn it, this review made me want to read it again. I knew that would happen.... ... Read more


52. Peter and the Starcatchers
by Dave Barry, Ridley Pearson
list price: $17.99
our price: $12.23
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786854456
Catlog: Book (2004-08-31)
Publisher: Disney Editions
Sales Rank: 292
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

Humorist Dave Barry and suspense writer Ridley Pearson have clearly taken great delight in writing a 400-plus page prequel of sorts to Scottish dramatist J.M. Barrie's beloved Peter Pan stories. The result is a fast-paced and fluffy pirate adventure, complete with talking porpoises, stinky rogues, possible cannibals, a flying crocodile, biting mermaids, and a much-sought-after trunk full of magical glowing green "starstuff." Ever hear of Zeus? Michelangelo? Attila the Hun? According to 14-year-old Molly Aster they all derived their powers from starstuff that occasionally falls to Earth from the heavens. On Earth, it is the Starcatchers' job to rush to the scene and collect the starstuff before it falls into the hands of the Others who use its myriad powers for evil.

On board the ship Never Land, an orange-haired boy named Peter, the leader of a group of orphaned boys being sent off to work as servants in King Zarboff the Third's court, is puzzled by his shipmate Molly's fantastical story of starstuff, but it inextricably binds him to her. Peter vows to help his new, very pretty friend Molly (a Starcatcher's apprentice) keep a mysterious trunk full of the stuff out of the clutches of the pirate Black Stache, a host of other interested parties, and ultimately King Zarboff the Third.

The downright goofy, modern 8-year-old boy humor sometimes clashes with an old-time pirate sensibility, and the rapid-fire dialogue, while well paced, is far from inventive. Still, the high-seas hijinks and desert-island shenanigans will keep readers turning the pages. Greg Call's wonderful black-and-white illustrations are deliciously old-fashioned and add plenty of atmosphere to a silly, swashbuckling story that shows us how Peter Pan came to fly and why he, and his story, will never get old. (Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson ... Read more


53. Bridge to Terabithia
by Katherine Paterson
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064401847
Catlog: Book (1987-06-17)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 1591
Average Customer Review: 4.41 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

A secret world of their own

Jess Aaron's greatest ambition is to be the fastest runner in the fifth grade. He's been practicing all summer and can't wait to see his classmates' faces when he beats them all. But on the first day of school, a new kid, a new girl, boldly crosses over to the boy's side of the playground and outruns everyone.

That's not a very promising beginning for a friendship, but Jess and Leslie Burke become inseparable. It doesn't matter to Jess that leslie dresses funny, or that her family has a lot of money -- but no TV. Leslie has imagination. Together, she and Jess create Terabithia, a magical kingdom in the woods where the two of them reign as king and queen, and their imaginations set the only limits. Then one morning a terrible tragedy occurs. Only when Jess is able to come to grips with this tragedy does he finally understand the strength and courage Leslie has given him.

... Read more

Reviews (548)

3-0 out of 5 stars A Great Friendship
Have you ever wanted a good friend? If you answered "yes", then you should read Bridge to Terabithia. This interesting and exciting book about friendship will teach you about love, determination, and loss. Jess Aarons wants to be the fastest runner in the fifth grade, but when his new neighbor, Leslie Burke, comes to school the challenge is even harder for him. Even though Jess didn't become the fastest runner, he found a new friend in Leslie. Jess and Leslie also found a magical place in the woods that they called Terabithia. It was a private place just for them. Jess likes to draw, he's a good friend, and he's nice. Jess has two older sisters. They're lazy, selfish, whiney, and bossy. Jess also has a younger sister named Maybelle. She follows him everywhere like a cute little puppy, but he draws the line when it comes to Terabithia. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who likes great books about friendship.

4-0 out of 5 stars Bridge to Terabithia
Katherine Paterson wrote a book called, ''Bridge to Terabithia.'' The novel is about a fith grade boy namd Jesse Oliver Aarons who dreams of being the fastest runner in the fith grade. Jess has a poor family life, but when a tomboy named Leselie Burke moves in from Arlingtron, Virginia his self-esteem is jolted up. Together they create a magical kingdom named Terabithia. When a tradgety happens Jess realizes the strength Leselie gave him. Realistic fiction is this seventies book's genre. Find out what the tradgety is and read the novel, ''Bridge to Terabithia.''
Do I personally like this book? You bet! I especially like the special ending and how it matches the title. My opion is that it is a very entertaining and heartwarming novel. The novel, ''Bridge to Terabithia,'' is one book that I highly recommend. So read it and see how you like it. I'm almost positive you won't regret it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Deliciously sad!
This book is hard to describe. I read it before buying it for my niece a few years after it was first published. I thought it was excellent, especially at depicting the mind of a pre-adolescent boy and how he confronts tragedy. Everything about the book struck me as honest, true and insightful at the time. Though looking at it now, some of the author's messages seem to lack subtlety. But how much subtlety do you want in children's literature? Still, I'm sure the author would be offended to hear me call this "children's literature." The fact is it's a great and enjoyable read that will keep your child thinking for a long time. But it's also a book that any adult can enjoy and will also have them thinking as well. If you don't own this one, buy it today.

5-0 out of 5 stars Valuable Life Lessons
I have read "Bridge to Terabithia" many times as both a child and adult, and have continued to return to it for many reasons. Jess, an unappreciated artistic boy, feels pressure from his family and school to live up to their expectations of "male" behavior, yet he learns with the help of individualistic Leslie that he needs to be true to himself. Together they create a magical kingdom where they can be themselves, applaud each others' talents, and escape the closed-minded world that fails to understand them. When Leslie suddenly leaves Jess' life, Jess realizes he has gained the confidence (with Leslie's help) to face the world on his own. He then passes Terabithia on to someone else who needs its "powers" the same way he did. This powerful, touching book teaches readers to always be themselves, that struggles and tragedies can make us stronger and bring us closer together, that appearances can be deceiving, and that friendship and imagination have remarkable powers. My class of reluctant 6th grade readers loved this book as well.

1-0 out of 5 stars WORST BOOK EVER!
This book is terrible! All my friends and I hate it. Sometimes for a whole chapter it talks about Jess thinking about things that nobody cares about. This would never happen in real life. All they do is say wow im in happyland. No wonder they dont have any other friends. LESLIE DIED! LETS HAVE A PARTY! ... Read more


54. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler
by E.L. Konigsburg
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689711816
Catlog: Book (1998-04-01)
Publisher: Aladdin
Sales Rank: 1090
Average Customer Review: 4.52 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Claudia knew that she could never pull off the old-fashioned kind of running away...so she decided not to run FROM somewhere, but TO somewhere. And so, after some careful planning, she and her younger brother, Jamie, escaped -- right into a mystery that made headlines! ... Read more

Reviews (223)

5-0 out of 5 stars An educational yet exciting book for readers of all ages.
Claudia and Jaime are two very intelligent characters that enlighten the reader as to the workings of a child's mind. Claudia, as the main character, always thinks of interesting ways for her and Jaime to live inside the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It is a fantasy of everyone to be locked in a museum or store after all of the other people are gone. This book is a way for the reader to experience that feeling without the fear of being arrested! I believe that anyone who reads this story will become inspired by the Kincaids and find themselves wanting to learn more. The children have so much fun without hurting others or making fun of others as happens in some children's novels. Claudia is a definite role model for young girls and keeps the book interesting despite the academic undertones of Claudia and Jaime's reasons for visiting Mrs. Frankweiler. PARENTS-read this to your children to get them excited about reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars This book is definately not 'mixed up'
I first heard about this book on a computer reading game, but I could only read bits and parts of it and when our computer crashed I completely forgot about it.
Then one day I was at the library and I saw this book for sale, but I wasn't sure if it was any good or not. I didn't want to waste my money, so I borrowed it instead. Now I wish I had bought it. This book is fantastic!

It's about a girl named Claudia who is fed up with her boring life, so she decided to run away with her bother Jamie to the Metropolitan Museum of Arts in New York City. There she falls in love with an angel statue that is rumored to have been made by Michelangelo, but no one knows for sure. Claudia takes it upon herself to find out who made it before she goes home. Her quest takes her to the home of the strange Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, where the statues true maker is revealed.

At first I had been hesitant to read this book because I thought it would have magic or some other stuff and nonsense in it, but I was pleasantly surprised. This story is about Claudia and Jamie's search for the statues maker, and it is also pretty realistic. It's interesting to see how they improvise to make life livable in the great Museum.

I think this book is tops, and it is definitely a must-read.

5-0 out of 5 stars A timeless entertaining adventure
I read this book almost 30 years ago and loved it, I've bought copies for my friend's children and it's always a hit. Great book for kids who can identify with Claudia, who are intelligent, love art, feel a little misunderstood and crave adventure. Big kids like this book as well!

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply Excellent
I first read this book in fifth grade. The entire Literature class was assigned to it, so we read it bit by bit during the day, and I couldn't stand waiting to know what would happen next. After three days of the teacher reading the book to us, I ran to the library and bought it for myself.

The characters and their adventures are simply delightful.

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful treat for wild imaginations
Claudia feels underappreciated in her suburban household - a thing all children have most likely felt during at least one time or another. Here, Konigsburgs writes of these feelings with brutal honesty and frankness. Because Claudia is not an only child, it almost seems as if to her, and to readers, that there isn't enough love and attention to go around. Unjustly so, the poor girl frequently gets caught up in chore after chore while her siblings are off the hook.

So she will run away and teach them all a lesson in "Claudia appreciation." The Metropolitan Musuem of Art will become her grandiose and excitingly fantastic home away from home, so to speak. And younger brother Jamie will accompany her, mainly because he has saved every single penny since birth and will have money, just what Claudia needs. Yet to say she's using her younger bro merely for financial purposes would be unjust. I believe Claudia truly wants and needs the companionship.

The highlight of their one-week vacation is a mysterious and ethereal statue of an angel, titled as such. It is oh-so mysterious because everyone is unsure of the statue's creator. Some believe it to be the renown Michelangelo - but it has yet to be confirmed and 12 year-old Claudia is incessantly in awe of thee angel's beauty. She knows she cannot go home until she uncovers the secret of the statue and that will mean having to get in contact with a total stranger, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, who is the statue's previous owner. And if she refuses to help Claudia solve the mystery on her mind, she and Jamie may never get home.

FROM THE MIXED-UP FILES OF MRS. BASIL E. FRANKWEILER, first published in 1967, has been capturing the attention of children everywhere. Konigsburg has skillfully woven a loveable masterpiece that seems magical, almost too wonderful to be realistic. Yet it is. Claudia feels what so many of society's children today feel. And like many children, she keeps her feelings to herself and deals with pent up frustrations the only way she knows how, hence her escape to The Metropolitan.

I first read this novel when I was 9. I found myself relating to feeling less love from seemingly uncaring parents, due to having a sister who had no responsibilities and extra TLC because of her young age. I found myself envious of Claudia's grand escape to the musuem and I contemplated a night away from home spent at The Philadelphia Musuem of Art. That, of course, never happened. In retrospect, I realize how wild of an imagination I had. My mind was constantly roaming. Children today are just as creative - or they can be - which is why they'll much enjoy this book. Despite now being seven years older, I still frequently pick it up off my bookshelf, worn and dog-eared, to read it again and again. ... Read more


55. The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11)
by Lemony Snicket
list price: $11.99
our price: $8.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064410145
Catlog: Book (2004-10-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 25
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

It's tough when the things that stand between you and your desired sugar bowl are a host of deadly mushrooms and an uncomfortable diving suit. The unlucky Baudelaire orphans find themselves in deep (once again) in this eleventh book in Lemony Snicket's odd-and-full-of-woe-but-quite-funny Series of Unfortunate Events. In The Grim Grotto, the siblings find themselves headed down Stricken Stream on a broken toboggan when they are spotted by the submarine Queequeg, carrying Captain Widdershins, his somewhat volatile stepdaughter Fiona, and optimistic Phil from Lucky Smells Lumbermill. The adventures that follow as the crew tries to get to the aforementioned sugar bowl before Count Olaf are so horrible that the narrator inserts factual information about the water cycle so that readers will get bored and stop reading the book. It doesn't work. As per usual, readers will want to soak up every awf! ul detail and follow the Baudelaires all the way back to the place we first met them--Briny Beach. (Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson

Amazon.com Exclusive Content
Lemony Snicket Door Poster
Keep the wrong people out of your room! Print, personalize, and post this important sign.



An Interview with Lemony Snicket
Lemony Snicket has captured the hearts of childen and adults alike with the hilariously gloomy series that began, of course, with The Bad Beginning. Amazon.com had a chance to question the author of this marvelously morbid and delightfully depressing series, and the communicationwas grim indeed. Read the cumbersome communique and see for yourself.



A Few Words from Daniel Handler
Due to the world-wide web of conspiracy which surrounds him, Lemony Snicketoften communicates with the general public through his representative, Daniel Handler. We were lucky enough to hear from Daniel, and asked him the questions we ask every author, Amazon.com's The Significant Seven ... Read more

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent book!
I personally loved this book. I am a huge fan of Lemony Snicket's writing, and this book brought hidden mysteries into my veiw that were hidden in the rest of his series, disguised as a simple comment from a charecter or something as simple as a sugar bowl. If you love mystery, excitement, and the feeling to read on, then I recommend this book, and the rest of the Unfortunate Events series, for that matter. This book is appealing to all ages, whether you be 13 or 35.

5-0 out of 5 stars So Good!!
I am such a fan of Lemony Snicket! He's a very charming writer, and The Grim Grotto lives up to the standards of books 1-10. I bought it the night it came out, and finished it in a couple of hours, I just never put it down.

5-0 out of 5 stars A real page turner
I have read all but the 11th..I can't wait!!!Got to have it Lemoney! One of the summer's hottest hits!!!If the best you can get is a ''Double U'',this would be a ''triple U''!!

5-0 out of 5 stars THe Grim Grotto
This book is destined to be great! I have read 1-10, and I've been dying to read this book. I can't wait to read this one, or the 12th, or the 13th! I have to find out what happens to Quigley, Violet, Klaus, Sunny, Count Olaf, Ducan and Isadora.

5-0 out of 5 stars A series of great books
I have read every book in this series. Each one got better and better. Now I just read the 11th book and I was still astonished on how it can keep getting better? Thats what I wonder! I hope they keep the chain going because I will buy each and every book as long as they do! ... Read more


56. Young Bond Series, The: Silverfin - Book One : A James Bond Adventure
by Charlie Higson
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.53
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 078683661X
Catlog: Book (2005-04-27)
Publisher: Miramax Books
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

This thrilling prequel to the James Bond dynasty shows young James at boarding school at Eton in the 1930's, where he spent his formative years.Acclaimed British writer Charlie Higson, with the Ian Fleming Estate, writes an edge-of-your seat thriller that brilliantly plants the seeds to show how young James learns the skills that will eventually make him history's most formidable and suave super spy. ... Read more


57. What's Happening to My Body? Book for Boys : A Growing Up Guide for Parents and Sons
by Lynda Madaras, Simon Sullivan, Jackie Aher, Martin Anderson
list price: $12.95
our price: $10.36
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1557044430
Catlog: Book (2000-12-04)
Publisher: Newmarket Press
Sales Rank: 3566
Average Customer Review: 4.32 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

"Hanging Low, Keeping Cool," "A Hairy Question," "Feeling Private/Feeling Guilty," "You Don't See Any Blind, Crazy Morons Around Here, Do Ya?"

Can you guess what all these chapter titles are about? Give you a hint:everything you ever wanted to know about (but were afraid to ask)... You got it,boys and puberty! Author Lynda Madaras and her daughter Area Madaras haveexpanded and updated their sensitive, detailed, often witty guide for boys onthe cusp of adolescence. To help boys realize they are not alone in theirconcerns about masturbation, body hair, growth spurts (or lack thereof), femalepuberty, voice changes, perspiration, shaving, and sexuality, this classic guideis written in a down-to-earth, nonjudgmental style and filled with answers tothe many questions boys have as their bodies begin the transformation intoadulthood. As a result of thousands of reader letters over the years, as well asthe ever growing body of information about puberty in boys, the third editionhas been revised to include more detailed discussion of penis size (the authorsget more questions about penis size than all other topics combined), updatedinformation on acne treatment, expanded sections on eating right, exercise,steroid abuse, and weight training, and important facts about STDs, AIDS, andbirth control. Filled with anecdotes, illustrations, and diagrams, the guide isdesigned with the understanding that some boys and parents will want to read ittogether, while others will want to pore over it on their own. Either way, thisresource will prove to be incredibly useful for boys and their parents overthese strange, exciting years. The companion volume for girls, What's Happening to My Body? Book forGirls is a must-read as well. (Ages 8 to 15) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (19)

3-0 out of 5 stars Not for preteens
I bought the third edition of this book hoping it would be something my ten year old son could refer to if he has questions he is embarassed to talk about. The book is very factual without being overly clinical, but some of the topics discussed at lenght are more suited for older teens. The exhaustive list of slang names for male and female body parts really isn't necessary -- adolescent boys seem to do well in that department all by themselves! I also feel that the chapter "Girls and Puberty" has far more detail than a pre-teen boy needs or can handle. The book would be much better if it were presented in a loose-leaf format so I could give my son the sections he is able to handle at his age. I also wonder why the author has removed chapters on the important topics of birth control and STD's, which she says were in her previous edition. The book will certainly help me in my talks with my son, but I'm still looking for the right book for him to read on his own.

4-0 out of 5 stars What;s Happening to My Body? Book for Boys: A growing up Gui
I initially borrowed an earlier edition of this book to read, as my son is 11 years old. My husband is very uncomfortable in discussing puberty with his son, and even with me. He was a very late bloomer and therefore, not a great resource on when things may occur or start to occur in my son. I read the book and then sat down one night with my son. As we sat on the couch, I read the book to him, as he looked on. We laughed some, we talked some, we giggled some, we learned a lot. His father came in during our conversation and sat down. Dad then was able to become part of a discussion that had already started and did not have to bring up himself. This worked great for our
family. I found humor, so did my son. It did have a lot of slang terms, but every child may not know exactly what they mean, and this way, my son now does and can be better educated in the slang and in the correct names. Too graphic? I do not thinks so, there were certainly some chapters we did not address
at this time, as they are more appropriate for another (older) time. The book is around the house so he can read it as he wants, there is nothing in the book that I do not want him to know. Very educational for me as well as I grew up in a family of females and therefore had no idea at what ages certain things happened to boys. My son then was able to talk to me about some of the changes that were happening to him. He then had other questions? I was able to discuss these questions with him intelligently and comfortable in my facts. He was very nervous about going through puberty, now he is not. I believe this a book for the family, not just to be handed to the child. Every child has questions that need to be answered, this book has most of the answers. I found it nonjudgemental. It did not discuss abstenance in its chapter on birth control, I wish it had, but the book will help us as a family discuss the topic of birth control and we can add in our moral values as we teach, learn and discuss.

5-0 out of 5 stars My 10 yr old REALLY thought this book was GOOD!
He said it explained a lot about some things he just didn't feel like asking me or his father about. I am glad I got it for him. He feels much more comfortable with his pre-teen body now.

1-0 out of 5 stars Parents; yes- Teenage boys; no way.
I was looking for a book for my stepson, (he's almost 12) and noticed that this book received a lot of positive reviews- so thought I'd try it. I just wanted a book that my wife and I could read first; turn him loose with it on his own, then talk with him afterwards about what he thought of it. Unfortunately, we won't be giving it to him, and here's why:
This book doesn't really relate to 8 to 15 yr old boys- on their own level. The words are way too big, and the book's approach is way too clinical. I remember being a teenagage boy, and I think it's safe to say that if you try to work words like "bulbourethral glands" or "pre-ejaculatory fluid" into the conversation- you lose 'em REAL fast. No kid would EVER sit around reading it! Then about every 10th page, you'd find a crude drawing of everything from simply naked boys; to cross-sections of penises, breasts, and vaginas. It ranged from clinical to slightly creepy, and just put yourself in the shoes of a teenage boy: you may want to know what it feels like to touch a female breast, but cross-sections of milk ducts can be a little scary to think about. And really- who actually needs an arrow pointing to a "nipple", in order to know what (or where) it is? "Oh THAT's a nipple! How illuminating! Can't WAIT to get my hands on that uterine lining"!:-) Which brings me to my main complaint about the book: We searched cover to cover, but found NO sense of humor in the approach- and I believe that if you want to help teenage boys to be comfortable about the topic of sexuality - you need that. Let's just say that if you want to give your teenage boy a book that he'll actually read, enjoy,and benefit from - Keep looking.

1-0 out of 5 stars Hated it!
I bought this book for my 14-year-old nephew. When the book arrived I scanned it and found it had a lot of sexuality information that I disagreed with. I thought this book was going to be straight health & science...this is what happens to your body as it matures, this is what you can expect. Instead, I found it had opinions on sexual orientation,... etc. Abstinence wasn't given equal time. I thought the title of this book misrepresented its content. This book just wasn't for our family. I returned it for a refund. ... Read more


58. Where the Red Fern Grows
by WILSON RAWLS
list price: $6.50
our price: $5.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553274295
Catlog: Book (1984-08-01)
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Sales Rank: 1546
Average Customer Review: 4.68 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

Author Wilson Rawls spent his boyhood much like the character of this book, Billy Colman, roaming the Ozarks of northeastern Oklahoma with his bluetick hound. A straightforward, shoot-from-the-hip storyteller with a searingly honest voice, Rawls is well-loved for this powerful 1961 classic and the award-winning novel Summer of the Monkeys. In Where the Red Fern Grows, Billy and his precious coonhound pups romp relentlessly through the Ozarks, trying to "tree" the elusive raccoon. In time, the inseparable trio wins the coveted gold cup in the annual coon-hunt contest, captures the wily ghost coon, and bravely fights with a mountain lion.When the victory over the mountain lion turns to tragedy, Billy grieves, but learns the beautiful old Native American legend of the sacred red fern that grows over the graves of his dogs. This unforgettable classic belongs on every child's bookshelf. (Ages 9 and up) ... Read more

Reviews (804)

5-0 out of 5 stars Exciting novel
Where the Red Fern Grows
In spite of being labeled as a sad sob story, Where the Red Fern Grows is a priceless novel filled with adventure and excitement. I believe that Rawls uses the two dogs Old Dan and Little Ann plus the emotional ending of the novel to attract the female gender. But to the same affect attracts the males with the adventures that these dynamic three undergo. Billy, a young boy, whose had a dream of owning a pair of coon hunting dogs. Works two long years of backbreaking work to finally raising enough money to purchase the two dogs. He embraces the dogs as if they are his children, working with them none stop so that they could become the very best coon-hunting team in Cherokee county. A lot of the time this book is required reading for many middle school students. So I believe Rawls uses this never give up attitude to encourage the young readers. After working so hard and accomplishing many goals with the dogs Billy enters a competition and wins. Thrilled with his accomplishment he ventures to other events. First place after first place Billy and the team seek higher standards. As you read, we follow the threesome on an adventure of a lifetime. Traveling on foot Billy and his two dogs head to the Tournament of tournaments the Coon Hunting Championship. Billy, unknowing of the dangers of the journey, runs into a little trouble on the way. As the book slows down and almost loses readers, this journey to the championship keeps us into it. Fortunately the team arrives in one piece and enters the competition. The team wins but to Billy's surprise the dogs aren't satisfied. Because they still have one coon to get, Shadow, the coon that cannot be caught. Rawl takes us on an adventure, and yet again has you sitting at the edge of your seat.

5-0 out of 5 stars And So The Adventures Begin
If you are going to read a book to your class, Having your class reading a book, reading a book to yourself, giving a book to a friend or relative, or any thing else, Where The Red Fern Grows ,by Wilson Rawls is the book for you. it is a wonderful and touching story about a boy, Billy, and his dogs. It starts out with a man looking back on his childhood, and how he dreamt of having some fine dog. Finally he got enough money to buy the dogs his heart was set on, and so the adventures begin. This book is very well written. It brings you to the place, time and point if view of Billy and his family, and without being too descriptive or boring. There aren't those chapters which you find in moast descriptive books where all that seems to happen is you know EXACTLY what a certain character looks like. Not only that, it is a real page turner. No matter how much you read you have to know what happens next. With every chapter comes a new adventure! If someone told you that a book about a boy and his dogs catching raccoons would be a page turner, you probably would not believe them, but you are never satisfied to stop after any chapter. Some people find the way that they talk with a southern accent gets in the way, but soon you will get used to it. I think it ads to the atmosphere. You should definitely at least try out this book and when you do, which should be soon, you will find it is a excellent read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Is there a better story out there?
NO, this has to be the best story I have ever read. I read this book recently to my 7 year old son. Wanting to show him the power of books. I was worried he'd be upset by the ending in this. I shouldn't of worried. I was the one who ended up crying and reading it to him at the same time. As an adult I felt foolish. He wasn't near as upset about it as me and I KNEW what was going to happen since I read it as a child myself. WOW, the power of a book. Simply amazing.

5-0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time when I was a little girl
I hate it when a reviewer gives the story away, so I won't. Safe to say, though, that when I was a little girl, I read a book in one night, under the covers with a flashlight. That book, of course, was WTRFG. I just re-read it again after 20 some-odd years. I am surprised to find that I cried as hard as I did as when I was 9. I was once again, so engrossed that I read it in one night, ignoring the fact that I had to work the next day. It is a beautiful story, a timeless one. A childhood favorite. I am amazed that it didn't win a Newberry Honor medal, or some other kind of award. This is one of the books that helped instill a loving of reading at an early age. A GEM, don't miss it. A story about a young boy on the brink of manhood and his love for his pups....whom he worked so hard for. You will laugh and cry, at age 9, 29, or 99. Buy it for your kids, and rea it for yourself.

4-0 out of 5 stars Read This Book!
Wow! this is one of the best book I have written in a long time. If you have not read Where the Red Fern Grows trust me it is the kind of book you will have regeted if you did not read it. Ok well the book is about a boy named Billy that works for his own needs. Billy wants to get 2 dogs that he can train to get racoons. He eventually works for weeks to get the money for his dogs and then gives the money to his grandfather for him to buy the dogs. Old Dan and Little Ann are the names of the two dogs. The exciting advetures that Billy,Old Dan and Little An go through are thrilling and endless. To top it all off the story has a twist at the end. You should definetly read this book to find out whuat happens! ... Read more


59. Complete Anne of Green Gable Boxed Set (Anne of Green Gables, Anne of the Island, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, Anne of Ingleside, Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside)
by L.M. MONTGOMERY
list price: $36.00
our price: $24.48
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553609416
Catlog: Book (1997-10-06)
Publisher: Starfire
Sales Rank: 673
Average Customer Review: 4.85 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

When Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of Green Gables, Prince Edward Island, send for a boy orphan to help them out at the farm, they are in no way prepared for the error that will change their lives. The mistake takes the shape of Anne Shirley, a redheaded 11-year-old girl who can talk anyone under the table. Fortunately, her sunny nature and quirky imagination quickly win over her reluctant foster parents. Anne's feisty spirit soon draws many friends--and much trouble--her way. Not a day goes by without some melodramatic new episode in the tragicomedy of her life. Early on, Anne declares her eternal antipathy for Gilbert Blythe, a classmate who commits the ultimate sin of mocking her hair color. Later, she accidentally dyes that same cursed hair green. Another time, in her haste to impress a new neighbor, she bakes a cake with liniment instead of vanilla.Lucy Maud Montgomery's series of books about Anne have remained classics since the early 20th century. Her portrayal of this feminine yet independent spirit has given generations of girls a strong female role model, while offering a taste of another, milder time in history. This lovely boxed gift collection comprises Anne of Green Gables, Anne of the Island, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, Anne of Ingleside, Rainbow Valley, and Rilla of Ingleside. (Ages 9 to 12) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (121)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic Story For All Ages
In our present world, there are so many silly, pointless books about violence and action heroes, books that lack sense and have neither morals nor character development. This story reflects a time when novels were about people just like you and me - people with the same problems, thoughts, and feelings as us.

Anne of Green Gables is a story where a young orphan is adopted by a family in Prince Edward Island, a beautiful area in Canada. The young optimistic girl's imagination often get her into trouble, which makes the book both humorous and enjoyable. The important point about her problems is that they are conflicts faced by many young girls in today's society, despite the fact that she "lived" over a century ago. The character development through the series is what truly makes this piece of literature a classic.

Finally, I would like to say that this is an ideal story for a mother and daughter to read together. This lovely book, full of laughs for all generations, has earned its five stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Book in Literary History
first of all, let me begin with I LOVE THIS BOOK! I have read this book more times than I can remember...easily more than a dozen...thus, I am going to set my mind to write a glowing review of it.

This book portrays a stunning sketch of Canadian History and Culture in the late 1800s to early 1900s. The character personalities are so real and so amazingly "human" that one cannot help but fall in love with them. You really get a taste of PEI in its glory.

This story is set in Avonlea, Prince Edward Island (Canada), a fictional settlement which is really Cavendish, Prince Edward Island, the place where Lucy Maud Montgomery, the author grew up.

The main character is Anne Shirley...and eleven year old, enigmatic, imaginative, sparkling, highly intelligent orphan who is sent to Green Gables, a farmhouse in Avonlea, under the impression that she was to be adopted by a pair of elderly siblings, Matthew and Marilla Cuthburt. But, apon arrival to Green Gables, Anne discovers that there had been a horrible mistake...the Cuthburts never wanted a girl...they wanted a boy who could do the chores and help Matthew with the farm. Anne was was in the "depths of dispair". Matthew, on the drive home from the train station had taken a great shine to Anne and had his heart set on keeping her, regardless of any mistake. Marilla, however, was not so easily enchanted. She agreed to let Anne stay at Green Gables on trial, to see if she would behave herself and lend a helpful hand to Marilla. After the trial, Anne is welcomed to Green Gables and flourishes under the love of the Cuthburts and all Avonlea folk. Anne, however, has one big problem. Her Hair. It is a hopeless shade of carrotty red and Anne felt that it was the ugliest hair anyone could imagine. She was extremely sensitive about it and she was horribly embarrassed about it. On her first day of school, Anne's hair was made fun of by Gilbert Blythe, the smartest and handsomest boy in school. "Carrots! Carrots!" he said. Anne's temper got the better of her and she was so angry she broke a slate over his head. After that, for many years, she snubbed Gilbert every time he spoke to her and he developed a boyhood crush on her.

Ah, but to keep this review interesting and the book mysterious, I will stop telling you the story and begin reviewing. The characters in the book are so well-defined that it seems to you that you know every character personally, like an old friend or neighbour.

And by all means, don't let the age recommendation fool you either...this book can be read by all ages alike...and I have no doubt that this book will still be my avid favorite at the age of 85.

The book is not boring, contrary to many opinions of those who read the first chapter of small print and historical settings. The discriptions will place you right into the heart of the story and you find you will laugh and cry while reading this story. Every time I read it I cry at a certain part which I'm not sure if I should reveal to you for fear of spoiling the good parts in the story, but it is dreadfully sad. If you read the book, then you will know what part I am talking about. The one saddest part in the whole story.

Although this book has some old ideas and ways of expressing them, you will learn a great deal of Canadian history through them and there's no doubt in my mind that this book will still be popular decades and most likely even centuries to come.

5-0 out of 5 stars One word - Classic!
The Anne of Green Gables series is a wonderful and grand masterpiece. I would give it more stars if I could.

L.M. Montgomery wrote some of the most memorial works in children's literature. Anne of Green Gables was an instant hit, and still is today.

The eight books all follow the story of Anne Shirley, a red headed, smart and imagnative Canadian girl who was an orphan all her life. When she enters Marilla and Matthew Cuthberts' life, she changes not only them, but all of Avonlea.

I really enjoyed the third one, Anne of the Island. Anne really grows up in that novel. It really showed a difference in the next novels to come.

In the last one, Rilla of Ingleside, it seemes like it was most narrated by Anne's daughter, Rilla, rather than Anne herself. The feelings and plaots were mostly seen threw Rilla's eyes. It was quite a diffference from the normality of Anne's feelings.

I would recomend these books any day. It shows that the twentieth century novel can be a classic. Anne of Green Gables is a story no one should go without reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book I have ever read in my life!!!!!
The book Anne of Green Gables is a great book for all ages. Although it is a bit lengthy, there is ALWAYS something happening on each page. If you take the time to read it, this is really a worthwhile book. The story is about a young orphan girl who is accidentally adopted by the Culberts, who had wanted a boy instead of a girl . Anne gets into all sorts of trouble soon, like jumping onto beds, (with people sleeping in them) and dying her hair green! Although Anne was an "accident", the Culberts would never forget life without her. If you are an adventure-loving person, you should definitely read this book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Comfort Book
Encountering Anne and her magical world at the age of 11, I have never quite escaped Avonlea and the wonderful characters concocted by L.M. Montgomery. Montgomery takes to heart the advice given to Anne in Anne of the Island to write about the simple things in life, and she does so beautifully. Reading one of the'Anne' book is like coming home - no matter where you're from. ... Read more


60. Search of the Moon King's Daughter
by LINDA HOLEMAN
list price: $9.95
our price: $8.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0887766099
Catlog: Book (2003-09-02)
Publisher: Tundra Books
Sales Rank: 220576
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Gentle Emmaline loves nothing more than books and flowers and her little brother Tommy. Sadly, her idyllic country life in Victorian England comes to an abrupt end when her father dies of cholera. The family is forced to move to a mill town, where Emmaline’s mother is dreadfully injured in a factory accident. To ease her pain she takes laudanum and is soon addicted, craving the drug so badly that she sells Tommy into servitude as a chimney sweep in London. Emmaline knows that a sweep’s life is short and awful. Small boys as young as five are forced to climb naked into dark chimneys, their bare feet prodded by nail-studded sticks to keep them working. If Tommy is to survive, it is up to Emmaline to find him.

Linda Holeman brings a bygone period to life in a book of serious historical fiction for young adults.
... Read more

Reviews (2)

4-0 out of 5 stars A Lovely Surprise
When I picked up this book from the library, I wasn't expecting much to be behind the pretty cover. Was I ever in for a surprise! Linda Holeman has created a uniquely beautiful novel that deserves to be much more popular than it is.

In 1830's England, Emmaline Roke spends her childhood in a a quiet country village. Surrounded by her carefree father Jasper and an idyllic setting, she is shocked when her father dies and her baby brother Tommy's illness harms him tragically. Poverty-stricken without Jasper's money, Emmaline's mother Cat must begin a horrible life of mill work. Then her mother is injured in a mill accident-and the consequences of her accident endager both Cat and Tommy, who is the dearest thing in Emmaline's world. Intelligent, sweet, and determined, Emmaline goes on a quest to rise above her terrible life and save her precious brother.

Emmaline's story is wonderfully engaging. Holeman writes with beauty and skill, and her somehow quaint style captures the essence and sweetness of Emmaline and Tommy. While in other books a similar story would be dull, this book is filled with enough characterization, fascinating period detail, and complications that it grabs the reader. Emmaline inspired and impressed me, and I couldn't wait to see what happened to her.

My only complaint with the book is that the ending, although it had excellent themes, was that it seemed a little too rushed. However, everything else about "Search of the Moon King's Daughter" was completely wonderful.

5-0 out of 5 stars You'd never know by the title
Picking up this book from the library, I figured it was a fantasy about some Princess on a quest. Imagine my surprise when I found out that it was about Emmaline, an English girl living in the 1800's. When Emmaline's father dies, her mother, her deaf younger brother Tommy, and Emmaline must move away from their country home into a dirty, crowded city. Emmaline's mother goes to work in the mills, and Emmaline herself must work as a seamstress to her Aunt Phoebe.
Then another tragedy strikes: Emmaline's mother is severely injured at the mills. She can no longer work and worse, she soon becomes hooked on laudanum, the pain-reliever she takes. Not only does she spend all the money Emmaline brings in on the drug, but she also sells Emmaline's few possessions and, eventually, even Tommy.
When Emmaline finds that her mother has sold Tommy to be a chimneysweep in London, she goes there to find him. The only problems are that London is a big city, and Emmaline has no idea where Tommy is. Besides that, she doesn't have enough money to survive until she finds him.
This is an awesome book that you will probably enjoy. It's historical fiction, but doesn't make you feel as if you've been lectured. I reccomend this book. ... Read more


41-60 of 200     Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next 20
Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

Top