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$11.86 $11.14 list($16.95)
41. Dog Heaven
$4.99 $2.38
42. Seedfolks (Joanna Colter Books)
$23.07 $16.99 list($34.95)
43. Your Favorite Seuss : A Baker's
$8.05 $1.60 list($8.95)
44. Stargirl
$23.80 $23.45 list($35.00)
45. The New Way Things Work
$11.86 $10.18 list($16.95)
46. Where the Wild Things Are
$7.19 $3.43 list($7.99)
47. A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea
$15.57 $15.22 list($25.95)
48. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland:
$6.29 $3.12 list($6.99)
49. Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (Aladdin
$12.59 $11.28 list($17.99)
50. A Light in the Attic
$6.29 $2.39 list($6.99)
51. I'm a Big Brother
$6.29 $2.50 list($6.99)
52. I'm a Big Sister
$5.99 $1.95
53. Bridge to Terabithia
$6.26 $4.30 list($6.95)
54. Time for Bed
$10.19 $9.80 list($14.99)
55. Cars and Trucks and Things That
$4.49 $1.06 list($4.99)
56. Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You : Dr.
$8.97 $7.75 list($14.95)
57. The Lorax
$7.19 $4.92 list($7.99)
58. Jamberry Board Book
$5.85 $2.77 list($6.50)
59. The Watsons Go to Birmingham -
$6.26 $3.95 list($6.95)
60. Barnyard Dance! (Boynton on Board)

41. Dog Heaven
by Cynthia Rylant
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0590417010
Catlog: Book (1995-09-01)
Publisher: Scholastic
Sales Rank: 4878
Average Customer Review: 4.87 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (70)

5-0 out of 5 stars I just love Dog Heaven!
This book is such a wonderful way to help anyone who has lost a dog, especially children. I teach preschool and one of my student's lost his dog. I gave him this book as well as I'll Always Love You. His parents said the books really helped, and it really helped our entire class learn about the passing of a beloved family member. It's hard for children to understand death anyway, but when it's someone like a dog or cat who just loves so unconditionally, books like this one really help to alieviate any fear that the pet is in pain, or that pet might forget us! I HIGHLY recommend this book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Comforting to Think about Where our Sasha is now
This is a great book for kids and adults alike who may be grieving the loss of a beloved dog. The illustrations are charming, and the sentiments are great. (God makes dogs special treats in heaven, and they play with angel children, who need their company.) I have given this book to an adult friend who also lost a pet, and she found it very comforting too. We still miss our Sasha dog, but this book helped our family through a rough time.

5-0 out of 5 stars TEACHER RECOMMENDS!
I have given this book to countless children (and adults) who are grieving the loss of a furry friend. Being a teacher, I am quite often faced with a student who experiences the loss of a beloved pet. If you believe dogs go to heaven, this book offers wonderful comfort in allowing children to imagine what it might be like for their dog in heaven. I would recommend this book to almost any parents trying to ease some of that heartbreak for their child and quite possibly themselves.

4-0 out of 5 stars A very sweet image of Heaven!
I got this book for my 6 year old son to read for school (to earn AR credits). At the time, he had been very anxious about death, having lost one pet when he was 3 and having another who was very old. We also had two older neighbors die in the past year. He had often had deep worries about death and dying. I was almost afraid for him to read it - worrying that it would bring out those feelings again. But I am so glad he did read it.

The comforting way Dog HEaven is depicted was JUST what we needed. He did ask me if this was real - non-fiction, as he put it. I told him that nobody who is living today has ever been to heaven, so people just have to guess what it is like, and this is what the author believes it is like. That did the trick.

When our second dog passed on, it was very helpful to the children to remember the ideas in Dog Heaven. They were happy that Penny would be able to be with our other dog - Edison; and they had a good time thinking about Edison "showing Penny around in heaven". And also, thinking about our neighbor being there to give biscuits and throw balls to Penny.

It should be on the bookshelf of every family who has a dog!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book
This is a sweet book which I initially bought due to my love of dogs. I wanted to share that love with my children and teach them about God as well. Recently our dog passed away and my 4 year old was having a hard time dealing with it. This book helped her to think of Moose being in a special place where he doesn't hurt anymore, he can run and have fun. ... Read more


42. Seedfolks (Joanna Colter Books)
by Paul Fleischman
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064472078
Catlog: Book (1999-04-30)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 73825
Average Customer Review: 4.19 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Common Ground

A vacant lot, rat-infested and filled with garbage, looked like no place for a garden. Especially to a neighborhood of strangers where no one seems to care. Until one day, a young girl clears a small space and digs into the hard-packed soil to plant her precious bean seeds. Suddenly, the soil holds promise: To Curtis, who believes he can win back Lateesha's heart with a harvest of tomatoes; to Virgil's dad, who seems a fortune to be made from growing lettuce; and even to Mariclea, sixteen and pregnant, wishing she were dead.

Thirteen very different voices--old, young, Haitian, Hispanic, tough, haunted, and hopeful tell one amazing story about a garden that transforms a neighborhood.

An old man seeking renewal, a young girl connecting to a father she never knew, a pregnant teenager dreading motherhood. Thirteen voices tell one story of the flowering of a vacant city lot into a neighborhood garden. Old, young, Jamaican, Korean, Hispanic, tough, haunted, hopeful'Newbery Medal winner Paul Fleischman weaves characters as diverse as the plants they grow into a rich, multi-layered exploration of how a community is born and nurtured in an urban environment.

00-01 Utah Book Award (Gr. 7-12)

... Read more

Reviews (54)

5-0 out of 5 stars seedfolks
Seedfolks by Pual Fleischman is a story of racial divide changed to community through the actions of a little girl. It all starts when she plants beans in honor of her dead father. People take notice, and one by one, people in the neighborhood begin to plant various crops from their native lands. Eventually they build a strong, protective, and friendly community that grows along side the garden.
The story is told through the eyes of 13 different characters each explaining their diverse background, what they've seen in the garden, and why they're now involved. The style makes the book a quick read, and because the characters are not directly revisited, it's not confusing.
Overall, this book's inspirational sense of true community is not only achieved in the fictional garden, but ideally in day-to-day life. Seadfolks leaves you with an uplifting, warm and fuzzy all over feeling, and a strong desire to make change.

4-0 out of 5 stars Seedfolks Review
Seedfolks is takes place in a diverse community in Cleveland, Ohio. It is basically a story about a young Vietnamese girl that plants lima beans in a vacant lot filled with garbage to please her dead father. An older lady sees the girl through her window. Expecting that the girl is up to no good, she sends one of her friends out to investigate. The friend comes back and reports that the girl had only planted beans and that they wouldn't grow if he didn't help her take care of them. Other members of the community see that someone has removed all of the garbage from the lot and notice that someone was growing plants. Slowly, everyone begins to plant things in their own section of the garden. People begin to talk and get to know each other and help to transform the neighborhood.
One of the strengths of the story is the way each of the characters tells their own personal story but it all ties back to the garden. Even though there are many different characters, you never get thrown off track. This book is short and to the point with a good message. One of the weaknesses of the story is the way it ended. You find out that once winter comes, the garden looks run down and no one is really taking care of it; their owners have dug up most of the plants. You're kind of left wondering whether the garden is ever rejuvenated after spring returns.
I really enjoyed this book. I like the way this story is put together and the way each of the characters is of a different ethnicity. The fact that this book can be read in one day is also a plus. Seedfolks shows how one simple act can bring a community together. I would recommend this story to anyone who is looking for something positive to read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Seeds of hope
I loved Seedfolks, with its way of bringing you to see other people's side of the story. It was amazing, the way Paul Fleischman used rich descriptions and amazing details to bring you into the hearts and thoughts of an entire neighborhood. I read this book when I was in fifth grade, and since, I have always remembered the characters and plots from this remarkable story. Every now and then, I find myself in a situation like one in this book, and I always find myself asking, "What would Virgil do here?" or "If I were Curtis, what would I do now?" This is one of the best books I have ever read. And I read quite a lot, so that's saying something!

1-0 out of 5 stars Not for MY 10-year-old!
After reading the entire book, I've concluded that one chapter doesn't belong--at least not for elementary school students: The Maricella chapter. In it, a 16-old-girl is considering abortion after realizing the baby she loathes is making her look fat. She hasn't been invited to any parties since she started to show. She wishes her baby would die. She talks about leaving its body in a dumpster.
This has NOTHING to do with culteral diversity. Okay, so she is a member of two minority groups. And sure, in the end she decides that she--like the garden they've planted--is part of a never-ending cycle of life and that maybe she'll keep her baby after all.
Why does a 10-year-old need to know about such a negative societal situation such as this? Please, parents, know what your child is reading. Middle school students would probably be fine with this. Anyone younger than 7th grade, no way.

4-0 out of 5 stars Intertwined lives
I enjoyed this story of a community that comes together because of the act of one little girl. The book celebrates the ability of a group to work with our strentghs to fill in the weaknesses of others. Also, it illustrates how people approach situations differently and bring new ideas and new approaches to others. I teach sixth grade and plan to use the book with my classes this school year in an effor to help celebrate diversity. ... Read more


43. Your Favorite Seuss : A Baker's Dozen by the One and Only Dr. Seuss
by DR SEUSS
list price: $34.95
our price: $23.07
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375810617
Catlog: Book (2004-10-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 615
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Book Description

From his very first book to his very last book, here in one big volume are 13 classic Dr. Seuss stories, everyone’s favorites. All of the words and virtually all of the illustrations are included. Each story is prefaced by a short essay by someone whose life was changed by Dr. Seuss or who is simply an unabashed admirer. Also included are photographs of Dr. Seuss, memorabilia, and original sketches from his books. The stories included are: And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, Horton Hears a Who!, McElligot’s Pool, If I Ran the Zoo, Happy Birthday to You!, Dr. Seuss’s Sleep Book, Yertle the Turtle, The Cat in the Hat, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Green Eggs and Ham, The Lorax, The Sneetches, and Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Theodor Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss) was born March 2, 1904, and died September 25, 1991.

With introductory essays to each story by:

Barbara Bader, Author and Critic

Stan and Jan Berenstain, Creators of The Berenstain Bears

Audrey Geisel, Widow of Dr. Seuss

Peter Glassman, Children’s Bookseller

Starr LaTronica, Children’s Librarian

John Lithgow, Actor and Children’s Book Author

Barbara Mason, Kindergarten Teacher

Richard H. Minear, Author of Dr. Seuss Goes to War

Christopher Paolini, Author of Eragon

Charles D. Cohen, Author of The Seuss, the Whole Seuss, and

Nothing but the Seuss

Pete Seeger, Folksinger

Christopher Cerf, TV Writer, Composer, and Producer

Lane Smith, Children’s Book Illustator ... Read more


44. Stargirl
by JERRY SPINELLI
list price: $8.95
our price: $8.05
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 037582233X
Catlog: Book (2002-05-14)
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 3018
Average Customer Review: 4.41 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Stargirl. From the day she arrives at quiet Mica High in a burst of color and sound, the hallways hum with the murmur of “Stargirl, Stargirl.” She captures Leo Borlock’s heart with just one smile. She sparks a school-spirit revolution with just one cheer. The students of Mica High are enchanted. At first.

Then they turn on her. Stargirl is suddenly shunned for everything that makes her different, and Leo, panicked and desperate with love, urges her to become the very thing that can destroy her: normal. In this celebration of nonconformity, Newbery Medalist Jerry Spinelli weaves a tense, emotional tale about the perils of popularity and the thrill and inspiration of first love.

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Reviews (468)

5-0 out of 5 stars A girl at her best.
Star Girl, written by Jerry Spinelli, is a wonderful fiction novel. It is a story about a girl in Arizona who has just come from home schooling to the town's high school. Her name is Stargirl and she has a lot of interesting qualities about her. She wears different clothing then most girls and acts completely different also. She even has a pet rat named Cinnamin. One day in school a boy catches her eye. Even though she is so different there is something about her that he can't stop thinking about. At first she is lonely, then she joins the cheerleading squad and suddenly she was one of the most popular girls in school. Then she does something that makes the cheerleaders turn their backs on her and then she is unpopular again. This boy keeps on seeing and likes her a lot. They finally make it public that they like each other and then before you know it, everyone is interested on how their relationship will work. The ending in this book is amazing. So read the book to find out what happens to Stargirl and her pet rat, Cinnamin.

5-0 out of 5 stars Thank you, Mr. Spinelli...
Unlike many of the other reviews I will not summarize the plot as well, but give a public thank you to Mr. Spinelli for such a poignant story. Having just finished the audio version, I must applaud both the verbal performance (by John Ritter, excellent choice and we miss him dearly) and the excellent content.

As an adult reader, it caused me to reflect on my years in high school and remember, with some embarrassment, my need to conform and not rock the boat of popularity. I feel the book goes much beyond the surface story, touching on the deep human need to make a difference in other people's lives. Unfortunately, that longing is often lost early in life - the need for acceptance takes center stage and rarely gives up the spotlight.

This story made me laugh and cry, and shall join the short list of books I would take with me if ever stranded on a desert island. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Those wanting more of Mr. Spinelli's excellent work should also read the audio book Loser, performed superbly by Steve Buscemi.

I hope you're still out there, Stargirl. Please keep your eye on me, too.

5-0 out of 5 stars To conform or not to conform, that is the question.
Stargirl, with a name like that she would have to be an original and she is. No one at Mica High has ever met anyone so non-conformant to the group norm. Stargirl sings happy birthday to student in the cafeteria while playing her ukulele. She drops money on the sidewalk for little kids to find. She cheers for BOTH teams at sports tournaments. Can anyone this selfless and caring survive the pressure to "follow the unwritten school rules" of behavior? Will her individuality be squashed or will the town of Mica, Arizona never be the same?

Karen Woodworth-Roman

5-0 out of 5 stars *GIRL*
WOW! I got this book in a small book shop in an upstate town. It had an interesting cover and so i thought it would be interesting. I believe in the phrase "you cant judge a book by its cover". So i thought i would give it a shot. I read it in one day!!! I was shocked when i found out that it was narrorated by a boy. Usually girls narerate. Besides the point... It is a great book about how a boy falls in love with a girl who is not what everyone else is. When the whole school stops liking Stargirl, Leo is torn between stargirl and the school. It is a great book about how being different has its ups and its downs. It showed me that being different is something that everyone should try and that not following the croud is something that is not always a good thing. It tought me how to be different in a good way.

4-0 out of 5 stars Making Conformity Unpopular
I'm not the biggest fan of Spinelli. Although he's a wonderfully artistic writer, his works usually depress me. He has changed my mind with his book, "Stargirl". Reading the book, I recognized the pressures for conformity not only from my high school days, but even now, during my lasT years of college. I both wanted to be and hated the character Stargirl. She's everything we SHOULD be, but never come close to becoming. I hope this book doesn't remain in the young adult circle, but spreads to the adult section as well. A winner. ... Read more


45. The New Way Things Work
by David Macaulay
list price: $35.00
our price: $23.80
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0395938473
Catlog: Book (1998-10-26)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books
Sales Rank: 400
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

"Is it a fact--or have I dreamt it--that, by means of electricity, the world of matter has become a great nerve, vibrating thousands of miles in a breathless point of time?" If you, like Nathaniel Hawthorne, are kept up at night wondering about how things work--from electricity to can openers--then you and your favorite kids shouldn't be a moment longer without David Macaulay's The New Way Things Work. The award-winning author-illustrator--a former architect and junior high school teacher--is perfectly poised to be the Great Explainer of the whirrings and whizzings of the world of machines, a talent that landed the 1988 version of The Way Things Work on the New York Times bestsellers list for 50 weeks. Grouping machines together by the principles that govern their actions rather than by their uses, Macaulay helps us understand in a heavily visual, humorous, unerringly precise way what gadgets such as a toilet, a carburetor, and a fire extinguisher have in common.

The New Way Things Work boasts a richly illustrated 80-page section that wrenches us all (including the curious, bumblingwooly mammoth who ambles along with the reader) into the digital age of modems, digital cameras, compact disks, bits, and bytes. Readers can glory in gears in "The Mechanics of Movement," investigate flying in "Harnessing the Elements," demystify the sound ofmusic in "Working with Waves," marvel at magnetism in "Electricity & Automation," andexamine e-mail in "The Digital Domain." An illustrated survey of significant inventions closes the book, along with a glossary of technical terms, and an index. What possible link could there be between zippers and plows, dentist drills and windmills? Parking meters and meat grinders, jumbo jets and jackhammers, remote control and rockets, electric guitars and egg beaters? Macaulay demystifies them all. (Click to see asample spread of this book, illustrations and text copyright 1998 David Macaulay, Neil Ardley, published by Houghton Mifflin Co.) (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (21)

5-0 out of 5 stars The New Way Things Work
This is the best book for childern and adults I have ever read. I recieved "The Way Things Work" When I was in 4th grade. Now I have this newer version. My classmates and I both used it during my College Mechanical Engineering Classes. Everyone can learn from this book it is not just for kids but really belongs on every childs bookshelf.

5-0 out of 5 stars This book really tells you how things work!
Do you think you know how a lot of things work? Yes? Well, you are probably wrong. I am a Physics Major in college and I thought I knew how a lot of things work. However, when I found this book in my physics professor's office, I fell in love with this book. I ordered for my copy on the same day. This book is good for the kids, but some of the stuff is hard to understand because there are some words like forces or angles. These are hard to understand for kids, but the pictures in this book are good for the curious kids. They may understand some of the stuff. But, I would rate this book for grownups. You will learn how locks work, how airplanes fly, how helicopters can go forward or backward. You will understand the mechanics just by looking at the pictures, but the reading the explanations also helps you understand. This is a nice book to keep at the corner of your bookshelf.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Absolute Need for Every Household
Few books can compare to "The Way Things Work" in the amount which they can teach the curious. Be they old or young, college educated engineers or preschoolers, everyone can pick something out of this book. Trust me; I've seen it from all ends.

When I was six, I loved the mammoths...and learned about simple machines and airplane wings. When I was in high school, I appreciated the mammoths' wit...and learned about automatic transmissions and transistors. Now that I'm in college, I've read the whole thing, and it's still a great reference book, just as entertaining and informative as it was so many years ago. And the mammoths are still funny.

For kids with insatiable curiosity, "The Way Things Work" can be a great and entertaining resource; for everyone who's ever wondered how their car drives, or why their computer works, or how satellite communications happen, it can be an immensely satisfying read.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good book, but not for the very young
I bought this book for a boy of the age of 8. He didn't seem very interested in the text explanations of how things work. Perhaps he's a little young, but like other reviewers said, this is a book that can most definately be put on the shelf for several years and still have relevance when a few years of knowledge is gained.

5-0 out of 5 stars BUY THIS BOOK!
My god, this has to be one of my favorite books. When I was a kid, I was FASCINATED (well, I still am) by mechanical things. I must have checked this book out of the library twenty times, and it never got old. It is PACKED with info, the drawings are great, and it is very educational. Well, I was at the library today checking out books for a mechanical engineering class, and there it was on the shelf. I checked it out again for old times sake, and here I am at Amazon.com (to buy my very own copy of course), writing a reveiew. Nuff said. Anyway, if you have a child, boy or girl, old or young, smart or not, it doesn't matter- this book ROCKS! ... Read more


46. Where the Wild Things Are
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060254920
Catlog: Book (1988-11-09)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 65
Average Customer Review: 4.78 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In the forty years since Max first cried "Let the wild rumpus start," Maurice Sendak's classic picture book has become one of the most highly acclaimed and best-loved children's books of all time. Now, in celebration of this special anniversary, introduce a new generation to Max's imaginative journey to where the wild things are.

Winner, 1964 Caldecott Medal
Notable Children's Books of 1940–1970 (ALA)
1981 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for Illustration
1963, 1982 Fanfare Honor List (The Horn Book)
Best Illustrated Children's Books of 1963, 1982 (NYT)
A Reading Rainbow Selection
1964 Lewis Carroll Shelf Award
Children's Books of 1981 (Library of Congress)
1981 Children's Books (NY Public Library)
100 Books for Reading and Sharing 1988 (NY Public Library)
... Read more

Reviews (195)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Children's Book, in Many Ways
Max puts on a wolf costume and feels mischievous. He breaks some rules and is sent to bed without supper. From there, his imagination takes over, a jungle grows in his bedroom, and he goes on a magical journey of (self-)discovery. The world he explores is populated by colorful, scary, and somewhat silly monsters who all get tamed by Max.

This book is beautifully illustrated, the story flows rapidly and flawlessly, and the language is simultaneously simple and loaded with meaning. While it is unlikely to happen, watch out for your children trying to write like Sendak, with his trademark run-on sentences.

This is the first book I remember reading by myself. It holds a special place in my heart.

Wow! I think that any child can sympathize with Max as he just wants to do what he wants to do, and then gets in trouble for breaking the rules. We also can understand how his frustration and anger cannot be sustained in the face of parental clarity, consistency, and calm strength. He works through his anger during his "journey" through the "jungle" and tames himself as he tames the monsters. Along the way, he discovers how lonely he is and how much he dislikes disapproval. The ending is simple, happy, and realistic.

This is a great book to read with your children, and then turn over to them to read on their own. It opens the door to discuss many simple but crucial issues of childhood. Please buy this book and use it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wild About Wild
Maurice Sendak is one of those great children's book creators who could write and draw. He helped me dream as a young boy, and I should pay him credit for helping me imagine things today.

When I was little, I'd stare at the page long after my mother finished reading it to me. Sendak seemed to have found my creative pulse, as he drew me in to wonder about his world of pretend monsters. The monsters are not quite so terrible, and could be considered friendly.

Max and I are both boys, and it must ordinary for we boys to get in a terrific amount of trouble in the process of playing. I related to Max. He sounded like a real boy. I was never quite sure what a rumpus was, but I knew it sounded like a lot of fun.

The pictures are cool. There is a rich, full-of-flavor tension in the art. The expressions and poses of the characters come across as genuine.

Don't be fooled by the amazing pictures. You'll enjoy the carefully laid story just as much, and your child can close his eyes and imagine his own version.

A wonderful book. A classic. If you've got kids, or if you read to your family's or neighbor's kids, this is one book which will be dog-eared from numerous reads.

I fully recommend "Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak.

Anthony Trendl

1-0 out of 5 stars not as good as new books
I am almost 7 and my teachre said we have to say why we like a lot of books or do not like a lot of books this summer on amazon and then print out them and give them to our new teacher next year So I am starting with this book.

My dad reelly likes this book because he said it was good when he was a kid. I dont like it. The pictures are boring and the story is not long. My dad reads this to me a lot and I like the books that are newer. New books have pictures that are pretty and the storys are funner and longer. This book has pictures that look old. I wish my dad would read this to himself and let me read something diferent. Nichole

5-0 out of 5 stars the book I loved best as a child.
My love affair with Maurice Sendak's "Where The Wild Things Are" goes back further than I think I can remember. I fell hard for the vibrant prose and unbelievable illustrations. It is a beautiful book throughout and it has absolutely withstood the test of time.

I am twenty-four years old now. I love this book as much as I did the first time I read it. This book speaks to places in the heart and the mind that you sort of forget about as you age. It's a magical book, it never fails to transform me.

Long live King Max....and all of his beautiful monsters.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book!!
I took a children's literature class a few years ago in college and I am now expecting my first child and I remembered this book and have recently purchased it. It's absolutely wonderful!! ... Read more


47. A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea Trilogy, Book 1)
by URSULA K. LE GUIN
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553262505
Catlog: Book (1984-05-01)
Publisher: Spectra
Sales Rank: 249
Average Customer Review: 4.17 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Often compared to Tolkien's Middle-earth or Lewis's Narnia, Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea is a stunning fantasy world that grabs quickly at our hearts, pulling us deeply into its imaginary realms. Four books (A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, and Tehanu) tell the whole Earthsea cycle--a tale about a reckless, awkward boy named Sparrowhawk who becomes a wizard's apprentice after the wizard reveals Sparrowhawk's true name. The boy comes to realize that his fate may be far more important than he ever dreamed possible. Le Guin challenges her readers to think about the power of language, how in the act of naming the world around us we actually create that world. Teens, especially, will be inspired by the way Le Guin allows her characters to evolve and grow into their own powers.

In this first book, A Wizard of Earthsea readers will witness Sparrowhawk's moving rite of passage--when he discovers his true name and becomes a young man. Great challenges await Sparrowhawk, including an almost deadly battle with a sinister creature, a monster that may be his own shadow. ... Read more

Reviews (284)

5-0 out of 5 stars Inexplicably entrancing
I swore I wouldn't read Ursula Le Guin for the longest time, but curiosity won out over other things. I picked up a copy of "Wizard of Earthsea" at my local library and settled down to read it.

This book follows the wizard Ged, who was born in a Earthsea (a grouping of many, many islands) village in Gont. The boy soon shows signs of great power, the ability to call animals and to laugh even when his tongue has been bound by a spell. But he surpasses the expectations when he saves the village from invaders.

A mage named Ogion apprentices Ged--who is known as Sparrowhawk, as knowledge of his true name would give anyone power over him. But Ogion's discipline and lessons are full of silence and self-examination, something which soon sends Ged to the school for mages in Roke. At the school, he meets two boys that will help shape his destiny: kind, easygoing Vetch, and arrogant Jasper who mocks Ged at every turn.

The boys all study and grow in their power, but Jasper's pride is unchanged. He finally mocks Ged into a magical duel, and Ged attempts a dangerous magic: to waken a long-dead woman. A monstrous creature made of shadow appears with the woman, and attacks Ged, nearly killing him. Ged remains within the school from then on, for the shadow is pursuing him.

But upon the completion of his studies, the now-wiser wizard sets off to an island, where the dread Dragon of Pendor is attacking the natives with its children. The dragon offers him a way to escape the shadow, but Ged refuses for the sake of others. Later, he is tempted again by an entranced queen and a magical Stone -- but again he refuses for the greater good. As the shadow closes in on Ged and his life becomes increasingly imperiled, he must discern what -- and who -- it is, to make himself truly whole.

I do not know WHY I liked this book as much as I did. It has many qualities that often annoy me in fantasy - several years are skipped over in a few pages; we know little of Ged's thoughts and emotions aside from "Ged felt this" and "Ged knew that"; it is also written in a spare mythologic style, which is occasionally broken for interludes of spellbinding nature description. It's a little difficult to visualize some scenes, such as Ged's battle with the dragons, but is relatively easy considering the lack of illustration. (I also liked the maps)

Ged is a classic hero of high SF and fantasy: he is talented and initially hot-headed, but through his misfortunes is tempered into a more selfless, albeit scarred person (both physically and emotionally). A little like Obi-Wan Kenobi of the Jedi Apprentice novels. I really fell in love with Vetch, though, that gave it an entire star. Vetch is such a DARLING, so kind and understanding toward his haunted friend.

I wouldn't qualify this book as being equal to Tolkien (NOTHING can match the Master!) but it definitely has a good place among the high fantasy books. Le Guin's mythologic style and Eastern philosophy tones may not be to everyone's taste, so I advise you to get a peek at a chapter of the Earthsea books before you decide whether or not to buy this.

I'll definitely read "Tombs of Atuan" and "Farthest Shore," but am not sure about "Tehanu" (though as a fifth book is reportedly forthcoming, I may read it anyhow). "Wizard of Earthsea" is not the best, but it is pretty high up there.

5-0 out of 5 stars Terse, mystical, profound
It is an insult to the genius of this book to try to describe it in layman's terms. Words just don't do justice. Le Guin always proves that she has a unique outlook on the world, and the Earthsea books are no exception.

The Wizard of Earthsea is the first part of a series of (now) four books. This part details the origins and youth of Ged - a boy from a backwater village in the great archipelago world of Earthsea. With a magical feat that saves his entire community from barbaric invaders, he shows himself to be greatly proficient in the Art. He is apprenticed to a sorceror (who nevertheless hides under the guise of a simple healer), and makes his way to the Academy on the Island of Roke. There, out of his great pride, he unleashes a shadow-thing in a contest of forbidden magics. Injured, scarred both physically and mentally, he now must flee the thing he brought into this world - or confront it.

One of the most surprising and masterful twists is the terse, epic writing: Le Guin does not spend time to write whole descriptive paragraphs; she sets the scenes with broad strokes of a few sentences, focusing on the most important events. This book is very quick reading.

Ged is an inspiring character. He can be crudely compared to Ender from Orson Scott Card's writings, or perhaps Taran from Lloyd Alexander's, in that he wields great power, by which he is burdened. The reader quickly becomes attached to his grim, brooding persona, as his quest takes him through the world. Ged is also a powerful role-model: he must acknowledge his undeniable talent and shed his fears of losing control of his powers.

The Wizard of Earthsea is undoubtedly a classic, a powerful work of high fantasy and spiritual development.

5-0 out of 5 stars There's More to Earthsea than the Trilogy
Reading the Earthsea Trilogy was one of the highlights of my childhood. Discovering that it had become the Earthsea Quartet and now Quintet is one of the highlights of life today. Why it's still being featured as a trilogy when there are two further books to be read, I don't understand!

Le Guin is the daughter of anthropologists and through all her fiction there is a deep, ingrained understanding of societies work and how they are built and evolve (or disintegrate). It's very interesting to see how her own interests have matured and deepened over the decades of writing this series - the latest Earthsea Title - The Other Wind is a fabulous rendition of concerns about gender/sexism/prejudice and the very nature of things. BUT that's for the grown ups, what really matters is that underneath all her incisive intelligence Ursula Le Guin tells a gripping, exciting and devastating series of stories that come at one in a rush of tight telling and delicately realised plots. She is simply one of the greatest writers for older children - or anyone! So start with the Wizard himself, then read on and on....

1-0 out of 5 stars Where Are The Negative Stars When You Need Them?
I give this book five stars. No, wait, I mean negative five. I cried when I read this book. Seriously, I ran and sobbed in the closet for about half an hour; that's how much I hated it.

There are much, much better fantasy stories out there. I'm very strict with myself about the integrity of my reading- that is, I don't allow myself to skip anything or skim over boring parts. Unfortunately, I realized after I was finished with AWoE, the whole novel was one enormous boring part and I should have flipped through the pages and called it a day.

The author has somehow managed to turn an archetypal journey into an over-reaching, unsubtle literary disaster.

5-0 out of 5 stars A VERY Inspiring Start into the Fantasy World
I read this book in about 3 days, on and off, and I was so inspired by it. It wasn't my first fantasy book, but it made me want to read more and more of the genre (despite my decision to read all fantasy series years ago). It is so exciting to read this book. I read it at age 13, and am saddened to think I hadn't read it earlier. It has all of the elements of a fantasy book, but is written better than most. It doesn't overkill with words like Terry Brooks (whose writing I do love, especially Shannara) or say too little. You love the technique (Le Guin is the best female fantasy/science fiction writer in the world, in my opinion). I can't describe the feeling you have towards Duny/Sparrowhawk/Ged, and are saddened when it ends after, what, 160 pages? That is the only downside: This book is so short. At least there are 5 others in the series, though. This is a piece of literature that every elementary school student should read. I am happy to say I will introduce this to my nephews/nieces when they grow up. It will be worth it for them.

Darn it, this review made me want to read it again. I knew that would happen.... ... Read more


48. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland: A Pop-up Adaptation
by Lewis Carroll
list price: $25.95
our price: $15.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689847432
Catlog: Book (2003-10-01)
Publisher: Little Simon
Sales Rank: 227
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is Robert Sabuda's most amazing creation ever, featuring stunning pop-ups illustrated in John Tenniel's classic style. The text is faithful to Lewis Carroll's original story, and special effects like a Victorian peep show, multifaceted foil, and tactile elements make this a pop-up to read and admire again and again. ... Read more

Reviews (20)

5-0 out of 5 stars fabulous addition to your Sabuda collection
Once you have one of his pop-up books, you will be drawn willy-nilly to buy all of the rest. This is not his most sublime effort on two fronts. The art work is in the exact style of the original, so while it is stunning and beautiful, I think it is not as lovely as his absolutely original imaginings. A few of the pop-up effects such as the little baby changing to a pig face(found in one of the mini books within a book) don't work very well, since only the pig is visible unless you go thro contortions to peek inside before ever opening that page. The same with the scene of painting the roses red.

While a great deal of the original text has been abridged, only a couple of the nonsense rhymes that made the original unabridged alice one of my childhoods read aloud favorites has been included.

Overall, the pop up engineering is still stunning, to see Alice's face inside the White Rabbits home with her arms sticking out windows, and her feet out the chimney and front door, the mad hatters tea party, and of course, the very first telescopic view of her fall down the rabbit hole are not to be missed! My 3 1/2 year old sits thro 90% of the story just as long as he can enjoy the pop-ups again and again!

5-0 out of 5 stars Another Sabuda masterpiece.
As a huge fan of Sabuda's WIZARD OF OZ, I grabbed ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND as soon as I saw it in the store, and it didn't disappoint at all.

The book is similar in design to WIZARD OF OZ, has several eye-popping pages that literally jump out at you and contains a faithful abridgement of Lewis Carroll's classic text.

The first page, featuring the forest where Alice first encounters the White Rabbit, is glorious, and Sabuda has imagined a remarkable way to give readers a look "down the rabbit hole."

This one's as good as THE WIZARD OF OZ, and it's going to be a great gift for all my cousins this holiday season.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is the MOTHER of all pop-up books EVER!
I've never written a review of any book before, but am compelled to do so now. (I'm not a very good writer!)

I've been collecting pop-ups for a long time, and this is the Pop-Up to End All Pop-Ups!

This book exceeds all my expectations of any Pop-Up. Innovative, top quality, surprise after surprise, includes full story, just superb!

I cannot give this book enough stars. If 5 is the highest, I give this book a 15! You will not be dissappointed!

5-0 out of 5 stars AMAZING!!!
There is a REASON that reviewers of Robert Sabuda's "Alice in Wonderland" are AMAZED. This is NOT just another "pop-up book." THIS is a WORK OF ART!!

Robert Sabuda's work is MAGICAL as you literally peer down the rabbit hole. Another page shows Alice in the house; Alice at the tea party; the Cheshire Cat; the deck of cards....

This book can be great to show young babies as it will spark their curiosity, but you have to just have them look at it and keep it out of reach as young toddlers would probably rip the art work. If you know a young boy or girl (ages 4 and up) or a young teenager or anyone who appreciates illustrative art - this is the book to buy.

My mother bought this book for me plus one for her good friend and we both loved it!

Robert Sabuda's "Wizard of OZ" was great....this might be even better!

5-0 out of 5 stars Alice's Adventures in Wonderland: A Pop-up book
Absolutely the best pop-up book I have ever seen. A collectible for sure. Not only do you have large pop-ups on each page, but you have smaller multiple ones on the pages, too!! Beautiful color and excitment for everyone, adults included!! ... Read more


49. Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (Aladdin Picture Books)
by Jr, Bill Martin, John Archambault
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 068983568X
Catlog: Book (2000-08-01)
Publisher: Aladdin
Sales Rank: 516
Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A told B,
and B told C
"I'll meet you at the top
of the coconut tree."

Countless children -- and their parents -- can joyfully recite the familiar words of this beloved alphabet chant. The perfect pairing of Bill Martin Jr and John Archambault's lively rhymes, and Caldecott Honor artist Lois Ehlert's bright, bold, cheerful pictures made Chicka Chicka Boom Boom an instant hit and a perennial favorite.

This full-sized, quality paperback edition will bring even more fans to this endearing, enduring classic.

Chicka chicka boom boom!
Will there be enough room?

There will always be room for Chicka Chicka Boom Boom on every child's bookshelf! ... Read more

Reviews (75)

5-0 out of 5 stars Go ahead and emphasize the rhythm!
"Chicka Chicka, Boom Boom! Will there be enough room?"

The simple, rhythmic text of this book just begs to be chanted as you read it to your young child. Go ahead and lose your self-consciousness and do it: Your child will love the book and learn the alphabet to boot!

The story line is simple: the lower case letters pass along the word that everyone is going to climb to the top of the coconut tree. Just after z makes it up the tree, "Uh-oh! Oh, no! Chicka chicka BOOM BOOM!" The uppercase letters come along to "hug their little dears and dust their pants." I understand this is where the board book version of this story ends, but I would highly recommend that you buy the regular version instead.

In the full-length version, the lower case letters get up from the jumble with all their bumps and bruises and head home. But after the sun goes down, "a gets out of bed and this is what he said, 'Dare, Double Dare! You can't catch me! I'll beat you to the top of the coconut tree!' Chicka Chicka Boom Boom!"

If you have fun with it, your young children will love to listen to it. The alphabet is printed in its entirity (upper and lower case letters) in the fly leaves of the book, and these are great to point to while singing the alphabet song or play a quick game of "What's that?" before or after reading the book. And your child will quickly start to chant the story along with you, I'm sure!

I, for one, was thrilled when my two-year old started bringing it to me and saying, "Read it, Mommy! Read it, the Boom Boom!" He's learning his letters and having fun. For what more could I ask?

5-0 out of 5 stars Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
This is hands down the best book for children age 3 and under that I have ever encountered (and we have over 1,000 children's books in our home!). I began reading it to my oldest child when she was 2 months old, and by 16 months, she could recite the alphabet AND identify all 26 letters of the alphabet-- upper AND lower case! I give most of the credit to this wonderful book (but keep in mind, we read it EVERYDAY, often times, several times a day!) My youngest child picks this book out of the shelf first and foremost. He is only 13 months old, but he absolutely loves this book and prefers it over most toys. Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault have more than a classic here, not to mention the great illustrations by Lois Ehlert. If you're looking for the perfect book to teach your children the alphabet or you just simply want an entertaining book that is sure to be a hit, look no further. This is it!

5-0 out of 5 stars Toddler's Loving it!!!
This is now our regular nighttime read. My 18 month old daughter gets an absolute kick out of it! She says the BOOM, BOOM! part when we get to it. While I read the part "up the coconut tree", I walk my fingers up the tree. It really seems to get and keep her attention. Every parent should own this book!!

4-0 out of 5 stars Ellamennow P
A word of warning. If you haven't a rhythmic bone in your body, you'd best not be reading "Chicka Chicka Boom Boom" anytime soon. This book is arguably the best known alphabet book on the market today. Telling a tale of alphabetic foolhardiness, a troop of lower case letters (all of them, in fact) go bounding up the nearby coconut tree for a variety of reasons. When the tree can no longer support their weight the little letters find themselves splayed out on the ground. Fortunately the big letters come along to comfort the little ones, though it's obvious by the end that not all have learned their lesson.

Verses of the letters' exploits are intermixed with chants like so;

"Chicka chick boom boom!
Will there be enough room?
Here comes H
Up the coconut tree"

The text has a nice rhythmic quality to it. A kind of onomatopoetic elegance. And the illustrations, while not particularly stunning, fulfill their purpose excellently. It's a good read-aloud story for kids learning their alphabet, and would fit into any storytime excellently. A fun feisty book.

5-0 out of 5 stars alphabet
this book is great for little children because it teaches them their alphabet. the author of the book did a good job rhyming words that match the letter. ... Read more


50. A Light in the Attic
list price: $17.99
our price: $12.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060256737
Catlog: Book (1981-10-07)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 532
Average Customer Review: 4.89 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Last night while I lay thinking here
Some Whatifs crawled inside my ear
And pranced and partied all night long
And sang their same old Whatif song:

Whatif I flunk that test?
Whatif green hair grows on my chest?
Whatif nobody likes me?
Whatif a bolt of lightning strikes me?...

Here in the attic of Shel Silverstein you will find Backward Bill, Sour Face Ann, the Meehoo with an Exactlywatt, and the Polar Bear in the Frigidaire. You will talk with Broiled Face, and find out what happens when Somebody steals your knees, you get caught by the Quick-Digesting Gink, a Mountain snores, and They Put a Brassiere on the Camel.

From the creator of the beloved poetry collections Where the Sidewalk Ends and Falling Up, here is another wondrous book of poems and drawings.

Notable Children's Books of 1981 (ALA)
Best Books of 1981 (SLJ)
Children's Books of 1981 (Library of Congress)
1981 Children's Books (NY Public Library)
1981 USA Children's Books of International Interest
Winner, 1983–84 William Allen White Award (Kansas)
Winner, 1983 Garden State Children's Book Award (New Jersey Library Association)
1984 Garden State Children's Book Award for Non-Fiction (New Jersey Library Association)
1984 George C. Stone Center for Children's Books (Claremont, CA) "Recognition of Merit" Award

... Read more

Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Where does the sidewalk end? In the attic.
If you don't remember these rhymes from your childhood, then it's about time you visited the attic, "A Light in the Attic," that is. Silverstein combines humorous sketches, whimsical poetry and fanciful word play in another amusing collection. "Where the Sidewalk Ends" will always be my favorite, but poems like "Spelling Bee," "Deaf Donald," "Nobody" and "Little Abigail and the Beautiful Pony" definately make "A Light in the Attic" a close runner-up.

If you know Silverstein's work, then you are familiar with his simple rhyming style. His flair for combining drawings and words make for a book that's much more than just a collection of poetry. His poems are an experience that would be diminished without the visual aspect.

Silverstein's collections are great for all ages. I read them as a kid, but I enjoy them just as much now. Silverstein has the soul of a child, but the wit of a sage.

"The saddest thing I ever did see
Was a woodpecker peckin' at a plastic tree.
He looks at me, and 'Friend,' says he,
'Things ain't as sweet as they used to be.'"
-Shel Silverstein page 83

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book of all times, exiting and very funny.
This poem book is the best yet, I have never read any poems as funny as the ones Shel Silverstein writes."A Light in the Attic" is a book for people of all ages.The whole class of seventh graders enjoyed it.We were laughing our heads out when we heard the poem,"Standing is Stupid".I recomend this book to anyone who is having a bad day and wants a moment of happiness!

5-0 out of 5 stars A MUST HAVE
I am not a big poem fan but I love this book! Drawings are great and so fun!

5-0 out of 5 stars A review by a children's author
I read Shel Silverstein when I was young and I loved his poetry. I used to read it to the kids I babysat (and I never sat on a baby) and I now read it to my own children. What can be said that hasn't been said already?

This: Shel Silverstein wrote more than just silly. Some of his greatest poems bring tears to my eyes and make me think about things like justice, death, love, and even my Creator. Pretty deep stuff. I personally believe it's that inane sense of humor he had combined with an almost philosophical take on life that mades Shel a great children's poet.

Some of my favorite poems by Shel are in this collection, The Light in the Attic.

The Little Boy and the Old Man should make any person who reads it think about aging and reaching out to our loved ones who are er, how shall I say it, a little past their prime and also to those who haven't quite reached their prime yet. And How Many, How Much is a wonderful reminder that friendship starts in your own heart.

And I wonder, was one of my favorite movies (Bruce Almighty) inspired by one of my favorite Shel Silverstein poems (God's Wheel)? Did the writer read that poem and think "What a great premise for a movie!" Could be. Whatever the case I know his work was one of my inspirations in becoming a children's writer. And now I'm writing a book of poetry for children and as I craft it I returned to all these funny, touching, ironic, wistful, poems and realized, "Uh oh, I set the bar too low. I need to kick it up a notch." I so I strive to do just that.

My nightmare is being compared by a cranky reviewer to Shel Silverstein, "This writer is an imposter to the throne of the great Shel." Let me state here and now that I don't want the throne. I would just like to sit under a oak tree in the courtyard outside the palace if that's okay. And while I'm there I'll just take a big whiff of the rosebush that stayed so very small (read the book and you shall see what I mean).

Finally, let me add this, I believe these poems expanded my creativity in my younger years and I believe they expand it to this very day. Buy a Light in the Attic for your children and read the poems together. You will expand their vocabulary, help them develop a sense of comedic timing, cultivate an interest in poetry, and give them their first lessons in philosophy, all the while having a fantastic time together. Now that's what I call maximum return on a minimal investment(...)

4-0 out of 5 stars the laughing stock
Hula eels, magic carpets and tickilish tom are all things in A Light in the Attic. This hilarios book has fun filled poems all over! such as Little Abigail and the beautiful pony. What happens to Abigail when she doesn't get what she wants?
The author Shel Siverstein uses rymes through out the whole book to make it super funny. I would recomend this book if you like fantasy and magic. You will love these poems and be rolling on the floor laughing. ... Read more


51. I'm a Big Brother
by Joanna Cole, Maxie Chambliss
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0688145078
Catlog: Book (1997-04-25)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 2220
Average Customer Review: 4.55 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The author/artist creators of How I Was Adopted present this child's-eye view of family life, deftly describing the joy of welcoming a new sibling into the family. A companion volume to I'm a Big Sister. ... Read more

Reviews (29)

4-0 out of 5 stars Good for older toddlers, preschoolers
I bought this book to help my almost-three-years-old son adjust to the idea of a new baby brother or sister. He loves it and asks to read it about four times a day. The text is easy to understand. It explains some of babies' limitations ("Too little to walk. Too little to talk.") and also talks about why babies cry, etc. The illustrations are really sweet and everyone is smiling, even the kitty cat.

The one thing I don't like about this book is that it assumes the mom will be bottlefeeding. There are bottles in several pictures (one shows the brother giving a bottle). Since we breastfeed, I would have preferred a book where the mother nurses the baby. However, this hurdle was easily overcome by some quick mommy text improvisation. ("Babies like to nurse," instead of "Babies like to drink milk"). All in all, it's a great sibling book and one I don't hesitate to recommend.

5-0 out of 5 stars What a great little book!
I bought this book for my 6 year old son just before the birth of his brother. We loved it! It is short for kids who need an introduction but might not want to dwell on the subject, very positive about all the family relationships - especially about being a sibling, friendly and engaging. The reason I really like the Big Brother/Big Sister difference is that the sibling-to-be spends a couple of months hearing that he or she will be a brother or sister and this book follows right along! I did enjoy the breastfeeding illustration, unobstrusive and just as easily a cuddling illustration, which is something many books skip right over. If there was anything disappointing about the book it's the fact that our Big Brother had no interest in looking at it once the baby was here. But, hey, why should I be upset with a book for answering all my son's questions so soon and so easily? ... it was well worth what he got out of it for 3 weeks' worth of reading. I recommend this book highly!

4-0 out of 5 stars a nice preparation for the new baby
My 18 mo son will sit and listen to this book, and it's the most I get to discuss the "new baby" with him. If I try to point to the new crib, or my burgeoning belly, he just says "no baby" and goes back to his cars and trucks. I agree that the book should have a nursing mother, in this breastfeeding age, or at least say "some babies have Mommy's milk and some babies have milk from bottles," or whatever. But I like that the little boy in the book is unflaggingly positive about his new sibling, and how much his parents still love him.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book for Big Brothers
We bought this book to help my son get ready for his little sister's arrival. It has simple text and really highlights on the differences in big kids vs babies. Gets him excited about the big kid things he already gets to do without wanting to regress. I also liked the way the book touches on the nurturing side of the big brother and the parents towards both children. The pages are a little thicker if you have a toddler prone to ripping pages, mine hasn't yet. They are holding up well. A great book that is asked for atleast twice a day by my son! I recommend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars a much-requested story
this book is one of the favorite stories of our 18-month-old, so much so that we're able to quote the story during regular conversations during the day. we have yet to find out how well this book does for preparing our son for his little brother, but at least he knows that there are some things that big kids can do that babies cannot. i like the fact that the book emphasizes that a big brother can be very helpful with the new baby and is still very loved by his parents. ... Read more


52. I'm a Big Sister
by Joanna Cole, Maxie Chambliss
list price: $6.99
our price: $6.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0688145094
Catlog: Book (1997-04-25)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 1098
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Warm, loving pictures accompany this upbeat look at how a family grows when a new baby comes home. A companion volume to I'm a Big Brother. ... Read more

Reviews (24)

4-0 out of 5 stars "Big Sister" Endures
We received this book shortly after our son was born, and our 2-1/2 year old daughter loved it right away. She still asks to read it, 7 months later. She loves being a big sister, and the book reinforces it in a very positive way. She identifies with the character, down to wanting to get hair bows just like in the illustrations. We like that it is gender-specific as to the "big" sibling, but not the baby.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book for toddlers
My daughter is 26 months old and we are expecting our second child in another month. She immediately took to the book and has asked to have it read to her almost everyday. Before this book, we would talk to my daughter about the baby, but we weren't sure how much was sinking in. This book has really helped! After just a couple of weeks, my daughter is much more focused on the baby, and talks about how certain things will be for the baby, such as the infant seat, bouncy chair, pacifier, things like that. She also wants to see my belly all the time and will act like she is feeding the baby, or she will give the baby hugs and kisses. It is very cute, and it really seems like she understands a lot more what to expect when the baby comes. I am sure there are other good books out there, but this one seems especially appropriate for kids in the 1 to 3 year old range. It is straightforward and not too complicated, and has good illustrations. I highly recommend this book!

3-0 out of 5 stars Nice book with one drawback
I bought this book when my son was born for my 2 year old daugther after reading all the good reviews. I like it a lot - except for the bottle feeding reference. As a breastfeeding mom I would have preferred it if the author simply left feeding out. There are plenty of other things that a big sister can do.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good, even for young sister-to-be
Our daughter was 17-months-old when she became a big sister, and this book was the only one out there that helped her understand the concept of having a little sister.
It is written very simply, talking about what the little girl can do and how she is a big girl. It talks also about the baby and what the baby can do, what the baby needs, etc. It is very reassuring, I think, to the older child that they are still loved because they are special.
The drawings are very cute and appealing to my daughter - she loves to see the big sister and the baby, the dolls and bears, and the mommy and daddy.
I think it really helped her understand the concept and I would really recommend it for any age!

5-0 out of 5 stars What a wonderful book
We got this for our daughter (2 1/2) to let her know she's going to be a big sister, and SHE LOVES IT. It has QUICKLY become her favorite book and like to repeat the big kid things she can do. I would HIGHLY recommend this to anyone who's going to have a new big sister in the house! ... Read more


53. Bridge to Terabithia
by Katherine Paterson
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064401847
Catlog: Book (1987-06-17)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 1591
Average Customer Review: 4.41 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A secret world of their own

Jess Aaron's greatest ambition is to be the fastest runner in the fifth grade. He's been practicing all summer and can't wait to see his classmates' faces when he beats them all. But on the first day of school, a new kid, a new girl, boldly crosses over to the boy's side of the playground and outruns everyone.

That's not a very promising beginning for a friendship, but Jess and Leslie Burke become inseparable. It doesn't matter to Jess that leslie dresses funny, or that her family has a lot of money -- but no TV. Leslie has imagination. Together, she and Jess create Terabithia, a magical kingdom in the woods where the two of them reign as king and queen, and their imaginations set the only limits. Then one morning a terrible tragedy occurs. Only when Jess is able to come to grips with this tragedy does he finally understand the strength and courage Leslie has given him.

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Reviews (548)

3-0 out of 5 stars A Great Friendship
Have you ever wanted a good friend? If you answered "yes", then you should read Bridge to Terabithia. This interesting and exciting book about friendship will teach you about love, determination, and loss. Jess Aarons wants to be the fastest runner in the fifth grade, but when his new neighbor, Leslie Burke, comes to school the challenge is even harder for him. Even though Jess didn't become the fastest runner, he found a new friend in Leslie. Jess and Leslie also found a magical place in the woods that they called Terabithia. It was a private place just for them. Jess likes to draw, he's a good friend, and he's nice. Jess has two older sisters. They're lazy, selfish, whiney, and bossy. Jess also has a younger sister named Maybelle. She follows him everywhere like a cute little puppy, but he draws the line when it comes to Terabithia. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who likes great books about friendship.

4-0 out of 5 stars Bridge to Terabithia
Katherine Paterson wrote a book called, ''Bridge to Terabithia.'' The novel is about a fith grade boy namd Jesse Oliver Aarons who dreams of being the fastest runner in the fith grade. Jess has a poor family life, but when a tomboy named Leselie Burke moves in from Arlingtron, Virginia his self-esteem is jolted up. Together they create a magical kingdom named Terabithia. When a tradgety happens Jess realizes the strength Leselie gave him. Realistic fiction is this seventies book's genre. Find out what the tradgety is and read the novel, ''Bridge to Terabithia.''
Do I personally like this book? You bet! I especially like the special ending and how it matches the title. My opion is that it is a very entertaining and heartwarming novel. The novel, ''Bridge to Terabithia,'' is one book that I highly recommend. So read it and see how you like it. I'm almost positive you won't regret it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Deliciously sad!
This book is hard to describe. I read it before buying it for my niece a few years after it was first published. I thought it was excellent, especially at depicting the mind of a pre-adolescent boy and how he confronts tragedy. Everything about the book struck me as honest, true and insightful at the time. Though looking at it now, some of the author's messages seem to lack subtlety. But how much subtlety do you want in children's literature? Still, I'm sure the author would be offended to hear me call this "children's literature." The fact is it's a great and enjoyable read that will keep your child thinking for a long time. But it's also a book that any adult can enjoy and will also have them thinking as well. If you don't own this one, buy it today.

5-0 out of 5 stars Valuable Life Lessons
I have read "Bridge to Terabithia" many times as both a child and adult, and have continued to return to it for many reasons. Jess, an unappreciated artistic boy, feels pressure from his family and school to live up to their expectations of "male" behavior, yet he learns with the help of individualistic Leslie that he needs to be true to himself. Together they create a magical kingdom where they can be themselves, applaud each others' talents, and escape the closed-minded world that fails to understand them. When Leslie suddenly leaves Jess' life, Jess realizes he has gained the confidence (with Leslie's help) to face the world on his own. He then passes Terabithia on to someone else who needs its "powers" the same way he did. This powerful, touching book teaches readers to always be themselves, that struggles and tragedies can make us stronger and bring us closer together, that appearances can be deceiving, and that friendship and imagination have remarkable powers. My class of reluctant 6th grade readers loved this book as well.

1-0 out of 5 stars WORST BOOK EVER!
This book is terrible! All my friends and I hate it. Sometimes for a whole chapter it talks about Jess thinking about things that nobody cares about. This would never happen in real life. All they do is say wow im in happyland. No wonder they dont have any other friends. LESLIE DIED! LETS HAVE A PARTY! ... Read more


54. Time for Bed
by Mem Fox
list price: $6.95
our price: $6.26
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0152010661
Catlog: Book (1997-09-01)
Publisher: Red Wagon Books
Sales Rank: 1887
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Darkness is falling everywhere and little ones are getting sleepy, feeling cozy, and being tucked in. It’s time for a wide yawn, a big hug, and a snuggle under the covers--sleep tight! “Working beautifully with the soothingly repetitive text, each painting conveys a warm feeling of safety and affection.”--School Library Journal
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Reviews (77)

3-0 out of 5 stars Sweet Nighttime Rhymes
The outstanding watercolor illustrations highlight this book - and are the reason I bought it at all. The rhyming text is sweet, but too repetitive. I find myself doing a little self-editing as I read it aloud. All the illustrations are amazing, although I would prefer the snake and the bee weren't included. I usually skip those pages. A nice way to teach your child the names of animals - especially since the illustrations all contain a "mommy" or "daddy" and a "baby" - the first words most children learn.

5-0 out of 5 stars Precious book!
This darling bedtime story, so endearing will charm your youngster to sweet dreams night after night. Jane Dyer's watercolor illustrations depicting animals, and their offspring are OUTSTANDING. Each two-page spread features a different Mommy (or Daddy), in a suitable setting, preparing their "little one" for bed. For instance, the mice are portrayed at the base of a hallow tree, and the fish are deep at sea. The sweet, and simple text appears on the left side of the book, while each mimicking phrase begins with, "It's time for bed." Subtle and rhythmic, the beat is ideal for nighttime reading, "It's time for bed, little sheep, little sheep, the whole wide world is going to sleep." The book concludes with a Mommy tucking a toddler into bed, "The stars on high are shining bright, sweet dreams, my darling, sleep well, good night!" This is a precious bedtime book.

As an educational tool, children will learn to recognize the illustrated animals: mouse, goose, cat, calf, foal, fish, sheep, bird, bee, snake, pup, and deer. My son received the hardcover edition of "Time For Bed" as a baby gift, and I was so captivated by the artwork that the board book version was purchased as a supplement. One-year and up.

5-0 out of 5 stars Our favorite bed time book
I began reading this book to my daughter when she was six weeks old. Even at that young age, she responded to the soothing cadence. She is now four months old and this book lulls her right to sleep for naps and bed time. We both love it!

5-0 out of 5 stars awesome book
My 14 month old daughter absolutely LOVES this book. She's captivated by every page!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great bedtime book!!
I bought this book for my daughter when she was 18mths. We have read it almost every night for the past 6 months. She has the verses memorized. She loves the picture of the baby animals w/ their mothers and likes to point them out "my sheep, mommies sheep". The rhymes are easy to read and the pictures are great! ... Read more


55. Cars and Trucks and Things That Go
by RICHARD SCARRY
list price: $14.99
our price: $10.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0307157857
Catlog: Book (1998-06-01)
Publisher: Golden Books
Sales Rank: 324
Average Customer Review: 4.98 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Although this book was around when many of today's parents wereyoungsters, it has remained a steadfast must-have in every toddler's library. For starters, it's a great vocabulary guide that names the many things that go (and some that haven't a prayer of going, but are great fun to imagine anyway). It's also teeming with detail-rich scenes and characters on every page, teaching children the rewards of looking long and closely (such as finding the hidden "Goldbug" in each spread). Along the way it entertains with the silly and slapstick--everything from toothpaste and toothbrush cars to six fire department vehicles that show up to extinguish a ladybug-size fire in a miniature pink convertible. What's most amazing about this book, however, is its longevity. When you purchase it for your fledgling talker, you should consider it an investment. Even 11-, 12-, and 13-year-olds are known to pore over the book nostalgically, cooing at Lowly Worm and eagerly tracking Officer Flossie's book-long chase after that irresponsible, speedster driver in a cowboy hat. (Ages 2 and older) --Gail Hudson ... Read more

Reviews (55)

5-0 out of 5 stars I agree - thank you Richard Scarry!
I started reading this book with my son when he first learned to talk a few years ago. He's not tired of it yet (and neither am I). There are so many fun illustrations (I especially like the "pickle car"), and so much going on that this book can be read again and again. Now that my son is familiar with all of the vehicles, and able to point them out when we go driving in our car (although we have yet to see a pickle car in our area) we have fun not just reading the story, but looking for the tiny "Goldbug" on every page.

5-0 out of 5 stars My 2.5 year old son's FAVORITE book
We were given this book when my son was born; he has always enjoyed the colorful and imaginative pictures, and has been finding Goldbug on each page since he was about 18 months. However, his early love for this book pales in comparison to his obsession with it now -- it's the only book he wants to hear at story time, day after day ... Luckily for Mom and Dad, it's also whimsical enough that we enjoy it, too, day after day.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Son's FAVORITE Book
I have just purchased my SECOND copy of this book. My 22 month son loves it so much that it has been through the ringer in the past months, with his favorite pages ripped out because of over use! I had it when I was little, and it brings back great memories. But, I never expected the reaction that he would have to this book! It is perfect for any who loves PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES!! If only there was a board version!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book for Generate Interest in Reading/Focus of Toddler
This was the first book my son received in 1992. I started reading it to him before he was 1 years old. He loved to sit quietly and look at the book. He continued to look for Goldbug until he was in kindergarten. Great book for spending quality time with your child and get the added bonus of an educational foundation for reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars A tradition continues
This book was a favorite of our youngest son, age 31. Now our well loved copy is a great hit with the grandchildren. I have to buy three new copies. In this day of DVD, VCR it is a thrill to have children so engrossed looking for Gold Bug. ... Read more


56. Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You : Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises (Bright and Early Board Books)
by DR SEUSS
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.49
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0679882820
Catlog: Book (1996-11-26)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 302
Average Customer Review: 4.61 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Oh, the wonderful things Mr. Brown can do! In this "Book of Wonderful Noises," Mr. Brown struts his stuff, as he imitates everything from popping corks to horse feet ("pop pop pop pop" and "klopp klopp klopp," respectively) while inviting everyone to join him in the fun. Young readers who are still learning their sounds and letters will get a wacky workout as they follow along with the very serious-looking, squinty-eyed Mr. Brown. Whether it's eggs frying in a pan or a hippo chewing gum, the skillful Mr. Brown just keeps topping himself, with a "sizzle sizzle" or a "grum grum grum." "Mr. Brown is so smart he can even do this: he can even make a noise like a goldfish kiss!... pip!" As usual, the words and pictures of Dr.Seuss make reading (and making all sorts of funny noises) impossible to resist. Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? will stay fresh through many a giggling reading. --Paul Hughes ... Read more

Reviews (89)

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful first book for your baby!
I first started reading this book to my baby at 2 months old, and she was fascinated by the sounds and the bright pictures. I've read it to her so many times that I think we both have it memorized. When my baby was 3 months old I could simply recite the book to her while I was driving in a car trip and she would be entertained.

I highly recommend this book, along with Sanda Boynton's two books "Barnyard Dance" and "Moo, Baa, La La La!" books for infants and toddlers. With books that are interesting like these, my baby will sit for 45 minutes at a time to be read to!

A great way to interact with your child and teach her to love books and read.

5-0 out of 5 stars AN ABSOLUTE MUST FOR SPEECH-DELAYED TODDLERS!
My son (now 3) is speech-delayed, and this is one of the first books that actually had him talking along! I would read, "Oh, the wonderful sounds Mr. Brown can do. He can sound like a cow, he can go..." and my son at 2 would yell "MOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" and do the same with the other sounds! It ENCOURAGES your child to speak by having them make some silly sounds! We even came up with hand gestures for several of the sounds to supplement my son's sign language (ASL) he used at the time. We read this book every night at least 4 times before bed. As his speech flourished (yay!), he began to want to say more of the words himself (we've memorized the book - not hard, and very fun to recite when waiting in lines, etc, heeheehee). Then, we bought him the Dr. Seuss video of ABCs, which has this book's "video" at the end. He watches the video with this book in hand, although the video has a few more sounds (I think this board book is a bit abridged, but not too much), and is now learning to read with the video/board book combination! I am HIGHLY pleased with this book, from it's hilarious illustrations (see lightning/thunder page) to it's musical cadence and silly sounds - it helped my son realize sounds can be fun and silly and encouraged him to play with them when speech was so frustrating for him at the time.

2-0 out of 5 stars Fun reading, but not very sturdy
I have bought several of the Dr. Suess Bright and Early Board Books, and they simply don't stand up to the abuse a toddler dishes out. None of the other board books we own have fallen apart the way these have.

5-0 out of 5 stars My 2 year old loves this book!
My daughter just loves having me read this book to her. "Boom boom boom, Mr. Brown is a wonder. Boom boom boom, Mr. Brown makes thunder!" She has memorized most of it, and has such fun making the sounds in it along with me. It really is worth buying for your little one - this is really a fun book to read!

5-0 out of 5 stars Dr. Seuss inspires parents and kids to make wonderful noises
In the old days it was Old MacDonald who had a farm and on this farm he had a cow, duck, and all sorts of other animals, each of which made a particular sound that can be imitated. But then along game Mr. Brown, a creation of Dr. Seuss, who makes Old MacDonald look like the strong silent type. That is because as we learn in "Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?: Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises," Mr. Brown can do more than "moo" like a cow, "buzz" like a bee, and go "hoo hoo hoo hoo" like an owl. Mr. Brown can go "pop" like a cork, "eek eek" like a squeaky shoe, and even make the sound of a hippopotamus chewing gum.

I think one of the reasons this is a popular book with beginning readers is not only because kids enjoy making all these noises, but also because parents and other adults get to embarrass themselves in making the sounds on these pages come alive (or a reasonable facsimile thereof). Trying to make the sound of the rain or a big cat drinking is not too hard, but doing a very hard noise to make like the sound of lighting (which is a "splatt" apparently) or a noise like a goldfish kiss ("pip") might be pushing the envelope too much.

Of course, you can make up any sound you want when you are reading this to very young children. But you have to keep in mind that the whole point of these Bright and Early Books for Beginning Beginners is to inspire them to read on their own one day, which means you can look forward to being confronted by an indignant young child demanding to know how the noise you made every time you read them the book has anything to do with what is highlighted on these pages. So be forewarned, that sooner or later you are going to be embarrassed reading this book. ... Read more


57. The Lorax
by Dr. Seuss, Theodor Seuss Geisel
list price: $14.95
our price: $8.97
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394823370
Catlog: Book (1971-08-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 730
Average Customer Review: 4.83 out of 5 stars
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When Dr. Seuss gets serious, you know it must be important. Published in 1971, and perhaps inspired by the "save our planet" mindset of the 1960s, The Lorax is an ecological warning that still rings true today amidst the dangers of clear-cutting, pollution, and disregard for the earth's environment. In The Lorax, we find what we've come to expect from the illustrious doctor: brilliantly whimsical rhymes, delightfully original creatures, and weirdly undulating illustrations. But here there is also something more--a powerful message that Seuss implores both adults and children to heed.

The now remorseful Once-ler--our faceless, bodiless narrator--tells the story himself. Long ago this enterprising villain chances upon a place filled with wondrous Truffula Trees, Swomee-Swans, Brown Bar-ba- loots, and Humming-Fishes. Bewitched by the beauty of the Truffula Tree tufts, he greedily chops them down to produce and mass-market Thneeds. ("It's a shirt. It's a sock. It's a glove. It's a hat.") As the trees swiftly disappear and the denizens leave for greener pastures, the fuzzy yellow Lorax (who speaks for the trees "for the trees have no tongues") repeatedly warns the Once-ler, but his words of wisdom are for naught. Finally the Lorax extricates himself from the scorched earth (by the seat of his own furry pants), leaving only a rock engraved "UNLESS." Thus, with his own colorful version of a compelling morality play, Dr. Seuss teaches readers not to fool with Mother Nature. But as you might expect from Seuss, all hope is not lost--the Once-ler has saved a single Truffula Tree seed! Our fate now rests in the hands of a caring child, who becomes our last chance for a clean, green future. (Ages 4 to 8) ... Read more

Reviews (58)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Lorax - Still Powerful After 30 Years
Children used to Dr. Seuss' lighthearted, whimsical stories filled with wacky names and places will undoubtedly perceive a vast difference with "The Lorax". It still contains the wacky names, places, and rhymes, so characteristic of Seuss, but with one blatant overtone. This story goes all out to show the devestating consequences of human greed, and what can happen to the environment when humans misuse and take advantage of nature and natural resources.

The story begins when a boy comes to the home of a peculair creature called Once-ler. The boy wants to know about something called the Lorax; "what it was", and "why it was there". After paying the Once-ler a small fee, he narrates the story for the boy. The pictures incorperated into the story are also poignant; for, as we see in the beginning, the small town in which the Once-ler lives is very grey and barren.

However, as the Once-ler begins his story, the pictures become brighter, more cheerful, and colorful, as we see how the town once looked, long, long ago. There were animals, birds, green grass ... and trees!

The Once-ler says, "I came to this glorious place. And I first saw the trees. The Truffula trees". Transfixed by these trees, the Once-ler cuts one down to make a "Thneed". Now, a Thneed is supposed to be a useful thing, which people can find many uses for. Shortly after the first tree is cut down, the Lorax appears. He explains that he talks on behalf of the trees, because the trees cannot talk for themselves. "They have no tongues".

The Lorax is very upset at what the Once-ler has done. But the Once-ler ignores him, and continues to cut down the trees to make Thneeds, until all the trees have been cut down. This action, of cutting down the trees, building a factory to make the thneeds, and releasing waste residue into the water is greatly illustrated in the pictures, showing the cause and effect of polluting the environment.

Eventually the pictures return to the grey, morbid colors we see in the beginning. The Lorax has had to make all the birds, animals and fish leave the town before they die of hunger and starvation, and before they choke to death on all the smog generated by the Once-ler's factory.

As we can clearly see in "The Lorax", Dr. Seuss is making a very defined political statement about how humans have manipulated and destroyed our natural surroundings for their own personal greed. "The Lorax" was written in 1971, in the hayday of environmental activism, and one year after the first Earth Day.

Still, Dr. Suess does not make this story into a gloomy one. He gives us hope. The Once-ler tosses down a seed to the boy; the one last remaining Truffula seed. With this one seed, Dr. Seuss tells us the possiblities are endless, and hope is not lost.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Serious Message in Classic Suess Style
I grew up on Dr. Suess books(I even learned to read with one), and I think he is one of the greatest children's authors ever. His hypnotic phrasing and wonderful illustrations are enough to delight children and adults as well (my brothers and I still enjoy looking through our old Suess favorites). In my senior year of high school, I had the opportunity to go with two other classmates to a local elementary school on a weekly basis to teach basic lessons on honesty, friendship, etc. When we taught our lesson on the environment, I brought "The Lorax" to read to the class. To my surprise, when I asked who in the class had read the story, only three out of the 28 students had. Many looked skeptical, thinking it was a little kid's book, but once I started reading, the entire class was mesmerized. After I was finished with the story, we had the most lively question-and-answer session that we had ever had-the story really hit home with the kids and brought our planet'! s ecological crisis into terms that they could understand. Afterward, many of the children asked where they could get a copy of "The Lorax". Thank you to Dr. Suess for a masterpiece of children's literature!

5-0 out of 5 stars Inspiring for a lifetime
When I was in elementary school in the mid-1970s, probably around the age of 7 or 8, all the students in the school were assembled and shown the film of the Lorax. The film was very similar to the film of The Grinch that was made at about the same time and is now a video classic - - wonderful animation and great word-for-word narrative reading of the text. I had been unaware of the book before that. I remember very clearly being very moved and inspired by the tale, and I can trace part of my development as an environmentalist to it. I now work in environmental outreach/education, and every once in a while I get out the book of The Lorax and get re-inspired, especially by the line "UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not." I still find the book very relevant to today. It's not extremist in any way. Even its depiction of the Once-ler is not as an evil man, but someone very recognizable. He doesn't mean harm, but "Business is business, and business must grow." Sound familiar? He doesn't recognize the damage he's causing, or understand just how painful and permanent it will be, until too late. This book reminds all of us to not take our beautiful world for granted, but to take responsibility for it.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the best Seuss books there is!
This story about being a steward for our world and environment is a job for parents and kids alike. My two year old has is memorized (as I do) but we never tire of reading it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Lorax
My children love this book. By the time my son was two, I had read it to him so many times that he had memorized it! He, as well as my daughter, just love this story. ... Read more


58. Jamberry Board Book
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0694006513
Catlog: Book (1994-12-30)
Publisher: HarperFestival
Sales Rank: 1526
Average Customer Review: 4.84 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Hat and boot in hand, a boy and a bear set off on a delicious and raucous romp through Berryland. They frolic in strawberry fields forever, rumble and ramble in blackberry brambles, and topple their canoeberry with blueberries. Silly rhymes and a musical beat practically beg to be read aloud, preferably accompanied by dancing. New readers will giggle as they follow the fruit-frenzied pals on their berry adventures. Jamberry builds quickly in intensity and complexity, starting with "One berry, Two berry, Pick me a blueberry," and working up to "Raspberry, Jazzberry, Razzmatazzberry, Berryband, Merryband, Jamming in Berryland." Children will love discovering the subtle touches in Bruce Degen's illustrations: a frog climbing out of a hat, crackers and butter instead of lily pads, and a sign by the raspberry skating rink imploring skaters not to pick the jelly rolls planted nearby. Every character seems giddy with well-fed joy in this veritable jamboree of flavorful fun. Jamberry is a book best enjoyed on a gloomy day with a dollop of vanilla ice cream. (Baby to Preschool) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (63)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Berry Blast.....
Come join a little boy and his very endearing bear friend as they travel through berryland, on a "razzamatazzberry" adventure of a lifetime, picking and eating and playing together. Bruce Degen fills this entertaining treasure of a book with lively and joyous wordplay, alliteration, and high-spirited fun, and complements his jazzy, rhyming verse with bright, bold, and engaging illustrations. Imaginations will soar with each page turn as little ones explore the busy artwork, finding something new and special each time they open the book. Perfect for preschoolers, Jamberry is a marvelous mouth-watering, toe tapping, energetic, romp that begs to be read aloud, and is sure to send you off to the kitchen for a jamberry snack of your own. This is a classic to share with family, friends and future generations. "Mountains and fountains/Rain down on me/Buried in berries/What a jam jamboree!"

5-0 out of 5 stars My toddler twins LOVE this book!
I have to admit that when I first read this book, I wasn't too sure what I thought of it. As another reviewer said, it contains a lot of fanciful words: jamberry, moonberry, berryband, and so forth. My twins absolutely LOVE this book, though! To them, it's every bit as good as their favorite Dr. Seuss classic. They enjoy the rhyme and repetition of the words, and love to look through the beautifully illustrated pages to find things they recognize. We have a lot of books, and this is the one that they will ask me to read every day (sometimes more than once). We've nearly worn out one board book by reading and rereading it, so I'm going to buy another for them soon. I highly recommend this book for your toddler!

5-0 out of 5 stars Rooty Tooty Fresh and Fruity!!
Yummy!! A delicious book packed with fruit flavor. Mouth-watering blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries burst from each page, as you float along on rhymes with punch. I eat this book up every time.
This is as good as it gets in a board book for your wee one. The illustrations are gorgeous, and Degan has fun with it too, giving a "hint" of the next page's adventure as the starring duo finish hunting for one fruit and move on in search of the next. Although it's tempting to whip through, singing the rhymes like a song, it's also fun to linger on each page and point out all the things going on in each picture -- hints of the adventure to come and remnants of the one just completed. So, you can read through it a couple of times in each sitting.
This is my favorite of favorites to read to my one-year-old -- luckily, he likes it too!!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Library Book We Had to Buy
We checked this book out of the local library 2 weeks ago. Our 19 month old son fell instantly in love with it. He asks to read it several times a day, he carries it around and talks about it. I logged onto Amazon today to buy a copy because I know he's going to miss it greatly when it goes back to the library next week.

1-0 out of 5 stars no love from our book lover!
My son is 18 months old and LOVES books. He seems to have an insatiable desire for books. I was disappointed by the "busy" illustrations and awkward reading. This is the only book we own that doesn't hold his interest at all. ... Read more


59. The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963 (Yearling Newbery)
by CHRISTOPHER PAUL CURTIS
list price: $6.50
our price: $5.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440414121
Catlog: Book (1997-09-08)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 10377
Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Enter the hilarious world of 10-year-old Kenny and his family, the Weird Watsons of Flint, Michigan. There's Momma, Dad, little sister Joetta, and brother Byron, who's 13 and an "official juvenile delinquent." When Momma and Dad decide it's time for a visit to Grandma, Dad comes home with the amazing Ultra-Glide, and the Watsons set out on a trip like no other. They're heading South. They're going to Birmingham, Alabama, toward one of the darkest moments in America's history.
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Reviews (400)

4-0 out of 5 stars heba heba heba heba
The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963

The Watsons Go To Birmingham-1963 is a magnificent book. I really recommend you reading it. It is filled with fun things and Historical Fiction at the end.

The setting is where the story takes place. It begins in Flint, Michigan. It was very cold and Byron and Buphead teased Kenny a lot. On the road trip, Kenny's mom had planned everything out like where to stay. At the rest stops, Kenny and Byron said that rest stop's restrooms stunk and were really dirty. When they finally got to Birmingham, everyone complained how hot it was. Then there were racial problems. This is how I remembered the setting.

Kenny is very smart but is also very funny. In Chapter 2, he reads a book to Byron's class up side down. Some times Byron tortures Kenny. In Chapter 1, Byron and his friend Buphead threw Kenny around in the snow. Kenny sometimes doesn't believe what Byron says and then does like in Chapter 13. He doesn't believe in the Wool Pooh and then does when he thinks he sees the Wool Pooh. That's how I relate to Kenny Watson.

In the beginning, Byron gets his lips stuck to the car mirror. Then his dad buys the Ultra-Glide and they go on a three-day trip to Birmingham, Alabama. After Kenny seeing the Wool Pooh and to white men bombing Joey's church, the finally go back to Flint.

As I said in the beginning, The Watsons Go To Birmingham-1963 is a very good book. I recommend it to children of all ages.
By Plunky Universe

4-0 out of 5 stars The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963 book review
The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963, by Christopher Paul Curtis, is a great book. It takes place during the Civil rights movement. It is about a Family that lives in Flint, Michigan. The family is made up of Daniel (dad),Wilona (mom), Byron,Kenny, and Joetta, also known as Joey. I think the characters in this story are really interesting. Kenny is smart. He reads stuff to higher grades than he is in. He is also one of the least popular kids in his school. And, he has a lazy eye. Kenny's big brother Byron is a trouble maker. He is known as the god of the school children at Clark elementary. Joetta, Kenny's little sister, likes to protect Byron from her mom. She also believes all the tall tales he makes up. The whole family seems so realistic. Christopher Paul Curtis does something cool with Byron in the book. Byron changes from a trouble-maker to a nice person. He changes because of a true historical event that happened in this story.In the beginning of the story is parents get so mad because of the bad stuff he did. They decide to drive to their grandma Sands house in Birmingham, Alabama. That is how they end up going to Birmingham.

Christopher Paul Curtis has a cool bad guy for the story. When they are in Birmingham, Kenny goes some where he shouldn't go and meets the bad guy of the story,The Wool Pooh. He says that it has a gray body, no face, square feet, square shoulders, and square fingers. Kenny sees the Wool Pooh twice in the story. When he is swimming where he shouldn't and after the historical event. Kenny thinks that it means death.

I think there are some bad things about the book. Christopher Paul Curtis skips the part when they are going back to Flint. There are some other things he doesn't tell about. For example,He doesn't tell when Kenny tells his Mom, Dad, and Byron that Joey is back at Grandma Sands house I give this story four stars. It is a great book to read. One of the morales of this story is how important family is. That is why Byron became changed from a trouble-maker to a nice person. So all in all I think you should definitely read this book. And if you want to find out what the historical event is, read the book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dy-No-Mite!
This book had me lauging one minute, and crying the next. Curtis takes his reader on an adventure with the Watson family, whom coincidentally has family members with which we can all proably relate with in one way or another. I would highly reccommend this book to my fourth grade peers.

5-0 out of 5 stars if you like history books
I read The Watson's go to Birmingham -1963.
The author is Christopher Paul Curtis.
I loved this book . It has 5 characters.
The character that I liked is Byron. Hi's a bully,
But he cares for his brother and sister. Kenny is
a great boy. He likes to hang out with his
brother. Joetta is a four year old girl. She likes to
go to Sunday school at church. Dad is a cool
He likes to decorate the brown bomber(the car). Mom is a women that likes stuff her way.
Whenever they travel she has everything
Ordered in her note book .I Enjoyed this book because it's fun and awesome and I loved it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Review
I read the book The Watsons go to Birmingham - 1963 and found it very interesting and funny. The story is about a boy named Kenneth Watson who has an older brother, Byron, a younger sister, Joetta, a mom, and a dad. They all live in Flint, Michigan. Byron is constantly getting into trouble, so mom and dad decide that he should spend the summer with his grandmother in Birmingham. The whole family has to go on the trip because they can't leave anybody at home. While they are in Birmingham, the church is attacked by white people who throw a stick of dynamite into it. Kenny goes into the church after this and thinks he sees Joetta's shoe, and he thinks that the Whool Pooh, an imaginary evil twin of Winnie the pooh, is trying to kidnap her, so he leaves. When he finds out that Joetta wasn't in the church, he feels guilty because even if she had been in the church he wouldn't have helped her escape the Whool Pooh. After this, they decide to leave Birmingham. When they get back home, Kenneth hides behind the couch in their house and hopes to not feel guilty about not rescuing Joetta. Byron finally (...). I like this book and would recommend it to readers of any age. It is funny and entertaining. For example, one funny part is when Byron tries to kiss his reflection is the car mirror and gets his lips stuck to it. In conclusion, I think the book is amusing though it is sad and is a good book for anyone to read. ... Read more


60. Barnyard Dance! (Boynton on Board)
by Sandra Boynton
list price: $6.95
our price: $6.26
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1563054426
Catlog: Book (1993-10-01)
Publisher: Workman Publishing Company
Sales Rank: 871
Average Customer Review: 4.96 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Everybody sing alongóbecause it-s time to do-si-do in the barnyard with a high-spirited animal crew! From Boynton on Board, the bestselling series of board books with over 2.6 million copies in print, here is BARNYARD DANCE, with Sandra Boynton-s twirling pigs, fiddle-playing cows, and other unforgettable animals. Extra-big, extra-fat, and extra-fun, BARNYARD DANCE features lively rhyming text and a die-cut cover that reveals the wacky characters inside. Guaranteed to get kids and adults stomping their feet. Main selection of the Children-s Book-of-the-Month Club. Winner of the 1994 Gold Medal from the National Parenting Publications Award. Suitable for ages 1-4. 828,000 copies in print.

... Read more

Reviews (83)

5-0 out of 5 stars My Personal Favorite Board Book
This book has such great rhythm and rhyme! Nothing but silly fun! This book can easily be read in a kind of song manor, which is a lot of fun for toddlers. Your child will not only have fun, but learn about different animals and some verbs too, like stomp, clap, twirl, bow and more!

"Stomp your feet and clap your hands,
everybody ready for a barnyard dance."

5-0 out of 5 stars A favorite Boynton book - read it and act it out as you go.
Sandra Boynton books are, in my opinion, the best set of children's board books around. In Barnyard Dance, our imaginations soar as my 2 year old daughter and I act out each page. Not only is Barnyard Dance a cute story, but it is a fun book to do your own barnyard dance to! I highly recommend any title by Sandra Boynton.

5-0 out of 5 stars GREAT BOOK!!!!
I bought this book for my son when he was 8 months old. Now he's 2 and he picks the books to read before bed. Every night this is the first book he picks from the shelf and we must read it several times. He loves the rhythm, words, and pictures. He learned his animals from this book. I highly recommend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful square-dance for the farm!
I love the square-dance caller's rhythm of this book. It's so easy to memorize, sing, chant, make silly noises with. My 2 year old son says "Read it again!" at the end every single time. My six year old daughter dances around while I read it to him. Everyone is equally entertained by this book: listener, observer, and most definitely reader! A true 5 star book.

4-0 out of 5 stars My 2 year old loves it.
My two year old girl literally "bows" to the horse and "bows" to the cow and then she twirls and it goes on and on. She interacts with this book every time we read it. It's so upbeat and fun. We first took it out of the library and it broke my heart to have to return it. So I came here and ordered her her very own copy. I can't wait for her baby brother to engage in this book soon too. ... Read more


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