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    $7.19 $3.91 list($7.99)
    1. Goodnight Moon (Board Book)
    $8.96 $3.95 list($9.95)
    2. The House on Mango Street (Vintage
    $7.99 $1.24
    3. The Little Engine That Could
    $8.99 $3.82 list($9.99)
    4. Pat the Bunny (Touch and Feel
    $8.10 $5.56 list($9.00)
    5. The Little Prince
    $6.29 $1.90 list($6.99)
    6. Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)
    $4.99 $1.80
    7. Five Children and It (Puffin Classics
    $6.29 $1.30 list($6.99)
    8. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    $6.00 $2.00
    9. Half Magic
    $10.87 $8.49 list($15.99)
    10. The Giving Tree
    $25.15 $20.99 list($41.93)
    11. The Chronicles of Narnia Boxed
    $8.09 $4.99 list($8.99)
    12. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
    $5.95 $1.99
    13. Tuck Everlasting
    $6.50 $3.11
    14. The Phantom Tollbooth
    $5.85 $2.96 list($6.50)
    15. A Wrinkle in Time
    $7.19 $2.71 list($7.99)
    16. The Runaway Bunny
    $9.00 $3.24 list($12.00)
    17. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (Oprah's
    $5.39 $2.50 list($5.99)
    18. The Outsiders
    $25.20 $19.95 list($40.00)
    19. The 20th-Century Children's Book
    $100.80 $100.00 list($160.00)
    20. The World of Peter Rabbit Original

    1. Goodnight Moon (Board Book)
    by Margaret Wise Brown
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0694003611
    Catlog: Book (1991-09-30)
    Publisher: HarperFestival
    Sales Rank: 110
    Average Customer Review: 4.57 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Perhaps the perfect children's bedtime book, Goodnight Moon is a short poem of goodnight wishes from a young rabbit preparing for--or attempting to postpone--his own slumber. He says goodnight to every object in sight and within earshot, including the "quiet old lady whispering hush." Clement Hurd's illustrations are simple and effective, alternating between small ink drawings and wide, brightly colored views of the little rabbit's room.

    Finding all of the items mentioned throughout the book within the pictures is a good bedtime activity--a reappearing little mouse is particularly pesky. By the end of the little rabbit's goodnight poem, the story has quieted to a whisper, and the drawings have darkened with nightfall. As you turn the last page, you can expect a sleepy smile and at least a yawn or two. (Picture book) ... Read more

    Reviews (287)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A little rabbit goes to bed but is not at all tired...
    Generation after generation of children who have not wanted to go to sleep at night when told it was their bedtime have found an endearing manifesto of not being sleepy in "Goodnight Moon." Margaret Wise Brown poetry keeps things as simple as Clement Hurd's illustrations, which show a little rabbit who insists on saying "Goodnight" to pretty much every single object in the bedroom (including the old lady whispering "hush"). Eventually the little rabbit runs out of things to say "Goodnight" to and falls asleep. But we know that this scene will be repeated the next night and the night after that, when your child demands that you read this timeless children's classic from 1947 to them over and over again. There are certain books that every child should have in their library and if "Goodnight Moon" is not at the top of that list it has to be very close to the top for over half a century. Before this decade is up I am sure I will pass it on to a third generation of my family. How many generations is your family up to?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Bedtime Book
    My daughter received this book as a gift for her 1 yr birthday(She is now 22 mos old and still loves this book. We read it every night before bed). At first, when I read it, I wasn't impressed with it at all. But then, the more we read it, I became wrapped up in the story through my daughter's enthusiasm of finding the little mouse in the pages and realized the sheer joy of her learning experience through reading and imagination. The lines are very short so little ones won't be easily bored waiting for the page to turn and it is so much fun for her to find the little mouse in each colored page, to watch her put her little finger to her mouth and whisper 'hush' with the little old lady in the corner, and to point out other objects in the room.

    The story is based on a little bunny going to bed and saying goodnight to various items in his room and with each turn of the page, the light in his room grows dimmer. '...Goodnight mush/And goodnight to the old lady whispering "hush"/Goodnight stars/Goodnight air/Goodnight noises everywhere' and with that the room is dark and the bunny is fast asleep. The book alternates between color pages and black & white pages during the story. The pages show full color the little bunny's room where a little mouse hides in different areas and is waiting to be found by little searching eyes. Then the pages alternate to black and white that show other items that are found in the room that the bunny says goodnight to.

    I have also found that if my daughter is hyper before bedtime, this book helps calm her down through the repetition of saying goodnight, by lowering my voice with each page that we turn and it actually helps prepare her for bed just like the bunny.

    This is a very short, very colorful and very fun book for little ones. I highly recommend it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Must-Have Bedtime Book...
    This book was one of our bedtime rituals. When I was weaning my son from frequent night-time breastfeedings, we would read this book at bedtime every evening. Sometimes I could hear him "reading" this book to himself in the dark if he was still have trouble settling down. Often, we read it in unison, and chuckled together. It's sweet and slow and comforting, and simply taking the time to cuddle and read it has a peaceful effect on both parent and child.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Still a Favorite
    I first read this book when my son was a year old. The simple words and colorful illustrations made it one of his favorite bedtime rituals. The book focuses on a little rabbit going to bed and saying "good night" to everything in his room as well as the moon outside. In addition to reading the book, I would ask my son to point to the things the rabbit was saying "Good Night" to. Especially finding the little mouse on every color page. (I believe he's on everyone). We used it like an identification game as well as a story. Simple words that rhyme like "Hush" and "Mush" are easy for little ones to learn and repeat.
    An interesting aspect of the illustrations is that the room is drawn darker as the book nears its end. The magic was still there the other night when I read it to my son who is now 3 and a half. Like other books by this author, there is an essentially childlike quality coupled with that "hard to pin down" quality of a classic.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If your child loves the original, they'll love this as well
    My 21 mo old daughter loves the original "Goodnight Moon" and loves to play with the little acessories and popout features in this book. The story is the same and there is "lots to do" while turning the pages. ... Read more


    2. The House on Mango Street (Vintage Contemporaries)
    by SANDRA CISNEROS
    list price: $9.95
    our price: $8.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0679734775
    Catlog: Book (1991-04-03)
    Publisher: Vintage
    Sales Rank: 3920
    Average Customer Review: 3.41 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Told in a series of vignettes stunning for their eloquence, The House on Mango Street is Sandra Cisneros's greatly admired novel of a young girl growing up in the Latino section of Chicago.Acclaimed by critics, beloved by children, their parents and grandparents, taught everywhere from inner-city grade schools to universities across the country, and translated all over the world, it has entered the canon of coming-of-age classics.

    Sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous, The House on Mango Street tells the story of Esperanza Cordero, whose neighborhood is one of harsh realities and harsh beauty.Esperanza doesn't want to belong--not to her rundown neighborhood, and not to the low expectations the world has for her.Esperanza's story is that of a young girl coming into her power, and inventing for herself what she will become.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (437)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not exactly what I expected
    I really expected something more from House on Mango Street, especially after reading such glowing reviews.
    It's a creative, inventive, courageous piece of writing, painting the coming of age of a young Latina in an ethnically mixed, lower class Chicago neighborhood. Each 'chapter,' some of which are only a few sentences in length, is a little vignette of a different aspect of Esperanza's life in her home, on the street, with relatives, at school, and in her wider neighborhood.
    It's written in the child's voice, and maybe that's one of what I would call the books difficulties. A persistent child narrator's voice can become cloying, and it's necessarily limited by 'what the child can know.' I guess that's another way of saying the voice got a little tiresome after while.
    But that very voice is also part of the book's strong appeal...
    I dunno...You'll have to read it yourself, something that's easily done at one sitting.
    House on Mango Street is a very interesting experiment, bound to be dissected and discussed in writing classes for a long time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A top book in the genre
    There is a growing genre of books by people of Latin, Asian, and African-American heritage, describing their lives and cultures, often in juxtaposition to the Anglo mainstream they may or may not have dealings with. The House on Mango Street fits into this genre, and at the same time extends it. Cisneros writes with a deeply personal voice. At her core she is an individual, a watcher, as are most children; she happens also to be a girl in a Latino neighborhood. The people and events in this community are distilled through her eyes into small fables, moral lessons, and epiphanies: the moments and connections that shape a child into the adult she will become. The rhythmic songs of rope-jumpers, a drunk on the street, the potency of one's first pair of high-heeled shoes, the cruelty and kindness of friends; she takes them all in, using everything as food to nourish her dream of someday having her own house. It's not surprising that the adult Seasoners indeed does, nor that its eccentricity puts some of her neighbors on edge - but those are stories from other books of hers, equally worth reading.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Title
    Just an obnoxious test... ignore this

    1-0 out of 5 stars AAAAAHHHHHH!!!!! BORING CRAP
    This book is a complete nightmare. Sandra Cisneros gets a bunch of credit for her fantastic writting, when she really needs to take a trip back to 1st grade and learn to put quotation marks in front of sentences that somebody is saying. She needs to indent, and make her vignettes longer than the mostly 2 paragraph long ones the book beholds. I'm only reading this crappy book because I have to, and believe me, it is all a waste of time, and the 11 dollars I paid for it at Barnes & Noble.
    Believe me, Sandra Cisneros is not the great writter she could be when she wrote this peace of s**t.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable book, for those who are ready
    It's sad that teachers are making high schoolers read _The House on Mango Street_. Having read their scathing reviews, I see that most high school students are not ready for this book. I'm thankful that I wasn't exposed to it until I was in college and able to appreciate its themes. The book is written from a child's perspective, yet it explores areas of life which many younger people don't feel comfortable exploring, which is understandable. This isn't a book for everyone, but it's a gem nonetheless and filled with wisdom, there for anyone who cares to recognize it. ... Read more


    3. The Little Engine That Could
    by Watty Piper, George Hauman, Doris Hauman
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0448405202
    Catlog: Book (1978-06-01)
    Publisher: Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1042
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    The unknowing progenitor of a whole generation of self-help books, Wally Piper's The Little Engine That Could is one of the greatest tales of motivation and the power of positive thinking ever told. In this well-loved classic, a little train carrying oodles of toys to all of the good boys and girls is confronted with a towering, seemingly impassable mountain. As nicely as they ask, the toys cannot convince the Shiny New Engine or the Big Strong Engine--far too impressed with themselves--to say anything but "I can not. I can not." It is left up to the Little Blue Engine to overcome insurmountable odds and pull the train to the other side. The Little Engine That Could is an entertaining and inspirational favorite, and the Little Blue Engine's rallying mantra "I think I can--I think I can" will resonate for a lifetime in the head of every child who hears it. (Ages 4 to 8)) ... Read more

    Reviews (41)

    5-0 out of 5 stars History of Little Engine that Could
    When I began reading this book to my kids, I was suprised that the broken down engine and the little engine that can were both female, while the unhelpful engines are male. I remembered the little engine being male. I was interested in the feminist message of such an classic children's story. A little research on the web gave a lot of info. Apparently, this version of the story was published in 1930 with the male and female references as they are in this current printing. This story was pulled from an slightly earlier version in which the characters were all gender neutral. If you'd like to learn more about the historical background, you may want to look at http://tigger.uic.edu/~plotnick/littleng.htm which does a nice job of giving an historical overview of the evolution of this wonderful tale of self strength.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Too bad it is abridged
    The current self-help genre tends to be dwelling on hurts and self-pity, then finding magical solutions. Our Little Engine just has healthy self-confidence and determination. And please don't stress even that when reading it to the kids who will love it, since they find their own more imaginative interpretations.

    The unabridged version is a lifetime favourite of mine, and, for classroom use or that with older children, find a copy at all costs. This version does retain much of the essence, however, and is great for the pre-school set. The only "negative" I can think of is that the kids so love the repetition that parents may grow a bit tired of the daily requests for it to be re-read, especially if the particular child wants to hear only certain sections (I knew one who always wanted "the clown part," the other "the food part.")

    The same enjoyable repetition makes this a favourite story to read to children in primary grades. Yes, be sure you don't stop the kids from all joining in "I think I can..."

    This remains one book that every favourite kid of mine receives as a present. If it disappoints any of your children, that will be a first, in my experience!

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Little Engine that Could
    This story is a childrens classic. A wonderful tale about a little helpful train that overcomes great physical adversity through sheer will power. A great moral teaching story for young impressionable children. This story teaches our children especially our daughters that they too can be successful if they
    work hard and think positive. This is a story I'll read to my daughter many times. The little engine represent a positive female role model without flaunting its femininity. In fact I had forgotten the engine was female until I read it again recently. A great story worth checking out.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A CHILDRENS SUCCESS CLASSIC
    As a parent of three, one of the most important things I can give my children is motivation.

    The attitude that he or she CAN DO ANYTHING IF THEY THINK THEY CAN DO IT.

    By reading this story over and over again, the message will go into their conscious and subconscious mind and my hope is that they will follow their dreams and become all they are able to become.

    Zev Saftlas, Author of Motivation That Works: How to Get Motivated and Stay Motivated

    What better gift can a parent give their child than believing in them?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect! My daughers were both mesmerized.
    My second daughter has now fallen in love with this book, at about the same age as her older sister did (3 and 1/2). So, we are reading it every single night, often multiple times. If her older sister is any guide, this will probably continue for about 6 months.

    This is simply an absolutely perfect children's story. The plot has some tension to keep the child's interest to the end of the story. The story shows how small people (or trains, if you want to be literal) with a good heart (like a child) can make a big difference in the world. The illustrations are extremely colorful and magical. The only fault (this is incredibly minor) I can find is the one-time usage of the word "indignantly", which no child is going to know. Other than that, I wouldn't change any other word or aspect of this book.

    It's also a fun story for an adult to read outloud. I enjoy using different voices for the arrogant Shiny New Engine, the gruff Freight Engine, and the tired Old Engine, as well as helpful Little Blue Engine's famous repetitive cadence ("I think I can").

    It will be a sad day when my youngest outgrows this book. Don't deny yourself or your child the pleasure - buy it! ... Read more


    4. Pat the Bunny (Touch and Feel Book)
    by DOROTHY KUNHARDT
    list price: $9.99
    our price: $8.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0307120007
    Catlog: Book (2001-05-01)
    Publisher: Golden Books
    Sales Rank: 389
    Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    For over 50 years, Pat the Bunny has held a special place as Baby'sFirst Book...and as a perennial bestseller.Since its first publication in1940, Pat the Bunny has sold over 6 million copies, making it the number 6 all- time bestselling children's hardcover book*.Play along with Paul and Judy asthey smell the flowers, look in the mirror, play peek-a-boo, and, of course, patthe bunny.

    *Publisher's Weekly, 2/5/96 ... Read more

    Reviews (63)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Simply the Best Ever
    Some things become life experiences not only for one's child, but for oneself. "Pat the Bunny" is such a book. It is so dear, so simple, and so very, very perfect that it is deceptive. It really can teach a very young baby about textures and colors and the fact that the world is a varied and wonderful place.

    When my first child (now almost 18) was less than 6 months old, I would take her tiny hand and place her chubby fingers on each different texture...the bunny, the cloth, and of course my favorite...Daddy's scratchy beard! (a piece of sandpaper). I don't know how much of the simple and sweet words my daughter absorbed, but she was cuddled in my arms, being rocked (our favorite place to read) and she definitely liked to touch the textures. Now the interesting thing is that the book remained special, and when she should have outgrown it, she did not. It remained in the collection. I think that's because it is just so peaceful and simple, remnants of a former time.

    If you are expecting, if one of your friends has a new baby, if you are a grandparent or a loving aunt or uncle, you cannot give a better book for a new baby. It will be that baby's cherished book in short order. Guaranteed. One word of warning, though. Make sure that you are buying the original, with all the textures. I saw one oversized board book version the other day, and its only texture was the cotton of the bunny, which carried through to each page. No no!! We need everything right for this book of a lifetime.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This Bunny's a FAVORITE!!
    Our son inherited two identical copies of Pat the Bunny from his big sister (who adored the book equally), and he quickly learned all the fun things he could do with Paul and Judy. His favorite thing to do is to play peek-a-boo with Paul. We are disappointed that the binding has failed on both copies, but gladly, it is due to them being so LOVED. In order to keep our now-one-year-old boy happy, we are buying him a copy of his own for Christmas (and maybe a spare for the diaper bag for outings).A true favorite story-simple and fun! And a great gift to receive for a new baby.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Pat the Bunny
    My daughter enjoys this book from time to time. I, on the other hand, can't get past the smell of the flowers in it. I gag everytime I get near it. The book is somewhat bland. I wouldn't really reccoment it to buy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cute
    This is a cute classic book. It is fun to read and fuzzy bunny is fun for kids.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Eh...
    It's a cute book, but very dated. Not very sturdy either. I cringe whenever my son reaches for it, but that's not too often, as it doesn't hold his interest very well. ... Read more


    5. The Little Prince
    list price: $9.00
    our price: $8.10
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0156012197
    Catlog: Book (2000-05-15)
    Publisher: Harvest Books
    Sales Rank: 1637
    Average Customer Review: 4.55 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry first published The Little Prince in 1943, only a year before his Lockheed P-38 vanished over the Mediterranean during a reconnaissance mission. More than a half century later, this fable of love and loneliness has lost none of its power. The narrator is a downed pilot in the Sahara Desert, frantically trying to repair his wrecked plane. His efforts are interrupted one day by the apparition of a little, well, prince, who asks him to draw a sheep. "In the face of an overpowering mystery, you don't dare disobey," the narrator recalls. "Absurd as it seemed, a thousand miles from all inhabited regions and in danger of death, I took a scrap of paper and a pen out of my pocket." And so begins their dialogue, which stretches the narrator's imagination in all sorts of surprising, childlike directions.

    The Little Prince describes his journey from planet to planet, each tiny world populated by a single adult. It's a wonderfully inventive sequence, which evokes not only the great fairy tales but also such monuments of postmodern whimsy as Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities. And despite his tone of gentle bemusement, Saint-Exupéry pulls off some fine satiric touches, too. There's the king, for example, who commands the Little Prince to function as a one-man (or one-boy) judiciary:

    I have good reason to believe that there is an old rat living somewhere on my planet. I hear him at night. You could judge that old rat. From time to time you will condemn him to death. That way his life will depend on your justice. But you'll pardon him each time for economy's sake. There's only one rat.
    The author pokes similar fun at a businessman, a geographer, and a lamplighter, all of whom signify some futile aspect of adult existence. Yet his tale is ultimately a tender one--a heartfelt exposition of sadness and solitude, which never turns into Peter Pan-style treacle. Such delicacy of tone can present real headaches for a translator, and in her 1943 translation, Katherine Woods sometimes wandered off the mark, giving the text a slightly wooden or didactic accent. Happily, Richard Howard (who did a fine nip-and-tuck job on Stendhal's The Charterhouse of Parma in 1999) has streamlined and simplified to wonderful effect. The result is a new and improved version of an indestructible classic, which also restores the original artwork to full color. "Trying to be witty," we're told at one point, "leads to lying, more or less." But Saint-Exupéry's drawings offer a handy rebuttal: they're fresh, funny, and like the book itself, rigorously truthful. --James Marcus ... Read more

    Reviews (335)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Magical, mystical, majestical
    This review refers to the T.V.F Cuiffe translation which I was unable to find on Amazon. I don't know anything about the Howard translation.

    This amazing book was written supposedly for children and it reads like a children's story. It's also beautifully illustrated. However, it meant much more to me when I reread it as an adult than as a child. I could say the book is an alegory and that it contains much symbolic value but it would debase it's melancholy beauty to attach academic terms to it.

    The story is about the narrator, a pilot just like the author, being stuck in the Sahara waiting to repair his plane. He meets the little prince who hails from a tiny planet that's not much bigger than him. The book relates his solitary existence at his home, his travels through the other asteroids, inhabited by single individuals such as the Geographer (which can be seen as archetypes) to his arrival on earth culminating in the relationship with the pilot.

    Again, saying that the book is about life, loneliness, love, friendship and finding one's true nature would be missing the point (one which the book beautifully mentions through the mouth of a fox) that the most important things are not said in words. The book has no "themes" as such but it's a fully integrated work. The pictures are as important as the text and contain so much kindness, humour and irony (as does the work itself) that this work is an absolute must.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If you tame me...
    Something confuses me about "The Little Prince". Here we have a small simple tale that takes about half an hour to read. It is quiet and philosophical. The plot, such as it is, follows a the Little Prince and his petite adventures. The Little Prince loves a rose very much, but he must travel about the planets to better understand this love. The book is so lyrical in its simplicity that it's no wonder that it's often given to graduating students each and every year. More so than "Winnie-the-Pooh" or "Oh the Places You'll Go", this book encapsulates the world with pinpoint precision.

    My confusion? Why has this book been repeatedly ruined for kids? Am I the only one who remembers that catastrophe that was, "The Little Prince", an anima television show that played on Nickelodeon in the 1980s? How about the movie, starring Bob Fosse as the snake and Gene Wilder as the fox? How does a book this perfect become so exploited? I can only liken it to other books of its caliber. Like "Alice In Wonderland", the absurd plot elements make the story poignant. And like "Alice" (or the aforementioned Pooh) the book's simple writing is easily "improved" by the adults of the world.

    I don't think "The Little Prince" is ideal children's literature, mind you. Kids may humor their parents by listening to it, but when you sit right down and read the book, it is not gripping stuff. The patronizing tone taken about "grown-ups", the Peter Pan-like elements, etc. all combine to make this a book that is ideally for children without actually saying anything to them directly. This is a book for adults but ostensibly for kids. Few children are going to be fooled by this. They'd rather sink their fangs into something a little more along the lines of "Harry Potter" or Lemony Snicket. But it is a piece of children's literature that will last beyond all our lives. This is a classic for the 20th century, and "The Little Prince" fully deserves to take his place amongst the other classic kid characters encompassed in the cannon. It is an outstanding tale of simply loving small.

    5-0 out of 5 stars nothing is lost with time.
    One of my absolute favorites.

    This book is something you read as a child; it was magical and it held you in ways you could not understand. And there were so many things in it that seemed above your young head. But you think you get them at the time.

    You read it again when you're older....

    and it's all the more magical.

    You understand - completely.

    Everyone should read this book at least twice.

    5-0 out of 5 stars ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS EVER!!!!!
    I read this book in my 5th grade class last year, and I loved it!!! It was so wonderful and really made you think about life, death, and that the things that are really impoortant are invisable! I REALLY SUGGEST YOU READ THIS BOOK!!! It brings you to thinking about imaginary things that everyone dreams about (that are extremely real in this book). So live your biggest dream and READ THIS BOOK!

    2-0 out of 5 stars The Little Prince...I Don't really like it.
    This books is just not my type of book. I did not really get anything from this book because I have to go over the metaphors before I can understand it. Anyways, this book tells the grown ups all over the world that they can still use their imaginations even though they have matured and have a job. This is some connections I heard from Einstein. Einstein said that Imaginations are more important than knowledge because Imagination creates knowledge. This book made me read it even though I wasn't very interested to it because it makes me think deeply of some words that are hard to understand and while I read the book, it reminded me of my childhood because I use to use my imaginations, ofcourse, probably all the kids use their imaginations. Now that I have grown, I forgot about imagining because I've grown up a lot. Just like in the book, when the little prince was growing up, he is losing his imaginations. ... Read more


    6. Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)
    by E. B. White
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0064400557
    Catlog: Book (1974-05-15)
    Publisher: HarperTrophy
    Sales Rank: 5936
    Average Customer Review: 4.66 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Beloved by generations, Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little are two of the most cherished stories of all time. Now, for the first time ever, these treasured classics are available in lavish new collectors' editions. In addition to a larger trim size, the original black-and-white art by Garth Williams has been lovingly colorized by renowned illustrator Rosemary Wells, adding another dimension to these two perfect books for young and old alike.

    Whether you are returning once again to visit with Wilbur, Charlotte, and Stuart, or giving the gift of these treasured stories to a child, these spruced-up editions are sure to delight fans new and old. The interior design has been slightly moderated to give the books a fresh look without changing the original, familiar, and beloved format. Garth Williams's original black-and-white line drawings for the jacket of Stuart Little have also been newly colorized by the celebrated illustrator Rosemary Wells. These classics return with a new look, but with the same heartwarming tales that have captured readers for generations.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (306)

    5-0 out of 5 stars among the best in children's literature
    As we all know, there are those certain books in the world that literally every single child in the world should read, and "Charlotte's Web" is a perfect example of must-read literature. It's such a classic story, not to mention a beautiful one. E.B. White creates such memorable characters and describes them very well. When a little girl named Fern hears that some baby pigs have been born in the barn, she is terrified to hear that her father plans to kill the littlest one, the useless "runt." Fern talks her father into letting her adopt the pig. She names it Wilbur and treats it as her own. Then the time comes for the pig to be more on its own, so Fern is forced to sell him to her uncle, who owns a farm. Wilbur feels lonely and out of place until he meets Charlotte, a kind spider who befriends him and, eventually, saves his life. Beautiful, beautiful story of friendship and courage. It contains characters and a fun plot that any child can enjoy. I read this book for the first time when I was in fourth grade, and I recently helped a little second-grader that I baby-sit for with her "Charlotte's Web" comprehension questions. It brought memories back. This is one of those books that you remember for the rest of your life once you've read it. It's excellent, and well worth the money.

    5-0 out of 5 stars 'O best beloved'
    This is a book which should have ten stars, not just five.

    Faced with the impending slaughter of Wilbur, the runt piglet she has saved and nursed to health, Fern is appalled that she has fattened him for the axe, and commits herself passionately to save her beloved animal. So, too, is Charlotte, the spider who inhabits the barn with him, and woh turns her web into a sort of billboard/oracle which astonishes (and admonishes) the community by weaving words that inform them that this is no ordinary pig! She recruits Templeton the Rat and the rest of the animals in her battle for Wilbur's life...will they succeed? or will Wilbur be a nine-days' wonder? and what will be the ultimate cost?

    This is the best present I can imagine to inspire a young reader; it's a wonderful tale of courage against the odds; it's warm, sad, and delightfully funny, and 30 years after I read it in fourth grade, I still get a lump in my throat thinking about it. A special, special book. (With wonderful original illustrations!)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Book about Friendship
    I must confess that having just read "Animal Farm" shortly before reading this book, I was a little hesitant about excepting this as a pure children's story without any hidden political agenda. I kept expecting the talking animals to rise up behind the pig and take over the farm. Rest assured however there was none of that, as E.B. White does a good job of keeping the story at a purely kids level.

    Wilber is the runt in a litter of pigs, and Mr. Arable the farmer is going to take him out back and have him slaughtered since as he says, "He is small and weak and will never amount to anything." His young daughter Fern who is eight, hears this and requests that her father give the pig to her to raise instead. The father wishing to prove a point to her, allows this so long as she promises to do all the work to take care of it. To Mr. Arable's surprise Fern does an excellent job of raising Wilber and he turns out to be "Some Pig", proving that even though he was very small he still could amount to something.

    As Wilber grows bigger the Arable's can no longer support feeding him, so Mr. Arable has Fern sell Wilber to her uncle Mr. Zuckerman who has a farm down the road. There she goes and visits Wilber every day. Being young I guess gives you the ability to sit and listen to the animals more intently than adults, and by doing so Fern is able to hear that the animals can actually talk and she understands them. (Being the father of two girls who are 7 and 5, I'd have to disagree somewhat with this logic as my girls never sit still, and certainly have a hard time listening at times, but for the sake of the story we'll just give them the benefit of the doubt.)

    Anywise Wilber meets all the other animals in the barn who are very nice, but none of them are really his close friend. He becomes lonely and wishes for a friend. A gray spider named Charlotte answers his prayers and after introducing herself, she becomes Wilber's best friend.

    When the other animals tell Wilber that Mr. Zuckerman is just fatting him up to eat him for Christmas, this makes him greatly disturbed. Charlotte being a great friend promises to do all she can to make Wilber so important to Mr. Zuckerman that he would change his mind. She sets a plan in action to weave messages into her web proclaiming how great the pig is, and by doing so she hopes to trick the adults into believing it as well. With the help of Templeton the rat she obtains some newspaper clippings and begins her work.

    Each new message in the web is looked upon as miracle, but rather than looking for any religious connection, the folks in the town just believe they have a very famous pig on their hands and accept it at face value.

    The suspense builds as Zuckerman takes Wilber to the Fair. If he can just win an award there, Charlotte knows his life will be saved. Charlotte and Templeton have to stow away in Wilber's crate just to accompany him to the Fair, and then when they get there the pig in the stall next to Wilber is twice as big and looks to be a shoe in for first prize.

    This book was obviously written at a much simpler time in history. At the Fair grounds the adults send the kids off on their own. Besides Fern who is 8, she has a little brother Avery who is only 5. After giving them all kinds of warnings such as not to eat too much, and to stay out of the sun, to not get dirty, and to be careful on the rides, the mother stops and says to the husband, "Do you think they'll be all right?" and he responds, "Well they have to grow up sometime." (None of the warnings were about staying away from strangers.) Of course when the kids returned they hadn't stayed out of the sun and were hot, and completely dirty, but they had fun.

    Fern meets a boy at the Fair, and starts to grow up a bit as playing with him starts to seem like more fun than talking to bunch of animals.

    It is a great book about overcoming obstacles even though you are very small, growing up, and most of all friendship. My girls loved the book as well, and especially seemed to like the illustrations by Garth Williams.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Quality literature for children
    A spider saves the life of a friendly pig by spinning accolades about him in her web, thereby producing a miracle that impresses people for miles around. This is a beautifully written little story for children that has real literary quality. The prose is excellent. Note in particular the simple but lovely descriptions of the passing seasons that Mr. White writes. The themes include friendship, coping with the loss of loved ones, and the realization that life goes on, changed but still worth living.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best book ever
    I think this is a really good book.It was about a pig and a spider who were vary good friends. My favorite part of the story was when they went to the Fair. The book was great. ... Read more


    7. Five Children and It (Puffin Classics - the Essential Collection)
    by E. Nesbit, H. R. Millar
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0140367357
    Catlog: Book (1996-12-01)
    Publisher: Puffin Books
    Sales Rank: 87506
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    To Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother, the house in the country promises a summer of freedom and play.But when they accidently uncover an accident Psammead--or Sand-fairy--who has the power to make wishes come true, they find themselves having the holiday of a lifetime, sharing one thrilling adventure after another.

    Asleep since dinosaurs roamed the earth, the ill-tempered, odd--looking Psammead --with his spider-shaped body, bat's ears, and snail's eyes --grudgingly agrees to grant the children one wish per day.Soon, though the children discover that their wishes have a tendancy to turn out quite differnetly than expected. Whatever they wish whether it's to fly like a bird, live in a mighty castle, or have an immense fortune --something goes terribly wrong, hilariously wrong.

    Then an accidental wish has horrible consequences, and the children are faced with a difficult choice: to let an innoncent manbe charged with a crime or to lose for all time their gift of magical wishes.Five Children and It is on of E. Nesbit's most beloved tales of enchantment.This deluxe gift edition, featuring twelve beautiful watercolor paintings by Caldecott medalist Paul O. Zelinsky, is sure to be treasured addition to every family's library.

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    Reviews (16)

    4-0 out of 5 stars My review of "Five Children and It"
    This book is about Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother who discover a Psammead,
    or Sand-fairy, who agrees to grant the children one wish per day.
    Soon, their wishes start to turn quite unlike what they expected.
    Then, an accidental wish has terrible consequences, and the kids
    are faced with a hard choice: to let an innocent man be charged
    with a crime, or to lose their gift of magical wishes.

    I read this book in one day, and I thought it was pretty good.
    This book turned out to be fairly interesting.
    I would probably read "Five Children and It" again.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Sandy delight
    This 1902 fantasy, a gift from my parents when I was in fourth or fifth grade, features an irritable Psammead whom Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother dig up in a sand pit. Then the magic begins. The sand-fairy does not like granting wishes, and his misshapen body with bat's ears and snail's eyes bloats when he does. The wishes, lasting only until sunset, all take unexpected, funny turns.

    The sand-fairy and other personalities and Victorian details render the magic entirely real-world, believable. This was my favorite children's book and I relived the delight when I found a copy to share with my own children. That this volume is illustrated by one of my favorite people from one of my favorite families triples the delight.

    The book is too challenging for independent reading for children under 10, but it's a great read-aloud for small children, as are the classics of Frank Baum, E.B. White and C.S. Lewis.

    Edith Nesbit was like J. K. Rowling a single mother in need of a means to support her children. Her books in their era were as popular as Harry Potter in this one. Some of her observations are surprisingly humane. Nesbit's treatment of a clan of Gypsies, for example, transcends the deep prejudice of her time. Not to worry, the book is not preachy or teachy. It's just grand, eloquent fun. Alyssa A. Lappen

    5-0 out of 5 stars Be careful what you wish for...
    E. Nesbit's classic story of about some Edwardian children who find a sand fairy one summer is an unsentimental delight. Each day the odd fairy grants them one magic wish, be it beauty, wealth, great size, etc. which will only last until sunset. Somehow each wish they make turns into a disaster, but through their own cleverness and a bit of luck, the children are able to make each problem work out in the end. Nesbit's writing is particularly full of amusing asides and offbeat humor in this one. Her turns of plot are inventive, and as the plucky children face their outlandish predicaments, it becomes clear that Nesbit has her finger on the pulse of the way real children might think. Her work has held up quite well considering it is over a hundred years old. This novel would be suitable for kids in about fourth or fifth grade.

    3-0 out of 5 stars sadly, this classic does not stand up to the test of time
    Edith Nesbit is a charming writer. She tells her story with wit and humour, and interjects sly digs that engender a wink and a smile, but while the premise is timeless and interesting, the prose is extremely dated, making the book a bit tedious to read for any length of time. Also, the ideas and prejudices exhibited by the characters date the material.

    The five siblings of the title, who have found a Sand-fairy willing to grant them one wish a day, continually make silly wishes that get them into trouble. Their first wish is to be "as beautiful as the day". Right there you get a sense of the book's outdated charm. This is of interest more as a tribute to a talented children's writer of a bygone era rather than for its own sake.

    I wanted to enjoy this classic, but I found it hard slogging through. That is just my opinion, however, but I'd suggest you read a bit of the text before purchasing it unless you're already familiar with, or particularly interested in, author Nesbit.

    Caveat: The occasional black-and-white line drawings are by H.R. Millar, not the Paul Zelinsky watercolors promised in the Editorial Reviews section.

    3-0 out of 5 stars A cynic's delight
    I doubt I would have liked "Five Children and It" even as a child: an ordinary child's troubles are so much more troublesome than the challenges these kids face, it's almost (but not quite) funny. Cyril, Robert, Anthea, and Jane live in a countryside mansion replete with servants, they take trips to toy stores where they can buy whatever their hearts desire (the author informs us that this is the way children ought to be brought up), and inside a gravel-pit they have found a prehistoric sand-fairy that grants them wishes, one each day, but all their wishes have been turning out rotten so far. Well, boo hoo.

    It isn't the concept that bothers me; it is the execution. Baum's and Carroll's heroines face comparable situations, but neither authors' books evoked such negative reactions from me. The reasons why the children's wishes fail I found especially abominable: when peerless beauty is wished for, the maid won't let them in since they look like "eyetalian monkeys"; when wealth is asked for and antique guineas appear by the bushel, the kids are arrested for thieves; when stolen jewellery magically reappears, it is Beale, the gameskeeper, who is immediately and incontrovertibly the chief suspect; when the four wish (accidentally) for the baby to grow up, the Lamb (Or Devereuz, or Hilary, or St Maur, as he should be rightly called) becomes a snappish fop. Nesbit draws miscellaneous moralistic lessons from her tale ("I cannot pretend that stealing is right"), but what use are these lessons when you are arrested whether or not you tell the truth? I would much rather Nesbit turn a cynical eye on the people she is describing, instead of using her keen powers of observations to weave an antithetical yarn.

    At least her prose is reasonable enough. Nesbit's language is lucid, and while her sentence structure is rather sophisticated, it is not unduly so. Sadly, the same cannot be said of her characters. The four children who are the novel's protagonists are essentially the only developed characters, and while they are developed rather well, with plausibility and realism, they are bland. They are honest, noble, polite, friendly, sociable, and well-off; they treat the servants and people of lower station as functionaries, tools, ways of getting from A to B, and so does the author. Thus, there is little desire on the reader's part to come to know them better. They allow little conflict, little empathy. I'm probably the first to levy the charge that they have little wit and, if not for the fact that the wishes disappear at sundown, they would have great difficulty dealing with ther wishes.

    But more about those wishes: it is quite surprising how many of them are accidental. In fact, there is little premeditated wishing going on past chapter six: otherwise, Nesbit would have been hard-pressed to find a reason for the children to wish for marauding Indians. What lesson are we, as readers, to draw from this? "Word your wishes carefully?" I'm reminded of the movie "Big," in where a twelve-year-old wishes to be grown-up to impress an older girl, and instead becomes Tom Hanks and scares the heck out of everybody. Just once I'd like a book where the characters get their hearts' true desires and have to come to terms with THAT. ... Read more


    8. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Puffin Novels)
    by Roald Dahl, Quentin Blake
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0141301155
    Catlog: Book (1998-06-01)
    Publisher: Puffin Books
    Sales Rank: 927
    Average Customer Review: 4.47 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    What happens when the five luckiest children in the entire world walk through the doors of Willy Wonka’s famous, mysterious chocolate factory? What happens when, one by one, the children disobey Mr. Wonka’s orders? In Dahl’s most popular story, the nasty are punished and the good are deliciously, sumptuously rewarded.
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    Reviews (254)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Obedience Counts
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is a great book by Roald Dahl. In this story Charlie Bucket is the main character. He is a poor boy that lives in a shabby house. Charlie and four other children (Mike, Veruca, Violet, and Augustus) all win a tour of Mr. Wonka's secret chocolate factory. Each of the children had found a golden ticket in a Wonka bar. Once they were inside the factory each kid, one by one, got into trouble, except Charlie. Some were so bad they were changed for life! But Charlie obeyed Mr. Wonka and got a big surprise.

    I like this book because it has lots of excitement, action, and humor on every page. My favorite part is the end when Charlie's grandparents, who have not been out of bed in years, are put into Mr. Wonka's great glass elevator screaming and howling. The funny thing about it was they did not know they were going to live with Mr. Wonka in his chocolate factory!

    People can learn to obey from this book. Four children disobeyed Mr. Wonka and got hurt, but Charlie obeyed and got a reward. I recommend this book for kids age six to eleven. It is also fun and exciting so you will definitely want to read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A delectably delicious book....
    This book is so delicious I just want to eat it! "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" might be in many people's eyes a story about morality but to me, it's a story about children and their love of all things sweet, sticky and delicious. Charlie Bucket is the delightful boy (who is so poor all he gets to eat is cabbage soup) who finds a golden ticket in a chocolate bar he buys with money he finds in the street. This ticket entitles him and a companion to enter the wonderful world of Mr. Willy Wonka, the most famous and mysterious chocolate maker that the universe has ever known. Other competition winners include such heinous but wonderfully over the top characters like Augustus Gloop, the greediest boy in the world, and Veruca Salt, a spoilt brat whose father buys 10,000 chocolate bars so she can win a golden ticket. These greedy children and their frightful companions get their come-uppance in various hilarious ways that will have you spluttering with laughter with every page that you turn. Dahl's most famous creation in this book though are the Oompa-Loompas, a race of small people that Mr. Wonka has saved from extinction in the days when he traveled the world. This is a glorious, glorious book, filled with amazing characters, incredible sweets such as the everlasting gobstopper for the child with limited pocket money, and the chewing gum that that is a whole three course meal in itself. Your mouth will be watering throughout the story, and the river of chocolate will make you drool a waterfall. A scrumptious book for everyone no matter what their age.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Everyone will love it
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is brilliant. Roald Dahl's language is eccentric and refreshing. This book is about a boy named Charlie Bucket who lives with his poor family right near a the greatest chocolate factory in the world. When the owner of the chocolate factory, Willy Wonka, sends out five golden tickets, the whole world erupts in chaos. No one has been allowed in the great factory for years, and everyone knows that Wonka is a magician with magic. The story will make anyone hungry for a good candy bar and is easily amusing. I would recomment that everyone read this book at least once, though it was directed towards kids in grades 2-6.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Author Study
    Charlie is in a family that is very poor. He lives in a small cottage with his grandparents and parets. He also lives by a great chocolate factory. Charlie is so poor that he only gets one Willy Wonka bar a year. No one has seen anbody or anthing go in or out of the chocolate factory.
    One day in the newspaper it said that the chocolate factory was opening up. There were five golden tickets on Willy Wonka bars to get into the factory in the whole world. The prize is you get to go into the factory and bring any person of their choice. You have to read the book to see if he gets a golden ticket.
    It was a good book to us because even if you saw the movie the book changed so you didn't know what was coming.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Snozzberries galore...
    There's plenty that adults can learn from children's books. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is such a book. Not only is it a great read, it says something about greed, gluttony, and the dangers of the fantastic.

    The story is probably familiar to many (thanks to the 1971 film adaptation), but the basic plot is this: Willy Wonka, a reclusive, famous (almost Howard Huges-like) owner of the largest candy factory in the world wraps five golden tickets in candy bars and distributes them to the world. No one has been in or out of Wonka's factory in years, but these tickets allow the ticket finders access to it for one day, as well as a lifetime supply of world-famous Wonka candy. Four tickets are quickly found by families who have the money and the means to do so (one of the finder's father even stops production in his factory so that his voluminous workers can unwrap the thousands of candy bars he's purchased in hope of finding one of the tickets). This is discouraging to Charlie Bucket, who comes from a destitute family who eat mostly watery cabbage and boiled potatoes. Charlie only gets one chocolate bar a year for his birthday - his father's job screwing on the tops of toothpaste tubes doesn't bring much income. Charlie's luck changes when he finds a dollar bill in the snow (after his father loses his job in the toothpaste factory the family begins to starve, and Charlie conserves energy by walking slowly, which helps him find the dollar). Luck leads to luck, as Charlie buys two candy bars and the second one contains a golden ticket. Charlie's 95 year-old (wow!) grandfather agrees to accompany Charlie. So, Along with four other spoiled brats and their families, Charlie and Grandpa Joe tour the Wonka factory. Inside, the factory is filled with amazing things, and the spoiled brats show their worst side and also expose the dangerous side of the fantastic. A river of chocolate is great until you fall into it. Trained squirrels are great unless they mistake you for a bad nut and through you in the chute. Chewing gum that tastes and nourishes as though it were an entire three course meal is great as long as the forumla is right and doesn't turn you into a giant blueberry. Being allowed into the Wonka factory is an amazing experience unless you're a spoiled brat who needs to grab, chew, eat, or touch everything you see. In this case being a brat brings dire consequences. The reward for not being a brat is something unbelievable, but the "losers" still get a lifetime supply of candy and chocolate.

    Fans of the film (which is mistitled "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" because Charlie is really supposed to be the hero here) will notice some great differences in the story. The famous "Oompa Loompa" song is not in the book, but they do sing, but they sing longer and more detailed songs than in the movie. One of the songs goes on about the evils of television:

    The most important thing we've learned
    So far as children are concerned,
    Is never, never, NEVER let
    Them near your television set -
    Or better still, just don't install
    The idiotic thing at all.

    They do not sing "Oompa Oompa Ommpity Doo, I've got another problem for you" such as in the movie. They also give credit where credit is due: the brattiness of the kids is also blamed on the parents. So in a way the story also becomes a lesson in parenting. The Oompa Loompas sing:

    For though she's spoiled, and dreadfully so,
    A girl can't spoil herself, you know.

    Alas! you needn't look so far
    To find out who these sinners are.
    They are (and this is very sad)
    Her loving parents, MUM and DAD.

    In this way the Oompa Loompas almost serve the purpose of a Greek chorus. Whenever of the brats "gets it" they sing about the tragedy and probable causes of the event. This book is a very enjoyable read for any age. If you're an adult, don't deprive yourself of great children's books such as this one. If you're a kid, don't deprive your parents of your great books such as this one. Make them read it. Force them to read it. You know you want to. ... Read more


    9. Half Magic
    by Edward Eager
    list price: $6.00
    our price: $6.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0152020683
    Catlog: Book (1999-03-31)
    Publisher: Odyssey Classics
    Sales Rank: 16910
    Average Customer Review: 4.72 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Since Half Magic first hit bookshelves in 1954, Edward Eager’s tales of magic have become beloved classics. Now four cherished stories by Edward Eager about vacationing cousins who stumble into magical doings and whimsical adventures are available in updated hardcover and paperback formats. The original lively illustrations by N. M. Bodecker have been retained, but eye-catching new cover art by Kate Greenaway Medalist Quentin Blake gives these classics a fresh, contemporary look for a whole new generation.
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    Reviews (98)

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite childhood books
    There are some memories from childhood that I can never quite place specifically. Things that linger in memory, but are so faint that they are like a sniff of fresh apple pie from down the street that you can't determine which house it is coming from. I recall reading some "magic" children books--at one time, I thought they were Andre Norton, who had several young adult novels with the word magic in the title, but I was never able to find the exact one. Until I ran across this book in the store, and realized a chapter into it that I was eating apple pie.

    I love this book, but it may be because I remember it so fondly. I've been trying to catch up on children's fantasy the last couple of years--reading E. Nesbit, Norton Juster, P.L. Travers, E.L. Konigsburg--and, of them all, Eager is my favorite. In Half Magic, fantasy is rolled with some of the logic of science fiction, in that the wishes that the magic coin gives the children only occurs in halves, and they must figure out how to use it. As children, they are quite believable--maybe not as realistic as Nesbit, but not the Bobsey Twins either.

    I should note that Eager was himself a fan of Nesbit's, and his stories do resemble her's in some ways. His affinity for her is clearly laid out here, where the children visit the library and one of their favorite books is The Enchanted Castle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A jumping-off point for years of fantasy enjoyment
    I first read this book at the age of 10. I am now 45 and have not changed my opinion that it is one of the most delightful books for children ever written. It involves four fatherless children and a magic charm, which brings many forms of magic to enrich and improve their lives. The story is written with humor and enormous imagination. I couldn't wait to get back to the library to read all the other Edward Eager books it had. Noting that Mr. Eager always gave credit to Edith Nesbit as his inspiration, I also read all the Edith Nesbit books available. I have continued to re-read them throughout my life; I have read them to my kids, and intend to read them to my grandkids. The Bodecker drawings carry the stories beautifully. I now work at a public library and recommend Half Magic to any child who wants stories about real children and magic, because this book opened such a magical dimension to my own reading life.

    5-0 out of 5 stars MAGICALY ENCHANTED
    Half Magic
    This novel, is about 4 children looking for an adventure. One day the oldest of the children jane finds what she thinks is a nickel. It turns out to be a magical coin. this takes them on the adventure they have been looking for. It takes them to visit sir lancelot, a desert, and turns the littlest one into a ghost. Their mother feels like she is having a nervous breakdown and is becoming mentally ill. Will they get through all these adventures without getting killed by three knights and a half statue, half dog? I give this book 2 thumbs up. It is a marvelous book for children.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Magic divided by two= A Great Fantasy
    Half Magic

    Half Magic is a magical fantasy by Edward Eager. Edward Eager has written several books about magical adventures.
    Half Magic begins when four children find an interesting looking coin in a crack in the ground. Soon they find out that if you wish something while holding the coin it comes half true. The children go on many magical adventures by wishing everything twice. After awhile the magic starts wearing down. The children decide to give the coin to another child so the magic can go on forever and ever.
    I liked this story because it has lots of different settings. If you don't like fantasy very much you could enjoy this book because it travels into history and takes you through some historical events. I would recommend this book to a third grader up to a sixth grader who likes magic and adventures.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Magical Book
    A Magical Book
    Half Magic
    By: Edward Eager

    Half Magic is about 4 children, Jane, Mark, Martha, and Katharine who get a magical coin that only works by halves. Jane the oldest always seems to be different from her siblings. Because she doesn't appear to agree with them much. Mark the only boy and is the second oldest child, doesn't mind much about being the only man around the house and doesn't become annoyed with his sisters much theat often although he wishes to have a dad. Martha the middle child is always ignored by her family. But she is let to say her opinions and ideas very often in necessary times. And Katharine the youngest does mostly annoying things to her siblings that might explain for being shoved under a movie theater seat! But Katherine doesn't mind she just choose to sleep through it.
    So these creative children's adventure takes time long ago when movies didn't have any sound and had to be written down. The 4 children's adventures include many things put back in history into Camelot and in the desert. There are man more places that journeys have been taken. Now the old charms to only be worked by halves. The children at first had the coin and coincidently made a wish. But they had not known that the coin had given there wish but only half of it. Then one day when there mother had the coin, she thought it was a nickel and made a wish that she would be home, and only got half of it. She than found herself in the road halfway from home. And there she found a very nice gentleman who gave her a lift there home . Then the children got suspicious and knew what it was now. They had also find out theat you had to wish more than its value to get what you really want. Like " I wish I was twice as far from here.
    They had many more adventures then that besides being half invisible . The nice gentleman got to know the family even more on this incredible journey. I believe the theme is " never make a wish without making it worth twice more than what you really want". As my opinion this book is one of the best book I 've picked up on the library's shelf not even knowing what great things were in the book. ... Read more


    10. The Giving Tree
    by Shel Silverstein
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060256656
    Catlog: Book (1964-06-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
    Sales Rank: 168
    Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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    To say that this particular apple tree is a "giving tree" is an understatement. In Shel Silverstein's popular tale of few words and simple line drawings, a tree starts out as a leafy playground, shade provider, and apple bearer for a rambunctious little boy. Making the boy happy makes the tree happy, but with time it becomes more challenging for the generous tree to meet his needs. When he asks for money, she suggests that he sell her apples. When he asks for a house, she offers her branches for lumber. When the boy is old, too old and sad to play in the tree, he asks the tree for a boat. She suggests that he cut her down to a stump so he can craft a boat out of her trunk. He unthinkingly does it. At this point in the story, the double-page spread shows a pathetic solitary stump, poignantly cut down to the heart the boy once carved into the tree as a child that said "M.E. + T." "And then the tree was happy... but not really." When there's nothing left of her, the boy returns again as an old man, needing a quiet place to sit and rest. The stump offers up her services, and he sits on it. "And the tree was happy." While the message of this book is unclear (Take and take and take?Give and give and give? Complete self-sacrifice is good? Complete self-sacrifice is infinitely sad?), Silverstein has perhaps deliberately left the book open to interpretation. (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

    Reviews (345)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Deeply powerful
    I had read and treasured The Giving Tree as a child, but I had largely forgotten it when I discovered a copy in a children's book store last year. I picked it up and showed it to my friend. "Look," I said. "I remember this book. What a cute story it was." We read it together, in the bookstore, for the first time in many years.

    I nearly cried. What I remembered as a cute and slightly silly children's story is in fact an extraordinarily powerful parable of life and faith. The wisdom and simple power of this book still holds, even after all these years. We have lost a very fine author who wrote some of the greatest children's books in our language.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is Essential Reading For Fans Of Children's Literature
    The Giving Tree, written by Shel Silverstein, is a controversial story for children. People either hate or love it. Like The Little Prince, The Giving Tree ultimately delivers a message which is both moving and profound. The illustrations, rendered in simple black and white line drawings, tell the story of a tree and the little boy who comes to visit her every day. As the story progresses the boy grows into a selfish adult who does nothing but take from the tree. He takes and takes until nothing is left of her but a stump. Finally one day the boy returns as a beaten down old man with no place left to go. The tree, always happy to see him, offers the old man the only thing she has left. She offers her stump for him to rest on. The Giving Tree is a powerful metaphor for the unconditional love parents and children share. Frustrating, sad, and ultimately beautiful, this is a story no child should miss reading.

    Preston McClear, author The Boy Under the Bed

    5-0 out of 5 stars The spirit of giving with nothing expected in return
    This is my favorite book of all time. In fact, I have designed the nursery for my newborn around this book, with the main focus of the room being a mural showcasing the cover. I believe the book shows that giving without expecting anything in return can be fufilling. The last line in the book states this, "and the tree was happy", what better lesson for a parent to teach their child. Sure you can look at the dark side, and focus on the selfishness of the little boy, but I choose not to. Shel Silverstein purposely left the meaning up to the reader for interpretation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Power of Simplicity, Taps into the Deeply Human
    There's not really a "plot" in this story in any traditional sense. It is a series of vignettes in the relationship between a boy and a tree. The symbolism is pretty straightforward, the tree representing parental nurturing, but there is nothing trite about it. This illustrations are simple black-and-white line drawings. Somehow this simple book really packs a punch. All I can really say is that I have never once, ever, in dozens of readings, whether alone or to the kids, made it through this book without crying. It's simply...touching.

    Further Comments: Silverstein was one weird, scary-looking dude. If you're interested in very idiosyncratic people, Google him and you'll be surprised. He has several other children's books with which I'm only vaguely familiar (I remember Where the Sidewalk Ends being on the shelf at my grade school, but I'm not sure if I ever read it. I think it's a collection of poems). I'd love to see some of those reviewed.

    (...)

    5-0 out of 5 stars inspirational
    I first read this book 3 years ago when I started working with children...my reaction was that this kid was a selfish little (...). As I have matured I've realized that children are supposed to be selfish and as a child care worker or parent it is our job to sacrafice everything that we have for the benefit of the child and then to give a little more. Personaly I think the highest point that a parent or teacher can reach is that of a stump. Everytime I feel myself tiring as the kid next to me at the dinner table eats 2 servings of potatos and leaves nothing for me, I picture myself as a stump and I pass them the rolls. ... Read more


    11. The Chronicles of Narnia Boxed Set
    by C. S. Lewis, Cliff Nielsen
    list price: $41.93
    our price: $25.15
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0064471195
    Catlog: Book (1994-07-08)
    Publisher: HarperTrophy
    Sales Rank: 64
    Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Collection includes all seven of the novels in the series. ... Read more

    Reviews (563)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Truly Fantastic
    Clives Staples Lewis has created a mythical world which absolutely captures the human mind. The Chronicles of Narnia contain exciting plots, which all converge upon each other at the finally of the series: The Last Battle. Through out the books weaves the morals and beliefs of Christianity. These books do a wonder job of telling the story of the Bible, from the instantaneous creation of the world to the death of Aslan (Jesus). The way God cares about every one and desires us to enjoy life through Him, to the last battle and final days at the end of the world (of course Lewis did not know what was going to happen, yet it is still an interesting idea). In one of the best written books of all time, the land of Narnia comes alive with lovable and evil characters. The battle between good and evil is made abruptly apparent in this book as a small country goes through its history fighting for what is right. Light and darkness collide in the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe as four kids explore the land which they will rule. For a time it appears as though the evil side emerges victorious; but it is found that the White Witch as not the ability to peer far enough back into the depths time. This book it one of the most important of the set, because contained in it is the most important message of all time. My father used to read the Chronicles of Narnia to me when I was younger, now I read them on my own. When he did this he stressed, Christianity is having the relationship with God, like the youths had with Aslan. I think these are very well written books and I would encourage any one to read. I uphold C.S. Lewis as a great writer of the centuries and I praise his books (all of them) as magnificant.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best fantasy series ever!
    If I could I would give The Chronicles of Narnia 500 stars. The story is fresh and fascinating. The world of Narnia is how our world should be with humans and animals and other fantstical creatures joing together for the greater good.

    The series starts with "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe." Very accurate title because these are the important magical objects in this book. The shell of the story is set during WWII when the children of London are evacuated to the countryside in order to protect them from the air raids. Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy are sent to a country manor where they discover a wardrobe that transports them to the Magical world of Narnia where it is always winter, never Christmas, and even time flows different. We meet Mr. Tumnus the fawn and a kindly beaver couple who help the children escape the dreaded White Witch. Finally there is the incredible Aslan, the lion ruler of Narnia.

    With seven books in the series it is impossible to sum up them all here, but they are all worth reading. My recommendation is to buy the series and read it to your children (that way you don't have to feel guilty that you are enjoying the books as much as they are). Or just buy it for the magical feeling of being young and full of imagnination.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This boxed set is the BEST way to get this CLASSIC
    Over the last century, C.S. Lewis' Narnia Chronicles have become among the most beloved works of children's literature ever published, and with good reason. The seven volumes of this series offer stories that are absolutely timeless, fairy tales mixing adventurous journeys, marvelous characters, mythical creatures, terrible evils, and moral lessons. That they are well told only helps them stand the test of time.

    This boxed set is simply gorgeous, with attractive covers and nice layouts - plus you get the books individually, which is good for children who may not have the stamina to hold up that giant collected edition.

    Each of the seven volumes can be read as an independent story, yet each are linked together by reoccurring themes and characters. Together the separate books form a unified whole, the grand and epic tale that is the Narnia Chronicles. Only "The Horse And His Boy" stands alone as a tale outside the core story arc, though there are cameos by core characters. Over the course of the six core volumes, the interwoven story of Narnia is told from that magical land's creation to its glorious end.

    The books are not always of consistent quality, but a strong book always follows the weaker volumes. Such was the case when the Homeresque "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" followed the forgettable "Prince Caspian," for instance.

    Of course, calling the seven-book series a single epic brings into mind a long-running debate. In what order should the books be read; chronologically or in published order? In truth, either order will work because the stories are strong enough to withstand any amount of juggling.

    The Narnia Chronicles are classics because they offer rich and rewarding stories, glimpses of far off and magical lands, and present entertaining characters to the reader. They stand the test of time because they contain age-old moral lessons, are written in an eminently readable way that just begs to be read aloud, and are simple enough for kids while deep enough for adults. The cliché holds true here: the books are great for young and old alike.

    No fan of young adult or juvenile literature should pass up on the Narnia Chronicles. Neither should any fan of fantasy, either. And probably nor should any reader at all, period. Recommended classics and near essential reading.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The second best fantasy series ever written...
    ...after Lord of the Rings, and easily the best children's series ever written. 'Nuff said!

    5-0 out of 5 stars CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER IS FOR ADULTS!!!
    If you are new to this series, especially if you are going to read it to a child, DO NOT READ THEM IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER! A child will lose interest after a few chapters. Few great stories are told strictly in chronological order and the hook for Narnia is "The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe".

    Many of these other reviews done by people saying that they like reading these books in chronological order are adults who fell in love with the series years ago, and now see this new order as making better grown-up sense. Reading it this way for the first time will leave you with many details that shouldn't be discovered until after reading the first few books in the original order, and won't keep a child interested the way I and so many others were as kids.

    So please, if you are an adult familiar and returning to this series, feel free to read it in any order you choose, (I certainly do) but if this is your first time, read it in the order below...cheers

    1) The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, 2) Prince Caspian, 3)The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, 4) The Silver Chair, 5) The Horse and His Boy, 6) The Magician's Nephew, and 7) The Last Battle ... Read more


    12. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Full-Color Collector's Edition)
    by C. S. Lewis
    list price: $8.99
    our price: $8.09
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0064409422
    Catlog: Book (2000-09-30)
    Publisher: HarperTrophy
    Sales Rank: 1538
    Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    They open a door and enter a world. ... Read more

    Reviews (319)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lions, Witches and Wardrobes--Oh My!
    Because it is so spectacular, I'm choosing The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe to be the first book I review here at Amazon. I first fell in love with this story (and the subsequent volumes in the series) when my fifth-grade teacher read it to our class. Though it has been more than a decade since, this book has remained one of my all-time favorite works of literature, and I try to reread it once a year. It has an enchanting effect on the heart, mind and soul that never diminishes.

    The novel features four British children: Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy (Sons of Adam and Daughters of Eve) who discover a magical world hidden behind fur coats in a wardrobe. In "Narnia", they encounter an endless parade of fantastic characters and events that aid them in their quest to free the land of Narnia from the spell of the White Witch. She makes winter a permanent season and turns those who oppose her into stone. The most prominent Narnians are the talking animals, but especially the lion Aslan who, with the children's help, must return spring and benevolent rule to the land.

    On a more analytical note, I find it fascinating how C.S. Lewis uses allegory to loosely bridge his fictional world with well-known themes and stories from the Bible. You can most easily recognize this in the ever-present battle between good and evil and the symbolic representation of Christ's Resurrection in the guise of Aslan's death and revival on the Stone Table. Which fulfills an "even deeper magic from before the dawn of time."

    The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a modern classic that should be included in EVERYONE'S library. It will leave you completely satisfied, but at the same time craving more (which can be found in the other six volumes of the Chronicles of Narnia series). Oh, to sit and rule at Cair Paravel while munching on Turkish Delight!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
    This book is about a girl named Lucy and her 3 siblings named Peter, Susan, and Edmund. They have to go live with a relative that they call the "Professor." On day they decide to play hide and go seek. Lucy runs to a closet and there she meets a kind faun named Mr. Tumnus in a really cold wintery place. Lucy returns to her brothers and sister and tries to convince them of what she saw. Lucy and her siblings have now entered the land of Narnia where the evil White Witch lives who dislikes children and it always trying to capture them. At the end of the book, there is a big battle between the witch's evil side and Aslan's (the lion) good side. Aslan's courage and loyalty to the children and people in Narnia brings Spring to their land.

    This is the best fantasy I have ever read because it keeps the reader always involved. It is really hard to put this book down. Although this story seems complicated and hard to follow, it is fast moving and always keeps the reader in suspense. I loved reading this book and recommend it for both girls and boys. I know this one will be on your top ten list.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I want to go to Narnia
    How can you not adore this? You know how food can be labeled "comfort food" - well this is the type of story that's a "comfort story". I felt so protected, secure and safe while reading this. It takes me back to a time in my life when I reguarly daydream adventures like those in Narnia. I think it reminds us of imagination, and freedom, and child-like wonder. Such a beautiful, wonderful story. Allow it to take you away and suspend your disbelief - you won't be sorry.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Hope
    I chose to read this classic by C.S. Lewis because every one else I knew had read it when they were younger. I was told that it was an allegorical novel by a friend, which spiked my interest in what I considered just a child's fantasy. Lewis fills his world, Narnia, with a wonderful array of different and interesting characters. Fauns, Nymphs, Dryads, Naiads, and hospitable beavers all contribute to the fantastic nature of this story. Lewis must have been a creative man to imagine such wonders and write them down. A place where perpetually deadened by the cold of winter, with no Christmas and, therefore, no hope would be a terribly bleak setting. The depiction of Aslan as a symbol of Christ was quite interesting. Even the girls, Susan and Lucy, become similar to the two Marys in the gospel in their caretaking of the lion. So as not to give away the story to anyone else I will end saying this unique world provides more than just a fantasy escape. To both children and adults it provides a reminder that there is hope, even in our world, when it too seems cold and dead.

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe a reveiw by Irene
    Have you ever imagined being sent away to someone's house, that has a secret that no one knows but you? The house in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe had a secret , which only Peter, Susan,Edmund, and Lucy knows. Once they went through the wardrobe in the house,their adventures would begin in the land called Narnia, and their lives will change.

    I love this book, because it tells about Lucy trying to save her friend Tumnus. It tells about the wonderful adventures she had with her friends, Peter, Susan, and Edmund and the great dangers they faced in Narnia. I also liked the little rhymes that describes Aslan, the great lion.

    I wish that this book would be longer and the adventures of Narnia would countinue in this book.

    I recommend this book for people who like adventure stories, because this book is filled with adventures.

    My favorite part is when the dwarf made Edmond a prisoner and used a whip to threaten him to go faster. If the White Witch ( a terrible witch) that calls herself queen of Narnia wants Edmond to go faster, the dwarf whips him until he goes faster.

    My other favorite part is when Edmond got tricked into bringing Peter, Susan and Lucy to her because she wants to turn Edmond and his friends into stone. They are smart and she doesn't want them to break the White Witch's spell. The spell is a spell that will keep Narnia always in a winter season.

    On the map, I think it is a little confusing because it doesn't show the place where Peter, Susan, Edmond, and Lucy came through the Wardrobe to Narnia, but the story is exciting. ... Read more


    13. Tuck Everlasting
    by Natalie Babbitt
    list price: $5.95
    our price: $5.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0374480095
    Catlog: Book (1985-11-01)
    Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
    Sales Rank: 4697
    Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Doomed to - or blessed with - eternal life after drinking from a magic spring, the Tuck family wanders about trying to live as inconspicuously and comfortably as they can. When ten-year-old Winnie Foster stumbles on their secret, the Tucks take her home and explain why living forever at one age is less a blessing that it might seem. Complications arise when Winnie is followed by a starnger who wants to market the spring water for a fortune
    ... Read more

    Reviews (817)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book!!!
    In the book Tuck Everlasting a girl named Winnie wonders into the woods and sees a boy drinking from a spring.But she can't have any of the water.There is something mysterious about the water.The family the boy lives with is very secretive.He takes her to his house to explain why she can't have any.She has to keep their secret or else....
    In this book the author is trying to make you think about the book.She is trying to tell you that some people really do live differently and sometimes you have to accept them for who they are.Winnie had to keepthe Tucks secret for their safety.Babbit makes this book adventurous and suspenseful.
    This book has very good partsto it.Babbit has everything set up the way it should be.People come in at the right time and things will happen that will change the story.It is exciting to read something so clear and concise.She created a plot full of twists and turns for young readers.The first three chapters took a while to get good, but after that it was awesome.If you are looking for a book to read you want Tuck Everlasting.You will enjoy it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lovely and Timeless
    Tuck Everlasting is a beautifully written fantasy that will appeal to both children and adults. The prose is spare yet descriptive, moving quickly through a young girls life as she stumbles upon a secret known only to a few, but one that will change her outlook on life, and living, forever.

    This gentle yet ultimately poignant story begins before the turn of the century as 10 year old Winnie Foster dreams of running away from her well-ordered life, as most children do. She would never act upon this impulse, of course, but a brief excursion into the enchanting woods owned by her family, which sit invitingly just outside her fence, will alter the coarse of her life in ways she could not have imagined.

    Winnie will discover the Tuck family in these woods. They have lived there ages, guarding the water which stops time, and gives all those who drink of it immortality. As Winnie is sort of kidnapped, in a friendly way, she gets to know each of the Tucks, and forms a bond so close she will be tempted to join them one day.

    Natalie Babbitt does a wonderful job making this fantasy real to the reader. Winnie's reactions to this family and especially young Jesse, who will be 17 forever and wants her to join him when she can, has the ring of truth. But there is a price to pay for this stoppage of time, and Jesse's father eloquently conveys to Winnie the joy of actually living and changing, like the water as it flows, and the unexpected anguish of living as the Tucks do.

    Her second family will be in harm's way when a mysterious stranger who wants to prosper from this secret tracks down Winnie and the Tucks, and the adventure that follows will bring forth decisions for Winnie Foster about how she wants to live.

    There is humor and sweetness to this tale. It is an injustice to call this a children's classic. It is a classic, period, and should be taken to the heart of every reader. There is a message here for us all.....

    4-0 out of 5 stars Still Great!
    Read it as a child and loved it, so I had to read it again as an adult and still fully injoyed it

    3-0 out of 5 stars Freaky, but boring
    Winnie is a girl who finds a family who lives in the woods, and they drank from a well that makes you immortal and they can't get older or die and they are bored! Was I the only kid who was forced to read this in 5th grade?

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good Book.
    I love thiss book.
    It's about a small town girl, in the early 1900's, who is bored with life. One day she is walking through the woods when she spys Jeese Tuck, who is drinking from the "Fountain of Youth." Winnie, the girl, wants a drink of it and getting scared that she would end up like his whole family, Jesse takes her home with him. The Tuck family keeps her until they are accused of kiddnapping her. The older Tucks go to jail, and then, with some help from winnie, escape. When the Tucks are leaving, Jesse gives a bottle of the special water to winnie, asking her to drink it when she is 17.... or somewhere around that age. One day Winnie sees a frog out in the middle of the road, and figures that he needs the bottle of water more than she does..... scince she can always get more from the spring. So she pours it on the frog, so the frog will never get hurt and won't die..... then the forest where the spring is burns down.... and then Jesse returns almost a hundred years later.... ... Read more


    14. The Phantom Tollbooth
    by NORTON JUSTER
    list price: $6.50
    our price: $6.50
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0394820371
    Catlog: Book (1988-10-12)
    Publisher: Yearling
    Sales Rank: 730
    Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Illustrated in black-and-white. This ingenious fantasy centers around Milo, a bored ten-year-old who comes home to find a large toy tollbooth sitting in his room. Joining forces with a watchdog named Tock, Milo drives through the tollbooth's gates and begins a memorable journey. He meets such characters as the foolish, yet lovable Humbug, the Mathemagician, and the not-so-wicked "Which," Faintly Macabre, who gives Milo the "impossible" mission of returning two princesses to the Kingdom of Wisdom. ... Read more

    Reviews (363)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Take an adventure inside your own imagination
    I read this book as a child, and very happily reorded it when a memory of it surfaced. The plot is as excellent as I remembered it. A young boy named Milo finds the entire world to be completely uninteresting, and he's already bored, cyncial and jaded, despite the fact that he can't be more than 12 years old. Somebody gives him a way to explore, and he's off to a fantastic land of imagination in his little electric car. Once there, he finds that knowledge and thought have become personified. He encounters cities of words and numbers, a woman who guards and saves sounds, he literally jumps to Conclusions, takes a swim in the sea of knowledge. The main plot involves Milo and some assorted friends (my favorite is the watch-dog Tock, who has a real watch on him, but then I've always loved dogs) rescuing two princesses who are trapped in the Mountains of Ignorance. Milo must battle all of the demons that plauge goodness and knowledge to accomplish his goal. Along the way, he discovers that he and the world are much more interesting and exciting than he thought. Besides that, another little gem is hidden in here. Life is not just about learning and pursuing knowledge. There are many varities and experiences out there. Math, science, art, history and so on. The key is not just learning about them, but learning how to balance them so that they all work together to make us better people. Milo got the message in the end, and I hope that more follow in his footsteps. This book is written on a children's level, but the author never talks down to kids or patronizes them. It's a pleasant read for all ages. Enjoy!

    5-0 out of 5 stars It doesn't get better than this
    My father read this book to me the first year it was published. I was nine and it has been on my bookshelf since. I can't tell you how many copies of this I have purchased for people.

    This is a great book to encourage thinking, not simply memorizing. Each page contains new language, new ideas, new ways to play with learning. It also happens to be a wonderful story. I may have been too young at nine to read it on my own, but certainly it is a great read-aloud for children nine or a bit younger. At nine, I didn't understand all the fancies, but like the Wizard of Oz or Alice in Wonderland, this book succeeds on many levels.

    The Phantom Tollbooth encourages a child's love for language. It paints wonderful pictures (with the help of Feiffer's charming line drawings). It is as perfect a thing as can be written.

    Oh, and if you're an adult without any children at home - buy the book for yourself. It will take you away from the Doldrums and into the Kingdom of Wisdom where your spirit can be renewed.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Classic wordplay!
    This book is fun for all ages, one of the handful of great children's books that will still be fun to read 50 years from now. It's like Dr. Seuss for older children. Buy it. You won't be disappointed.

    5-0 out of 5 stars What a wonderful book
    This book is just so clever. I mean the word play in this book never ends. I love all the ideas in this book, but my favorite ideas are that sounds are made and that someone plays the color in the world. I will most likely allways remember when Milo claps his hands and all the paper surrounds him. This is my third time reading this book and I highly recomend it to anyone and everyone.

    5-0 out of 5 stars REALLY REALLY GREAT!
    this book is so so good. I really like the spelling bee.I think this book is the funniest book I have ever read in my life.this book should get all the awards. ... Read more


    15. A Wrinkle in Time
    by Madeleine L'Engle
    list price: $6.50
    our price: $5.85
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440498058
    Catlog: Book (1973-04-01)
    Publisher: Yearling
    Sales Rank: 329
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Everyone in town thinks Meg Murry is volatile and dull-witted, and that her younger brother, Charles Wallace, is dumb. People are also saying that their physicist father has run off and left their brilliant scientist mother.Spurred on by these rumors and an unearthly stranger, the tesseract-touting Mrs Whatsit, Meg and Charles Wallace and their new friend Calvin O'Keefe embark on a perilous quest through space to find their father. In doing so, they must travel behind the shadow of an evil power that is darkening the cosmos, one planet at a time. This is no superhero tale, nor is it science fiction, although it shares elements of both. The travelers must rely on their individual and collective strengths, delving deep within themselves to find answers.

    A well-loved classic and 1963 Newbery Medal winner, Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time is sophisticated in concept yet warm in tone, with mystery and love coursing through its pages. Meg's shattering, yet ultimately freeing, discovery that her father is not omnipotent provides a satisfying coming-of-age element. Readers will feel a sense of power as they travel with these three children, challenging concepts of time, space, and the triumph of good over evil. The companion books in the Time quartet, continuing the adventures of the Murry family, are A Wind in the Door; A Swiftly Tilting Planet, which won the American Book Award; and Many Waters. Every young reader should experience L'Engle's captivating, occasionally life-changing contributions to children's literature. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (787)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Space Travel at It's Best
    "A Wrinkle in Time " tells the story of Meg and Charles Wallace who, with their friend Calvin, decide to look for their missing father. They meet three mysterious alien women who aid them in their search by giving them interesting powers. With the help of their new alien friends, the children enter a tesseract, a short way of traveling between worlds. They go to a world terrorized by the evil It. Their father is on this world and the children devise a plan to safely leave with him. Their plan goes terribly wrong.

    This book has lots of action and it' s characters are children whose reactions are very realistic in their situations. If you like science fiction and love to read about time travel, you will love this book.

    3-0 out of 5 stars An outstanding Sci-fi!
    Do you know those books where you accidentally yell out loud to a character to run or hide because you're so tied into the book? Well if you do, this book is definitely one of those. The book started me off confused with Mrs. Whatsit and her involvement in the book, but soon enough the unique characters of the three children and the odd supernatural women made me want to read more.

    I loved how Madeleine L'Engle wrote about the aliens and their planets. Most people believe that aliens are much smarter and stronger that us, but she described them different than us, but with a reasonable intelligence level. It makes sense that she made Earth a clouded planet because compared to Ixchel, our planet is full of hate and evil. The only downside of the book for me was the ending. I expected a showdown between good and evil in the last heart stopping scene, but the book came to an ending with the usual 'love is the best power of all."

    Looking at this book and comparing it to Harry Potter wouldn't be fair. First of all because after reading both books the overall excitement of Harry Potter way beyond that of A Wrinkle in Time mostly because of the size of the book. I t would also not be fair because Harry Potter, when I was reading it, was the best book of all time and the excitement in the writing was just incomparable. If you're looking for a good Sci-fi book though to read on your free time you will love it. Then again, I guess what I am trying to get to you is that if I were to choose to read the fifth Harry Potter book or all four of the Wrinkle in Time books (I think they are about the same amount of pages) I would definitely choose Harry Potter.

    Hope this helps,
    Travis Robinson

    5-0 out of 5 stars Really good!!
    I read this a long time ago, but it's still really good! Read it! Anyway, that's not my real point.

    Would all those people who are complaining about the "lack of scientific substance" stop?!?!?! This isn't supposed to be a scientific journal! It's a NOVEL! What do novels do? Tell stories! NOT give scientific facts.

    So, with that aside, I recommend this book to everyone.

    Have fun reading!

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Wrinkle in Time
    A Wrinkle in Time is a fantastic Sci-Fi young adults book. It is about discovery of one's self and accepting yourself as you are.

    The story follows Meg, her brilliant brother Charles Wallace, and her new friend Calvin as they journey through space and behind an evil cloud to find Meg's father. They are assisted by Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who, and Mrs. Which, who show the children that they can do anything with the talents (and weaknesses) they have.

    The reason it didn't receive 5 stars is because the story fell flat in certain places and many times it seemed rushed. Also, my favorite is A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and comparing this book to that one, this book falls short, but only just a little bit.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Challenging and thought-provoking for all ages
    This is one of those amazing kids books that can be read on all different levels by people of all different ages. Is it the story of a bunch of spunky kids out to save their father? Or is it one big metaphysical metaphor?

    When gawky Meg, "new" Charles Wallace, and popular Calvin O'Keefe get whisked off across the universe to rescue Meg and Charles Wallace's father, they have no idea that they are part of the greater battle between good and evil.

    The amazing thing is that this book does not talk down to kids. It is chock full of graduate-level science, religion, and philosophy. Classical poets and thinkers are quoted without a second thought. A relatively obscure sonnet from Shakespeare serves as an important plot point. But although it challenges, it also rewards. It is never difficult to read or understand.

    I have always thought that this book would be a great starting point for a discussion if read alongside Lois Lowry's "The Giver." Both are about dystopias where there is no such thing as individuality and privacy. How are the two worlds different, and how are they the same? "Aberations" are dealt with in surprisingly similar ways. What is the role of "love" in both books? What does Meg mean when she screams "Like and equal are not the same thing" and how does that relate to the snobiness that Jonah's "parents" show towards some professions?

    Everyone over the age of 10 should read this book. Grown-ups should not consider it a "kids book," because it can be read on so many different levels. It is a classic, thought-provoking book that will be read again and again. ... Read more


    16. The Runaway Bunny
    by Margaret Wise Brown
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0061074292
    Catlog: Book (1991-02-27)
    Publisher: HarperFestival
    Sales Rank: 758
    Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Since its publication in 1942, The Runaway Bunny has never been out of print. Generations of sleepy children and grateful parents have loved the classics of Margaret Wise Brown and Clement Hurd, including Goodnight Moon. The Runaway Bunny begins with a young bunny who decides to run away: "'If you run away,' said his mother, 'I will run after you. For you are my little bunny.'" And so begins a delightful, imaginary game of chase. No matter how many forms the little bunny takes--a fish in a stream, a crocus in a hidden garden, a rock on a mountain--his steadfast, adoring, protective mother finds a way of retrieving him. The soothing rhythm of the bunny banter--along with the surreal, dream-like pictures--never fail to infuse young readers with a complete sense of security and peace. For any small child who has toyed with the idea of running away or testing the strength of Mom's love, this old favorite will comfort and reassure. (Baby to preschool) ... Read more

    Reviews (66)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A heartwarming, beautifully written book, a MUST-HAVE !!!
    I first heard a few lines from this book on a T.V. show, and I was in tears! I ran straight to my computer and ordered it. This book is a must have for every child (and parent!). I have never read a book expressing the love of a mother for her child so beautifully. The mother bunny becomes whatever it takes for her to "find" her little bunny as he dreams of different things to be to run away from her. The mother bunny doesn't condemn him, but conforms to his thoughts and dreams and "chases" after him as he tells her what he will become and how he'll run away. I loved the way the mother spoke so lovingly to her little bunny, letting him know that no matter where he went, she'd find him. My son loves the brilliantly colorful images on every other page. It is a nice contrast to the black and white writing in between. This has become a favorite in my home and I intend to give this book as a gift to any and every mother (or mother-to-be) that I know!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Runaway Bunny
    This book is wonderful. My son is in an accelerated reading program at school, he brought this book home last night to read and we had such a great time with it. When the story starts off with the little bunny telling his mom that he'll run away and she says she'll follow him I just thought . . . that is love. I told my son that he was the little bunny and I was the mommy bunny, so throughout the story we pretended that those characters were us. The look on my son's face was priceless, I could tell that he knew that his mommy loves him dearly (children need reassurance). He was so proud to hear that I would follow him like that. The color illustrations kept us laughing. They were just so sweet and cute. This book is a classic. I would recommend it to any parent. I didn't see it as a way a mother holds a child back from adventuring out, but as a way a mother/father can deal with a little child wanting to runaway. My son has told me a time or two that he was going to runaway (I believe all kids do - I can remember telling my mom) next time he tells me that I'll just remind him of this story and that I am a mommy bunny! Call me crazy, but I'm assuming that God has read this book as well. After all He keeps running after each and every one of us. Children of all ages need to know that.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A heartwarming tale with an equally heartwarming message
    Ever thought of running away? Or, have you ever been really angry at your mother? Well, I have just the cure for that, this book. This is timeless tale of a little bunny who can't help but test the extent of his mother's love, but for every idea the little bunny has for running away, his mother counters with a way of making sure they are always together. For instance, when the little bunny says he will escape his mother by turning into a sailboat, his mother says in reply "If you turn into a sailboat, I will become the wind and blow you home." A wonderful story that displays the unconditional love a mother has for her children.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great book
    I think this book is a wonderful demonstration in love.The message is no matter what happens i will be there for you. reading some of the other reviews I feel that some people are reading into a sweet story.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Scary? Disturbing?! Squashed spirits?!? Not at all!
    The one- and two-star people have the totally wrong impression. What do you think the (equivalent) age of the little runaway bunny is -- 16 to 25? To what age group are we reading a book like this? You have somehow missed the point, and context.

    The idea here is that the little bunny is a very young child, far too young to be on his own -- you know this when he actually tells his mother he is running away! Imagine your child of 4 to 7, momentarily angry about something, who tells you he wants to run away from home, pouting and saying things he doesn't mean, wanting attention, testing your love. (Heck, imagine your adolescent of 16 literally running away, though he wouldn't warn you beforehand!) He is far too young to be on his own, and his mother loves him so much that she will always be there for him when he needs her, and will not let harm come to him. He needs her now, though in his current emotional state he doesn't realize it. Would you let your child run away?

    This book's audience is toddler through early-reader, the kind of age where their early needs for independence are joined with an intense need to feel the constant love and presence of the parent -- they need to know their parent(s) will always be there for them. Margaret Wise Brown was not talking about an older child figuratively spreading his or her wings, only to be smothered and squashed by Mother's "love." (The only overall metaphor here is that bunnies = humans.) She's literally talking about an immature child impulsively saying he will run away, and what any good, loving parent would say and do to help and comfort him. The book is from 1942, so perhaps that makes it unclear to some, but from the moment I read it I understood the context; it is a beautiful story if you understand the intent. That little bunny has a great imagination -- the color pages are his mental images of the previous text -- and Mama is fostering it with her responses in kind.

    There is one place where I would have worded the mother's part differently: where she she becomes the wind, she says "...blow you where I want you to go." I would have said, "...blow you back to me," and I think that's what the author meant. Also, somebody commented in 2000 about the "I will fish for you" part and said the mother catches him on a hook. Look at the picture -- there is no hook on the line, just a carrot tied on for the little bunny to bite, and a net to scoop him up.

    I've replaced our worn, torn paperback with the big lap edition boardbook. We also have the "Goodnight Moon" lap edition, and although they are big and heavy, the size is a plus for the illustrations, and they're virtually indestructible. Our first daughter (4.5) caused many small rips in the pages of her books as she turned them with gusto, and our second daughter (20 mos.) likes to finish those rips when she can! ... Read more


    17. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (Oprah's Book Club)
    by Carson McCullers
    list price: $12.00
    our price: $9.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0618526412
    Catlog: Book (2004-04-21)
    Publisher: Mariner
    Sales Rank: 929
    Average Customer Review: 3.92 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    With the publication of her first novel, THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER, Carson McCullers, all of twenty-three, became a literary sensation. With its profound sense of moral isolation and its compassionate glimpses into its characters' inner lives, the novel is considered McCullers' finest work, an enduring masterpiece first published by Houghton Mifflin in 1940. At its center is the deaf-mute John Singer, who becomes the confidant for various types of misfits in a Georgia mill town during the 1930s. Each one yearns for escape from small town life. When Singer's mute companion goes insane, Singer moves into the Kelly house, where Mick Kelly, the book's heroine (and loosely based on McCullers), finds solace in her music. Wonderfully attuned to the spiritual isolation that underlies the human condition, and with a deft sense for racial tensions in the South, McCullers spins a haunting, unforgettable story that gives voice to the rejected, the forgotten, and the mistreated -- and, through Mick Kelly, gives voice to the quiet, intensely personal search for beauty.Richard Wright praised Carson McCullers for her ability "to rise above the pressures of her environment and embrace white and black humanity in one sweep of apprehension and tenderness." She writes "with a sweep and certainty that are overwhelming," said the NEW YORK TIMES. McCullers became an overnight literary sensation, but her novel has endured, just as timely and powerful today as when it was first published. THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER is Carson McCullers at her most compassionate, endearing best. ... Read more

    Reviews (80)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Art Takes Effort!
    I was disturbed to read so many negative reviews of Carson McCullers' The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter. This book is one of the finest works of literature in the American canon. Oprah's bookclub has lately been doing the admirable work of resurrecting old classics - McCullers WAS, in fact, quite the sensation among her contemporaries. I feel that Heart' is the book around which all of McCuller's other pieces orbit. I'll agree with a few other reviewers in saying that this is not an action book, it is not "funny train station" literature, and the impetus is psychological, and often quite intangible.

    As a master's degree student in writing at Sarah Lawrence College, I love this book. As a high school student, I adored it. People picking up something for fluffy entertainment value should probably not read this book. People looking to experience a different kind of life, to read a beautifully written social commentary, to experience psychological empathy pertaining to the human condition...those people should read this book.

    It's great writing. Don't bash it because it's not your type of reading material.

    To drive my point into the ground, people who enjoy authors in the vein of Flannery O'Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, Tennessee Williams, Anne Tyler, Annie Proulx, Katherine Dunn, William Faulkner, Harper Lee, possibly Jeanette Winterson...these readers, and readers looking for great literature, should sample Carson McCullers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Slow going at first, rewarded at the end!
    After hearing everyone's glowing reviews, and being so excited to start reading this book- after reading Part 1 of this book, I was ready to give up. However, I'm glad I picked it up again a few days later & finished it. Still, the book was not quite what I envisioned, and it does not make my list of favorite books. But I realize I'm not much of a "classic novels" reader, so that probably had a lot to do with how I felt about this book.

    I enjoyed the premise of this town full of misfits; a drunk, a bar-keep, a teenage girl who's an outsider, a deaf mute and a repressed black doctor- all of which who made excellent characters. And once the stories of these people really got going, in part 2, I was enjoying the reading. It's just that part one really sets the stage for each of these characters, so it's not very exciting reading. And also, it took me a while to get into Carson's writing style, which is a bit unique- for instance, there were times when her sentence structure was kind of backwards. I'm not sure if this is because that's how they spoke in the 40's, or if it's McCullers's dialect. I will say that this book did have some very poetic thoughts and prose. There were several profound things, and it made the reading all the more worthwhile.

    I do recommend this book for reading- just with the warning that part 1 is slow going, but if you make it that far, you'll be rewarded in part 2 & 3. I don't want to give anything away about this story, so I'll leave it there.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Heart Wrenching
    Light reading, whimsical - no! Realistic, introspective, entertaining, a wonderful enlightment into the soul - yes! Don't pick up the book if you don't want to think. Otherwise, experience, enjoy and appreciate the brilliance of the characters, the story and the author.

    5-0 out of 5 stars No funny train station literature, but a great piece of art
    I enjoyed this book. To those who find it too depressing, I would like to say that anything that deserves to be designated as "literature" irritates the reader. I recommend this book to anyone who looks for reading material that is not just entertaining or funny, but for something that enriches their minds.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Overrated
    Overrated. Just god awful, can't stand it. Ok, I know that isn't really helpful, but I have a feeling that this is one of those books that everyone claims to enjoy becuase they don't want to be accused of "not getting it." The characters were really difficult to care about, and the writing was just blah. Truly overrated (like most Oprah books). ... Read more


    18. The Outsiders
    by S. E. Hinton
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 014038572X
    Catlog: Book (1997-11-01)
    Publisher: Puffin Books
    Sales Rank: 3394
    Average Customer Review: 4.62 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1145)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Prejudice
    I really liked S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders because of the unique way the book was written. Instead of the "conventional" writing style, Ms. Hinton wrote the book like she is Ponyboy Michael Curtis, "Greaser." This book was very interesting, it had many unexpected twists and turns. The Outsiders is a very believable book, and in many ways there are real "outsiders" today.

    The Outsiders dealt with prejudice, and as you are reading this book you begin to understand what life is like for other groups and how they act towards each other. It's sad because no matter what or who is in the group, they are all classified as "bad," "good," "smart," etc. It made me realize that I too judge and group people too easily, we all do.

    I would recommend this book to anyone (over the age of 11 or so) who wants to read an awesome novel about life, family relationships, friendships, social groups and prejudice.

    A Student at Secrist Middle School, 3rd period Language Arts

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Outsiders - A Timeless Read
    Even though S.E. Hinton's young adult novel, The Outsiders, was first published 35 years ago, it is timeless. Just like Romeo and Juliet, or West Side Story, it is a story of rivaling groups and the emotional and physical scars that the rivalry plays on the individuals of both sides. There is no love story, but the relationships among three recently orphaned brothers and their gang of greaser friends tells of deep attachments, love and hate.

    The story is told by fourteen year old Ponyboy who is the youngest of the Curtis boys. He reveals his opinions, insights and feelings towards the people and events going on around him. Throughout the story Ponyboy's sensitivity to the complexities of peoples thoughts, motivations, and actions, including his own, increases dramatically. As Ponyboy develops an understanding of his world, so does the reader develop an understanding of how a teenage mind works and grows.

    Hinton's greasers and socs (socialites) represent the cliques that forever seem to reign in middle and high schools. For this reason most readers will find it easy to relate to one or more of the characters. If the reader is an adult, like me, Ponyboy's revelations will shed some light on who some of those other kids in school were, and why they did what they did. For the teen reading the book for the first time,Ponyboy offers insights that might make the road they're travelling easier to understand now.

    If you have a teen in your home, don't show them the movie. Give them this book to read. They are sure to appreciate the gift.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Outsiders - A review
    This book is very good. i have read it in 2 days, and you can read it very good. it is not bad.keep cool, Heiko Rabus

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Outsiders is the best book ever!!!!
    Hey everyone we had to read the book the Outsiders this year(8th Grade) and then we had to watch the movie we had to do a BIG report on it and it was so0o0 much fun and I got a great mark on it..I liked it so much that in the summer I went out and bought the book and then I rented the movie and I have read the book like 4 times and watched the movie like 5 times it's the best ever if you are looking for a good book to read, read The Outsiders!! It's worth it!!
    From The Outsiders Fan
    Gel

    5-0 out of 5 stars A girl's review on the outsiders..
    I have read this book 3 times and everytime I learn something different. I think everyone can relate to atleast one caracter in this book. I related myself to Ponyboy (the caracter that's telling the story from his point of view.)
    The author made me feel like he really went threw all of this, and this book wasn't fiction at all. Many life lessons come out at you as you read...and you don't want to put it down. The main caracter is an intellegent, opinionated teenager who is willing to hide himself and his feelings in order to fit into the world he is forced to live in..but some people he'll trust to open up too. He comes off as a poor troublemaker by the way he dresses, but he is really purer and golden than anyone.
    I recomend this book to everyone, especially teenagers. ... Read more


    19. The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury: Picture Books and Stories to Read Aloud
    by JANET SCHULMAN
    list price: $40.00
    our price: $25.20
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0679886478
    Catlog: Book (1998-09-14)
    Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1627
    Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Believe it or not, 44 complete read-aloud classics and future classics--from Goodnight Moon to Stellaluna--are packed in this remarkably svelte, positively historic anthology. Flipping through the 308 pages of The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury is like browsing a photo album of beloved friends and family. The familiar faces of Curious George and Ferdinand the Bull peer earnestly from the pages, and scenes from Madeline and Millions of Cats resonate as if you just experienced them yesterday. Think of the advantages of carrying this book on a vacation instead of a suitcase of single titles! (Your kids can always revisit their dog-eared hardcovers when they get home.)

    This impressive collection of concept books, wordless books, picture books, and read-aloud stories was artfully compiled by longtime children's book editor and publisher Janet Schulman. Stories are coded red, blue, and green to designate age groupings from baby/toddler books such as Whose Mouse Are You?, through preschool books such as Where the Wild Things Are, to longer stories for ages 5 and older such as Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. The reason the book isn't bigger than Babar is because many of the illustrations from each story were reduced or removed to fitthe anthology's format.(Leo Lionni's Swimmy, for example, takes up 5 pages total, compared to its original 29 pages.)Brief biographical notes that are surprisingly quirky shine a little light on the 62 authors and illustrators, and an index helps, too, for the child who likes one story best. We love the idea of being within easy reach of a Star-Belly Sneetch, a William Steig donkey, and a Sendak monster at all times, and we're sure your little bookworms will, too. (Click to seea sample spread from The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury, compilation copyright © 1998 by Janet Schulman, illustrations © renewed 1997 by William Steig.) (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

    Reviews (66)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A truly wonderful collection of classic stories!
    I bought this book after checking it out at the library and being in awe at the wonderful stories in it. My boys are 2 and almost every night at dinner we read a new story. With classics from Curious George and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel to the rhythmic Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, there are surely stories to fit every need. The book also lists which stories are appropriate for different ages. Most of the stories are condensed to 4-6 pages with lots of pictures, but some have few illustrations and are great for reading in the car, at dinner, or at bedtime when your child is really sleepy.

    We own several of the individual books and will probably buy more of them for the boys to be able to read and hold. This book is too heavy and awkward for small children to be handling, but it is a convenient way to expose them (and me!) to some of the great stories that have been written over the years. Besides, you'll want to keep it in good shape to hand down to your grandchildren! This collection of stories will make a wonderful gift for new or expecting parents or for older children who love to read.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely amazing collections of children's favorites
    Most of the 'greatest hits' collections - whether for a time period or a particular artist seem to always leave out the best song or super-star groups. This Treasury astounded me by collecting 'all' the great authors and stories (at least all of the ones I can thing of). Madeline, Dr. Seuss, Babar, Curious George, Where the Wild Things Are, The Berenstain Bears, Amelia Bedelia, Stellaluna, Pooh, etc... I am amazed that the editors managed to get the rights to publish all of these incredible favorites!

    The texts of the stories are complete (as far as I can tell), but the illustration have been shrunk so that all of the stories will fit in one volume. Something is lost in the process, but I can imagine that it would be the perfect book for a trip, keeping a any kids' home-away-from-home (like grandma's house), or just to read to discover previously unknown classics (which is what my five year old and I are doing).

    An added benefit is the history - the stories were all written in a historical context and to a greater or lesser extend reflect the society in which they were written. The editors wisely put the year of publication with each story. So when I read them to my daughter I can also comment (when applicable) not only about whether or not I had read the story as a kid, but also set the story in a historical context (take Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, published in 1939, for example).

    Of course, for stories destined to become favorites, the full-sized editions with illustrations are really needed; but for an anthology, this book cannot be beat!

    3-0 out of 5 stars Before you buy, know what you are missing
    This is a good book for reference but if you intend to buy it INSTEAD OF the children's classics it includes, you will be missing out on a lot. Please read the School Library Journal review and Booklist review in entirety before making a decision to buy this, they both touch on the problem of condensing stories and missing illustrations with the effect they have on the stories' impact. It is especially noticable for stories that rely on illustrations for pacing or an element of surprise. I find that my kids, both beginning readers, do not go to this book on their own the same way that they will run to look at any of their favorite individual story books and although we use it, it is usually only as a convenience to me (to avoid hunting down and carrying several goodnight books). If it gets you to read more, great, but for fostering a love of these classics in your kids there is nothing like using the real individual books in their covers, formatted as originally intended.

    5-0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING!
    We have hundreds of children's books, but this is the one we turn to over and over. (Our son is 3 1/2; daughter is 6). Great at story time, and even better when you need some help entertaining the kids (e.g., doctor's office, long trip, snow day at home). The collection is a real treasure of books we knew, and books we discovered for the first time. My prediction: your children will still remember this book when they are reading to your grandkids. By far, our family's favorite.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A terrific collection of classics
    I'm an American journalist living in Germany and raising two bilingual kids. I've had this book for about 3 years now. It has been a wonderful source of bedtime reading for my oldest son, who is now 6. The stories offer a good variety of reading levels, so it has really grown with him. Yes, some of the illustrations are small, but I found that a small price to pay for the convenience of having a single book to grab at bedtime when we are both very tired, but needing a great story. ... Read more


    20. The World of Peter Rabbit Original Presentation Box 1-23
    by Beatrix Potter
    list price: $160.00
    our price: $100.80
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0723284075
    Catlog: Book (2002-09-01)
    Publisher: Frederick Warne and Company Inc
    Sales Rank: 15124
    Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    The complete collection of Beatrix Potter's 23 original books is available in this brand-new 100th anniversary presentation box. There has never been a more attractive way to keep and display Potter's classic tales. This luxurious box features spot lamination and a full-color, decorative scene inside the top. It holds all 23 little books, each of which has been redesigned and features improved reproductions of the illustrations. ... Read more

    Reviews (6)

    5-0 out of 5 stars aesthetic integrity
    By printing each tale as a separate book, this boxed series presents Potter's tales in the form they were originally published. The format allows each story to unfold with a deliberate pace, as the turning of each page reveals a fresh illustration alongside a few sparse lines of text. In contrast, a so-called "complete tales of" volume I looked at totally destroyed the aesthetic integrity of Potter's work by squeezing entire stories into 2 or 3 11" x 8" pages. Furthermore, the illustrations no longer followed the storyline in a linear fashion but instead looked like haphazard afterthoughts. I would recommend this series for preserving that almost undefinable "charm" of the originals.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Family Treasure
    My children grew up reading these beautiful little books. Our set is identical to the one pictured, only we bought ours in the early 90s. Now with one in college and one who is a "punk rocker" I can *still* get them both to curl up with me and read Tom Kitten or Jemima PuddleDuck or The Roly-Poly Pudding or their favorite...Ginger and Pickles. Amazing, but true. Both my kids treasure this collection in its lovely case and the set was a very wise purchase. After all, stories like this keep your kids close to you, it is almost a ritual, and a good thing! Other editions of these stories are fine, but there is something about the little books and the special case that creates a sort of magic. Well worth the expense...I *promise.*

    1-0 out of 5 stars An old world approach to children's books
    These books were great back in 1909, but now they don't talk to children about their world. They don't even talk about a world of yesteryear in a way that is useful or entertaining. The illustrations are good and can be used to make up a story that is more interesting and understandable to children, but why should this be necessary?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Tales That Span Generations...
    This Peter Rabbit collection is a tiny world of parables, stories and lessons for children and adults of all ages. The beauty of the books is greatly enhanced by their encapsulation in a darling box, and they are just the right size for small hands to look through and admire. The simple pictures tell the story even without words! They are a wonderful addition for the bookshelf of your child, and the lessons they teach are most appropriate today- in a world where trouble exists and ethics are compromised.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Corrections to Editorial Review
    This is a great boxed set, but the Editorial Review must be about another set. This one does not have a lock and handle and it has 23 books, not 12. Just so you know... ... Read more


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