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    $11.19 $5.77 list($15.99)
    1. Al Capone Does My Shirts
    $8.96 list($11.95)
    2. Carnival at Candlelight (Magic
    $86.60 $75.00
    3. World History: Connections to
    $10.85 $10.35 list($15.96)
    4. Magic Tree House Boxed Set (Volumes
    $9.56 list($11.95)
    5. Season of the Sandstorms (Magic
    $8.96 $5.95 list($9.95)
    6. Search of the Moon King's Daughter
    $11.55 $7.00 list($16.99)
    7. The Teacher's Funeral: A Comedy
    $5.39 $2.15 list($5.99)
    8. Number the Stars (Laurel Leaf
    $6.29 $1.94 list($6.99)
    9. Crispin : The Cross of Lead
    $5.39 $0.98 list($5.99)
    10. My Brother Sam Is Dead (Point)
    $5.39 $2.37 list($5.99)
    11. Sadako and the Thousand Paper
    $5.39 $1.49 list($5.99)
    12. The Sign of the Beaver
    $5.39 $1.49 list($5.99)
    13. Out of the Dust (Apple Signature
    $11.53 $10.49 list($16.95)
    14. How the Amazon Queen Fought the
    $5.85 $2.22 list($6.50)
    15. The Witch of Blackbird Pond (Laurel
    $10.20 $9.94 list($15.00)
    16. Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster
    $5.39 $3.42 list($5.99)
    17. The Secret Garden
    $10.87 list($15.99)
    18. Judy Moody Declares Independence
    $6.29 $4.15 list($6.99)
    19. Amazing Impossible Erie Canal
    $6.50 $3.63
    20. Johnny Tremain (Yearling Newbery)

    1. Al Capone Does My Shirts
    by Gennifer Choldenko
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $11.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0399238611
    Catlog: Book (2004-03-01)
    Publisher: Putnam Publishing Group
    Sales Rank: 11629
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Moose Flannagan moves with his family to Alcatraz so his dad can work as a prison guard and his sister, Natalie, can attend a special school.But Natalie has autism, and when she’s denied admittance to the school, the stark setting of Alcatraz begins to unravel the tenuous coping mechanisms Moose’s family has used for dealing with her disorder.

    When Moose meets Piper, the cute daughter of the Warden, he knows right off she’s trouble.But she’s also strangely irresistible. All Moose wants to do is protect Natalie, live up to his parents’ expectations, and stay out of trouble.But on Alcatraz, trouble is never very far away.

    Set in 1935, when guards actually lived on Alcatraz Island with theirfamilies, Choldenko’s second novel brings humor to the complexities of family dynamics and illuminates the real struggle of a kid trying to free himself from the "good boy" stance he’s taken his whole life. ... Read more

    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars "Al Capone Does My Shirts"
    "Al Capone Does My Shirts" is about a 12-year old boy named Moose, whose family moves to Alcatraz in 1934 for his dad's job as a prison guard there. If you don't know, Alcatraz is a maximum-security prison on a rocky island across the bay from San Francisco. Although it is no longer in use, in the 1930's, Alcatraz was prison sweet prison to such notorious gangsters as Al Capone and Machine Gun Kelly. You could understand why Moose isn't excatly thrilled to live there. But the other reason they moved is so his sister, Natalie, could go to the Esther P. Marinoff school. Natalie has a disease that is today called autism, but was unidentified in the 30's. Moose, wanting his sister to be "normal", agrees to move for her sake. Still, he isn't happy about living on what he calls "a 12-acre rock covered with cement, topped with bird turds and surrounded by water". But the other families that live on Alcatraz might change his mind.
    This book is both funny and sad, and Moose is very easy to relate to. Other very dynamic characters make "Al Capone Does My Shirts" interesting. You'll finish it quickly and wish it were longer.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Every 10-12 year old should read this book
    My 10 year old daughter read this book in just over 2 days! She could not put it down!!! After reading Choldenko's "Notes from a Liar and her Dog" she could not wait for this to be published. We are buying them as gifts for many summer birthdays. I am now reading it and am thrown right back into my childhood of many years ago. Well written (as was the first), gets right into a 10-12 year olds way of thinking. Children between these ages will be able to totally relate. We can't wait for next one!

    5-0 out of 5 stars a sensational read
    Twelve-year-old Moose Flannagan doesn't know how to feel about his new home. Sure, it's neat to live right in San Francisco Bay, but the neighbors leave something to be desired. You see, Moose and his family live on Alcatraz Island, where Moose's father has a new job as electrician and prison guard. At school on the mainland, Moose is a bit of a misfit. Not only do the other guys think living on Alcatraz is a little weird, they also don't understand why Moose can't stay after school to play baseball.

    Instead, Moose has to head home to watch his sister Natalie. Natalie has autism, a condition that had not even been identified in 1935, when this novel is set. No one is quite sure how to deal with Natalie. Most "experts" tell the Flannagans to put her in an institution, but the family would rather try a variety of experimental therapies, which yield mostly disappointing results. Moose is the only one who can really reach Natalie, and he constantly clashes with his mother about the best way to work with her.

    Moose and Natalie discover a new kind of community among the several families who live on Alcatraz Island, including bossy seven-year-old Theresa and the warden's manipulative, sneaky (but also kind of cute) daughter Piper. In the end, the kids cooperate --- with a little help from Al Capone himself --- to find a place where Natalie can finally belong.

    Believe it or not, this novel's unusual setting is based on fact --- the families of Alcatraz prison guards actually did live on the island. The author includes a helpful note explaining the historical facts behind the story, as well as a brief note about autism.

    What really makes this a winning novel, though, is not the setting but its main character. Moose, who narrates the story, is responsible and trustworthy in spite of himself. The love he feels for his sister despite the frustrations she causes him shines through all his words. The relationships among Moose, his hardworking father and his well-meaning mother are also rich and dynamic. Even without its connection to the famous mobster, AL CAPONE DOES MY SHIRTS would still be a real hit.

    (...)

    4-0 out of 5 stars You and Your Students/Children Should Read This!
    This is a beautiful story that mixes all the elements of great fiction. Historical setting and characters, emotional involvment with genuine characters, laugh-out-loud humor, and a fresh writing style combine to form a unique and sensitive story. Highly reccomended for anyone interested in Alcatraz, Autistic children, or anyone looking for well-done modern kids lit piece. Also reccomended: Notes From a Liar and Her Dog(same author).

    5-0 out of 5 stars A fascinating read.
    This novel worked for me on many levels. First, it was a gripping, fast-paced character study of a teenage boy. The author developed a sympathetic, interesting, flawed character. I kept turning the pages to see what would happen to him and how he would respond.

    Second, the book was quite poignant in showing what it was like to live with an autistic child, especially in an era when autism hadn't been diagnosed and no one was sure how or if it could be treated.

    Third, the setting was so interesting. It takes place on Alcatraz island when prison workers and their families lived there. I learned a lot, but I didn't feel like I was being instructed as I read.

    I highly reccommend this novel. ... Read more


    2. Carnival at Candlelight (Magic Tree House #33)
    by MARY POPE OSBORNE
    list price: $11.95
    our price: $8.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0375830332
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-08)
    Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 11684
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    3. World History: Connections to Today : The Modern Era
    by Elisabeth Gaynor Ellis, Anthony Esler
    list price: $86.60
    our price: $86.60
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0130628018
    Catlog: Book (2002-10-01)
    Publisher: Pearson Prentice Hall
    Sales Rank: 468499
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Human History in Brief
    This is one of the best book on global history, you can find every religion from east to west, north to south. You can read about all empires and kings, you can know all cultures and traditions. There is no other book which have reviewed and presented true picture of three major religions; Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Book Review
    The book was not the best textbook.....there is no study guide

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pounds and Education
    My daughter have to carry tree of these size books. Her school bag is 18 lbs. Why not divide all of these schoolbooks on two parts and make our kids happy. I believe school(elementary, middle and high) is not militarytraining base.

    Gregory Yamin ... Read more


    4. Magic Tree House Boxed Set (Volumes 1-4)
    by MARY POPE OSBORNE
    list price: $15.96
    our price: $10.85
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0375813659
    Catlog: Book (2001-05-29)
    Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 129
    Average Customer Review: 4.12 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Ten years ago, Jack and Annie found a Magic Tree House in the woods and the world of reading was changed forever. Millions of letters later (from children, parents, and teachers around the world!)the exciting and inspiring four books are available together in a keepsake-worthy boxed set. The perfect gift to encourage a struggling new reader or remind old fans of the way they first discovered the magic of books. ... Read more

    Reviews (17)

    5-0 out of 5 stars wonderfully imaginative..........
    The Magic Tree House books are wonderful for early elementary kids. My first and second graders love for me to read these books aloud. They are simple and uncomplicated with short chapters which could cause them to be a bit boring for older kids. Each book has Jack and Annie magically going to another time and place by wishing on a book left in the tree house. This series (I have #1-24) have really turned some of my non-readers onto reading.

    5-0 out of 5 stars GREAT SERIES
    When I found the Magic Tree House series, I was thrilled. Mary Pope Osbourne is writting books with non-fictional details in a fictional plot!! And I love that there are pictures on every other page--it keeps the early readers entertained. My older boys read early so it was hard to find books they could read that weren't "silly" and kept their interest (and had pictures). Even when my two older boys stepped into more difficult reading books, they still wanted to follow the series! Now my 7 year old is taking over!!

    I understand that the writting is for younger kids, but last year I worked as a teacher's aide, and every day I would read a chapter to the 4th grade class, before dismissal, and they were sold--found Magic Tree House more fun than Harry Potter!! When we started a new book, we would all wait until the tree house stopped spinning and the whole class would say with me "everything was still; absolutely still" (a standard line in each book)!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Can't Get Enough!
    I bought the boxed set 1-4 based on my sister's recommendation. She has a 5 and 3 1/2 year old and they listen to Ms. Osborne's books on tape. They looovvve the stories--yes even her younger son. I decided to give it a try. I thought my bright almost 5 year-old daughter would like to try something different and also, give her a taste of what chapter books were all about. My daughter cannot get enough of these books. They are interesting, intriguing, thought provoking and often times my daughter ends up with her fingers in her mouth because she gets so excited about what's happening in the story. What a wonderful way to broaden your child's look at the world--from Egypt to the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. I went ahead and bought books 5-8 and look forward to reading them to my daughter.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Chapter Books for First, Second & Third Graders
    This is the first series of chapter books my son actually wanted to read by himself. While many of the reviewers complain about grammatical errors, etc., I feel these can be overlooked as these delightful stories keep a child's interest from start to finish. Each chapter is fairly short and has frequent pictures (a must for beginning chapter readers). The main characters have all sorts of adventures and the reader actually learns some historical facts. While the books are probably too easy for advanced readers, they should appeal to most beginning chapter readers. I think it is very important that children think reading is fun and the books from The Magic Tree House Series provide a wonderful introduction to chapter book reading!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great fun to read for both of us!
    We were looking for "chapter" books for our 4 year old and a librarian recommended these. We are starting our own collection. Eventhough our daughter can't read yet, she loves them! I deliberately stop midway and discuss what she thinks will happen next. She is then very excited the next day when we finish. Great!! ... Read more


    5. Season of the Sandstorms (Magic Tree House #34)
    by MARY POPE OSBORNE
    list price: $11.95
    our price: $9.56
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0375830316
    Catlog: Book (2005-06-28)
    Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 2584
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    6. Search of the Moon King's Daughter
    by LINDA HOLEMAN
    list price: $9.95
    our price: $8.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0887766099
    Catlog: Book (2003-09-02)
    Publisher: Tundra Books
    Sales Rank: 220576
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Gentle Emmaline loves nothing more than books and flowers and her little brother Tommy. Sadly, her idyllic country life in Victorian England comes to an abrupt end when her father dies of cholera. The family is forced to move to a mill town, where Emmaline’s mother is dreadfully injured in a factory accident. To ease her pain she takes laudanum and is soon addicted, craving the drug so badly that she sells Tommy into servitude as a chimney sweep in London. Emmaline knows that a sweep’s life is short and awful. Small boys as young as five are forced to climb naked into dark chimneys, their bare feet prodded by nail-studded sticks to keep them working. If Tommy is to survive, it is up to Emmaline to find him.

    Linda Holeman brings a bygone period to life in a book of serious historical fiction for young adults.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Lovely Surprise
    When I picked up this book from the library, I wasn't expecting much to be behind the pretty cover. Was I ever in for a surprise! Linda Holeman has created a uniquely beautiful novel that deserves to be much more popular than it is.

    In 1830's England, Emmaline Roke spends her childhood in a a quiet country village. Surrounded by her carefree father Jasper and an idyllic setting, she is shocked when her father dies and her baby brother Tommy's illness harms him tragically. Poverty-stricken without Jasper's money, Emmaline's mother Cat must begin a horrible life of mill work. Then her mother is injured in a mill accident-and the consequences of her accident endager both Cat and Tommy, who is the dearest thing in Emmaline's world. Intelligent, sweet, and determined, Emmaline goes on a quest to rise above her terrible life and save her precious brother.

    Emmaline's story is wonderfully engaging. Holeman writes with beauty and skill, and her somehow quaint style captures the essence and sweetness of Emmaline and Tommy. While in other books a similar story would be dull, this book is filled with enough characterization, fascinating period detail, and complications that it grabs the reader. Emmaline inspired and impressed me, and I couldn't wait to see what happened to her.

    My only complaint with the book is that the ending, although it had excellent themes, was that it seemed a little too rushed. However, everything else about "Search of the Moon King's Daughter" was completely wonderful.

    5-0 out of 5 stars You'd never know by the title
    Picking up this book from the library, I figured it was a fantasy about some Princess on a quest. Imagine my surprise when I found out that it was about Emmaline, an English girl living in the 1800's. When Emmaline's father dies, her mother, her deaf younger brother Tommy, and Emmaline must move away from their country home into a dirty, crowded city. Emmaline's mother goes to work in the mills, and Emmaline herself must work as a seamstress to her Aunt Phoebe.
    Then another tragedy strikes: Emmaline's mother is severely injured at the mills. She can no longer work and worse, she soon becomes hooked on laudanum, the pain-reliever she takes. Not only does she spend all the money Emmaline brings in on the drug, but she also sells Emmaline's few possessions and, eventually, even Tommy.
    When Emmaline finds that her mother has sold Tommy to be a chimneysweep in London, she goes there to find him. The only problems are that London is a big city, and Emmaline has no idea where Tommy is. Besides that, she doesn't have enough money to survive until she finds him.
    This is an awesome book that you will probably enjoy. It's historical fiction, but doesn't make you feel as if you've been lectured. I reccomend this book. ... Read more


    7. The Teacher's Funeral: A Comedy in Three Parts
    by Richard Peck
    list price: $16.99
    our price: $11.55
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0803727364
    Catlog: Book (2004-09)
    Publisher: Dial Books
    Sales Rank: 2068
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    Book Description

    "If your teacher has to die, August isn't a bad time of year forit," begins Richard Peck's latest novel, a book full of his signature wit andsass. Russell Culver is fifteen in 1904, and he's raring to leave his tinyIndiana farm town for the endless sky of the Dakotas. To him, school has beennothing but a chain holding him back from his dreams. Maybe now that his teacherhas passed on, they'll shut the school down entirely and leave him free toroam.

    No such luck. Russell has a particularly eventful season of schooling ahead ofhim, led by a teacher he never could have predicted--perhaps the only teacherequipped to control the likes of him: his sister Tansy. Despite stolen supplies,a privy fire, and more than any classroom's share of snakes, Tansy will manageto keep that school alive and maybe, just maybe, set her brother on a new, wisercourse.

    As he did in A Long Way from Chicago and A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peckcreates a whole world of folksy, one-of-a-kind characters here--the enviable andthe laughable, the adorably meek and the deliciously terrifying. There will beno forgetting Russell, Tansy, and all the rest who populate this hilarious,shrewd, and thoroughly enchanting novel. ... Read more


    8. Number the Stars (Laurel Leaf Books)
    by LOIS LOWRY
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440227534
    Catlog: Book (1998-02-09)
    Publisher: Laurel Leaf
    Sales Rank: 7962
    Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Ten-year-old Annemarie Johansen and her best friend Ellen Rosen often think of life before the war. It's now 1943 and their life in Copenhagen is filled with school, food shortages, and the Nazi soldiers marching through town. When the Jews of Denmark are "relocated," Ellen moves in with the Johansens and pretends to be one of the family. Soon Annemarie is asked to go on a dangerous mission to save Ellen's life.


    From the Paperback edition.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (501)

    5-0 out of 5 stars NL-S Approved Book
    Lois Lowry's book, Number the Stars, is the second best book about the Holocaust that I have ever read. This book is about Annemarie Johansen's family trying to help Ellen Rosen's family get away from the German Nazis. On the way to her uncle's boat, Annemarie is stopped by two Nazis and is late to deliver a special package. The Rosens are brought safely to Sweden where they could live without having to worry about the Nazis.

    I relate to Ellen Rosen in several ways. One way is that I am part Jewish and my family went through the Holocaust. Annnemarie's family helped them to escape to freedom and some family helped mine escape. Another way I relate to Ellen is that by the description of her personality and ways, we are kind of the same.

    I felt this book helped me to see what was actually happening during the Holocaust. I have read this book many times other the last several years of my life, realizing more and more what actually happened. The way Lois describes the setting really helps you visualize the scenes. She describes her scenes with easy understandable words and life like similes. I recommend this book to teenagers but anyone could read it because it is easy to understand and easy to follow. If you like books on the history of the world, read this book because it is a very good reference to the Holocaust.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Number the Stars
    Remarkable, intense and suspenseful are just three of millions of words that describe this book. The book has a groundbreaking plot and keeps you in suspense after every chapter. Read Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. This story depicts a struggle between a brave girl named, Annemarie, trying to help her best friend, a courageous girl, Ellen, a Jewish neighbor. This touching book takes place in the year 1943 when Annemarie and Ellen are fighting for freedom from the Nazi soldiers in Copenhagen, Denmark. When the soldiers invade Annemarie's house, Ellen was disguised as Lise,Annemarie's older sister. Will the soldiers find out who Ellen really is? Lois Lowry wrote very simply, but is very well organized. She keeps you in suspense after every chapter. Read this book and you will find yourself sitting at the edge of your seat. Will Annmarie help Ellen and her family escape the Nazi soldiers?

    5-0 out of 5 stars History lesson in an exciting form
    As Hitler secretly prepared to round up all the Jews of Denmark, someone (to this day no one knows who, although there are some theories) warned the government. The result is that almost all of the 7,500 Jewish people living in Denmark managed to escape the country in the space of a few days, even though the country was already under the occupation of watchful Nazi troops.

    This book is about that escape. Annmarie is 10 years old and lives in the same appartment building as her best friend, Ellen, who is Jewish. One day, Ellen's parents must flee and Ellen moves in with Annmarie and pretends to be her dead sister. Annmarie, her parents, and her little sister must band together with the rest of the Danish resistance to get Ellen to safety.

    This is an exciting, fast-paced book about bravery and doing what's right. The characters are very realistic and human. This is an inspiring story for any child, and it teaches a very interesting history lesson to any adult who might not know the story of how practically no Danish Jews died under Hitler.

    5-0 out of 5 stars girls in a really hard place to be
    This book is exciting and scary. To think girls really had to llive like this is sad but it is a good book. I liked the way they took in the girl to stay with them and the way a girl had to do something scary to try and save her firend form the nazis. If you like this book you will also maybe like other books about girls in hard places to be like Camp of the angel and the bears house as well as pictures of hollis woods.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cool Book!!! Ever!!!
    This is a great book it is funny at some parts, but the rest is all sad. I think it is so cool at every part!!! Ithink everyone should read this book!!! ... Read more


    9. Crispin : The Cross of Lead
    by Avi
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0786816589
    Catlog: Book (2004-06-01)
    Publisher: Hyperion
    Sales Rank: 16855
    Average Customer Review: 3.97 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Book Description

    The 2003 Newbery Award Winner and New York Times Best-seller. "Avi's latest novel is superb combination of mystery, historical fiction, and a coming-of-age tale... Breathlessly paced, beautifully written, and filled with details of life in the Middle Ages, this compelling novel is one of Avi's finest."-Book Report ... Read more

    Reviews (62)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Surviving in Medieval England: Crispin, The Cross of Lead
    The book Crispin, The Cross of Lead can be defined as a "good book" due to the high literary merit used by Avi. In the book, Avi presents the developed theme of survival. A thirteen-year-old boy, who never knew his father, is alone in the world when his mother dies. All he really knew about himself and his past was that everyone called him Asta's son. He is proclaimed a "wolf's head" and must escape the place he's only ever known and find a way to endure. Before he leaves though, Asta's son discovers his real name is actually Crispin. Through his journey, he meets a man named Bear, and he must also learn to survive as his servant. Both the characters and setting are portrayed in such a way that is realistic for the time period they are representing. The vocabulary Avi utilizes describes how fourteenth century England really existed, especially with the social aspects of the period. Avi's pacing and style of the book is appropriate for the content also. Due to the fact that the book is set during Medieval England, most of the book seems to have a slow steady pace to it, especially when Crispin is walking through the forest. As the story grows with more action the pace quickens for the reader, especially where Crispin becomes stuck in some interesting situations, such as when Crispin is running away from his steward, John Aycliffe, in order to stay alive. Even the dialogue offers insight into the characters and their points of view. For example, Bear at the one point in the story gives Crispin the "freedom to choose" if he will join Bear or not on his journey. All Crispin can say is that he has no choice to decide because Bear is his master. Bear says, "Should not every man be master of himself?" Crispin responded with, "You made me call you master," and so Bear chose for him once again. As the plot thickens however, the reader is always wondering what the outcome will be and try to answer the two main dramatic questions of the story--Will Crispin survive in this harsh era? If so, will he ever find out about his past?

    Crispin, The Cross of Lead is an excellent book for grades 4 through 7. Children who appreciate history, especially Medieval England, and value religion would find this book to be extremely enjoyable. Teachers who would like to use this book in their classroom should consider doing a thematic unit on Medieval England. One idea would be that the students could learn about the time period and make food and play games from the 1300's. Another thought would be that the teacher could incorporate math by teaching the students about a number line and have them make time line about Medieval England. The teacher could also teach the students about how the world was different back then in order to integrate science. For the summative assessment, the students could put together a Medieval fair in their classroom or for even the whole school and write an article for their school newspaper about the fair. Also, in a parochial school, teachers could incorporate this book into a theology lesson, especially because of the characters moral beliefs.

    5-0 out of 5 stars JD's Book Review
    I loved this book, I couldn't put it down.I think that Avi outdid himself."Asta's son" is what he's been called all of his life, but the town's priest tells him that his name is Crispin.One of the most important things to Crispin is that his mother, that is deceased now, had a cross of lead that she gave to him.Well the book goes on to tell that Crispin has been declared a "wolf's head", so this steward named John Aycliffe and his men try to catch Crispin.But he escaped just to a village where he meets a man called Bear.Bear takes Crispin in as an aprentice.They were looking for a town named Great Wexly and they find it.They go to a place called Green Man's Tavern to stay for a while.But if you want to know more about you will have to read it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars crispin
    The beginning started off slow and boring. Then little by little it got better and better. When Crispin finds out Cerdic lead him into the trap is when the book started to get better. Next Crispin starts is wandering away. Then Crispin finds Bear. Bear was scary in the beginning and nice, father like towards the rest of the book. it starts to get boring until Bear teaches Crispin to play the recorder and performs in the first town. The best part is when they enter Great Wexly. Read the book to find out the rest. The book over all has a good concept. p.s.- The boring parts don't last very long.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Crispin
    The book Crispin is a great book! It is good because, it keeps you thinking what's going to happen next. Crispin is about a boy named Crispin who is on his own because his mom dies. Throughout the book Crispin tries to figure out who he is. He meets people who help him figure out who he is. One of their names is Bear . He is a big help to Crispin. The author Avi wanted to keep you reading. This book was a little slow in the beginning, but it got really good! I recommend this book to anyone who likes adventure and mystery.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Crispin crisping in the fire, by Mark Prior
    Crispin could have possibly been the worst book and most boring book that I've ever read. Crispin, a wolf's head, runs away from his town to avoid being executed. He meets a man named Bear who teaches him an instrument so they'll work as a team to earn a few pennies. Then, when the book gets good, it gets boring again. As religious as this book is, God was certainly not with the author when he was writing this book. ... Read more


    10. My Brother Sam Is Dead (Point)
    by James Lincoln Collier
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 059042792X
    Catlog: Book (1989-01-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
    Sales Rank: 34948
    Average Customer Review: 4.07 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    All his life, Tim Meeker has looked up to his brother Sam.Sam's smart and brave -- and is now a part of the American Revolution.Not everyone in town wants to be a part of the rebellion.Most are supporters of the British -- including Tim and Sam's father. With the war soon raging, Tim know he'll have to make a choice -- between the Revolutionaries and the Redcoats . . . and between his brother and his father.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (235)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Historical-fiction book
    This book was an assigned as a 7th grade Knglish assignement. The teacher chose to read. Our class read this book in the fall of 1999. I read the most part of this book at home. I think this book is more of a kick back relax sort of book.

    This book is an historical-fiction which takes place in the Revolutionary War. The story gives the point of view of a young boy whose brother goes off to fight in the war. The boy is faced with a challenge, in which he has to decide whether to be a Patriot like his brother or a loyalist like his father. This book has a political conflict, character conflict, and a personal conflict. This book is a good example of irony because what I was expecting didn't happen. With the way the book started I didn't expect this ending.

    I liked this book because it kept you on the edge of you seat. It keeps the reader interested by throwing corners at you when you least expect it. It taught me about a historical period. It gave examples of how those people were living in those conditions. I thought it was good book because it told you everything you wanted to know about that period.

    4-0 out of 5 stars My Brother Sam Is Dead - A Cool Book
    My Brother Sam Is Dead is a very realistic book. It gives the reader an idea of how bad war really is. It shows what can come of war: death and sadness. In the story war is breaking apart families. The main character is Tim Meeker. His brother, Sam, is fighting on the side of the patriots while his father supports the English king. Tim doesn't know what side to be on. He's split between his brother and his father. Most people are used to reading books about the Revolutionary War that based on the patriots' thoughts and ideas. This book gives you experiences from both sides, Patriot and British. I recommend that you read this book!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Stupendous Book- A Must Read
    The book "My Brother Sam Is Dead" is a very heart-warming book. It is about family who is broken up by the Revolutionary War. The father is on the British side while his son, Sam, is fighting for the Patriots. It is very dramatic and has some older language. It is also gory and intense. This book is very descriptive in its war parts, which is awesome.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A good book.
    My Brother Sam is dead was a good book. L liked the book becouse it took place in a setting was very discriptive. I liked the fact that a family in it fought for each other. Even when they disagrea on a lot of topics. The book has a good sence of humer for how seriose the topic of the story. Like when Sam was talking about stealing Old Bess (the gun) wile putting chicken eggs in a basket with holes in the bottom of it. The book is the third most favorite book I read this year. The book cept its carictors vary discriptive and interesting through the hole book. But the oldest sun Sam gets in trubble with the law. He gets exicuted. That was the only part of the story I was not interested in. Since the famaly was so close or becoase he was so nise he didn't even commit the crime.His father tries to help even though they don't always get along all the time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I didnt want to read it, but i loved it.
    I read, My Brother Sam Is Dead. I liked this book a lot. It is not the usual kind of books I read but I really enjoyed this book. It kept me just wanting to keep on reading it was so good. A lot of unexpected things happened in the story.

    All Tim Meeker's life, Tim looked up to his brother, Sam. Sam is very smart and brave and always knows the right thing to do. In fact, everyone in Redding admired Sam Meeker... until now.
    Now Sam is part of the American revolutionary army. He talks about defeating the British and becoming independent and free. However, not everyone in town wants to be a part of this new America. Most people are loyal supporters of the English King, especially Tim and Sam's father.
    The war is raging and Tim knows he'll have to make a choice. However, how can he choose- when it means fighting his father on one side and fighting is brother on the other?


    I would recommend this book to everyone. This is almost all the genres. Mystery, historical fiction, suspense and sad. It's a GREAT book. I hope you read... MY BROTHER SAM IS DEAD. ... Read more


    11. Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes
    by Eleanor Coerr, Ronald Himler
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0698118022
    Catlog: Book (1999-12-01)
    Publisher: Puffin Books
    Sales Rank: 32124
    Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Hiroshima-born Sadako is lively and athletic--the star of her school's running team. And then the dizzy spells start. Soon gravely ill with leukemia, the "atom bomb disease," Sadako faces her future with spirit and bravery. Recalling a Japanese legend, Sadako sets to work folding paper cranes. For the legend holds that if a sick person folds one thousand cranes, the gods will grant her wish and make her healthy again. Based on a true story, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes celebrates the extraordinary courage that made one young woman a heroine in Japan.

    Includes instructions on how to fold your own paper crane!

    "An extraordinary book, one no reader will fail to find compelling and unforgettable." --Booklist

    * A Puffin Novel
    * Black-and-white illustrations
    * 80 pages
    * Ages 8-12

    * An NCSS-CBC Notable Children's Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies
    * A Child Study Children's Book Committee Children's Book of the Year
    ... Read more

    Reviews (117)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Sadako and the thousand paper cranes
    The book was interesting, because it had a good story line. I give this book three stars. This story was based on a little girl named Sadako. The book was about the past,on war. The story did not have much action in this book. It was a really good story. The cover of the book looked interesting and the name of it souned interesting. It was a sad story, it was about a radiation sickness an atom bomb droped on Sadako's home villiage. I recomend this book to evrey body!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Sadako's Life
    I think that "Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes" by Eleanor Coerr is one of the greatest books anyone can read. Now Sadako is one of my favorite books. When I read the book I felt sadness in my heart. If you read this book I don't think you would ever forget it. Usually the books that I get are boring in the beginning but this book is exiting in every little detail. The story is about a little girl that named Sadako, and was two years old when the World War 2 had started. One of the bombs made her sick. Then she had to go to the hospital because of the sickness. I guarantee you that this book is great, aswome, and interesting. But in the end it's sad. So read this book if you want to find out more!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very important children's literature
    I received this book free as a child when another one of my books (from a school book order) didn't arrive in time. Reading it really made a big impression on me and definitely gave me a perspective of the WWII that I would not have heard about in school. It is a short read, but really gets a lot of great information and emotion in that short space. To me this book is just as important reading as the Diary of Anne Frank.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Story
    I read this book called "Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes" because it was so interesting and please buy this book!!! I thought it was sad and exciting. Sadako gets leukemia and she likes to run and make paper cranes. Sadako likes to celebrate Oban Day and go to Memorials. If you want to learn more about "Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes" buy it now!!!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes
    Sadako is a fine story and it shows how to do a paper crane in the end it is a very sad story to read and when Sadako almost made it to 1,000 paper crane and only made 644 paper cranes she was a great girl who lived in Japan and her friends helped her make 1,000 paper crane her sprit stilled lived.

    By:
    Eduardo ... Read more


    12. The Sign of the Beaver
    by ELIZABETH GEORGE SPEARE
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440479002
    Catlog: Book (1994-07-01)
    Publisher: Yearling
    Sales Rank: 41213
    Average Customer Review: 4.03 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Left alone to guard the family's wilderness home in eighteenth-century Maine, a boy is hard-pressed to survive until local Indians teach him their skills. ... Read more

    Reviews (108)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A fifth grade reading book
    Sign of the Beaver is about a boy named Matt that lives in the woods with his father. One day his father leaves while he is sleeping. He knows where he went. A month later he met some Indians and started to read a book to a Indian. The book was about the dad leaving and an Indian helping out. I think this is a great book! Matt thinks that the Indan (Attean) is very inpolite. But the more Matt and Attean are around each other they get used to one another and become good friends, and Attean teaches Matt to hunt. He never finds his father, but he finds a good friend and he is no longer afraid or alone.At the end his father comes back with his family and they lived a new life.I hope you love this book!!!

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Review of the Beaver
    "THE SIGN OF THE BEAVER" is a adventure packed book that Justin really likes. It's about a family that is moving up to Maine in the late 1700's. Matt's dad left him at the cabin, while he went back to get the rest of the family back in Quincy, Massachusetts. Matt who is 12 years old decides to get honey from a bee's hive in a tree and instead he gets stung. Two indians save him and supply him with food for a while. The Chief Saknis and his grandson Attean help him back to full health. saknis asks Matt if he would teach Attean how to read and so Matthew Hallowell does. Attean also teaches Matt a lot of very usefull survival skills. He teaches Matt how to catch rabits with a snare and how to make a wood fish hook quickly and made well. Attean also shows him the signs of other indian tribes and warns him not to tresspass and to mark your path with like a broken branch or two rocks ontop of each other. Matt has a fun time but he can't get Attean to be proud of him. When Mr.Hallowell (Matt's dad) dosn't come after three weeks when he sould have Saknis asks Matt if he wants to come with them because his dad might not come back. Matt does wonder if he sould go North with Attean or stay and wate for his dad. What will he decide? It's a mind-unsettling question. Read to figure out what Matt decides and what happens after that...

    5-0 out of 5 stars We love it!
    We first checked out this audio-tape out from the library when my son was 7. He loved it on that first long car trip, and we have checked it out 3 more times since then. Today, I bought it on Amazon.com for our trip this summer.
    If you have a boy (or girl) who likes to listen to stories, this is a great one. As a Mom, I like that the boy learns to survive, works hard, and shows respect for others and their culture......a great role model for young kids today.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Horrible Put Down
    I hated this book so much! It was horrible. Nothing ever happend, it was one big bore! Don't read this book unless you are forced to. I would rather eat vetegtables than read this book . DO NOT READ !

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Sign Of The Beaver
    This is a good book. In the begining it is boring but keep on reading because it becomes fasinating. Matt's family leaves and
    Matt has to watch over the cabbin. Soon after they leave, a guy named ben came and stole Matt's gun. The Native American tribe (the beaver tribe) found matt and helped him. He becomes good friends with Attean (someone from the beaver tribe). But soon Attean and his tribe have to leave and they ask Matt to come with them and matt says.............Wait i'm not going to tell you how it ends if I told you it would be a total waste because the book is better. So read The Sign Of The Beaver and you'll find out. This book is an adventure book and also fun book. I just didn't want to put it down. So read this book and I hope you feel the same way I do!! ... Read more


    13. Out of the Dust (Apple Signature Edition)
    by Karen Hesse
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590371258
    Catlog: Book (1999-01-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 10601
    Average Customer Review: 4.08 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Introduce your students to a Newbery Award winning book with this engaging teaching guide. Includes an author biography, chapter summaries, creative cross-curricular activities, vocabulary builders, reproducibles, and discussion questions. ... Read more

    Reviews (628)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Out of the Dust Critique
    I think the novel "Out of the Dust" is a great, emotional story. It was very touching and I thought that it was neat that Karen Hesse wrote the story in free verse poems. The poems gave me enough information for my imagination to fill in. I could read the story at many levels.

    It is about a 14- year old girl, named Billie Jo. She suffered terrible dust storms in Kansas, the death of her mother, a non- communicative father, and the burning of her hands. She really liked to play the piano and was the smartest kid in the state.

    In the beginning of the book, her father worked on the farm, her mother did work around the house, and Billie Jo helped out, played the piano, and went to school.

    In the middle, a terrible accident happened. The Dad placed a pail of kerosene in the kitchen, and Ma thought it was water. She tried to make coffee using the kerosene. Then the pail caught on fire and Ma ran outside. Billie Jo picked up the bucket to keep the house from burning, and ran outside with it. As soon as she was outside, she threw the pail. Ironically, Ma was running back inside. The burning pail hit Ma and she was engulfed in flames. Billie Jo pushed her down and tried to put out the flames, burning her hands badly. A month later, Ma died, giving birth to a baby, who died shortly after. The tragedy was so horrible that I was drawn to find out how the story would end. Yet, the author didn't overwhelm me with morbid details.

    Billie Jo and her dad barely talked. It took time for the two to work out their problems. At the end of the book, they met a woman who acted like Ma. She was called Louise. Pa married her and Billie Jo forgave him and vice versa. They overcame the past and moved on in life.

    I like how Billie Jo gradually developed the problems and gradually solved them. In doing this, the author made everything believable.

    The whole story improved with the addition of Louise. There was always tension between Ma and Dad. Louise's influence brought calmness to Dad and Billie Jo. She also re-introduced Ma's good ideas to Pa, who finally acted on them.
    Louise also helped Billie Jo's confidence and sense of family increase. Through all this, these three characters grew in positive ways.

    In summary, the free verse poems, which encouraged my imagination and the gradual positive resolution of Billie Jo's and Dad's problems, left me feeling stronger and more positive about life. This story touches anyone who reads it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Out of the Dust
    I recently finished reading the book "Out of the Dust" by Karen Hesse. We are studying the Great Depression in history, and my History teacher thought it would be appropriate to read this book for further knowledge, and in depth descriptions. I think that reading this book, while studying the Great Depression is a great combination, and results in a rapid increase of knowledge. One of the most unique characteristics about this book is that it is written in diary format, completely in free verse poems, by Billie Jo, a 13-year-old girl living in Okalahoma, during the dust bowl. The best thing about expressing literature in poetry is that it adds emphasis on the dramatic parts; they also add emotion to places where emotion makes history a reality. Page upon page, Billie Jo describes how the dust storms impact the crops, as well as everyday life, and also how it feels to be living in the middle of the biggest dust storm in all of America; the Dust Bowl. As Billie Jo describes life during a dust storm, you are swept from your everyday life and brought into the reality of being in a dust storm. The descriptions are great, you feel as if you are Billie Jo, venturing into the wind, not being able to see, dust filling your mouth. This book explains the causes, effects, and impacts of the Great Depression, as well as many aspects of The New Deal. The FERA (federal emergency rescue association), a program in The New Deal, helps Billie Jo and her family with the farm, the CCC is also mentioned in the book. The story is not all about the dust storms however; "Out of the Dust" has a great plot, with many different things to pull you in farther. Many events happen that will alter Billie Jo's life forever, a horrible accident scars Billie Jo both mentally and physically, after which her relationship with her father will never be the same. As Billie Jo pursues to sort out her many family problems she surprisingly digs deeper into her soul than she ever thought was possible, finding things out about herself that she had never known before. I enjoyed this book very much, and I know you will too. If you enjoy learning more, while having suspense and a great, enthralling plot, this book is definitely for you!

    4-0 out of 5 stars it's a good story
    Recommendation-
    I recommend this book to anyone that's 13 years old and up because the first part of the story is emotional. Billy's mom died. "Ma died that day giving birth to my brother." Billy's mom died because of the fire in which she was burned badly. This is why I recommend this book to older kids. I like this book because when people that are close to you pass away it shows how you can get on with your live. "I was invited to graduation, to play the piano." This citation shows that people start to think that Billy is normal, and she can play the piano again.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent book. Makes you think about what you have.
    I read Out of The Dust when i was probably 11, and i LOVED it! For me, i love stories with a lot of drama and stories that make me cry. Some people don't like that feeling when reading a book. like i said though, i like it. As well as tears, there were also some laughs. it's a quick read and deffinately a good one!

    1-0 out of 5 stars NO GO FOR BILLIE JO
    I'm sorry but unless you are looking to throw yourself in a state of depression, this book is of no use to you.
    The story is about a girl who loses almost everything she has in a fire taking place around the time of the Dust Bowl. Sounds happy, huh?
    And when I say that the girl, Billie Jo, loses almost everything, which is closer to 'everything' than 'almost', I mean, she loses almost everything.
    Family? Her mother and unborn brother die in a kitchen fire, and the saddest part is that their deaths could have been prevented if Billie Jo hadn't flung boiling water out the door her mother had been walking through, and as you might imagine, that causes grief for Billie Jo, and her father as well. In fact, he goes on to become an alcoholic, or something like it, who lives in oblivion to pretty much everything. Even Billie Jo suffers from physical pain, when her hands were severely burned from the pot of boiling water she had unintentionally flung at her mother, causing her death.

    Belongings? Well, her family, or as the previous reviewer put it, 'what was left of it'..(I give you credit, whoever you are!) ...lost their fields, which were their main staple of income, in the dust bowl.
    Now, you might think that I'm exaggerating, but I assure you I am not. Before I had read it, my friends had told me how sick a book this was (and darn it, I couldn't agree more) and I just read it because I thought THEY were the ones exaggerating.
    So, you can be like me, If you wish, and go along and read it, which might not be such a bad idea, so you can get a taste for yourself how morally depressing this book is, or you can play it safe and not risk the nightmares. ... Read more


    14. How the Amazon Queen Fought the Prince of Egypt
    list price: $16.95
    our price: $11.53
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0689844344
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
    Publisher: Atheneum
    Sales Rank: 10834
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    CAN WOMAN EVER CONQUER MAN?

    Queen Serpot rules the Land of Women, where the Amazon women live free, without men, and hunt and fight their own battles. But one day their peace is broken. An army of Egyptian soldiers is approaching their land, led by their prince, Pedikhons.

    Pedikhons has heard stories of these warrior women. Now he has come to see them with his own eyes -- and to challenge them to combat. But the brave Serpot and her women are full of surprises. Can woman truly equal man in strength and courage?

    This story of love and war is based on an actual Egyptian scroll from the Greco-Roman period. Hieroglyphic translations of key phrases, intricate paintings in the Egyptian and Assyrian styles, and extensive notes about both cultures enrich this fascinating, untold legend. ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and Edifying
    Applause to Tamara Bower for bringing back to life a story heard by ancient ears.Her attention to artistic detail makes this book a visual feast.With all of the information included in this book it is interesting for children as well as for adults.
    Thank you Tamara Bower for this treasure!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beautifully told and illustrated
    This story is an ancient tale with a modern sensibility. Two great leaders, a prince and a queen, who do not know much about each other at first, rise to battle each other, then learn to respect each other and join forces. It's a great story of adventure, empowerment and acceptance, beautifully told with Tamara Bower's rich, colorful, hieroglyphic style paintings. This is a great book for anyone who likes Egyptian art and classic storytelling. ... Read more


    15. The Witch of Blackbird Pond (Laurel Leaf Books)
    by ELIZABETH GEORGE SPEARE
    list price: $6.50
    our price: $5.85
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440995779
    Catlog: Book (1978-06-01)
    Publisher: Laurel Leaf
    Sales Rank: 9905
    Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Kit Tyler is marked by suspicion and disapproval from the moment she arrives on the unfamiliar shores of colonial Connecticut in 1867. Alone and desperate, she has been forced to leave her beloved home on the island of Barbados and join a
    family she has never met. Torn between her quest for belonging and her desire to be true to herself, Kit struggles to survive in a hostile place. Just when it seems she must give up, she finds a kindred spirit. But Kit"s friendship with Hannah Tupper, believed by the colonists to be a witch, proves more taboo than she could have imagined and ultimately forces Kit to choose between her heart and her duty.
    Elizabeth George Speare"s Newbery Award–winning novel portrays a heroine whom readers will admire for her unwavering sense of truth as well as her infinite capacity to love.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (293)

    4-0 out of 5 stars ThE wItCh Of BlAcKbIrD pOnD--a GrEaT bOoK--
    Kit Tyler was once a rich girl of Barbados, but upon her grandfather's death, she finds out that she now is poor. She goes aboard the ship, the Dolphin, heading for Connecticut Colony, and wishes to live a better life at her aunt's house. While on the way, she becomes friends with the captain's son, Nat Eaton, John Holbrook, a man planning on becoming a minister, and Prudence, a little girl. When she finally arrives at her destination, she tries to fit in with the Puritans, and to keep up with her lively cousin, Judith, and her gentle one, Mercy. After a number of different accidents in the family and outside, she finds becomes friends with an old Quaker woman named Hannah, that lives at Blackbird Pond, who is said to be a witch. Kit does not believe this, and she keeps on being friends with the old woman. But, the villagers see Kit as a threat to the community, since they do not trust her as being a friend to their witch, and she goes on trial. Just as she thinks she is doomed, Nat Eaton and Prudence save her. However, Kit discovers that she will never fit in with the Puritans, and planned on going on the Dolphin the next time the ship came. Finally, the ship docks, and she goes on it, for what seems to be a much better future.

    My favorite part of the book was where Kit goes on trial. I thought of this at my favorite part for I think it is very interesting to hear how other people act to problems and try to blame it on someone else. I think it is very funny how people think of small problems and turn them into what sounds like a major disasters performed by a witch. I like the part where Prudence comes in, and stuns her own parents by doing what they had never thought she would be able to do, which was reading the Bible and writing her own name. I think it is not right when parents think very little about kids and think they are still their little babies that always need their parents to help them.

    I recommend this book to kids the ages of 10 and up. I also recommend adults to read this book and learn the facts of how kids can do things without any help from their parents or any one else. I believe Elizabeth George Speare is a great author who has written many books that I have enjoyed. After reading this book, I came to really enjoy it. At first I thought it was very boring, but in the end, it became more interesting and fun. I also learned not to judge anyone by what people say about them, but you should always think about your judgement before actually thinking about if it is true or not. I now understand the meaning of "Never judge a book by its cover."

    4-0 out of 5 stars A FASCINATING TALE!
    A witch? Someone thinks you are a witch? When Kit leaves Barbados on the lovely Dolphin ship to live in America with her Uncle, she is unprepared for what she encounters. What a surprise when she discovers that being able to read, swim, wear fancy clothes, as well as befriending a kind old woman is odd behavior for this town. In The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Elizabeth George Spears sends you on a reading adventure. The story includes a number of surprising and suspenseful events including a frightening witch hunt and a big outcry among some angry villagers against their government. Some parts of the story are a little boring, but the elaborate language and unpredictable moments bring you right back into the book. The climax of this book is the best part. It's unbeleivable and exciting. The main character, Kit, is very interesting. You will feel like you know her only after reading a few pages. Fiesty, wise, and stubborn are some of Kit's personality traits. You will also become very familiar with many of the other characters including Kit's two cousins, her Aunt and Uncle, Nat a seaman, and John and William two very interesting men, plus many more! This book has many hidden lessons in it. It teaches you about friendship, trust, bravery, genorosity, and happiness, It will fill you with sorrow and joy, and is a very adventurous story loved by many!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Diverse Religions, and History
    Kit comes over to the 13 colonies becuae her grandfather died. When she arrives, she finds a place very diffrent from her former home, Barbados. She is forced by her strict uncle to be a solemn as the puritans, and to set aside her silk gowns and wear homespun dresses. she feels completly stifled by her new life, and one day, after almost cuasing her crippled cousin her teaching job, she breaks. She runs to the "meadow" where she meets Hannah Tupper, a Quaker who is shuned and thought to be a witch by many. All she really is is a kind old lady. She takes kit home and feeds her, and helps her be brave and get her cousins job back. kit goes back to Hannahs house and eventually meets Hannahs seafaring friend, none other than Nat, the son of the man who brought her to America.And yes Nat was on the boat the whole time kit was. Then one day Kit is accused of being a witch. Something not to be taken lightly in the 1600's. She is rescued by none other than Nat. Then hannah is going to be burned out of her house, or if the people have their way, in her house. But Kit goes and helps Hannah get out before the evil people come, and she gets her on a ship... whose ship? Guess. Nats. And so Hannahs gone and Kits life is drudging on a usual.... and then someone comes... like you can't guess who... and something happens...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Now that's what I call a "living" book
    I just finished reading this book aloud to my 3 children. They are a tough audience but this book made the history lesson extra smooth. They were begging for "just one more chapter".

    This book delves into the Puritan lifestyle,touches a bit on some of the sentiments of the colonists and their fierce independence, briefly touches on some of the archaic medical practices of the times, shows how easily innocent circumstances turned into witch hunts and sparked a conversation about how people can fall into a mob mentality and much more.

    There is tons of information here to spark an interest in children to dig deeper. Our family highly recommends it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent lesson to be learned
    I discovered this book years and years ago in the fourth grade. The thought of it stayed with me through the years. I bought the book for my friend's son a couple years ago and reread it to see if it was as good as I remembered. It was even better because as an adult I can see some of the most important themes of the book that weren't evident to a child. Tolerance and acceptance are perhaps the biggest lessons of all to take away from it. Independence is another. I will continue to buy this book every time a child close to me comes to the age where they can understand it. The plotline is enough to keep them interested while at the same time teaching them valuable life lessons, without them even knowing it. ... Read more


    16. Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy
    by Gary D. Schmidt
    list price: $15.00
    our price: $10.20
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0618439293
    Catlog: Book (2004-05-24)
    Publisher: Clarion Books
    Sales Rank: 173143
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    It only takes a few hours for Turner Buckminster to start hating Phippsburg, Maine. No one in town will let him forget that he's a minister's son, even if he doesn't act like one. But then he meets Lizzie Bright Griffin, a smart and sassy girl from a poor nearby island community founded by former slaves. Despite his father's-and the town's-disapproval of their friendship, Turner spends time with Lizzie, and it opens up a whole new world to him, filled with the mystery and wonder of Maine's rocky coast.
    The two soon discover that the town elders, along with Turner's father, want to force the people to leave Lizzie's island so that Phippsburg can start a lucrative tourist trade there. Turner gets caught up in a spiral of disasters that alter his life-but also lead him to new levels of acceptance and maturity.
    This sensitively written historical novel, based on the true story of a community's destruction, highlights a unique friendship during a time of change.Author's note.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Richie's Picks: LIZZIE BRIGHT AND THE BUCKMINSTER BOY
    "From so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved."
    --Charles Darwin, THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES

    "Like angels appearing in the sky,
    whales are proof of God."
    --Cynthia Rylant, THE WHALES

    Because it is based upon a series of true, race-related events in Maine during the early 1900s, LIZZIE BRIGHT AND THE BUCKMINSTER BOY might make you think of Karen Hesse's WITNESS. Several of the "good guy" characters--Mrs. Carr and the elder Mrs. Hurd, for example--have a charm reminiscent of the idiosyncratic folk in BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE. But, because of the depth of the evil behind the tragic real events upon which the fictional story of Lizzie and Turner is built, the feelings of despair and anger with which we're left evoke memories of such books as MISSISSIPPI TRIAL, 1955 and TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

    The enchanting Lizzie Bright Griffin, a girl of great strength and few words, belongs to the youngest of many generations of African Americans who have called Malaga Island home.

    "Lizzie held close against her grandfather as the people of Malaga Island came out from the pine woods, gathered around their preacher on the shore to hear what had been said. Before they turned, Lizzie felt her grandfather ebb as though his soul were passing out of him, the way the last waves of a falling tide pass into still air and are gone. "She took a deep breath, and she wasn't just breathing in the air. She breathed in the waves, the sea grass, the pines, the pale lichens on the granite, the sweet shimmering of the pebbles dragged back and forth in the surf, the fish hawk diving to the waves, the dolphin jumping out of them.
    "She would not ebb.
    "Then she turned with her grandfather to tell the gathering people of Malaga that times had moved on, and they would have to leave their homes."

    Across the water, on the mainland, Turner is the new kid in town. And even worse--from his perspective--he's the new minister's son.

    "Turner Buckminster had lived in Phippsburg, Maine, for almost six whole hours.
    "He didn't know how much longer he could stand it."

    Here, as with the fight over the towers in Elaine Konigsburg's THE OUTCASTS OF 19 SCHUYLER PLACE, the root of conflict involves money and property values. Phippsburg's shipbuilding industry is dying, and the local "boys with the bucks" reckon that tourism may be the source of future prosperity if only the "less desirable" portion of the community can be run out of town.

    " 'Would you look at that monkey go? Look at her go. She climbing down or falling?' Deacon Hurd watched the last leap to the ground. 'Sheriff Elwell, I believe she thought you might shoot her.'
    " 'Wouldn't have been any trouble, Mr. Hurd. One less colored in the world.' "

    The character who is most difficult to decipher in this story of Turner's coming of age is his father. Reverend Buckminster was hired by the church leadership and is supposed to be serving God. However, he is being pulled in various directions: by the white community, by his own knowledge and conscience (or sometimes lack thereof), and by the beliefs of the maturing son he apparently loves, albeit in a stiff, 1912 Congregationalist ministerial fashion.

    "And suddenly, Turner had a thought that had never occurred to him before: he wondered if his father really believed a single thing he was saying.
    "And suddenly, Turner had a second thought that had never occurred to him before: he wondered if he believed a single thing his father was saying."

    Reverend Buckminster is but one of several characters who end up throwing Turner a curveball.

    The innocent, against-all-odds friendship that develops between Turner and Lizzie repeatedly caused me shivers, delight, and despair. It is first among the many reasons why LIZZIE BRIGHT AND THE BUCKMINSTER BOY is an entertaining and important piece of YA historic fiction. (...) ... Read more


    17. The Secret Garden
    by Frances Hodgson Burnett
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 006440188X
    Catlog: Book (1998-04-30)
    Publisher: HarperTrophy
    Sales Rank: 1171
    Average Customer Review: 4.51 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Mistress Mary is quite contrary until she helps her garden grow. Along the way, she manages to cure her sickly cousin Colin, who is every bit as imperious as she. These two are sullen little peas in a pod, closed up in a gloomy old manor on the Yorkshire moors of England, until a locked-up garden captures their imaginations and puts the blush of a wild rose in their cheeks; "It was the sweetest, most mysterious-looking place any one could imagine. The high walls which shut it in were covered with the leafless stems of roses which were so thick, that they matted together.... 'No wonder it is still,' Mary whispered. 'I am the first person who has spoken here for ten years.'" As new life sprouts from the earth, Mary and Colin's sour natures begin to sweeten. For anyone who has ever felt afraid to live and love, The Secret Garden's portrayal of reawakening spirits will thrill and rejuvenate. Frances Hodgson Burnett creates characters so strong and distinct, young readers continue to identify with them even 85 years after they were conceived. (Ages 9 to 12) ... Read more

    Reviews (165)

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Secret Garden a review by super-girl
    The Secret Garden

    Have you ever discovered a place that has bee locked up for a long time? If so, then you can relate to The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Mary Lennox, the protagonist, moves from India to Misselthwaite, England because her parents die of cholera. She lives with her cousin Colin Craven, who thinks he's a cripple and believes he is never going to walk. Mary tries to convince him that he's not a cripple. The children meet Dickon, a local boy who they call the animal charmer. Together they find a magical world inside a garden.

    Mary, Dickon, and Colin find the garden left alone and locked. They find a key with the help of Robin and then start to garden without anyone knowing it. Mary and Colin are very frail like a toothpick, but then they grow because the fresh air makes them well. Dickon is a teacher because he shows them how to garden.

    Then, on a rainy day, Mary and Colin go into rooms in the house that are locked up and they learn about their ancestors. In Colin's room Mary sees a portrait hidden under a tarpaulin, she opens it and sees picture of Colin's Mother (Mrs. Craven). Mary asks Colin why it is covered and he tells her that he doesn't want to see her because she reminds him of his Father and how he is mad at him because he will be a hunchback. Finally, Mary and Colin learn to overcome their tantrums and the fears of never seeing their parents again. When the children are in the garden, they were caught by one of the gardeners, however he said that he wouldn't tell because he himself had been inside the garden.

    Read to find out if the children ever get caught in the garden again, or if Colin ever walks. Ladies and gentlemen, I invite and encourage you to read The Secret Garden.

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of my childhood favorites -- and I still love it!
    I can't count how many times I read this book in elementary school -- dozens, I'm sure. I still read it occasionally and listen to the musical.

    Here's a brief synopsis: Mary Lennox is a bitter child whose parents live in India during the very early 1900s (approximately). Her mother and father pay no attention to her, and she is spoiled, selfish and temperamental. When cholera kills her parents, she is sent to live with her uncle -- a hunchback who lives in a huge mansion on the Yorkshire moors.

    Slowly and with the help of the maid, the maid's brother, and the gardener, Mary becomes a normal, happy child. But her uncle never sees her and is rarely there. He was devastated by his wife's untimely death years earlier and cannot bear to be in the house where they lived together.

    Mary also hears a mysterious crying that no one else seems to. She investigates and discovers it is her cousin, Colin, who refuses to see anyone, believing he is crippled. His father can't bear to look at him because his mother died in childbirth. Mary and Colin discover his mother's garden, long neglected, and eventually Colin realizes he is perfectly healthy and learns to walk again.

    This is one of those books every little girl should read. It will stay in your heart forever.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic
    I think that this is FHB's best book. Although I certainly enjoy the romatic ideas of diamond mines, life-size dolls, and (completly platonic) secret admirers (as all appear in "A Little Princess") nothing beats the spunky nature and burgeonng independance of Mary, Colin and Dickon.

    After her parents die of Cholera, spoiled brat Mary is sent to live with her uncle in Yorshire. She is shocked, absolutely shocked, to find a world that is the complete opposite of India. Not just the weather: gone is the fully staffed nursery which completely revolved around her every whim (and she had a lot of them) and in its place is a local maid who brings her breakfast and that's about it. Mary doesn't even know how to dress herself.

    Appalled at first by the notion of having to look after herself, Mary discovers that it's really not so bad. Especially when she discovers a secret garden that has been locked for ten years. Together with her cousin, a boy as bratty and obnoxious as she is, and Dickon, a local boy with a way with living things, she sets about to bring the garden back to life. Mary and Colin, who have been raised with fairly good intentions and plenty of material possesions but no real love, learn what love is as they care for and nurture the garden.

    Burnett really has an ear for children's dialogue, and she brings a real sympathy to Colin and Mary even when they are at their most obnoxious. In addition, their transformation is believable, complete with little relapses into their self-absorbed natures.

    This is a book that is perfect for people of all ages.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Anything is possible
    AThe Secret Garden had an inspirational effect on me. Frances Hodgson Burnett was able to show you that no matter how rough life gets, you always have a single ray of hope. Through realistic characters, she was able to show the value of life. Each character was so detailed and developed it was as if you were watching it all happen. Whether you believe in magic or not, it feels as if something is with you while you are reading. This story has been made into a movie. However, the book has a warmer nature as opposed to the movie.
    Mary was an unloved unwanted child with everything she could ever want except for a family. Due to the fact that her mother didn't want her around, her nanny would do anything for her to keep her happy. After her mother's death the only person left to keep her was her uncle in England. Coming from India, the people in England didn't expect Mary to be so picky. She finds that in order to stay amused she must overcome her selfish nature and do things on her own. This leads her to find her cousin, Colin. In time, they both learn to appreciate life and the only way to make it is to stop worrying and start believing. Mr. Craven, Mary's uncle, locked up parts of the manor and a special garden after his wife's death 10 years earlier. So, when it is found it is to be kept a secret between six new friends, until it can be revealed to Colin's father, which could or could not happen.
    I would rate this book a 4 because, there were s things I didn't agree with. Some of the less important characters were too developed and it is a long story. I did like that it gave me a warm feeling, as if anything is possible. I'm still thinking about how I can change someone's day the same way they did for each other. The only way to enjoy the miracle is to read it yourself.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Secret Garden
    I liked the book alot because it had alot of excitment and talked about Mary finding a room that was her aun'ts room. I liked the part where she found a key that opened the gate to the secret garden. ... Read more


    18. Judy Moody Declares Independence (Judy Moody)
    by Megan McDonald, Peter Reynolds
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 076362361X
    Catlog: Book (2005-06-30)
    Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
    Sales Rank: 278849
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    19. Amazing Impossible Erie Canal (Aladdin Picture Books)
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0689825846
    Catlog: Book (1999-06-01)
    Publisher: Aladdin
    Sales Rank: 203342
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    IMPOSSIBLE!

    When De Witt Clinton, a young politician, first dreams of building a canal to connect the Hudson River with the Great Lakes, folks don't believe such a thing can be done. But eight long years after the first shovelful of earth is dug, Clinton realizes his vision at last. The longest uninterrupted canal in history has been built, and it is now possible to travel by water from the American prairie all the way to Europe!

    Join Cheryl Harness on a fascinating and fun-filled trip as she depicts the amazing construction and workings of the Erie Canal. From the groundbreaking ceremony on the Fourth of July in 1817 to a triumphant journey down America's first superhighway, it's a trip you definitely don't want to miss. ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well done!
    This educational story tells about the construction of the Erie Canal. Colorful illustrations project the happiness felt by many once the waterway was completed. Along with these illustrations are diagrams and captions provided on most pages. Such graphic aids help the reader understand many different aspects of the canal. Readers ten years and older will appreciate the additional information as it explains how the canal operated. I would recommend this book for readers at the fourth grade level and higher. It is an informative story with exceptional illustrations. Readers will find the history of the canal engaging and the graphic aids intriguing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Brings history alive with a mix of pictures & text
    This is an excellent expansion of the "picture book" format for more mature readers; the colorful pictures show action scenes while text elaborates historical details. Additional embedded illustration shows map details of regional sections as the story unfolds. Fascinating information helps us understand why this feat was so important to the country's development at that time. ... Read more


    20. Johnny Tremain (Yearling Newbery)
    by Esther Forbes, Lynd Ward
    list price: $6.50
    our price: $6.50
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440442508
    Catlog: Book (1987-05-01)
    Publisher: Yearling
    Sales Rank: 5650
    Average Customer Review: 3.92 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    This story of a tragically injured young silversmith who ends up hip-deep in the American Revolution is inspiring, exciting, and sad. Winner of the prestigious Newbery Award in 1944, Esther Forbes's story has lasted these 50-plus years by including adventure, loss, courage, and history in a wonderfully written, very dramatic package. It's probably not great for little guys but mature 11-year-olds or older will find it a great adventure. ... Read more

    Reviews (221)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Johnny Tremain
    In this epic novel, Johnny Tremain, Esther Forbes through the eyes of a young boy, shows us what struggles America went through to become free. In Forbes only children's book Johnny, the main character, meets old Revolutionary heroes such as Sam Adams and Paul Revere. As the book progresses Johnny discovers hard times during the fight for freedom. Forbes takes Historical Fiction a step further by putting real characters and events in this story. Joy and sorrow are two of the many moods throughout the book. Set in Colonial Boston, Forbes story is a true Heart warmer. This book is challenging and appropriate for fourth grade and up. Forbes classic novel, for a good reason, won the Newberry Award, it is a true winner.

    4-0 out of 5 stars That a Man May Stand Up!
    This is fascinating historical fiction, for Esther Forbes has seamlessly woven a good Colonial yarn about an aspiring apprentice silversmith into the tapestry of New England's grievances, which culminated in the American Revolution. One could almost believe that Johnny--quick, cocksure, ambitious--actually lived and rubbed shoulders with the brilliant and fervent Boston patriots: Paul Revere, John Hancock, Sam and john Adams.

    What a wonderful parallel read this is for English-History classes, which will definitely appeal to boys
    who crave literary action. The protagonist is an impoverished youth who loses his job and ultimately his place in a modest craftsman's home, because of an accident in which he burns his hand beyond folk healing. He struggles to find a few position, new friends and a sense of self-worth, since he realizes that his silver dreams are shattered beyond repair. But Johnny also undertakes a personal quest--a legacy from his poor mother: to be recognized by a wealthy merchant's family as a direct heir. But was this spirited and talented fellow meant to be a nobleman? Ultimately he learns to value the nobility of the heart.

    As war clouds loom increasingly over disgruntled Boston, Johnny's outlook changes; his new, American loyalty is refined in a crucible of patriotic hope--fired by the empassioned oratory of James Otis. The coming Revolution will stand as a beacon to oppressed people the world over, even back in "mother" England. Johnny learns to curb his temper somewhat, as he comes of age and suddenly must perform a man's job by defending his values in perilous times. This book is an excellent story which will hold the reader's interest because of the intensely personal storyline, plus accurate historical details. This book makes one proud to be Yankee born!

    4-0 out of 5 stars after watching Disney's Johnny Tremain
    This was also required reading for our 5th grade curriculum. Daughter hated it, so about half way through to reinforce it we watched Disney's version of Johnny Tremain on home video. After that, she couldnt read it fast enough. The book filled in all the blanks the movie made for her, and she had faces and personalities to add to the book, along with visual points of reference.
    In the end, she really enjoyed it.

    1-0 out of 5 stars WORST BOOK EVER!
    This is the worst book I have ever read. The characters are weak, the action is non-existant and the book is just flat-out bad! There is little to no action throughout most of the book, and when there is, it is extremely predictable.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I love Johnny!!
    I had to read this book for school, and I assumed it would be boring. Well, I shouldn't assume because this book was excellent! It is the sad, funny, and exciting story of a fourteen year old silversmith in Boston during the Revolutioary War.
    The characters are so vivid, you feel like you've known them all your life. This book also teaches a lesson about pride, but I won't spoil what happens! Yes, this book is older, but don't judge it by its age. If you're looking for a good book, this is definintely one to read! ... Read more


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