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    $17.99 list($29.99)
    1. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood
    $15.98 list($16.95)
    2. Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception
    $13.57 list($19.95)
    3. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
    $11.56 $7.94 list($17.00)
    4. Oh, the Places You'll Go!
    $11.55 list($16.99)
    5. Maximum Ride : The Angel Experiment
    $7.19 $3.91 list($7.99)
    6. Goodnight Moon (Board Book)
    $72.95 list($115.79)
    7. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set
    $12.23 list($17.99)
    8. Runny Babbit : A Billy Sook
    $10.20 $9.88 list($15.00)
    9. Whales on Stilts (M. T. Anderson's
    $5.85 $3.20 list($6.50)
    10. The Giver
    $45.00 $12.63 list($75.00)
    11. Harry Potter and the Order of
    $44.07 $40.70 list($69.95)
    12. Harry Potter and the Goblet of
    $13.99 list($19.99)
    13. Star Wars: Episode 3 Visual Dictionary
    $7.99 $1.24
    14. The Little Engine That Could
    $10.87 list($15.99)
    15. Cirque Du Freak #9: Killers of
    $6.29 $1.90 list($6.99)
    16. Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)
    $8.99 $3.82 list($9.99)
    17. Pat the Bunny (Touch and Feel
    $64.99 list($85.80)
    18. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set
    $10.17 $9.31 list($14.95)
    19. Family Guy : Stewie's Guide to
    $16.50 list($35.99)
    20. The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate

    1. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Book 6)
    by J. K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré
    list price: $29.99
    our price: $17.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439784549
    Catlog: Book (2005-07-16)
    Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
    Sales Rank: 1
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Potter News You Can Use

    J.K. Rowling has revealed three chapter titles from Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to be:

    • Chapter Two: "Spinners End"
    • Chapter Six: "Draco's Detour"
    • Chapter Fourteen: "Felix Felicis"
    A Few Words from J.K. Rowling
    "I am an extraordinarily lucky person, doing what I love best in the world. I’m sure that I will always be a writer. It was wonderful enough just to be published. The greatest reward is the enthusiasm of the readers." --J.K. Rowling.

    Find out more about Harry's creator in our exclusive interview with J.K. Rowling.

    Why We Love Harry
    Favorite Moments from the Series
    There are plenty of reasons to love Rowling's wildly popular series--no doubt you have several dozen of your own. Our list features favorite moments, characters, and artifacts from all five books. Keep in mind that this list is by no means exhaustive (what we love about Harry could fill five books!) and does not include any of the spectacular revelatory moments that would spoil the books for those (few) who have not read them. Enjoy.

    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
    • Harry's first trip to the zoo with the Dursleys, when a boa constrictor winks at him.
    • When the Dursleys' house is suddenly besieged by letters for Harry from Hogwarts. Readers learn how much the Dursleys have been keeping from Harry. Rowling does a wonderful job in displaying the lengths to which Uncle Vernon will go to deny that magic exists.
    • Harry's first visit to Diagon Alley with Hagrid. Full of curiosities and rich with magic and marvel, Harry's first trip includes a trip to Gringotts and Ollivanders, where Harry gets his wand (holly and phoenix feather) and discovers yet another connection to He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named. This moment is the reader's first full introduction to Rowling's world of witchcraft and wizards.
    • Harry's experience with the Sorting Hat.

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    • The de-gnoming of the Weasleys' garden. Harry discovers that even wizards have chores--gnomes must be grabbed (ignoring angry protests "Gerroff me! Gerroff me!"), swung about (to make them too dizzy to come back), and tossed out of the garden--this delightful scene highlights Rowling's clever and witty genius.
    • Harry's first experience with a Howler, sent to Ron by his mother.
    • The Dueling Club battle between Harry and Malfoy. Gilderoy Lockhart starts the Dueling Club to help students practice spells on each other, but he is not prepared for the intensity of the animosity between Harry and Draco. Since they are still young, their minibattle is innocent enough, including tickling and dancing charms.

    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    • Ron's attempt to use a telephone to call Harry at the Dursleys'.
    • Harry's first encounter with a Dementor on the train (and just about any other encounter with Dementors). Harry's brush with the Dementors is terrifying and prepares Potter fans for a darker, scarier book.
    • Harry, Ron, and Hermione's behavior in Professor Trelawney's Divination class. Some of the best moments in Rowling's books occur when she reminds us that the wizards-in-training at Hogwarts are, after all, just children. Clearly, even at a school of witchcraft and wizardry, classes can be boring and seem pointless to children.
    • The Boggart lesson in Professor Lupin's classroom.
    • Harry, Ron, and Hermione's knock-down confrontation with Snape.

    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    • Hermione's disgust at the reception for the veela (Bulgarian National Team Mascots) at the Quidditch World Cup. Rowling's fourth book addresses issues about growing up--the dynamic between the boys and girls at Hogwarts starts to change. Nowhere is this more plain than the hilarious scene in which magical cheerleaders nearly convince Harry and Ron to jump from the stands to impress them.
    • Viktor Krum's crush on Hermione--and Ron's objection to it.
    • Malfoy's "Potter Stinks" badge.
    • Hermione's creation of S.P.E.W., the intolerant bigotry of the Death Eaters, and the danger of the Triwizard Tournament. Add in the changing dynamics between girls and boys at Hogwarts, and suddenly Rowling's fourth book has a weight and seriousness not as present in early books in the series. Candy and tickle spells are left behind as the students tackle darker, more serious issues and take on larger responsibilities, including the knowledge of illegal curses.

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

    • Harry's outburst to his friends at No. 12 Grimmauld Place. A combination of frustration over being kept in the dark and fear that he will be expelled fuels much of Harry's anger, and it all comes out at once, directly aimed at Ron and Hermione. Rowling perfectly portrays Harry's frustration at being too old to shirk responsibility, but too young to be accepted as part of the fight that he knows is coming.
    • Harry's detention with Professor Umbridge. Rowling shows her darker side, leading readers to believe that Hogwarts is no longer a safe haven for young wizards. Dolores represents a bureaucratic tyrant capable of real evil, and Harry is forced to endure their private battle of wills alone.
    • Harry and Cho's painfully awkward interactions. Rowling clearly remembers what it was like to be a teenager.
    • Harry's Occlumency lessons with Snape.
    • Dumbledore's confession to Harry.

    Begin at the Beginning
    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

    Hardcover
    Paperback
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

    Hardcover
    Paperback

    If You Like J.K. Rowling, You'll Love These Authors…

    • Cornelia Funke
    • Eoin Colfer
    • Garth Nix

    New Novels to Keep You Busy

    Cry of the Icemark

    The Dark Hills Divide

    Singer of All Songs

    The Game of Sunken Places

    Children of the Lamp

    Dragon Rider

    Authors Younger Potter Fans Should Try…

    • Geronimo Stilton
    • Andy Griffiths
    • Dav Pilkey

    While You Wait
    Hot New Series for Potter Fans

    Charlie Bone

    Guardians of Ga'hoole

    Keys to the Kingdom

    Underland Chronicles

    Dragons of Deltora

    A Few Words from Mary GrandPré
    "When I illustrate a cover or a book, I draw upon what the author tells me; that's how I see my responsibility as an illustrator. J.K. Rowling is very descriptive in her writing--she gives an illustrator a lot to work with. Each story is packed full of rich visual descriptions of the atmosphere, the mood, the setting, and all the different creatures and people. She makes it easy for me. The images just develop as I sketch and retrace until it feels right and matches her vision." Check out more Harry Potter art from illustrator Mary GrandPré.

    Did You Know?
    The Little White Horse was J.K. Rowling's favorite book as a child. Jane Austen is Rowling's favorite author. Roddy Doyle is Rowling's favorite living writer.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars poem for
    on your forehead
    tere is a scar
    but where you live
    is very very far.
    hogwart is the place
    you like the most
    and in this place
    live many ghosts. ... Read more


    2. Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl (Hardcover))
    by Eoin Colfer
    list price: $16.95
    our price: $15.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0786852895
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-03)
    Publisher: Miramax
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    Book Description

    Criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl is back…and so is his cunning enemy from Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident, Opal Koboi. At the start of the fourth adventure, Artemis has returned to his unlawful ways. He's in Berlin, preparing to steal a famous impressionist painting from a German bank. He has no idea that his old rival, Opal, has escaped from prison by cloning herself. She's left her double behind in jail and, now free, is exacting her revenge on all those who put her there, including Artemis. ... Read more


    3. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
    by CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.57
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 037582670X
    Catlog: Book (2005-08-23)
    Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1770
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    4. Oh, the Places You'll Go!
    by Dr. Seuss
    list price: $17.00
    our price: $11.56
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0679805273
    Catlog: Book (1990-01-22)
    Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 463
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Inspirational yet honest, and always rhythmically rollicking, Oh, the Places You'll Go! is a perfect sendoff for children, 1 to 100, entering any new phase of their lives. Kindergartners, graduate students, newlyweds, newly employeds--all will glean shiny pearls of wisdom about the big, bountiful future. The incomparable Dr. Seuss rejoices in the potential everyone has to fulfill their wildest dreams: "You'll be on your way up! / You'll be seeing great sights! / You'll join the high fliers / who soar to high heights." At the same time, he won't delude the starry-eyed upstart about the pitfalls of life: "You can get all hung up / in a prickle-ly perch. / And your gang will fly on. / You'll be left in a Lurch."

    But fear not! Dr. Seuss, with his inimitable illustrations and exhilarating rhymes, is convinced ("98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed") that success is imminent.As long as you remember "to be dexterous and deft. And NEVER mix up your right foot with your left," things should work out. (All ages) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (127)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not just for kids!
    Many of us grew up with Dr. Seuss,but did any of us ever think of how much his stories could help us relate to the real world? Oh, The Places You'll Go!, does exactly that. It is an inspirational book for all ages from a child beginning his or her first day of school to the college graduate. Dr. Seuss's whimsical book takes an optimistic look at life and its ups and downs or as he puts it, "Bang-ups and hang-ups can happen to you." In this book, his lovable and memorable rhymes are encouraging as well as entertaining and tongue twisting. In the end, he makes us all believe that we will succeed and yes, "Kid, you'll move mountains!"

    5-0 out of 5 stars Places you'll Go!
    "Congratulations! Today is your day. You're off to Great Places! You're off and away!" Oh, the Places You'll Go!, by Dr. Seuss is an inspirational book and characterized by uplifting messages that transcend age and encourage positive attitudes and self esteem to generations of people. Whether you are graduating high school or college, getting a job or retiring, this book will provide timeless messages that evoke and encourage a beneficial attitude throughout the generations. I have read this book many times and each time the memories of events passed are brought to mind, as well as hope for events to come. "You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And you are the guy who'll decide where to go." Seuss reflects positive attitude and self-esteem using his prose to encourage the message he is trying to get across to readers. He uses simple words and rhymes to enforce the idea; a book for the ages. This book is easily readable for anyone from the age of four to eighty four and applicable to the times in between. It can be especially relevant and helpful during transitional phases. Seuss inspires, that you have the ability to take yourself places and make something of yourself. "You'll join the high fliers who soar to high heights." Oh, the Places you'll Go!, shows that you can go to high heights in life as long as you maintain a positive attitude and esteem you can accomplish anything. Seuss' message also includes, "but sometimes you won't." Life isn't always easy, there will be, "bang-ups and hang-ups", along the way. But the point he makes is to not let those get you down and get out of your rut, escape those unhappy times for good times to come. "Oh, the places you'll go! There is fun to be done! There are points to be scored. There are games to be won." Whether you get hung up, still be positive for there is something that will happen which will be good to you. The message Seuss gives his readers about achieving goals and gaining success and happiness are timeless and will be prevalent for many years to come. "and will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed! (98 and ¾ percent guaranteed.) KID, YOU'LL MOVE MOUNTAINS!" I have read Oh, the Places you'll Go!, many times in the past year. When there are times of transition or struggle in my life the uplifting message Seuss reminds me to get out of my rut, get out of "the waiting place" and move on to the better things to come. I received this book as a high school senior as a present for graduation because it encourages me to think that there are bigger and better things to be achieved so I shouldn't wait for something to happen, but go out and make it happen. Oh, the Places you'll Go!, by Dr. Seuss engulfs the imagination and provides a vision of success and achievement for people of all ages at any time in their live. It is a book that transcends age and time, in which Seuss provides many people the opportunity to read this book and provide them with positive attitudes and achievement. "So... be your name Buxbaum or Bixby or Bray or Mordecai Ali Van Allen O'Shea, you're off to Great Places! Today is your day! Your Mountain is waiting. So... get on your way!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A must read book!
    This book is an absolute 'must read' for everyone. I truly believe that every home should have a copy of this book :-)
    I once saw it billed as 'the only self-help' book you'll ever need and this is a very acurate description.
    Children - even the tiniest ones - will love this purely because of the wonderful rhyming verse and eye catching illustrations. Older kids and particularly adults will love it because of the wonderful uplifting message that it contains.
    Sure, life isn't always easy and we all take wrong turns some times but if you keep going you are bound to end up in the right place.
    This book should be available on prescription as an anti-depressant!

    5-0 out of 5 stars You will Succeed 98 and ¾ Percent Guaranteed!
    Having just gotten this book as graduation present from my Mom when I graduated with my Masters Degree. It takes something like a book by Dr. Seuss to explain the ups and downs of life and the need for individual drive and perseverence. This book explains it all to you and puts it (life) in perspective. In some respects I wish I had received it sooner. Regardless of your education or age level this Graduation speech by the good Dr. Seusss will inspire you and bring a smile to your face. Filled with optimism for the future this book is nice reminder that it isn't so easy but you can (and will) make it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not Just For Kids!
    I just graduated from college and a beloved aunt of mine gave me this special book. I don't know whether I read this book as a child; though I probably did, and simply cannot remember. Nevertheless, I assure you that reading it today was exceptionally meaningful to me. Never has such a short read been so inspiring. Dr. Seuss really does cram it all in there. As other reviewers have noted, when Dr. Seuss writes about the "places you'll go," he not only mentions the joyous places, but realistically covers the bad times and how we can lift ourselves up and keep going. This honesty is refreshing and inspiring in itself. I cannot imagine how many lives Dr. Seuss touched with this book, but it has undoubtedly been tons. I unconditionally recommend "Oh, the Places You'll Go" to anyone, regardless of age. ... Read more


    5. Maximum Ride : The Angel Experiment
    by James Patterson
    list price: $16.99
    our price: $11.55
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 031615556X
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-11)
    Publisher: Little, Brown
    Sales Rank: 312456
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    6. Goodnight Moon (Board Book)
    by Margaret Wise Brown
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0694003611
    Catlog: Book (1991-09-30)
    Publisher: HarperFestival
    Sales Rank: 110
    Average Customer Review: 4.57 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Perhaps the perfect children's bedtime book, Goodnight Moon is a short poem of goodnight wishes from a young rabbit preparing for--or attempting to postpone--his own slumber. He says goodnight to every object in sight and within earshot, including the "quiet old lady whispering hush." Clement Hurd's illustrations are simple and effective, alternating between small ink drawings and wide, brightly colored views of the little rabbit's room.

    Finding all of the items mentioned throughout the book within the pictures is a good bedtime activity--a reappearing little mouse is particularly pesky. By the end of the little rabbit's goodnight poem, the story has quieted to a whisper, and the drawings have darkened with nightfall. As you turn the last page, you can expect a sleepy smile and at least a yawn or two. (Picture book) ... Read more

    Reviews (287)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A little rabbit goes to bed but is not at all tired...
    Generation after generation of children who have not wanted to go to sleep at night when told it was their bedtime have found an endearing manifesto of not being sleepy in "Goodnight Moon." Margaret Wise Brown poetry keeps things as simple as Clement Hurd's illustrations, which show a little rabbit who insists on saying "Goodnight" to pretty much every single object in the bedroom (including the old lady whispering "hush"). Eventually the little rabbit runs out of things to say "Goodnight" to and falls asleep. But we know that this scene will be repeated the next night and the night after that, when your child demands that you read this timeless children's classic from 1947 to them over and over again. There are certain books that every child should have in their library and if "Goodnight Moon" is not at the top of that list it has to be very close to the top for over half a century. Before this decade is up I am sure I will pass it on to a third generation of my family. How many generations is your family up to?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Bedtime Book
    My daughter received this book as a gift for her 1 yr birthday(She is now 22 mos old and still loves this book. We read it every night before bed). At first, when I read it, I wasn't impressed with it at all. But then, the more we read it, I became wrapped up in the story through my daughter's enthusiasm of finding the little mouse in the pages and realized the sheer joy of her learning experience through reading and imagination. The lines are very short so little ones won't be easily bored waiting for the page to turn and it is so much fun for her to find the little mouse in each colored page, to watch her put her little finger to her mouth and whisper 'hush' with the little old lady in the corner, and to point out other objects in the room.

    The story is based on a little bunny going to bed and saying goodnight to various items in his room and with each turn of the page, the light in his room grows dimmer. '...Goodnight mush/And goodnight to the old lady whispering "hush"/Goodnight stars/Goodnight air/Goodnight noises everywhere' and with that the room is dark and the bunny is fast asleep. The book alternates between color pages and black & white pages during the story. The pages show full color the little bunny's room where a little mouse hides in different areas and is waiting to be found by little searching eyes. Then the pages alternate to black and white that show other items that are found in the room that the bunny says goodnight to.

    I have also found that if my daughter is hyper before bedtime, this book helps calm her down through the repetition of saying goodnight, by lowering my voice with each page that we turn and it actually helps prepare her for bed just like the bunny.

    This is a very short, very colorful and very fun book for little ones. I highly recommend it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Must-Have Bedtime Book...
    This book was one of our bedtime rituals. When I was weaning my son from frequent night-time breastfeedings, we would read this book at bedtime every evening. Sometimes I could hear him "reading" this book to himself in the dark if he was still have trouble settling down. Often, we read it in unison, and chuckled together. It's sweet and slow and comforting, and simply taking the time to cuddle and read it has a peaceful effect on both parent and child.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Still a Favorite
    I first read this book when my son was a year old. The simple words and colorful illustrations made it one of his favorite bedtime rituals. The book focuses on a little rabbit going to bed and saying "good night" to everything in his room as well as the moon outside. In addition to reading the book, I would ask my son to point to the things the rabbit was saying "Good Night" to. Especially finding the little mouse on every color page. (I believe he's on everyone). We used it like an identification game as well as a story. Simple words that rhyme like "Hush" and "Mush" are easy for little ones to learn and repeat.
    An interesting aspect of the illustrations is that the room is drawn darker as the book nears its end. The magic was still there the other night when I read it to my son who is now 3 and a half. Like other books by this author, there is an essentially childlike quality coupled with that "hard to pin down" quality of a classic.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If your child loves the original, they'll love this as well
    My 21 mo old daughter loves the original "Goodnight Moon" and loves to play with the little acessories and popout features in this book. The story is the same and there is "lots to do" while turning the pages. ... Read more


    7. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set (Books 1-5)
    by J. K. Rowling
    list price: $115.79
    our price: $72.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439705525
    Catlog: Book (2004-10-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Press
    Sales Rank: 1394
    Average Customer Review: 4.68 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (38)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Why collect halfway?
    Mixed emotion here, firstly I would like to say that I love the Harry potter books. Each one is intelligently written, and the later books just leave you desperate to read the next volume.

    As for this set however I really don't see why anyone would buy it.

    If you haven't read the books (shame on you), buy or borrow the paperbacks.

    If you are a true Hary Potter fan, then buying a set with the terrible american covers, and the idiotic american title for the original novel (it's the PHILOSOPHER'S stone, not the sorcerer's stone), seems a little heretical to me. If you want a collector's item surely the original covers and the proper titles are more worth collecting?

    The main issue I have with this set though is the same issue I have with DVD box sets that come out when you KNOW there will be more titles available (Star Wars episode 1&2 for example). Why do it? You know that you'll only end up buying a box set with all 9 novels in, and you'll never be able to sell the 5 novel set afterwards.

    This is expensive and pointless.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Hogwarts or Bust!
    My only beef with the Harry Potter books is that they end! I read the entire first five in a week-and now I'm seriously hooked-they're worse than crack!

    They're wonderful reading for children, a classic show-down between good and evil. The message of love, friendship, courage and loyalty shines throughout the series.

    Harry Potter will go down in history as a literary classic-for ALL ages.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wow!!!
    I love these books! Rowling is an author who follows in the footsteps of the best fantasy authors such as Tolkien and Lewis. These books will be cherished for genarations to come. I cant wait for the last two books! (and hopefully more!)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Wonderful!!
    These are the best books I've ever read in my entire life! There's something for everyone in them, whether it's the fantasy world at Hogwarts and Diagon Alley or any of Harry's amazing adventures, these books have a place in the hearts of people young and old. My grandfather owns the entire series and discusses them with enthusiasm! If you haven't already read these books, you need to, they're incrediable!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Book Set That All Harry Potter Fans Should Have
    First things first: The magical world of Harry Potter created by J.K. Rowling is the greatest journey that the imagination can take at Platform 9 and 3/4.

    Secondly: A little bit about the books- [So far, we are in book 5 of 7]. It is the story of a boy named Harry Potter who has a scar on his forehead in the shape of a lighting bolt and for ten years lived a miserable life with his aunt and uncle Dursley and spoil brat cousin, Dudley, but at age of elven learns that he is a wizard. The story takes from there. In each book, Harry has to confront evil, Lord Voldemort (or He Who Must Not Be Named or You Know Who) who is responsible for Harry's scar and the his parents death.

    Thirdly: The Theme(s)-At first glance, or a read at teh back of the book, the reader gets the impression that Harry Potter and his world is nothing but pure magic: wizards and withces; unicorns and trolls; spells and curses, etc. But there is more to these books. For instence, and the most easy theme to be capture, is good vs. evil: Harry and his frieds(the good force) and Lord Voldemort and this followers( the bad force) confronting each other. Another easy to get theme is friendship: Harry and Ron and Hermoine always counting with one another in tough times. But there are also those themes that are a little bit more deeper and intense. One of them is racism/intolerance: In Harry world there are those wizard characters (like the Malfoys) that belief that only pure-blood wizard and witches are worth something; also, there are non-magic folks (like the Dursleys) that despise the magical world and its people. Another theme is corruption and power: the ministry of magic thrying to keep some things hidden from the normal-and-nest-door wizard. As the books are unfold, these and many more themes that can be apply to real life can be found.

    Lastly: This collection should be in every Harry Potter Fan Book Collection, and those that have not taken the Hogwart Express train to take a tour at Harry Potter's wordl should do it now. ... Read more


    8. Runny Babbit : A Billy Sook
    list price: $17.99
    our price: $12.23
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060256532
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins
    Sales Rank: 427438
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    Book Description

    Runny Babbit lent to wunch
    And heard the saitress way,
    "We have some lovely stabbit rew --
    Our Special for today."

    From the legendary creator of Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, and The Giving Tree comes an unforgettable new character in children's literature.

    Welcome to the world of Runny Babbit and his friends Toe Jurtle, Skertie Gunk, Rirty Dat, Dungry Hog, Snerry Jake, and many others who speak a topsy-turvy language all their own.

    So if you say, "Let's bead a rook
    That's billy as can se,"
    You're talkin' Runny Babbit talk,
    Just like mim and he.

    ... Read more

    9. Whales on Stilts (M. T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales)
    by M. T. Anderson
    list price: $15.00
    our price: $10.20
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0152053409
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
    Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books
    Sales Rank: 532
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Lucky for Lily Gefelty, her two best friends are the stars of their own middle-grade series of novels: Jasper Dash (better known as the Boy Technonaut) and Katie Mulligan (beloved by millions as the heroine of the Horror Hollow series). It's going to take all their smarts to stop this insane, inane plot from succeeding.

    This first installment of a riotous and wonderfully weird new series marks the Harcourt debut of award-winning author M. T. Anderson. With Whales on Stilts, he's entering new territory, creating a smart, sassy, and self-aware comedy that fans of Lemony Snicket will snicker and snort over.

    Look for future installments of M.T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales, coming soon!
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great!
    A got an advanced reader's copy to review through a library program, and at first I was turned off by how "little-kidish" (short, small, and double spaced), but within moments, I couldn't put it down. You don't have to be a young kid to enjoy this - in fact, the older (and, I'm assuming, wiser) you are, the more allusions you're likely to catch.

    With chapter titles like, "What You Can Learn From Larry's Teeth," and a quick, witty writing style, you can't help but laugh and read on. Although it is soon obvious how the ending will turn out, it doesn't seem to matter while you're reading it; the reason why Whales on Stilts! stands out from other books is not its complex plot, but its halirity.

    Don't miss it... or the whales will crush your home and shoot lasers from their eyes at you.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great fun!
    We just finished Whales on Stilts--we'll I was reading it to my nine year old and he couldn't wait to finish it so I finished it after him--anyway--very funny, over the top--lol!We loved the end of the book "literature circle" discussion prompts and essay question starters. We spent an hour making up our own silly book club discussion questions after reading MT Anderson's and had fun using his format to lampoon other books my son had to read for literature circle this year.We hope there will be more to come!

    5-0 out of 5 stars "Monstrous Thrills! Gruesome Chills! Sidesplitting Laughs!"
    "On Career Day Lily visited her dad's work with him and discovered he worked for a mad scientist who wanted to rule the earth through destruction and desolation." Lily Gefelty has always considered herself a little drab next to her friends Katie Mulligan and Jasper Dash, who each have their own adventure book series. But when Lily uncovers a plot to take over the world at her fathers workplace in the clearly labeled Abandoned Warehouse, it's her turn to step into the limelight and save the planet. Cleverly masked as "a midsize company devoted to expanding cetacean pedestrian opportunities," the goings on in the Abandoned Warehouse are not what they seem (er, actually...). Lily and her friends discover that Mr. Gefelty's boss, Larry, is really a whale-human hybrid intent on destroying the world using whales, stilts, lazers, and mind control. And it's up to Lily to stop him.

    At first glance, you may think that "Whales on Stilts" is a silly, cheesy story geared towards ten-year-olds. You'd be right. However, "Whales on Stilts" goes so far beyond cheesy that it's positively hilarious for readers of any age, ten on up. If Douglas Adams had made a foray into juvenile fiction, this uproarious book may have been the result. Lily is so normal that she's the perfect main character to put into such a ridiculously overdone book. The other characters are uniquely strange in their own rights. The plot is straightforward and wouldn't be interesting at all in other circumstances, but the story is so stuffed with hilarity that the obvious and cliche plot is perfect. The best part of the book, in my opinion, actually occurs after the ending - an "educational" section written by one Ann Mowbray Dixon-Clarke, who seems to have a bit of trouble writing objectively ("1. How are Katie, Jasper, and Lily different? ... Do you have any friends who are different from you? What are they like? Why don't you think that Ann Mowbray Dixon-Clarke has any friends? She bought a big grill for her backyard, hoping that people would come to cook their ribs...."). "Whales on Stilts" is definitely a must read, because who knows when you'll need to know how to defeat an evil whale-human villain and his lazer-eyed whale minions?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Stilted Whales
    A got an advanced reader's copy to review through a library program, and at first I was turned off by how "little-kidish" (short, small, and double spaced), but within moments, I couldn't put it down.You don't have to be a young kid to enjoy this - in fact, the older (and, I'm assuming, wiser) you are, the more allusions you're likely to catch.

    With chapter titles like, "What You Can Learn From Larry's Teeth," and a quick, witty writing style, you can't help but laugh and read on. Although it is soon obvious how the ending will turn out, it doesn't seem to matter while you're reading it; the reason why Whales on Stilts! stands out from other books is not its complex plot, but its halirity.

    Don't miss it... or the whales will crush your home and shoot lasers from their eyes at you. ... Read more


    10. The Giver
    by LOIS LOWRY
    list price: $6.50
    our price: $5.85
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440237688
    Catlog: Book (2002-09-10)
    Publisher: Laurel Leaf
    Sales Rank: 959
    Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear of pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12 he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.


    From the Paperback edition.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (2207)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent novel - Worth all the praise & adoration it gets!
    After Lois Lowry produced the entrancing 'Number The Stars' it didn't seem possible that she could produce a work, for children, to top it. With 'The Giver' she easily met that goal.

    'The Giver' appears to be a rather simple story of a young boy (12 years old to be exact) named Jonas who lives in a seamingly perfect society. He is given the task of becoming the 'Receiver of Knowledge'; an apprentice to the 'Giver of Knowledge'. But that is where the simpleness ends.

    The 'knowledge' spoken of in Jonas' job title is all of the memories of pain and suffering that were collected to rid all citizens of uncomfort. The Giver telepathically has to give Jonas all of these memories so he can suffer the pain of famine, war, disease, and death - to spare the community.

    The themes in this novel are profound. The thought of a 'utopia' is considered extensively, but it is clearly shown that a perfect world can not exist -- therefore, 'distopia'. The novel also deals with life, death, indivuality, and more; an amazing amount of thought-provoking subjects for a book with a grade 4.5 reading level.

    This book, however, may not be suitable for younger readers. Death is a common theme and the murder of an infant is described. There are mild nods to sexuality, but many young readers will dismiss these as benign.

    A must read for students as well as adults! Excellent job, Ms. Lowry. You gave America another profound and excellent novel - one that will be on schools' required reading lists for many years to come!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A children's version of 1984, only more entertaining
    My own personal grudge against the book comes from the extent of the writing profession, and how it beared so scary and remarkable a resemblence to one of my unpublished ramblings into the SF genre. I had plans of doing a novel where all emotion is stripped away, set in a world much like THE GIVER. Then when I read it, I was somewhat concerned for my own work.

    Anyway, this is often comparted to a children's 1984. Yes, while it does bear resemblance to 1984, this book is wonderful on its own terms. The story is the world has been taken down into a utopia, a place with no crime and no feeling, no true feeling. The family establishment is essentially nil with no sexuality at all (this resembles the dominant theme in my own work). Birth Mothers are the source of the population, though it does not give the identity of the fathers. Work and family comes about by selection. Jonas, the hero, has been selected to be the Reciever of Memory. It is here he realises how shockingly sterile and devoid of beauty his world truly is. The ending, somewhat vague, rewards the reader by not giving away to much detail.

    For those readers who will be travelling on to Orwell after this, go to ANIMAL FARM, my own personal favorite, and then 1984 for when they're older.

    Like all good children's literature, this book deserves to be read by both adults and children alike. Bravo Lowry!

    Other significant works by Lowry: Number the Stars.

    Mike London

    5-0 out of 5 stars A brilliant dystopian novel
    This is a complex, beautiful book that offers a look into a futuristic dystopia in which there is no color, no aberation, no hot or cold, and no personal choices. Drugs are taken to repress sexual urges and even out temprament, and careers are chosen for children based on their aptitude. Children are raised in prearranged family units. There is no privacy and no personal choice, but is this really a bad thing if people have no concept of those things? There is no hunger, emotional pain, violence, crime, war, or sadness.

    Growing up in this world is Jonas, a bright 12 year old who is about to receive his career assignment. He is given the important but extremely rare job of "Reciever": the keeper of "memories" of what life was like before the creation of his utopian world. Slowly, he begins to see color, to learn what love, hate, death, and heartbreak are like. He begins to understand that some of the "happy" things around him maybe aren't so happy.

    The brilliance of this book is that the world unfolds gradually. Lowry does not hit us over the head with an up-front description: in fact, the place starts out sounding fairly normal if a bit Montesori. Slowly, though, the reader realizes quite how foreign this world is. Lowry is a deft writer with an excellent sense of subtlety.

    Ultimately, this book is about the importance of cultural memory. The idea of cultural memory is probably a new one for kids, and some of the concepts of death and destruction might be a little disturbing, so I recomend that parents read this book too so that they can discuss it with their children. This in no way means that I think that it is innapropriate for kids: I just think that it is an amazing starting point for discussion about what makes us human. Please read my review of "A Wrinkle in Time" (also made today) for my thoughts on how these two books are related.

    This is a moving, thought-provoking book that is a great read for adults as well as kids. Adults might find it interesting that the idea of a drugged-to-make-them-"normal" population where everyone is encouraged to analyze and discuss every aspect of their lives sounds eerily familiar...

    5-0 out of 5 stars A brilliant dystopian novel
    This is a really brilliant book, which everyone should read.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Giver
    Kiddoes, I just finished rereading this book for about the eighth time, but I'll try to transport my mind back in time to when I first read it. I think you'll get a better perspective that way.

    It's about a society that wants to be 'perfect'. Well, actually, 'perfect' wouldn't be the best word. I suppose that they want everything to be structured and uniform. They call it in the book 'Sameness'.

    There are books and movies about futures that stink, but, let me tell you, this is an especially insane one.

    The land is climate-controlled, and completely the same. Flat; no hills, no valleys. No colors, even. And it isn't just the outside that's controlled... The people don't love, aren't sad or guilty... basically, they don't feel human emotions. Only the Receiver is allowed to experience those things, and he is the keeper for the entire community... without him, the memories would be unleashed and the community would revert to chaos.

    People have their jobs chosen for them, their mates chosen, even their children. You get to old? You're 'released'. (Releasing is killing, if you haven't figured that out.) A twin, and smaller than your brother or sister? You're released. Make a mistake, like flying in the wrong direction? Released. It's scary about what you can't do...

    Jonas is chosen as the new Receiver, and (surprise) he's the character that the book centers around. We read about his life before he is selected, during, and afterwards, and I don't know about you, but it was a major shock to me that there wasn't color.

    I'm not sure if I can say that I LOVED this book. Loving would imply that I loved the concepts, and also would imply that I wasn't horrified while I was reading it. Happy little kiddoes in America aren't really exposed to this kind of stuff... not even CLOSE to it.

    But I really respect it, and totally understand why it's a classic. Lois Lowry got a fan with this book; Number the Stars didn't quite do it for me.

    And another thing I think people need to understand about this book is that even though the text is simple and that youngsters can READ it, the concepts are meant for older kids. ... Read more


    11. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Book 5 Audio CD)
    by J. K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré, Jim Dale
    list price: $75.00
    our price: $45.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0807220299
    Catlog: Book (2003-06)
    Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
    Sales Rank: 596
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    As his fifth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry approaches, 15-year-old Harry Potter is in full-blown adolescence, complete with regular outbursts of rage, a nearly debilitating crush, and the blooming of a powerful sense of rebellion. It's been yet another infuriating and boring summer with the despicable Dursleys, this time with minimal contact from our hero's non-Muggle friends from school. Harry is feeling especially edgy at the lack of news from the magic world, wondering when the freshly revived evil Lord Voldemort will strike. Returning to Hogwarts will be a relief... or will it?

    The fifth book in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series follows the darkest year yet for our young wizard, who finds himself knocked down a peg or three after the events of last year. Somehow, over the summer, gossip (usually traced back to the magic world's newspaper, the Daily Prophet) has turned Harry's tragic and heroic encounter with Voldemort at the Triwizard Tournament into an excuse to ridicule and discount the teen. Even Professor Dumbledore, headmaster of the school, has come under scrutiny by the Ministry of Magic, which refuses to officially acknowledge the terrifying truth that Voldemort is back. Enter a particularly loathsome new character: the toadlike and simpering ("hem, hem") Dolores Umbridge, senior undersecretary to the Minister of Magic, who takes over the vacant position of Defense Against Dark Arts teacher--and in no time manages to become the High Inquisitor of Hogwarts, as well. Life isn't getting any easier for Harry Potter. With an overwhelming course load as the fifth years prepare for their Ordinary Wizarding Levels examinations (O.W.Ls), devastating changes in the Gryffindor Quidditch team lineup, vivid dreams about long hallways and closed doors, and increasing pain in his lightning-shaped scar, Harry's resilience is sorely tested.

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, more than any of the four previous novels in the series, is a coming-of-age story. Harry faces the thorny transition into adulthood, when adult heroes are revealed to be fallible, and matters that seemedblack-and-white suddenly come out in shades of gray. Gone is the wide-eyed innocent, the whiz kid of Sorcerer's Stone. Here we have an adolescent who's sometimes sullen, often confused (especially about girls), and always self-questioning. Confronting death again, as well as a startling prophecy, Harry ends his year at Hogwarts exhausted and pensive. Readers, on the other hand, will be energized as they enter yet again the long waiting period for the next title in the marvelous, magical series. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (5092)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Most Anticipated Book Lives up to Its Hype
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a marvelous edition to J.K. Rowling's library, and well worth the long, long wait and the number of pages. Although the book is the darkest novel yet in the Harry Potter saga, it reads like one of the earlier editions, happy and light with plenty of humor thrown in compensate for the overall dark tone of the novel. The plot is complex and involved, but never difficult as Rowling takes time and trouble to make certain everyone understands the mystery before moving to the next part.

    Many characters in this book become more well-rounded, and their actions are better justified. Professor McGonagall becomes a much more likable character, and we get more insight into the reason behind Professor Snape's hatred of Harry. We also see Harry's love life blossom somewhat as he ages, and he goes through typical teenage strife with his friends, Ron and Hermione.

    The ending is an exciting, heart-in-your-throat adventure that is sure to delight Harry Potter fans old and new. My only advice for reading this book: Don't make this your first Potter foray. Read the other books first. Rowling doesn't explain every detail from the first ones; she just assumes you've read them and doesn't bog you down with details you already remember (if you've read the first four).

    Basically, this is a very exciting book that well lives up to the Harry Potter saga and is sure to delight the many legions of fans who have waiting with bated breath for the newest edition.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Book Five: My Fondest Dreams Realized.
    At the end of book 4, I like most others found myself wishing one thing: the fifth book. It was a far greater delay than i wanted, but it was worth it. This is the Best Book in the Series.

    I shall endeavor to avoid spoilers of any kind. Do Yourself a Favor. Dont wait for it to be out on Paperback. Read it now. If you havent read 1-4, start now so you can read book 5

    Harry is finally growing up and his questions are finally getting answered. HP5 really made me wonder what happened to JK Rowling to make her paint the Ministry of Magic as such dangerously and willingly ignorant fascists.

    The disjointed often poorly paced book 4 was full of a lot of passages where i wanted to slap Harry around for being such a whiner. Not So Book 5. The conflict is shaping up beautifully. It feels like this is the "Empire Strikes Back" of the Harry Potter Book: grim and full of white-knuckle tension, and not the funniest or easiest episode, but its the finest crafted and most important episode.

    I thought Maybe JKR wouldnt beable to keep up the passion, angst and beautiful craftmanship of the first few books since they were written when she wasnt rich and famous etc. I thought fame might pull the spark out of the books, but i was wrong. If anything she's honed her craft even more.
    What always struck me about the Harry Potter boos was that there was a legitimate, tangible sense of horror underlying the bad events. Often in children's books the bad stuff is contrived to give the main character something to Do, not so Harry Potter. Book 5 makes it clearthat death is very real, and it affects everyone, and that evil is real and present, And OFTEN done in the name of good.
    Book 5 ups the ante, making it even more important to read. It is not so much a 'children's book' and more a book about universal struggles that we in which all need to immerse ourselves.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Can't wait for the movie...
    I'm a huge fan of the horror genre and am a huge King fanatic, but I couldn't resist reading this book after seeing the Third film. I'm 17 and I found unbelievable that these books are aimed at 9-12 yr olds. The vocabulary is fantasic and Ms Rowling is quite an inticing writer.
    I should have read the fourth book first, that's a little advice for the rest of ye, because now I know the general outcome of that book - so I think I'll wait for the fourth film rather than read it.
    Anyway, being such a huge King fan, I can't help comparing different writers to him. He is - to me - the best writer in the world, just just at horror but at everything, and I found J.K Rowling right up his alley. She's brilliant, the book's brilliant, cant wait for the film!!! :-)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good, but dark
    There's a good reason most of us cannot recall being 15 very well and the latest Harry Potter book will show you why: his heroic behavior is being marred by hormones that make him confused, angry, and irrational. The blue cover should give you an idea of the darkness of this 5th and darkest year of Harry's schooling at Hogwarts. I was so enraptured by reading book #4, Goblet of Fire, that I paid the $30 to get an advanced hardback copy of this book. I would advise against that; it's not worth it, but is worth reading. It's nearly as long, about 700 pages, but you'll find yourself wizzing through them. The author balances action with description and lets her imagination run wild with this fantasy world. The dark tone of this book and the surprising twists will have you anxiously reading to find a good place to stop, but the evil does not let up until the final pages. Phoenixes, like the human spirit, rise perpetually, and in this book we get some long overdue explanations, but at the cost of someone's life. In this book, Harry has a complete reversal of fortune and becomes the laughing stock of the school. New characters are introduced, there is some serious espionage in this book, and the book mainly centers on the war between the Ministry of Magic and Hogwarts. We learn much in this book and even get to see Harry's dad who is less the saint then Harry has been told. The book also seems to be a scathing social commentary, in typical English style, against the government and the media. In this episode, they suddenly become unthinkably evil, twisting facts, commiting gross injustices, physically hurting people, and manipulating public sentiment. In this novel, the good guys get put on trial for crime, and it is mindboggling.

    Overall, a very imaginative book, different in tone from the rest, that both captures teenage angst and the disruption to daily life caused by the Dark Lord. If you love the series, buy it but don't rush to do so. It's not as good a read as the other books, and is very dark, almost depressing. It's all bad news until the last few pages, and the kids cause some terrible trouble this time.

    I have always taken issue with these stories as "childrens literature" for their moral content and bad role models. These kids break rules, lie, sneak around, and singlehandedly confront the dark lord on a regular basis. Perhaps this is why China has banned the books. Well, I think that Rawling has simply put aside these moral issues to tell a good, compelling, imaginative story. Harry is not every man, he is a very special kid, a sort of christlike lowliest child. If the kids were constantly telling Dumbledore what was going on, the story would get dull. In this book, you get a good sense of how annoying it is to constantly have adults intercede. And of course the overall moral tale is that good always triumphs over evil. In the end, it is for parents, not books to teach values.

    5-0 out of 5 stars worth the wait
    Harry's back and so is the others, well harry is having a crudy summer and when he goes back to school things dont seem to lighten up because the new teacher has the personality like a poisend beehive with a rabid badger and throw in a couple of 50 seperate posions and you get Dolores umbridge. however there are som good stuff, like ron becoming keeper, a secret program, and Harry might have a shoot at Cho but Voldemort is still out there and Harry is having this dream about a door at the end of a hallway but he wakes up. you got to read the book. ... Read more


    12. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Book 4 Audio CD)
    by J.K. ROWLING
    list price: $69.95
    our price: $44.07
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0807282596
    Catlog: Book (2000-07)
    Publisher: Bantam Books-Audio
    Sales Rank: 970
    Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Read by Jim Dale

    Running time:20 hrs., 30 mins. 12cassettes

    Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts for his fourth year of magical adventures in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.This year Harry turns 14 and becomes interested in girls -- one in particular.And with Dark Magic comes danger, as someone close to Harry dies.You'll have to listen to learn more!The audio is available on July 8th.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4706)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Darkness Reborn.
    HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE is the fourth installment of the Harry Potter series and (so far) is also the longest and most dark. I had enjoyed the previous three books immensely, but had heard so many conflicting reviews about GOBLET OF FIRE, that I didn't know what to expect. After finally finishing the novel, I found that it was a most intriguing read and has become my favorite in the series so far.

    The book begins during the summer before the fall term starts at Hogwarts. Harry joins the Weasley family and Hermione for a trip to the World Quiddich Cup. The tournament is marked by strange events which foreshadow the dark horrors and adventures that lie waiting for Harry and friends back at school.

    The book builds from the opening, sinister and puzzling chapter to it's conclusion (over 700 pages later) when a line in the sand is drawn and the forces of good unite to stand against the resurrected Lord Voldemort. Whereas the previous three novels seemed self-contained and concluded in themselves, GOBLET OF FIRE ends on a cliffhanger, merely hinting at the huge struggle facing the forces of good. I have a feeling things are only going to become more dark and depressing for Harry and the gang.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not just for kids!
    Ages 9-12 shouldn't get to have all the fun! "The Goblet of Fire" is a terrific story for anyone who has ever wanted to fly or gazed longingly at a poster of a favorite athlete, wishing that athlete could come to life. JK Rowling makes it happen and if your imagination hasn't been too stifled and trodden down by the concerns of everyday life, then this book might be for you, no matter what your age. "The Goblet of Fire" is exciting, funny, frightening and impossible to put down. I kept telling myself "just one more chapter" until I had finished the final 450 pages in one fell swoop! The hype and hyperbole proved to be fully justified and Ms Rowling has shown herself to be a wonderfully creative and insightful writer. As a junior high and high school English teacher, one of my main frustrations is the fact that my students don't want to read for pleasure, even when given time to do so in class. However, the Harry Potter series has renewed the hope with which I began my career 15 years ago, that books and good, old-fashioned story-telling and imagination weren't yet out of style. Thanks, Ms Rowling, for Harry Potter, Hermione, Ron and the rest of the Hogwarts gang, yes, even Draco Malfoy, the kid we all love to hate! And thanks, too, for bringing back my own junior high memories after all these years with your refreshingly honest and accurate portrayals of young boys and girls discovering new experiences and getting to know each other again for the first time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome!
    I definitely think JK Rowling has honed her craft. I did not like the original Potter book, because I thought there wasn't much depth to the characters and everthing was predictable. As of the Prisoner book, I think she has definitely improved. I liked this so much I could barely put it down.

    The thing that separates this book out from her first two novels is that as the characters age, the plots have become much darker and much less predictable, and this one, in particular, reads almost like a mystery novel, because there is so much left up in the air.

    The ending also sets the stage for future novels.

    I think kids and adults (myself included) will find this to be the best Potter book yet (I have not yet read the Order of the Phoenix)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pushing it to the next level
    I'm a thirty-something woman and I am a Harry-a-holic. Why should this fantastic series be just for kids? Obviously I'm not the only person who feels this way. I see adults riveted by this series everywhere I go. And the best thing is kids love it too! This series opens the door that many of us need, something in common with our children. It really helps us to identify with each other. Thank you J.K. Rowling!

    "Goblet of Fire" shows us that it is not written reverently for the little ones, however. I must warn you, there is a tragic death. I'm sure most children can deal with it, but I personally was shocked. I'm not sure I'm old enough for where this series is going, but I'll let it take me there just the same.

    By opening that doorway to the sad inevitability we all face, Rowling has pushed the boundaries of how we view children's adventures. We realize now that Voldemort means business and that anything could happen as he continues his quest for power. Can Harry stop him? Voldemort continues to get more powerful with every novel and Harry is only just able to stop his nemesis from succeeding with his ingenious plots to take over all the witching world and quite possible the muggle world as well.

    This book left me waiting almost too eagerly for "Order of the Phoenix," which I read with my 9-year-old niece who seems to cope with the terrors in this series better than I am.

    If you're all growed up, read this with some kids, they can comfort you when it gets scary.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Real Emotion
    The Goblet of Fire is the first time that Harry really deals with hard problems, and dark emotions. This is also the first time the book every brought out real emotion, such as sadness. J.K. Rowling really knows how to make each book better and better. Although this isn't my favorite of the serious, it's a very close second. There were many times in which I just bursted out into laughter, and others when i cried. Every emotion is provoked in this book. I really recommend that every one read Harry Potter, even if it to read this one book in the series. ... Read more


    13. Star Wars: Episode 3 Visual Dictionary
    by Dk Publishing
    list price: $19.99
    our price: $13.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0756611288
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-28)
    Publisher: DK Publishing Inc
    Sales Rank: 173947
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    14. The Little Engine That Could
    by Watty Piper, George Hauman, Doris Hauman
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0448405202
    Catlog: Book (1978-06-01)
    Publisher: Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1042
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    The unknowing progenitor of a whole generation of self-help books, Wally Piper's The Little Engine That Could is one of the greatest tales of motivation and the power of positive thinking ever told. In this well-loved classic, a little train carrying oodles of toys to all of the good boys and girls is confronted with a towering, seemingly impassable mountain. As nicely as they ask, the toys cannot convince the Shiny New Engine or the Big Strong Engine--far too impressed with themselves--to say anything but "I can not. I can not." It is left up to the Little Blue Engine to overcome insurmountable odds and pull the train to the other side. The Little Engine That Could is an entertaining and inspirational favorite, and the Little Blue Engine's rallying mantra "I think I can--I think I can" will resonate for a lifetime in the head of every child who hears it. (Ages 4 to 8)) ... Read more

    Reviews (41)

    5-0 out of 5 stars History of Little Engine that Could
    When I began reading this book to my kids, I was suprised that the broken down engine and the little engine that can were both female, while the unhelpful engines are male. I remembered the little engine being male. I was interested in the feminist message of such an classic children's story. A little research on the web gave a lot of info. Apparently, this version of the story was published in 1930 with the male and female references as they are in this current printing. This story was pulled from an slightly earlier version in which the characters were all gender neutral. If you'd like to learn more about the historical background, you may want to look at http://tigger.uic.edu/~plotnick/littleng.htm which does a nice job of giving an historical overview of the evolution of this wonderful tale of self strength.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Too bad it is abridged
    The current self-help genre tends to be dwelling on hurts and self-pity, then finding magical solutions. Our Little Engine just has healthy self-confidence and determination. And please don't stress even that when reading it to the kids who will love it, since they find their own more imaginative interpretations.

    The unabridged version is a lifetime favourite of mine, and, for classroom use or that with older children, find a copy at all costs. This version does retain much of the essence, however, and is great for the pre-school set. The only "negative" I can think of is that the kids so love the repetition that parents may grow a bit tired of the daily requests for it to be re-read, especially if the particular child wants to hear only certain sections (I knew one who always wanted "the clown part," the other "the food part.")

    The same enjoyable repetition makes this a favourite story to read to children in primary grades. Yes, be sure you don't stop the kids from all joining in "I think I can..."

    This remains one book that every favourite kid of mine receives as a present. If it disappoints any of your children, that will be a first, in my experience!

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Little Engine that Could
    This story is a childrens classic. A wonderful tale about a little helpful train that overcomes great physical adversity through sheer will power. A great moral teaching story for young impressionable children. This story teaches our children especially our daughters that they too can be successful if they
    work hard and think positive. This is a story I'll read to my daughter many times. The little engine represent a positive female role model without flaunting its femininity. In fact I had forgotten the engine was female until I read it again recently. A great story worth checking out.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A CHILDRENS SUCCESS CLASSIC
    As a parent of three, one of the most important things I can give my children is motivation.

    The attitude that he or she CAN DO ANYTHING IF THEY THINK THEY CAN DO IT.

    By reading this story over and over again, the message will go into their conscious and subconscious mind and my hope is that they will follow their dreams and become all they are able to become.

    Zev Saftlas, Author of Motivation That Works: How to Get Motivated and Stay Motivated

    What better gift can a parent give their child than believing in them?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect! My daughers were both mesmerized.
    My second daughter has now fallen in love with this book, at about the same age as her older sister did (3 and 1/2). So, we are reading it every single night, often multiple times. If her older sister is any guide, this will probably continue for about 6 months.

    This is simply an absolutely perfect children's story. The plot has some tension to keep the child's interest to the end of the story. The story shows how small people (or trains, if you want to be literal) with a good heart (like a child) can make a big difference in the world. The illustrations are extremely colorful and magical. The only fault (this is incredibly minor) I can find is the one-time usage of the word "indignantly", which no child is going to know. Other than that, I wouldn't change any other word or aspect of this book.

    It's also a fun story for an adult to read outloud. I enjoy using different voices for the arrogant Shiny New Engine, the gruff Freight Engine, and the tired Old Engine, as well as helpful Little Blue Engine's famous repetitive cadence ("I think I can").

    It will be a sad day when my youngest outgrows this book. Don't deny yourself or your child the pleasure - buy it! ... Read more


    15. Cirque Du Freak #9: Killers of the Dawn : Book 9 in the Saga of Darren Shan
    by Darren Shan
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0316156264
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-11)
    Publisher: Little, Brown
    Sales Rank: 32690
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    16. Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)
    by E. B. White
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0064400557
    Catlog: Book (1974-05-15)
    Publisher: HarperTrophy
    Sales Rank: 5936
    Average Customer Review: 4.66 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Beloved by generations, Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little are two of the most cherished stories of all time. Now, for the first time ever, these treasured classics are available in lavish new collectors' editions. In addition to a larger trim size, the original black-and-white art by Garth Williams has been lovingly colorized by renowned illustrator Rosemary Wells, adding another dimension to these two perfect books for young and old alike.

    Whether you are returning once again to visit with Wilbur, Charlotte, and Stuart, or giving the gift of these treasured stories to a child, these spruced-up editions are sure to delight fans new and old. The interior design has been slightly moderated to give the books a fresh look without changing the original, familiar, and beloved format. Garth Williams's original black-and-white line drawings for the jacket of Stuart Little have also been newly colorized by the celebrated illustrator Rosemary Wells. These classics return with a new look, but with the same heartwarming tales that have captured readers for generations.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (306)

    5-0 out of 5 stars among the best in children's literature
    As we all know, there are those certain books in the world that literally every single child in the world should read, and "Charlotte's Web" is a perfect example of must-read literature. It's such a classic story, not to mention a beautiful one. E.B. White creates such memorable characters and describes them very well. When a little girl named Fern hears that some baby pigs have been born in the barn, she is terrified to hear that her father plans to kill the littlest one, the useless "runt." Fern talks her father into letting her adopt the pig. She names it Wilbur and treats it as her own. Then the time comes for the pig to be more on its own, so Fern is forced to sell him to her uncle, who owns a farm. Wilbur feels lonely and out of place until he meets Charlotte, a kind spider who befriends him and, eventually, saves his life. Beautiful, beautiful story of friendship and courage. It contains characters and a fun plot that any child can enjoy. I read this book for the first time when I was in fourth grade, and I recently helped a little second-grader that I baby-sit for with her "Charlotte's Web" comprehension questions. It brought memories back. This is one of those books that you remember for the rest of your life once you've read it. It's excellent, and well worth the money.

    5-0 out of 5 stars 'O best beloved'
    This is a book which should have ten stars, not just five.

    Faced with the impending slaughter of Wilbur, the runt piglet she has saved and nursed to health, Fern is appalled that she has fattened him for the axe, and commits herself passionately to save her beloved animal. So, too, is Charlotte, the spider who inhabits the barn with him, and woh turns her web into a sort of billboard/oracle which astonishes (and admonishes) the community by weaving words that inform them that this is no ordinary pig! She recruits Templeton the Rat and the rest of the animals in her battle for Wilbur's life...will they succeed? or will Wilbur be a nine-days' wonder? and what will be the ultimate cost?

    This is the best present I can imagine to inspire a young reader; it's a wonderful tale of courage against the odds; it's warm, sad, and delightfully funny, and 30 years after I read it in fourth grade, I still get a lump in my throat thinking about it. A special, special book. (With wonderful original illustrations!)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Book about Friendship
    I must confess that having just read "Animal Farm" shortly before reading this book, I was a little hesitant about excepting this as a pure children's story without any hidden political agenda. I kept expecting the talking animals to rise up behind the pig and take over the farm. Rest assured however there was none of that, as E.B. White does a good job of keeping the story at a purely kids level.

    Wilber is the runt in a litter of pigs, and Mr. Arable the farmer is going to take him out back and have him slaughtered since as he says, "He is small and weak and will never amount to anything." His young daughter Fern who is eight, hears this and requests that her father give the pig to her to raise instead. The father wishing to prove a point to her, allows this so long as she promises to do all the work to take care of it. To Mr. Arable's surprise Fern does an excellent job of raising Wilber and he turns out to be "Some Pig", proving that even though he was very small he still could amount to something.

    As Wilber grows bigger the Arable's can no longer support feeding him, so Mr. Arable has Fern sell Wilber to her uncle Mr. Zuckerman who has a farm down the road. There she goes and visits Wilber every day. Being young I guess gives you the ability to sit and listen to the animals more intently than adults, and by doing so Fern is able to hear that the animals can actually talk and she understands them. (Being the father of two girls who are 7 and 5, I'd have to disagree somewhat with this logic as my girls never sit still, and certainly have a hard time listening at times, but for the sake of the story we'll just give them the benefit of the doubt.)

    Anywise Wilber meets all the other animals in the barn who are very nice, but none of them are really his close friend. He becomes lonely and wishes for a friend. A gray spider named Charlotte answers his prayers and after introducing herself, she becomes Wilber's best friend.

    When the other animals tell Wilber that Mr. Zuckerman is just fatting him up to eat him for Christmas, this makes him greatly disturbed. Charlotte being a great friend promises to do all she can to make Wilber so important to Mr. Zuckerman that he would change his mind. She sets a plan in action to weave messages into her web proclaiming how great the pig is, and by doing so she hopes to trick the adults into believing it as well. With the help of Templeton the rat she obtains some newspaper clippings and begins her work.

    Each new message in the web is looked upon as miracle, but rather than looking for any religious connection, the folks in the town just believe they have a very famous pig on their hands and accept it at face value.

    The suspense builds as Zuckerman takes Wilber to the Fair. If he can just win an award there, Charlotte knows his life will be saved. Charlotte and Templeton have to stow away in Wilber's crate just to accompany him to the Fair, and then when they get there the pig in the stall next to Wilber is twice as big and looks to be a shoe in for first prize.

    This book was obviously written at a much simpler time in history. At the Fair grounds the adults send the kids off on their own. Besides Fern who is 8, she has a little brother Avery who is only 5. After giving them all kinds of warnings such as not to eat too much, and to stay out of the sun, to not get dirty, and to be careful on the rides, the mother stops and says to the husband, "Do you think they'll be all right?" and he responds, "Well they have to grow up sometime." (None of the warnings were about staying away from strangers.) Of course when the kids returned they hadn't stayed out of the sun and were hot, and completely dirty, but they had fun.

    Fern meets a boy at the Fair, and starts to grow up a bit as playing with him starts to seem like more fun than talking to bunch of animals.

    It is a great book about overcoming obstacles even though you are very small, growing up, and most of all friendship. My girls loved the book as well, and especially seemed to like the illustrations by Garth Williams.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Quality literature for children
    A spider saves the life of a friendly pig by spinning accolades about him in her web, thereby producing a miracle that impresses people for miles around. This is a beautifully written little story for children that has real literary quality. The prose is excellent. Note in particular the simple but lovely descriptions of the passing seasons that Mr. White writes. The themes include friendship, coping with the loss of loved ones, and the realization that life goes on, changed but still worth living.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best book ever
    I think this is a really good book.It was about a pig and a spider who were vary good friends. My favorite part of the story was when they went to the Fair. The book was great. ... Read more


    17. Pat the Bunny (Touch and Feel Book)
    by DOROTHY KUNHARDT
    list price: $9.99
    our price: $8.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0307120007
    Catlog: Book (2001-05-01)
    Publisher: Golden Books
    Sales Rank: 389
    Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    For over 50 years, Pat the Bunny has held a special place as Baby'sFirst Book...and as a perennial bestseller.Since its first publication in1940, Pat the Bunny has sold over 6 million copies, making it the number 6 all- time bestselling children's hardcover book*.Play along with Paul and Judy asthey smell the flowers, look in the mirror, play peek-a-boo, and, of course, patthe bunny.

    *Publisher's Weekly, 2/5/96 ... Read more

    Reviews (63)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Simply the Best Ever
    Some things become life experiences not only for one's child, but for oneself. "Pat the Bunny" is such a book. It is so dear, so simple, and so very, very perfect that it is deceptive. It really can teach a very young baby about textures and colors and the fact that the world is a varied and wonderful place.

    When my first child (now almost 18) was less than 6 months old, I would take her tiny hand and place her chubby fingers on each different texture...the bunny, the cloth, and of course my favorite...Daddy's scratchy beard! (a piece of sandpaper). I don't know how much of the simple and sweet words my daughter absorbed, but she was cuddled in my arms, being rocked (our favorite place to read) and she definitely liked to touch the textures. Now the interesting thing is that the book remained special, and when she should have outgrown it, she did not. It remained in the collection. I think that's because it is just so peaceful and simple, remnants of a former time.

    If you are expecting, if one of your friends has a new baby, if you are a grandparent or a loving aunt or uncle, you cannot give a better book for a new baby. It will be that baby's cherished book in short order. Guaranteed. One word of warning, though. Make sure that you are buying the original, with all the textures. I saw one oversized board book version the other day, and its only texture was the cotton of the bunny, which carried through to each page. No no!! We need everything right for this book of a lifetime.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This Bunny's a FAVORITE!!
    Our son inherited two identical copies of Pat the Bunny from his big sister (who adored the book equally), and he quickly learned all the fun things he could do with Paul and Judy. His favorite thing to do is to play peek-a-boo with Paul. We are disappointed that the binding has failed on both copies, but gladly, it is due to them being so LOVED. In order to keep our now-one-year-old boy happy, we are buying him a copy of his own for Christmas (and maybe a spare for the diaper bag for outings).A true favorite story-simple and fun! And a great gift to receive for a new baby.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Pat the Bunny
    My daughter enjoys this book from time to time. I, on the other hand, can't get past the smell of the flowers in it. I gag everytime I get near it. The book is somewhat bland. I wouldn't really reccoment it to buy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cute
    This is a cute classic book. It is fun to read and fuzzy bunny is fun for kids.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Eh...
    It's a cute book, but very dated. Not very sturdy either. I cringe whenever my son reaches for it, but that's not too often, as it doesn't hold his interest very well. ... Read more


    18. Harry Potter Hardcover Boxed Set (Books 1-4)
    by J. K. Rowling
    list price: $85.80
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439249546
    Catlog: Book (2001-11-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 51056
    Average Customer Review: 4.64 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Young wizard-in-training Harry Potter has had his hands full during hisfirst four years at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. As if excellingon and off the Quidditch field isn't enough, Harry has heard evil voices in thewalls, saved lives, and fended off convicts. Only time will tell how Harry willmanage the certain dangers in store for him over the next few years. The firstfour titles of J.K. Rowling's magical, witty, exciting adventures are nowavailable in a gift set, perfect for the legions of children whose big brothersand sisters (and parents) have made off with their copies. These grippingfantasy novels are on the road to becoming classics--don't wait to collect theselovely hardcover editions, illustrated by the talented Mary GrandPré.Each boxed set includes Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, HarryPotter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner ofAzkaban, and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. (Ages 8 and older)--Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (397)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Spellbounding
    I remember when I was a child reading books that I found unable to put down, every page full of intrigue and excitement, my imagination would run wild and I was transported into other worlds; as I got older books became something I read for exams and no longer fun, I rarely picked up a book for light entertainment and it was a few years before I started to read books again purely for pleasure. Once I had time to rekindle my love of books I discovered I still got lost in a good novel but never felt involved the way I had as a child.

    A few weeks ago one of my sons bought himself J.K.Rowling's Harry Potter set of books and enjoyed reading them, well he is twenty-five and more into Graham Greene, so I thought if he found them an enjoyable light read I would give them a go. I picked up the first book, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, from the eye catching brightly coloured, shinny box holding the set of four books and settled down with the intention of reading a couple of chapters, four hours later I was still there engrossed, unable to put the book down.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This may sound cliched, but the books are magical.
    I admit that I had never heard of Harry Potter until the huge fuss over the release of the fourth book. I didn't buy into the hype until a friend of mine dragged me to the movie... I admit that I became a Harry believer after the first 10 minutes of the film and wanted more. I immediately asked to borrow her books and read all four over the next two days. After reading her set, I decided that I had to have my own copies.

    The Harry Potter books are wonderfully imaginative and great for children of all ages (I myself am a 31 year old child!!) I loved being taken out of the real world and submersed in a world of fantasy and magic. Some say the stories and events are derivative of other classic "good vs. evil" stories; I don't happen to feel that way. The attention to detail of both the Muggle (non-magic folks) and the Wizard worlds is staggering and fascinating and unique. The J.K. Rowling style is also very refreshing and accesible to everyone even with the immense attention to specifics and details.

    These books are great and I highly recommend them. They are so unassuming and pleasant and can teach kids a lot about acceptance, forgiveness, and the true meaning of goodness.

    5-0 out of 5 stars AMAZING
    I have been a true Harry Potter fan for 6 years now. These books are GREAT. Harry Potter books are fantasy books about wizards and their wonderful world and about a young boy who falls into a world of magic and adventure. Harry Potter is full of bravery and is one of the best characters I have ever had the pleasure of running into. He is surrounded by good and the bad but he faces it all with courage in his heart and love by his side. Harry Potter Books have turned millions of children into readers and never fail to be exciting, sad, and funny. I have fallen in love with the characters that J.K. Rowling presents in Harry Potter Books and envy them for their unique and realistic personalities. If you haven't read these books you are positively insane and you must immidiately read them or be shot. These are the greatest books ever written and I applaude J.K. for her writting that always ceases to fall past perfection.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great!
    This is the best way to get all the Potter Books to keep and read forever! This is a great idea for gifts for people of all ages.

    5-0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC!
    This series is without a doubt the best books I have ever read. J.K Rowling sure knows how to write fantasy. I can realte to all the characeters and get lost in a magical world where anything can happen. These books have inspired me to write my own fantasy series.Wyhen I read Harry Potter, I feels happy, sad, excited, anxuious,scared and in suspense the whole time. Trust me, this sries is worth buying and is going to be around for a long time. J.K Rowling and Harry rock! ... Read more


    19. Family Guy : Stewie's Guide to World Domination
    by Steve Callaghan
    list price: $14.95
    our price: $10.17
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060773219
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-26)
    Publisher: Perennial Currents
    Sales Rank: 2047
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    With episodes of Family Guy now running on Fox, Cartoon Network, and TBS, the Griffins are taking over the airwaves. Discover how you too can rule your world with this handbook from one of the show's most popular characters!

    Stewie Griffin is a maniacal one-year-old baby genius who sees clearly what's wrong with the world and is hell-bent on staging a coup d'état that would turn absolute power over to him! The first tyrannical leader on his hit list is his mother, Lois -- the leader of the "gynocracy" making his young life totally insufferable. There are others, too.

    Hell, if it weren't for his lack of muscle tone, toilet training, and his need for parentally provided sustenance, Stewie would have already gained control over most of the third world.

    But even as a toddler Stewie knows that in order to rule the world you must first understand it. So he has compiled a book of his own musings on a wide variety of subjects: work, politics, religion, family, love, childhood, parenting, education, and more. What results is an anarchist's delight.

    Helped into print by Steve Callaghan, one of the television show's lead writers, Family Guy: Stewie's Guide to World Domination features articulate young Stewie at his acerbic best.

    ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Amusing, but not hilarious.
    I'm a big fan of Stewie, and might go so far as to say I think he is somewhere on the short list of best cartoon characters of all time.however this tome, as Stewie refers to it, leaves me wanting a bit.
    I haven't finished the book, as it's been relegated to the bathroom.A perfect spot for it, I think.Not because it stinks, but rather it's only amusing in smaller doses.
    Much of Stewie's appeal is in the delivery,his humor doesn't quite make the translation to the written page.
    Don't get me wrong it's funny at times, I just haven't cracked up the way I do watching the show.

    5-0 out of 5 stars SWEET!
    This is ther best book i have ever read! After i have memorized this book i will put my plan into action! ... Read more


    20. The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate Events, Books 1-3 (The Bad Beginning; The Reptile Room; The Wide Window)
    by Lemony Snicket
    list price: $35.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 006029809X
    Catlog: Book (2001-10-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
    Sales Rank: 16
    Average Customer Review: 4.21 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Fans of Lemony Snicket and newcomers to his gleefully ghastly Series ofUnfortunate Events will be elated to discover this boxed gift set of the firstthree books in hardcover: The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, andThe Wide Window. While it's true that the events that unfold in Snicket'snovels are bleak, and things never turn out as you'd hope, these delightful,funny, linguistically playful books are reminiscent of Roald Dahl, CharlesDickens, and Edward Gorey. After they get their paws on this boxed set, there isno question that young readers will want to read the continuing unluckyadventures of the three Baudelaire orphans. (Ages 9 and older) --KarinSnelson ... Read more

    Reviews (100)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Box of Unfortunate Events: The Trouble Begins (Books 1-3:
    Dear Reader,
    This series is about three children: Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Bauldiare. The books are filled with misery and woe, the children are always followed by misfortune and a crook by the name of Count Olaf. He is always after the Bauldiares enormous fortune, and somehow never seems to get a firm grip, just like you couldn't grab a stick of melting butter with your bare hand. The children (orphans, which we are bound to call them) always find a way to escape the scraggly grip of Count Olaf... The first book started as the three soon to be orphans were walking along the beach examining strange specimens that got washed up on the shoreline. When a strange figure came up to them, it turns out that it was Mr. Poe, the Bauldiares bank manager. This started all of the childrens' misery: the fact that an enormous fire had destroyed their home, and their parents... This has been just the beginning of the first book. There are currently 13 books, where misfortune and Count Olaf follow the poor Bauldiares, trying to get control over the fortune and the their lives.The books are very negative, so I personally don't recommend them for smaller children, but they are good, if your heart doesn't melt in the midst of them. Do the orphans escape Olaf, or do they lose their fortune, and their lives. To find out, read the Series of Unfortunate Events.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Teacher's Review
    As a teacher, I am constantly looking for the newest and biggest book to read to my students. During my travels, I came across a book entitled "The Bad Beginning" by Lemony Snickett. I decided to take a chance and purchase the book. I sat down at home and read the entire book in about two and a half hours, and it was one of the most enjoyable stories that I had read in a long time! I tried the book out on the kids, and they just ate it up. The students couldn't get enough of Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire....and to be quite honest, neither could I!! Soon after reading the first book, I purchased books two and three, and not to my surprise they were just as good! I again read these books to the students, and they again ate them up!!! Unfortunately, by the time we had finished the third book, the school year was over. However, I went on to finish my collection by getting books four through nine. I love these stories! The black humor that they contain should be that of a Coen Brothers film. The kids got every joke, and they totally fell in love with Snickett's radically original storytelling - explaining things in detail, translating Sunny's baby talk, and giving hilarious backstory. My peers often make fun of me because I read so much children's literature, but I have recommended these books to all of my friends. I even believe that these books are more interesting and fun to read than the Harry Potter series...but thats just me! I would recommend this book to parents of third and fourth grade students (it might be a little unfullfilling to the fiercly loyal fifth grade Harry Potter crowd) and also to adults who are unfamiliar with the series. A truly remarkable find and the most entertaining children's novels since Roald Dahl. Summer's the perfect time to pick these up!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Books!
    I've bought these books, and I've recieved them in a short period of time. They are interesting to read. It's hard to see these children struggle, and face all the sorrow that comes their way. I thought I would not like these, because they were supposed to be depressing. If you want a series you really get involved in, try these. This collection is by far entertaining, and detailed. I can't wait to buy the next box set!

    4-0 out of 5 stars From Bad to Worse: The Story of the Baudelaire Orphans
    When I first started reading this series of books I was set back a little because these stories are not written in the style of typical children's books. These stories are dark, and the evil characters are truly evil. A number of reviewers have panned this series because they are dark, and because they often push the boundaries of what some of us may find acceptable for children to read. It is because of the dark imagery that I have typically recommended that age 9 be a minimum age. Some children may be unprepared for these books until later.

    In the first three books in this series we learn that the three Baudelaire children, Sunny, the baby, Klaus, her brother, and Violet, a young teen, have lost their parents in a terrible fire. The children are sent to live with their evil uncle Olaf, who has ulterior motives yet to be revealed in later books. The children quickly learn how evil he is, and ultimately escape. They next go to live with their uncle Montgomery Montgomery in "The Reptile Room," only to be forced to move on again. In "The Wide Window" the children live with an aunt who is afraid of everything, only to ultimately be forced to move on again, continually chased by the evil Count Olaf in a variety of disguises.

    Book 11 in this series is soon to come out, and the original plan was for there to be 12 books. These books are like potato chips. Once you start one and find it intriguing, you will want to keep reading. If you do not like the first book, plan to stop with the first.

    This series is highly creative and many children 9 and older find them enjoyable. My children read them as teens and loved them. They did think they were different and unusual, and since they could not explain why I read them myself. They are different and unusual, but they also introduce children to situations that have occurred to children in the real world. A good way to introduce scary subjects.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The first three books = Set-up....
    Well, I'll admit its been a while since I've read the first three books of the series. They are are my least favorite in the series. Because in my opinion they get much better after those three. Especially after book 5. However, since this is a 1-3 box set, I MUST review these specific ones right now, so here goes.

    Book One: The Bad Beginning - Well in book one we our introduced to the Baudelaire's, they are quite happy children that live with their parents in a large house, and are very rich. These children include: Violet, a 14 year old whom is a genius inventor, and will tie her up when in the midst of inventing, Klaus, her 12 year old brother whom is a genius of books, hecan't get enough of them, and is quite often a well of imformation, and last but not least Sunny, a small baby whom is still crawling, can't really talk yet except with made up words, but she has for EXTREMELY long & sharp teeth.

    Now, so the story goes, the Baudelare children were playing on the beach, when they became orphans(wont tell you how), this is where there misfortunes began, because they must live with a gardian now, a relative or something. Well, they end up living with Count Olaf, and really I don't want to tell you more of that book.

    NOTICE: If you DON'T want ANYTHING in the books after book one spoiled DON'T the next to descriptions of the books, skip them and read my summary.

    Book Two: The Reptile Room - In this book the Baudelaire's have escaped Count Olaf and Mr. Poe has placed them in the care of Dr. Montgomery Montgomery, or their Uncle Monty. He is a man whom studies reptiles and has many interesting and dangerous reptiles. The Baudelaire's begin to feel that they will actually enjoy living there too. But is it safe for them to get comfortable?

    Book Three: The Wide Window - After they had to leave Uncle Monty's house(I wont say why), Mr. Poe has placed them in their care of their paranoid grammar obsessed Aunt Josephine. A woman who's husband died a couple years back and wont use stoves in fear that she set the house on fire or something like that. Her house "barely" sits on a ledge next to lake Lachreymose by Domocles Dock. The Baudelaire's don't enjoy living there very much, but how long will it last anyways?

    Well, I would say that "The Series of Unfortunate Events" is for those who are morbid at heart. These books have an extremely morbid sense of humor. But it is a great sense of humor, may take some time to get used to. And even though book 4 is the lowest rated on Amazon.com, I'd say that is where the books really hit their stride, in book for. That's where I really began to enjoy the books and their unique sense of humor. So whether you are young or old, though I think older people may enjoy these a little more cause they can understand them better(and most the people I know who've read them have been at least my age, 19yrs), you'll probably still enjoy them, they're fun books. And they have some things to teach, even though they don't seem like it.

    God Bless & *enjoy* ~Amy ... Read more


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