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$23.99 list($39.99)
101. The Spiderwick Chronicles (Boxed
$5.85 $3.11 list($6.50)
102. Where the Red Fern Grows
$11.86 $8.70 list($16.95)
103. Wild About Books
$7.19 $2.97 list($7.99)
104. The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl,
$10.87 $10.49 list($15.99)
105. Then He Ate My Boy Entrancers
$10.87 $5.95 list($15.99)
106. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie
$12.56 $9.27 list($17.95)
107. Quiltmaker's Gift
$24.48 $23.85 list($36.00)
108. Complete Anne of Green Gable Boxed
$7.19 $3.30 list($7.99)
109. The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl,
$10.87 $2.33 list($15.99)
110. Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse
$11.55 $7.00 list($16.99)
111. The Teacher's Funeral: A Comedy
$14.99 $8.49
112. Complete Hans Christian Andersen
$19.80 $19.69 list($30.00)
113. The Magic Tree House: Books 1-8
$5.39 $2.15 list($5.99)
114. Number the Stars (Laurel Leaf
$9.74 $7.88 list($12.99)
115. Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the
$8.09 $2.89 list($8.99)
116. Fox in Socks (I Can Read It All
$90.00 $54.99
117. Children's Literature: Engaging
$7.19 $4.79 list($7.99)
118. Watership Down
$9.59 $4.35 list($11.99)
119. The Ersatz Elevator (A Series
$12.57 list($17.95)
120. Star Wars: Visionaries (Star Wars

101. The Spiderwick Chronicles (Boxed Set) : The Field Guide; The Seeing Stone; Lucinda's Secret; The Ironwood Tree; The Wrath of Mulgrath (Spiderwick Chronicles)
list price: $39.99
our price: $23.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689040342
Catlog: Book (2004-10-01)
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Sales Rank: 255
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Book Description

It all started with a mysterious letter left at a tiny bookstore for authors Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black. Its closing lines: "We just want people to know about this. The stuff that has happened to us could happen to anyone." Little could they imagine the remarkable adventure that awaited them as they followed Jared, Simon, and Mallory Grace and a strange old book into a world filled with elves, goblins, dwarves, trolls, and a fantastical menagerie of other creatures. The oddest part is in entering that world, they didn't leave this one!

Five captivating books!
One thrilling adventure!
The Spiderwick Chronicles
... Read more


102. Where the Red Fern Grows
by WILSON RAWLS
list price: $6.50
our price: $5.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553274295
Catlog: Book (1984-08-01)
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Sales Rank: 1546
Average Customer Review: 4.68 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Author Wilson Rawls spent his boyhood much like the character of this book, Billy Colman, roaming the Ozarks of northeastern Oklahoma with his bluetick hound. A straightforward, shoot-from-the-hip storyteller with a searingly honest voice, Rawls is well-loved for this powerful 1961 classic and the award-winning novel Summer of the Monkeys. In Where the Red Fern Grows, Billy and his precious coonhound pups romp relentlessly through the Ozarks, trying to "tree" the elusive raccoon. In time, the inseparable trio wins the coveted gold cup in the annual coon-hunt contest, captures the wily ghost coon, and bravely fights with a mountain lion.When the victory over the mountain lion turns to tragedy, Billy grieves, but learns the beautiful old Native American legend of the sacred red fern that grows over the graves of his dogs. This unforgettable classic belongs on every child's bookshelf. (Ages 9 and up) ... Read more

Reviews (804)

5-0 out of 5 stars Exciting novel
Where the Red Fern Grows
In spite of being labeled as a sad sob story, Where the Red Fern Grows is a priceless novel filled with adventure and excitement. I believe that Rawls uses the two dogs Old Dan and Little Ann plus the emotional ending of the novel to attract the female gender. But to the same affect attracts the males with the adventures that these dynamic three undergo. Billy, a young boy, whose had a dream of owning a pair of coon hunting dogs. Works two long years of backbreaking work to finally raising enough money to purchase the two dogs. He embraces the dogs as if they are his children, working with them none stop so that they could become the very best coon-hunting team in Cherokee county. A lot of the time this book is required reading for many middle school students. So I believe Rawls uses this never give up attitude to encourage the young readers. After working so hard and accomplishing many goals with the dogs Billy enters a competition and wins. Thrilled with his accomplishment he ventures to other events. First place after first place Billy and the team seek higher standards. As you read, we follow the threesome on an adventure of a lifetime. Traveling on foot Billy and his two dogs head to the Tournament of tournaments the Coon Hunting Championship. Billy, unknowing of the dangers of the journey, runs into a little trouble on the way. As the book slows down and almost loses readers, this journey to the championship keeps us into it. Fortunately the team arrives in one piece and enters the competition. The team wins but to Billy's surprise the dogs aren't satisfied. Because they still have one coon to get, Shadow, the coon that cannot be caught. Rawl takes us on an adventure, and yet again has you sitting at the edge of your seat.

5-0 out of 5 stars And So The Adventures Begin
If you are going to read a book to your class, Having your class reading a book, reading a book to yourself, giving a book to a friend or relative, or any thing else, Where The Red Fern Grows ,by Wilson Rawls is the book for you. it is a wonderful and touching story about a boy, Billy, and his dogs. It starts out with a man looking back on his childhood, and how he dreamt of having some fine dog. Finally he got enough money to buy the dogs his heart was set on, and so the adventures begin. This book is very well written. It brings you to the place, time and point if view of Billy and his family, and without being too descriptive or boring. There aren't those chapters which you find in moast descriptive books where all that seems to happen is you know EXACTLY what a certain character looks like. Not only that, it is a real page turner. No matter how much you read you have to know what happens next. With every chapter comes a new adventure! If someone told you that a book about a boy and his dogs catching raccoons would be a page turner, you probably would not believe them, but you are never satisfied to stop after any chapter. Some people find the way that they talk with a southern accent gets in the way, but soon you will get used to it. I think it ads to the atmosphere. You should definitely at least try out this book and when you do, which should be soon, you will find it is a excellent read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Is there a better story out there?
NO, this has to be the best story I have ever read. I read this book recently to my 7 year old son. Wanting to show him the power of books. I was worried he'd be upset by the ending in this. I shouldn't of worried. I was the one who ended up crying and reading it to him at the same time. As an adult I felt foolish. He wasn't near as upset about it as me and I KNEW what was going to happen since I read it as a child myself. WOW, the power of a book. Simply amazing.

5-0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time when I was a little girl
I hate it when a reviewer gives the story away, so I won't. Safe to say, though, that when I was a little girl, I read a book in one night, under the covers with a flashlight. That book, of course, was WTRFG. I just re-read it again after 20 some-odd years. I am surprised to find that I cried as hard as I did as when I was 9. I was once again, so engrossed that I read it in one night, ignoring the fact that I had to work the next day. It is a beautiful story, a timeless one. A childhood favorite. I am amazed that it didn't win a Newberry Honor medal, or some other kind of award. This is one of the books that helped instill a loving of reading at an early age. A GEM, don't miss it. A story about a young boy on the brink of manhood and his love for his pups....whom he worked so hard for. You will laugh and cry, at age 9, 29, or 99. Buy it for your kids, and rea it for yourself.

4-0 out of 5 stars Read This Book!
Wow! this is one of the best book I have written in a long time. If you have not read Where the Red Fern Grows trust me it is the kind of book you will have regeted if you did not read it. Ok well the book is about a boy named Billy that works for his own needs. Billy wants to get 2 dogs that he can train to get racoons. He eventually works for weeks to get the money for his dogs and then gives the money to his grandfather for him to buy the dogs. Old Dan and Little Ann are the names of the two dogs. The exciting advetures that Billy,Old Dan and Little An go through are thrilling and endless. To top it all off the story has a twist at the end. You should definetly read this book to find out whuat happens! ... Read more


103. Wild About Books
by Judy Sierra
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 037582538X
Catlog: Book
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 801
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Book Description

It started the summer of 2002, when the Springfield librarian, Molly McGrew, by mistake drove her bookmobile into the zoo.

In this rollicking rhymed story, Molly introduces birds and beasts to this new something called reading. She finds the perfect book for every animal—tall books for giraffes, tiny ones for crickets. "She even found waterproof books for the otter, who never went swimming without Harry Potter." In no time at all, Molly has them "forsaking their niches, their nests, and their nooks," going "wild, simply wild, about wonderful books." Judy Sierra’s funny animal tale coupled with Marc Brown’s lush, fanciful paintings will have the same effect on young Homo sapiens. Altogether, it’s more fun than a barrel of monkeys! ... Read more


104. The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2)
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786817089
Catlog: Book (2003-05-06)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 1509
Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Artemis is at boarding school in Ireland when he suddenly receives an urgent video e-mail from Russia. In it is a plea from his father, who has been kidnapped by the Russian Mafiya. As Artemis rushes to his rescue, he is stopped by Captain Holly Short of the Leprecon fairy police. But this time, instead of battling the fairies, he is going to have to join forces with them if he wants to save one of the few people in the world he loves. ... Read more

Reviews (175)

5-0 out of 5 stars Artemis Fowl - Die Hard With Fairies
It's one of those things such as marmite, football and shopping. Artemis Fowl. You love it, or hate it. And I'm extremely glad to be able to count myself among those you love it.

I've read both books more than five times, and every night I sit and pray that the genius Eoin Colfer brings out a third. The characters all have so much character, even those mentioned just once, the descriptions are incredible and the flow of the words is easily the greatest use of the English language in the history of literature.

My favourite character? Artemis Fowl, of course. He's quick-witted, cool in the face of dangerous and viciously intelligent. But book two showed us the softer, most vunerable side of Artemis Fowl, as the boy he didn't ever truly have a chance to be.

The best bit in number two is when he emerges from the plasma in Koboi labs. What a scene. The movie has a good chance of living up to the superb quality of the book, but if it doesn't then I'll still be the biggest fan on Earth of Eoin Colfer.

Funny story. I've started to learn Russian, even since I first read book one, just because I love this book so much.

God bless Eoin Colfer. And God bless Artemis Fowl.

4-0 out of 5 stars terrific sequel, more mature hero
The great thing about the first Artemis Fowl novel was the idea that fairies, far from being pretty little things with gauzy wings are a secret race of technologically advanced beings living deep underground. Colfer tapped deep into Irish myth and came up with the idea that fairy gold was real - and a teenage master-criminal was going to get it.
Artemis is a great anti-hero, and when the new book begins he's running rings round the school shrink (whose ... psychology books he's naturally read and despised.) This is very funny, but what's better is that underneath the cockiness, Artemis is a boy with a messed-up family who really misses his Dad, who vanished in Russia. News comes that his father isn't dead but kidnapped by the Mafia, and the only way Artemis can get him out is to join forces with his arch-Nemesis, Holly SHort of the LEPRecon unit. Currently in disgrace, Holly has a few problems of her own...like putting down a goblin rebellion.
All the great comic characters such as Muclh Diggums, the disgusting dwarf who chomps his way through the earth, expelling it out his rear end (now pretending to be a reclusive Hollywood star) are back. It's fast and funny, and if Colfer's The WIsh List (published in the US as The Eternity Code) is more moving and thoughtful, well, kids will love that too.

5-0 out of 5 stars Double, Double Fowl and Trouble
I read the first book in the Artemis Fowl series last summer and sometimes wonder why it took me so long to read the second installment. Through the very first pages of "The Arctic Incident" I was instantly transported into Colfer's imaginative world, and underworld, peopled with fairies, goblins, and an evil boy genius, who seems to have matured. I was pleased to discover that the second book lived up to the impression that the first one made.

"The Arctic Incident" begins with a look at the young Artemis Fowl stuck in a dreadful boarding school, "killing off" counselor after counselor that tries to asses what is wrong with him. Meanwhile, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon police force has to deal with a smuggling problem that involves humans and the intelligence-challenged goblins. Believing Artemis to be the culprit, she kidnaps him and his mountain of a bodyguard Butler, to little avail. They are not the suppliers but they make a deal with Holly. They will help her discover who the smugglers are if she will help Artemis find his father, who is being held hostage in the Arctic Circle. Holly is not looking forward to helping Artemis after their encounter in Book One, but she has no other choice. Their journey to fulfill both of their missions is filled with tension and humor and further explores the inner-workings of these two fascinating characters.

Colfer has created an imaginative world that is peopled with rich and vivid characters, and witty asides to the reader. Artemis is a boy genius trying to surpress his evil ways in order to find his father and turn over a new leaf; his struggle is that of any teenager's angst. But the best characters are those who inhabit the lower elements; Foaly the centaur, Captain Short, Commander Root, and best of all, the returning Mulch Diggums, the thief dwarf. And while the Artemis Fowl books may be labeled as children's books, you don't have to be a child to enjoy the wry humor that Colfer dishes out.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bundle Up, Artemis!
Artemis Fowl, thirteen year old master criminal, runs away from his oppressive boarding school when he receives a cryptic message suggesting his father is still alive and being held for ransom by the Russian Mafiya. The fact that Artemis is so anxious to rescue his missing dad shows us that underneath his emotionally detached exterior, there's a lost boy wishing for a semblance of a normal family life. At the same time, Artemis's old enemies the elves have their own problems. There's evidence of human interference in their world and of course, Artemis is their prime suspect. For once Artemis is actually innocent, but he and elves join forces to defeat their mutual enemies. Again, elf Captain Holly Short is Artemis's spunky and self-reliant equal. Artemis is pinning a lot of hopes in his reuniting with his father, but this book suggests that Artemis may have already found his true family in his elf counterparts. They share with Artemis a quick wit and a savvy sense of technology. And they're marginalized in the same way Artemis's brilliance is unseen or misunderstood by the adult world. This is an absorbing second novel that shows us more of Artemis's complicated and intriguing character.

4-0 out of 5 stars Artemis on a Mission of Mercy
Artemis, the child genius criminal, is back in his second book. His mother has been restored to health (in the first book) and now he learns that his father might still be alive and a hostage of the Russian Mafiya.

Artemis puts his brains to work to rescue his father but is interrupted when he himself is kidnaped by Holly Short for interfering with Fairy business.

Well, Artemis is quickly cleared of the charges and a deal is struck. Artemis will help Holly track down who is really trafficking with the goblins in return for help rescuing his father. Sounds easy enough. But there are plenty of plot complications thrown into the mix before each side manages to square the deal.

This is quite a different book from the first one. When we were first introduced to Artemis, he was a criminal mastermind. But now we see a different side to him as he quests for his father, helps out the underground fairy population and experiences much of life that privilege has shielded from him. He is a much more likeable character now but possibly not as interesting. Still, the plot is tight and the action fast. Four-hundred pages flew by quite quickly. Not quite the same as the first, but I still recommend it. ... Read more


105. Then He Ate My Boy Entrancers : More Mad, Marvy Confessions of Georgia Nicolson (Confessions of Georgia Nicolson)
by Louise Rennison
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 006058937X
Catlog: Book (2005-05-24)
Publisher: HarperTempest
Sales Rank: 1499
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

We are going to Hamburger-a-gogo land! We are going there so that I can follow the Luuurve God, Masimo. He has gone to visit his olds, leaving me, his new (and lurker-free) nearly girlfriend, in Billy Shakespeare land. So he thinks! Imagine how thrilled he will be when I pop up where he is and say “Howdy!” Or whatever it is they say over there.

Let the overseas snog fest begin!!!

Georgia can't wait to visit Hamburger-a-gogo land with Jas in tow so she can finally track down Masimo, the Italian-American dreamboat. But after a long week in America, Georgia only succeeds in learning importantish things -- like how to ride a bucking bronco -- before she's dragged back to England by Mutti and Vati. Will Georgia be able to reel in the Italian dreamboat, or is she destined to live forever all aloney on her owney?

... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Greeeeeeeeat!
This book was soooo great! I've read all the books and I finally read the lastest one, And Then he Ate My Boy Entrancers and it was sooooo not a dissapointment.

As usual, Gerogia is full of hilariosity and her boy troubles countinue. Who will she pick? Robbie, Dave, or Masimo? Ohhhhhh...I'm rooting for Dave the Laugh. Although this latest book made me like Masimo and Robbie more than usual, haha.

Her trip in America is hilarious, although I think I can safely say that all of Ameica is not "Howdy" and Overalls. Looks like there will be another book!!! YAY! Can't wait!

5-0 out of 5 stars can't wait!
I haven't read it yet because it came out today but i know it's about georgia going to america (hamburger-a-gogo land) to find massimo and apparantly jas tags along aswell. this whole series is unbelieveably awesome and hilarious. READ THEM IF YOU HAVEN'T!My sister is picking it up on her way home from work for me so i just can't wait!

5-0 out of 5 stars I love the Georgia books
I think that this book will be hilarious just like all the others. They are the funniest thing i have ever read! i love them and i cant wait untill they come out! ... Read more


106. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie
by Laura Joffe Numeroff
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060245867
Catlog: Book (1985-06-30)
Publisher: Laura Geringer
Sales Rank: 1276
Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Who would ever suspect that a tiny little mouse could wear out anenergetic young boy? Well, if you're going to go around giving an exuberantly bossy rodent a cookie, you'd best be prepared to do one or two more favors for it before your day is through. For example, he'll certainly need a glass of milk to wash down that cookie, won't he? And you can't expect him to drink the milk without a straw, can you? By the time our hero is finished granting all the mouse's very urgent requests--and cleaning up after him--it's no wonder his head is becoming a bit heavy. Laura Joffe Numeroff's tale of warped logic is a sure-fire winner in the giggle-generator category. But concerned parents can rest assured, there's even a little education thrown in for good measure: underneath the folly rest valuable lessons about cause and effect. Felicia Bond's hilarious pictures are full of subtle, fun details. Fans will be happy to know that this dynamic author-illustrator pair teamed up again for If You Give a Moose a Muffin and If You Give a Pig a Pancake. (Great read aloud, ages 4 to 8) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (76)

5-0 out of 5 stars She wants it read again and again!
Simply put, this is a wonderful book. Our 19 month old daughter has enjoyed this book since she received it on her first birthday. The story is simple and easy to follow and the pictures are big and bright and wonderfully drawn. There aren't alot of words on every page so if you have a younger child that likes to turn the pages frequently, this makes it easy to keep the story going. Although the story is whimsical and involved enough for an older child to enjoy as well. We have read this book so many times that my daughter has memorized some of the words on every page and pretends to "read" it herself. Personally, I feel this is the best of the "If you give a ....." book series (we have them all). I think the only improvement this book could use is if it came in a board book version as the paper pages in our hardback version are quickly becoming worn from all the frequent reading and toting around! A true classic that I feel any parent with a young child can't go wrong with.

4-0 out of 5 stars If You Give Your Child This Book --- You'll Read It Alot!
Felicia Bond has a book that works for kids in the 2-5 age set. This is a nice story that leads from one object to another ("if you give the mouse a cookie, he's going to want some milk. If you give him some milk, he's going to want a napkin" etc., etc.)

The art is well drawn and holds my kid's attention well. The story is whimsical and teaches about twenty objects (milk, cookie, crayon, tape, pillow, etc.) to young kids. They memorize the lines fairly quickly and the book can help with sight reading for the pre-school set.

If you give this book to your child, he's probably going to want you to read it over and over again.

5-0 out of 5 stars Cookie cookie cookie starts with C
"If You Give a Mouse a Cookie" really has been the "It" book for some time. Parents love this story, and their children really get into it as well. On and off, I'd heard various things about it, but nothing that so sparked my interest that I ran to my nearest library to peruse its pages. Now, however, I've grown old and wise in the ways of kiddie lit. and I found myself wanting to know what all the fuss was about. Was this book really as overwhelmingly fantastic as everyone said? Was I doomed to fall desperately in love with it like 98% of the population of known Western Civilization? The answer is a resounding yes yes yes. I had counted on finding some mild enjoyment with a fun story. Was I got was extreme enjoyment from a sly, understated, exceedingly clever story.

As we open, a small mouse treks down a hill on its own as a boy contentedly reads his comic book, munching on a bag of delicious chocolate chip cookies. After the boy offers the mouse a cookie (not knowing what such an action has wrought) the mouse asks for milk. Milk leads to a napkin. A napkin leads to a mirror (to check for a milk mustache, of course). A mirror leads to a hasty haircut. A haircut leads to sweeping up. And so on. All the while the boy gamely follows his rodent friend over, around, and through the different parts of the house, ever supplying the guest with whatsoever it may require. By the end, the house is in shambles, the boy exhausted on the floor (parents will relish this picture above all) and the mouse has just started in on a second cookie.

Some books expertly place kids in the position of their parents. In the picture book, "Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus", kids are allowed to finally tell someone (the someone in that instance being a naughty pigeon) no. In this book, the kids are now the patient parents, forever cleaning up and amusing the endlessly enthusiastic and hepped-up mousey. The pictures are deceptively simple, drawn with pure pen and ink. Just the same, millions of tiny details are apparent in every shot. The boy's refrigerator displays (oddly) a newspaper clipping of a car crash. The mouse's drawing of his family displays some pretty original dresses on his mother and sister. And I'll leave up to your imagination the variety of odds n' ends surrounding the depleted boy at the end of the story. Suffice to say, ladies and gentlemen, this book has it all. And it's a delightful story to boot.

5-0 out of 5 stars I know this book by heart now...
My seventeen-month old son will search through his vast library to find this book (and the others in this series), protesting when I try to compromise with another selection. He loves the story, knows when to turn the page (which is no longer necessary, as I can recite them all from memory) and will accept no subsitute. I even tried burying the books away so that I could read something new to him, but he dug them out, carried them down the stairs and insisted I drop everything to recall what are apparently his favorite stories.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book
This is a great book about a greedy type mouse who wants one thing after another jsut like a kid.....this book has the mouse acting jsut like kids when we are little its great..one of hte best chirldrens books out next to green eggs and ham. adults will love this book just as much as kids will... ... Read more


107. Quiltmaker's Gift
by Jeff Brumbeau, Gail De Marcken
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.56
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439309107
Catlog: Book (2001-03-01)
Publisher: Scholastic
Sales Rank: 2734
Average Customer Review: 4.96 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Quiltmaker's Gift celebrates the quilting tradition, the value of generosity, and the spirit of community in a beautiful and touching fable for our times. This richly illustrated picture book celebrates the joy of giving and gently emphasizes the age-old truth that material wealth does not necessarily buy happiness. The Quiltmaker's Gift is a heartwarming children's fable, a celebration of quilters and quilting, and a challenging adult parable all wrapped into one.

A wise and generous quiltmaker, with magic in her fingers and love for humanity in her heart, sews the most beautiful quilts in the world-and gives each one away for free to a needy recipient. A greedy king, his castle overflowing with riches and treasures, never smiles-and yearns for the one thing that will bring him laughter and happiness. As the story unfolds, the reader watches the king learn the most valuable lesson of his life. Under the quiltmaker's guidance, the king is transformed as he gives away his precious things all around the world. He learns the true meaning of happiness by bringing joy to the lives of others. He finally begins to smile.

This charming fable is brought to stunning visual life by the beautiful bursting illustrations, which leap off every page of the book. The artist's years working for the Peace Corps are richly reflected in her art work, showing characters and adventures in all the colors of the world-as rich and varied as the crazy quilts made by the quiltmaker. Each page also highlights a different traditional quilt block pattern , the name of whichrelates to the unfolding story. Hundreds of subtle messages and intriguing substories are embedded in the art, inviting new discoveries reading after reading.

The reverse side of the book jacket features a dramatic puzzle poster showing the king's amazing collection of stuff. Gail de Marcken has pictured 250 different quilt block names among the treasure trove. ... Read more

Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Not Just for Children - A Gift for the Giver in Your Life
I'm not surprised to find this book listed as a Children's Book - who else is supposed to enjoy beautiful illustrated fables?

The answer, of course, is the grown-up who reads it aloud. The detailed illustrations in this book will fascinate the fortunate child who hears the tale. The fortunate adult reader and the child will enjoy following this story about an unhappy king, laden with "things" he thought would make him happy.

A classic consumer, he "gets" more and more - his closets and rooms are burdened with beautiful treasures that bring him little joy. He thinks the only thing he doesn't have - one of the quiltmaker's quilts - will bring him that elusive happiness. But she only gives to the poor - despite his threats and angry attempts to show her who has the power - she will not give him a quilt.

She tells him how he can get that quilt - the answer of course is simple, once he figures it out.

A wonderful gift for that person you know who always gives (s/he might like reading it to children or grandchildren) or the quilt-lover on your list. The colorful quilt patterns shown and named inside the front and back covers, and inside the dustjacket(! ) are fantastic.

Like "Old Turtle," this is a beautifully illustrated book with rich layers to be enjoyed by children and adults, year after year.

5-0 out of 5 stars a valuable treasure
Though my children are grown, I still enjoy brousing the children's book section of the local bookstore. I was drawn to remove The Quiltmakers Gift from it's resting place on the shelf because of the beautifully rendered, inviting illustrations on it's cover. And what a pleasant surprise when I opened the book to find a wealth of the same along with a most touching and tenderly written story about a king living in unhappy greed amongst the finest of splendor. Yet this same greed allows his path to cross with that of a loving, giving soul who has the gift to help the king learn how to find his own happiness. It is apparent that both author and illustrator have a deep understanding of the gift of giving, and have given us a wonderful story to share with our loved ones. I found myself sitting in the bookstore wiping away the tears from my eyes and I knew this book was a must even though I may save it for years before having grandchildren to read it to.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book for Old and Young Children
The illustrations are really good. For the younger children 2-4 years old, possible paraphrasing the story and looking closely at the illustrations would good. The older children will really benefit from the lesson about giving and consequences of greed, plus really enjoy the illustrations. Since I do not celebrate Christmas or Easter, I did not like the one page that made reference to these holidays. It's a very nice quality and colorful book with a great message. It's the type of book to pass on to generations.

5-0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book, both in illustrations and in writing
What an addition this has made to my second grade library. The children love to look at the intoxicating illustrations, and I love to hear the story again as I read it to them each time. It is a beautifully told story with an important moral...don't let your child miss out on this lovely book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Speechless (nearly!!)
This book is incredible. I love it. The artwork is almost intoxicating; every time I read it with my 3 year old son I see something I missed the first million times we read it!! My 4 month old likes to look at the paintings as well. The story is beautifully written also. This is one to leave on the coffee table. ... Read more


108. Complete Anne of Green Gable Boxed Set (Anne of Green Gables, Anne of the Island, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, Anne of Ingleside, Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside)
by L.M. MONTGOMERY
list price: $36.00
our price: $24.48
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553609416
Catlog: Book (1997-10-06)
Publisher: Starfire
Sales Rank: 673
Average Customer Review: 4.85 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

When Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of Green Gables, Prince Edward Island, send for a boy orphan to help them out at the farm, they are in no way prepared for the error that will change their lives. The mistake takes the shape of Anne Shirley, a redheaded 11-year-old girl who can talk anyone under the table. Fortunately, her sunny nature and quirky imagination quickly win over her reluctant foster parents. Anne's feisty spirit soon draws many friends--and much trouble--her way. Not a day goes by without some melodramatic new episode in the tragicomedy of her life. Early on, Anne declares her eternal antipathy for Gilbert Blythe, a classmate who commits the ultimate sin of mocking her hair color. Later, she accidentally dyes that same cursed hair green. Another time, in her haste to impress a new neighbor, she bakes a cake with liniment instead of vanilla.Lucy Maud Montgomery's series of books about Anne have remained classics since the early 20th century. Her portrayal of this feminine yet independent spirit has given generations of girls a strong female role model, while offering a taste of another, milder time in history. This lovely boxed gift collection comprises Anne of Green Gables, Anne of the Island, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, Anne of Ingleside, Rainbow Valley, and Rilla of Ingleside. (Ages 9 to 12) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (121)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic Story For All Ages
In our present world, there are so many silly, pointless books about violence and action heroes, books that lack sense and have neither morals nor character development. This story reflects a time when novels were about people just like you and me - people with the same problems, thoughts, and feelings as us.

Anne of Green Gables is a story where a young orphan is adopted by a family in Prince Edward Island, a beautiful area in Canada. The young optimistic girl's imagination often get her into trouble, which makes the book both humorous and enjoyable. The important point about her problems is that they are conflicts faced by many young girls in today's society, despite the fact that she "lived" over a century ago. The character development through the series is what truly makes this piece of literature a classic.

Finally, I would like to say that this is an ideal story for a mother and daughter to read together. This lovely book, full of laughs for all generations, has earned its five stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Book in Literary History
first of all, let me begin with I LOVE THIS BOOK! I have read this book more times than I can remember...easily more than a dozen...thus, I am going to set my mind to write a glowing review of it.

This book portrays a stunning sketch of Canadian History and Culture in the late 1800s to early 1900s. The character personalities are so real and so amazingly "human" that one cannot help but fall in love with them. You really get a taste of PEI in its glory.

This story is set in Avonlea, Prince Edward Island (Canada), a fictional settlement which is really Cavendish, Prince Edward Island, the place where Lucy Maud Montgomery, the author grew up.

The main character is Anne Shirley...and eleven year old, enigmatic, imaginative, sparkling, highly intelligent orphan who is sent to Green Gables, a farmhouse in Avonlea, under the impression that she was to be adopted by a pair of elderly siblings, Matthew and Marilla Cuthburt. But, apon arrival to Green Gables, Anne discovers that there had been a horrible mistake...the Cuthburts never wanted a girl...they wanted a boy who could do the chores and help Matthew with the farm. Anne was was in the "depths of dispair". Matthew, on the drive home from the train station had taken a great shine to Anne and had his heart set on keeping her, regardless of any mistake. Marilla, however, was not so easily enchanted. She agreed to let Anne stay at Green Gables on trial, to see if she would behave herself and lend a helpful hand to Marilla. After the trial, Anne is welcomed to Green Gables and flourishes under the love of the Cuthburts and all Avonlea folk. Anne, however, has one big problem. Her Hair. It is a hopeless shade of carrotty red and Anne felt that it was the ugliest hair anyone could imagine. She was extremely sensitive about it and she was horribly embarrassed about it. On her first day of school, Anne's hair was made fun of by Gilbert Blythe, the smartest and handsomest boy in school. "Carrots! Carrots!" he said. Anne's temper got the better of her and she was so angry she broke a slate over his head. After that, for many years, she snubbed Gilbert every time he spoke to her and he developed a boyhood crush on her.

Ah, but to keep this review interesting and the book mysterious, I will stop telling you the story and begin reviewing. The characters in the book are so well-defined that it seems to you that you know every character personally, like an old friend or neighbour.

And by all means, don't let the age recommendation fool you either...this book can be read by all ages alike...and I have no doubt that this book will still be my avid favorite at the age of 85.

The book is not boring, contrary to many opinions of those who read the first chapter of small print and historical settings. The discriptions will place you right into the heart of the story and you find you will laugh and cry while reading this story. Every time I read it I cry at a certain part which I'm not sure if I should reveal to you for fear of spoiling the good parts in the story, but it is dreadfully sad. If you read the book, then you will know what part I am talking about. The one saddest part in the whole story.

Although this book has some old ideas and ways of expressing them, you will learn a great deal of Canadian history through them and there's no doubt in my mind that this book will still be popular decades and most likely even centuries to come.

5-0 out of 5 stars One word - Classic!
The Anne of Green Gables series is a wonderful and grand masterpiece. I would give it more stars if I could.

L.M. Montgomery wrote some of the most memorial works in children's literature. Anne of Green Gables was an instant hit, and still is today.

The eight books all follow the story of Anne Shirley, a red headed, smart and imagnative Canadian girl who was an orphan all her life. When she enters Marilla and Matthew Cuthberts' life, she changes not only them, but all of Avonlea.

I really enjoyed the third one, Anne of the Island. Anne really grows up in that novel. It really showed a difference in the next novels to come.

In the last one, Rilla of Ingleside, it seemes like it was most narrated by Anne's daughter, Rilla, rather than Anne herself. The feelings and plaots were mostly seen threw Rilla's eyes. It was quite a diffference from the normality of Anne's feelings.

I would recomend these books any day. It shows that the twentieth century novel can be a classic. Anne of Green Gables is a story no one should go without reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book I have ever read in my life!!!!!
The book Anne of Green Gables is a great book for all ages. Although it is a bit lengthy, there is ALWAYS something happening on each page. If you take the time to read it, this is really a worthwhile book. The story is about a young orphan girl who is accidentally adopted by the Culberts, who had wanted a boy instead of a girl . Anne gets into all sorts of trouble soon, like jumping onto beds, (with people sleeping in them) and dying her hair green! Although Anne was an "accident", the Culberts would never forget life without her. If you are an adventure-loving person, you should definitely read this book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Comfort Book
Encountering Anne and her magical world at the age of 11, I have never quite escaped Avonlea and the wonderful characters concocted by L.M. Montgomery. Montgomery takes to heart the advice given to Anne in Anne of the Island to write about the simple things in life, and she does so beautifully. Reading one of the'Anne' book is like coming home - no matter where you're from. ... Read more


109. The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3)
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786814934
Catlog: Book (2004-05-01)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 2389
Average Customer Review: 4.57 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Ever the resourceful young criminal mastermind, Artemis has found a way to construct a supercomputer from stolen fairy technology.Called the "C Cube," it will render all existing human technology obsolete.Artemis then arranges a meeting with a Chicago businessman, Jon Spiro, to offer to suppress the Cube for one year in return for gold, his favorite substance.But the meeting is a trap, and Spiro steals the Cube and mortally injures Butler.Artemis knows his only hope to save Butler lies in fairy magic, so once again he is forced to contact his old rival, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon fairy police. Miraculously, Butler is healed, but there is a catch: he has aged fifteen years.Thus, Butler's infamously ditzy sister, Juliet, is called in as Artemis's bodyguard.Together, they travel to Chicago to steal back the Cube and ensure that Jon Spiro is put out of business-permanently. ... Read more

Reviews (149)

5-0 out of 5 stars Artemis Fowl The Eternity Code
Artemis Fowl, Eternity Code
By: Eoin Colfer
Reviewed By J. Poupongtong
Period: 6

"Artemis Fowl,The Eternity Code" is a great book for ages 10-13. It gets complicated at first, but then it starts to clear up. This book is about a thirteen year old boy who has a family record of criminals. His father has a serious injury that can only be healed by Holly Short, a lep officer. The lep is an underground organization that is made up entirely of fairy creatures. The healing that Holly Short performed changed his father's personality and made him care less about his stocks and more on his family. Artemis is changed by that and is about to go straight just after he pulls of his biggest crime yet. This crime started when a meeeting with Jon Spiro, an american industrialist and also head man of Fission Chips, a stock company that is only trailing Phonetix. They were arguing about the C-Cube, a micro computer that Artemis made out of stolen Lep circuits. This argument ended when Arno Blunt, Spiro's bodyguard, shot Butler, Artemis's bodyguard. Butler was in need of a healing and Artemis called Holly Short for the healing. The healing toook some life force from Butler, making him about 50 years old. Now the quest is on to get back the C-Cube, but Artemis will need backup. Aided by only Mulch Diggums, a dwarf, Holly Short, an elf, Butler, Butler's kid sister Juliet(who is also training to be a bodyguard), can Artemis get back the C-Cube?

I liked this book a lot. You can see that this is clearly an adventure book. But this is also a science fiction, comedy, and action book. So you can also see that this book has many genres. This book's dialog is also funny. When Artemis says that quote" I'm here because this odious little man threatened to crush my skull between his teeth" is one of the funniest and smartest jokes that I have heard in all the books that I have read thus far.

The dumbness of pex and chips, two bodyguards working for Blunt is also very humerous. When Chips said" Wanna know why they call me chips" and pulled out a bag of chips AND pex didn't know why chips was called chips was very funny. Also this books has a very high level of vocabulary. The system that I've read at Fission Chips is very advance. Also, the vault that keeps the cube has five diffrent defences. There are a weightsensitive, thumbprint, voice, and eye scans. Also they have live security in an air tight room.

My favorite part was when Holly was trying to subdue four goblins. Eoin Colfer making the goblins have the ability to know how to launch fireballs was very suspending. The lep have a wide variaty of weapons including a Nutrino 2000, a nonleathal handgun, and a camfoil, an invisability cloak. My least favorite part was when Butler almost died. That part was also very suspending. I'm waiting for the fourth book and if you read this book, I think that you would to.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fun brain Buster for kids
The Eternity Code is the best book out this year. Butler has made a C- cube out of fairy technology that was left over from the time that the fairies tried to raid the fowl mansion. It is at least 50 years before schedule in the technology industry and mafia man Jon Spiro has to have it. When Artemis has a meeting with Mr. Spiro he falls right into a trap. Even though Artemis gets out alive, Spiro's main man Blunt mortally and physically wounds his dear and close friend Butler. Artemis has to think on his toes to save Butler and save his C-cube. Artemis has deciphered a brilliant plan to storm Mr. Spiro's high tech research building but it requires a little bit of help. Artemis has recruited the notaries Mulch Diggins, Butlers little sister Juliet and Holly Short. This book is a great read for children and grown-ups alike. One of the best books of the year is out and about!

3-0 out of 5 stars Not as entertaining as 1 & 2
I see that Colfer has left himself a wee opening for an Artemis Fowl #4 and if there were one, I would read it. The Eternity Code's pacing is slower than books #1 and #2 but it's just as tight and almost just as entertaining. While on the one hand I was glad to see Butler make it through to the end, the book would have been stronger in many regards if he hadn't. I was also suprised to see Artemis' parents suddenly absent after they were Artemis' raison d'etra in books #1 and #2.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Dad, Bad Dad
In this third Artemis Fowl tale, Artemis gets into a jam when he tries to sell a tricked up piece of hardware cobbled together from technology he's filched from the fairy world. In an uncharacteristic lapse of judgment, he tries to sell it to Chicago Bad Guy Jon Spiro. Artemis's dad is back from the Artic, but he's changed. Artemis doesn't know what to make of this different dad, so maybe that's why he tries to go into business with Spiro. Spiro calls Artemis "Arty"-just like Artemis's dad does. Spiro is the bad old dad that Artemis was used to (and deeply misses). Spiro is also an omen of the kind of person Artemis will turn into if he doesn't change his ways.

As usual, the LEPricon police have to pop in and help Artemis save the day-but this time, they exact a price for their services. Their exasperation with Artemis is perfectly understandable. When will Artemis get the message that he can be his own worst enemy? Another engrossing Fowl book.

3-0 out of 5 stars Good, but not needed.
(...)

I thought the first book was great, I LOVED the second one, but this is probably the most disappointing. Not bad, but disappointing.

I really thought the second book pretty much wrapped up the series by itself. All the unfinished subplots were resolved, and it was satisfying to see Artemis 'redeem' himself and make peace with Holly and the Fairies, and find his father.

I was hoping that third novel would close up in an even trilogy. Eoin Colfer actually said that there would be three books, but its obvious he changed his ideas. (For one thing, he said the final two volumes would be called "Artemis Fowl Jr" and "Artemis Fowl the second", and that the third book would take place a day after the third, which did not happen, obviously) Instead, there are so many unresolved twists in this one, that there's bound to be more.

There are two plot twists that will probably hurt the series (or change it radically). (...)

The villain of this piece, Jon Spiro is not as nearly as interesting as Opal Kaboi was, or Artemis Fowl when he was a villain himself in the first book. His henchmen are hillarious, but thats about as far as it goes.

My thoughts about this book are really complicated, so it didn't get translated too well. Get the book, its still good, just not as good as the first two. ... Read more


110. Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0688128971
Catlog: Book (1996-08-19)
Publisher: Greenwillow
Sales Rank: 992
Average Customer Review: 4.81 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

The irrepressible mouse heroine of Chester's Way and Julius, the Baby of the World returns for another true-to-life and very funny episode. Lilly loves everything about school, especially her teacher, Mr. Slinger--until he takes away her musical purse because she can't stop playing with it in class. Lilly decides to get revenge with a nasty drawing of "Big Fat Mean Mr. Stealing Teacher!" but when she finds the kind note he put in her purse, she's filled with remorse and has to find a way to make things right again. Children will sympathize with Lilly's impulsive mistake and laugh uproariously at the witty and expressive pictures of the very human mice. In a starred review, Publisher's Weekly called this book "sympathetic and wise." (Ages 4 to 8) ... Read more

Reviews (36)

5-0 out of 5 stars HOORAY FOR LILLY!!!
This is a book that adults will appreciate as much as children. Pay close attention to all that's happening in the illustrations. You can't help but love Lilly, she means well but like any of us she finds herself in trouble. Mr. Slinger, Lilly's teacher is a hero. This is a must read for all kids. Makes a great gift, look for a purple plastic purse and movie star sunglasses to go a long with it! After reading this book you'll find yourself looking for and falling in love with all of Kevin Henkes' books! Wow! That is all I can say. Wow!

5-0 out of 5 stars Aesop would be proud, multi-level morals and fun
Kevin Henkes spins a wonderful tale that appeals to many age groups with the fun story of Lilly and her new purse. Lilly loves her teacher and school, but her normally attentive nature is put to the test when she brings her new purse and accessories to class one day. Woven with lessons about the importance of patience, listening, and responsibility, the story is accompanied by colorful and simple illustrations depicting the young mouse Lilly and other characters in ordinary classroom situations every child can relate to. Your children will love reading this with you; you'll have to read every delightful caption. Something in the story will make adults laugh every time they read it too. Very well rounded and enjoyable work.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fashionista rodentia
It is my understanding that "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse" is the book that really launched Kevin Henkes from mere picture book drudgery to children's book stardom. Though he'd been churning out stories that spoke to kids and their qualms ("Owen", "Chrysanthemum", etc.) Lilly grabbed the world's spotlight and focused it squarely on her cute little shoulders. Though she'd already appeared in two previous Henkesian creations ("Chester's Way" and "Julius, the Baby of the World"), this was Lilly's first foray as a protagonist with her name in the title. As such, the book has been turned into a stage play, been read by millions of small children, and gives spunky kids someone they can identify with and look up to. In short, she's a pip.

Lilly is mightily pleased with her life at the moment. She loves school and she adores her teacher Mr. Slinger. Mr. Slinger (undoubtedly a relation of Miss Twinkle from "Chrysanthemum") is the coolest prof in the world. He wears crazy colored ties, refers to his students as "rodents", provides yummy tasty snacks, and has a penchant for patterned shirts. Lilly is determined to someday be a teacher all thanks to Mr. Slinger. Unfortunately, Lilly's Slinger-love takes a downturn when she brings her new purple plastic purse to class. Noisily displaying it at an inappropriate time, Slinger confiscates the item until the end of the day. In anger, Lilly draws a mean portrait of her teacher and hides it in his book bag. But when the young girl opens her returned purse outside of school, she finds a note reading, "Today was a difficult day. Tomorrow will be better", and some yummy snacks are included. Suddenly wracked with guilt, Lilly decides to make up with her teacher and by the end the two have reconciled joyfully.

Now I was lucky enough to see the Minneapolis Children Theater's production of this particular book (combined with some of Lilly's other adventures to pad it out). And though I'm not a weepy gal by nature, I found myself tearing up during the reading of Mr. Slinger's note to Lilly (i.e. "Tomorrow will be better") as well as when I read the picture book. I don't tear up during children's stage productions and I CERTAINLY don't tear up when reading picture books. Yet here I was, all of 26 years of age, and bawling over the succinct sweetness of Slinger's comforting note. How many books have done this for you recently? How many picture books?

The tale is filled to the brim with the Henkes touches a person expects from his work (be sure to notice the Krazy Kat reference in Lilly's dining room). As per usual there is the comfortable family containing loving parents. And best of all, that wonderful way Henkes has of bringing a happy child to life on the page. No adult reading this book would want to be anyone BUT Mr. Slinger and no child reading it wouldn't want to know him. As for Lilly, she walks the fine line between precocious and precious. And wins. If you're a Henkes fan you won't want to miss this delightful star-making turn. If you're not a Henkes fan, do what you can to cure yourself of this ailment and then immediately read and enjoy this book. It's worth the effort.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Book Cracks me Up!
I babysit all of the time so I am always looking for great books to read to the kids. This book I read to myself. It is so funny and I love how Lilly is so ostentatious with her purse. She is exactly like I was at that age and I love the message of not impulsively taking revenge on someone before simmering down. I recommend this book to everyone and I promise you will love it! I even named my Hamster after Lilly.

3-0 out of 5 stars Great lesson in restraint, but hard to read...
I found this book to be very difficult to read aloud again and again. When I taught Kindergarten and preschool before that, I read this book to large and small groups of children and found it tedious and too wordy. For example, why have a line like "Lilly even wanted her own set of deluxe picture encyclopedias." Perhaps some of you may love the dozens of new vocabulary words, but I would rather not have to explain for the umpteenth time what "deluxe," or "diva" means, when the story already has many other new words that are more developmentally appropriate for this target group of readers (i.e., unique, jaunty, considerate, uncooperative...). Anyway, perhaps it is just me being picky, but I didn't care for this story much as a read a-loud. There are many books that I find much more worthwhile. If you have a child who could use a lesson about self-restraint, however, this book may be better than nothing. ... Read more


111. The Teacher's Funeral: A Comedy in Three Parts
by Richard Peck
list price: $16.99
our price: $11.55
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0803727364
Catlog: Book (2004-09)
Publisher: Dial Books
Sales Rank: 2068
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Book Description

"If your teacher has to die, August isn't a bad time of year forit," begins Richard Peck's latest novel, a book full of his signature wit andsass. Russell Culver is fifteen in 1904, and he's raring to leave his tinyIndiana farm town for the endless sky of the Dakotas. To him, school has beennothing but a chain holding him back from his dreams. Maybe now that his teacherhas passed on, they'll shut the school down entirely and leave him free toroam.

No such luck. Russell has a particularly eventful season of schooling ahead ofhim, led by a teacher he never could have predicted--perhaps the only teacherequipped to control the likes of him: his sister Tansy. Despite stolen supplies,a privy fire, and more than any classroom's share of snakes, Tansy will manageto keep that school alive and maybe, just maybe, set her brother on a new, wisercourse.

As he did in A Long Way from Chicago and A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peckcreates a whole world of folksy, one-of-a-kind characters here--the enviable andthe laughable, the adorably meek and the deliciously terrifying. There will beno forgetting Russell, Tansy, and all the rest who populate this hilarious,shrewd, and thoroughly enchanting novel. ... Read more


112. Complete Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales
by HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, LilyOwens
list price: $14.99
our price: $14.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0517092913
Catlog: Book (1993-05-10)
Publisher: Gramercy
Sales Rank: 5390
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Lilly Owens, ed. Illustrated edition of 159 cherished tales that have enchanted readers for generations. Includes The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Clothes, Snow Queen, all uncut with beautiful illustrations by Arthur Rackham, Hans Richter, et al. 60 B&W illustrations. 816 pages. ... Read more

Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Tales
Grimms-You call the Best but Hans Anderson, You call it a 'Classic of the classics' coz the beautiful stories lets your imagination go surfing on 'cloud nine' and these tales conveys moralistic message. Though the illustrations are in black and white, it doesn't matter as long as the stories are well read. Children learn to explore and imagine by listening and this is a book that every parent would love to read and narrate the stories to their loved ones. The Princess and the Pea is my fav' story and so is the 'Emperor's clothes' - Totally, an amazing fairy tales of Hans Anderson that grips you delightfully reading even as an adult. It would have been much better if more attention was given to make the book more trendy n new mod edition. Hans Anderson is so popular read that one can't resist a pick of any book that has his tales. An enchanting collection by bedside to read out to kid, any time, any day - A nice Pick 'Content is king' I would say!

4-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book for adults and children
I have always been a fan of the original versions of fairy tales, so I picked this book up a few years ago, just to read for myself. A few weeks ago my six year old found it hidden among my millions of other books, and asked me to read it to her. While easy to read silently, it is a bit hard to get into the rythm of the wording at first, but after stumbling through a few paragraphs, it becomes much easier to handle.

Since the discovery of this book, my children have been requesting stories from it almost every night. At first my three year old complained about the lack of pictures (it really isn't "fully illustrated"), but she quickly got over that and enjoys listening to every story. Both of my older children like to compare these stories to ones they've seen on TV, or read in the few modernized fairy tale books we own (given to us by friends and relatives). Maybe my children are warped - which is very likely - but they prefer the original stories, with their not-so-happy, and often times violent, endings.

I've never been one to believe children need to have their reality padded... real life doesn't always end the way we hoped, so neither should stories. Hopefully this book, and ones like it, will be a bedtime favorite for years to come.

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't even bother.
While I'm sure the stories are great, I can't get past the poor type setting, and cheap paper which is practically newsprint. The words and illustrations bleed through from the next page making reading very difficult. And to make matters worse, the stories are set in a terrible, hard to read font and tight leading. This book is NOT kid-friendly at all.

5-0 out of 5 stars The true story of "The Little Mermaid" will surprise you!
If you remember Thumbelina, The Nightingale, The Ugly Duckling or The Princess and the Pea, they are all here in a wonderful collection of stories written by Hans Christian Anderson. Unlike the Brothers Grimm, who collected and recorded popular tales, Hans Christian Anderson wrote his own "folk" tales, which also contain Danish history and foreign literature.

Not all of his stories end well, yet this is a side of life children should learn about so they can be aware of it later in life. Your child might be horrified to learn that not everything ends up quite as magical as it would in a Disney movie. My favorite tale has always been "The Little Mermaid." She wanted to be something she was not meant to be and for me that is a lesson of how we should be who we really are. She actually ends up not marrying the prince. I quote:

The little mermaid lifted up glorified eyes towards the sun, and felt them, for the first time, filling with tears. On the ship, in which she had left the prince......she saw him and his beautiful bride searching for her; sorrowfully they gazed at the pearly foam, as if they knew she had thrown herself into the waves.

Some of the stories are very moralistic, yet he retains a mischievous sense of humor in some stories. His stories always reflect his fertile imagination. This particular collection was translated by Mrs. H. B. Paull, H. Oskar Sommer, Jean Hersholt and several other unknown translators. Six distinguished artists helped to illustrate this book. These are black and white illustrations and there are not really very many of them. To me a fully illustrated book should be fully illustrated. Nonetheless, this is not a book just for children. In fact, I see this more as a book which should be read to children by their parents. In this way parents and children can discuss items of interest. This book on its own would most likely not appeal to a child, due to the lack of pictures. It is meant to be read to them as far as I can tell. I also would recommend it to adults who remembered these stories as I did and want to read them again.

Perhaps I also remember the story about the tinder box very well. It is a magical story of a soldier who goes into a hollow tree and finds a passage with doors which lead to chambers. It sounds frightening at first but has a lovely happy ending.

Books can take us to another world and this one will take a child to many places they will never forget. And so the first story begins: "Far down in the forest, where the warm sun and the fresh air made a sweet resting place, grew a pretty little fir-tree; and yet it was not happy, it wished so much to be tall like its companions¯the pines and firs which grew around it. The sun shone, and the soft air fluttered its leaves, and......."

2-0 out of 5 stars Expected Better Quality
Andersen and Grimm are supposed to be classics. While I like having the collection and while the illustrations are very nice - the pages themselves are much closer to newspaper-stock than what I'd expect from a durable, long-lasting book. Very thin, gritty, and easily tearable. It was kind of disappointing. This also applies to the Grimm book from the same editor. ... Read more


113. The Magic Tree House: Books 1-8 (Osborne, Mary Pope. Magic Tree House Series (New York, N.Y.).)
list price: $30.00
our price: $19.80
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0807206121
Catlog: Book (2001-10-09)
Publisher: Imagination Studio
Sales Rank: 1950
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Read by the author
5 hours, 40 mintues
5 CD's

Just in time for the holidays enjoy eight Magic Tree House chapter books in a special CD gift set.As an added bonus, listen to an interview with the author and reader, Mary Pope Osborne.

These eight stories, currently available as two retail volumes on cassette with a combines price of $36.00, are being offered now along with the interview in a 5-CD set at a special price of $30.00.

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Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Captivated my 3.5 yr old son and almost 7 yr old daughter
My seven year old daughter received the set of CDs (books one through eight) for Christmas. She listened to books one, two, and four non-stop, in one morning. Now, two days later, she's listened to them all, some twice.

I had the first book on hand, and she followed along page by page. Later that day I went to the library and got as many of the rest of the eight that I could, and she drank them up! It was great to watch her "reading along", and I'm sure it will help her feel more confident as she begins to read chapter books.

What really amazed me though, is that my 3 and a half year old son listened as well. Though he sometimes played while he listened, he was obviously caught up in the excitement of pirates, knights, dinosaurs, and the rest.

I found the books easy to listen to, and interesting enough. The author does a great job of using her voice to distinguish whose talking. I am amazed at how well the stories kept my kids' attention for hours at a time! And introduced them to some history as well, no less.

One thing to note though, our "disc two" is labelled as though it were disc three, and vice versa. A little confusing, but we figured it out. (5 discs in all).

5-0 out of 5 stars Magic treehouse books 1 to 8
The magic treehouse books are fun to read. There are big adventures in each book. The kids go back in time and do neat stuff. I like when the kids find their way back to the magic treehouse at the end of the books. I like that if they are wearing short sleeves and short pants and they are in cold weather, they find coats and things they need in the adventure. Sometimes the people can be nice or mean, but the kids always get away before the bad guys get them!

4-0 out of 5 stars Helpful for kids who can't concentrate or remember details!
A great cd(s) to have. I've initially tried it out with children who loves to talk and can't focus long enough to listen and pick up necessary information from people around them. The interesting stories kept them focus for the duration and encourages them to recall and discuss the story later.

It also helped rekindle a particularly slow reader's, in grade school, interest in reading. He is now keen to give reading another go if he gets to listen and visually follow the words in the book.

How I wish subsequent books are also available in cds instead of just cassettees only!

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Fantasy!!!
I am the mother of two boys, ages 3 and 5, I started to purchase audio cassettes to keep the boys quiet--for a least a few minutes -- on long car trips to grandmas house...over 2 hours away. The Magic Tree House Series has worked so well that the boys love to listen to them, over and over and over... even on short errands. The problem now, is, how do I get them out of the car?? The stories are delightful and have some historical/educational value, the vocabulary is not dummed down either. I find both boys discussing the "JAck and Annie" stories and role playing their favorite "scenes". ... Read more


114. Number the Stars (Laurel Leaf Books)
by LOIS LOWRY
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440227534
Catlog: Book (1998-02-09)
Publisher: Laurel Leaf
Sales Rank: 7962
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Ten-year-old Annemarie Johansen and her best friend Ellen Rosen often think of life before the war. It's now 1943 and their life in Copenhagen is filled with school, food shortages, and the Nazi soldiers marching through town. When the Jews of Denmark are "relocated," Ellen moves in with the Johansens and pretends to be one of the family. Soon Annemarie is asked to go on a dangerous mission to save Ellen's life.


From the Paperback edition.
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Reviews (501)

5-0 out of 5 stars NL-S Approved Book
Lois Lowry's book, Number the Stars, is the second best book about the Holocaust that I have ever read. This book is about Annemarie Johansen's family trying to help Ellen Rosen's family get away from the German Nazis. On the way to her uncle's boat, Annemarie is stopped by two Nazis and is late to deliver a special package. The Rosens are brought safely to Sweden where they could live without having to worry about the Nazis.

I relate to Ellen Rosen in several ways. One way is that I am part Jewish and my family went through the Holocaust. Annnemarie's family helped them to escape to freedom and some family helped mine escape. Another way I relate to Ellen is that by the description of her personality and ways, we are kind of the same.

I felt this book helped me to see what was actually happening during the Holocaust. I have read this book many times other the last several years of my life, realizing more and more what actually happened. The way Lois describes the setting really helps you visualize the scenes. She describes her scenes with easy understandable words and life like similes. I recommend this book to teenagers but anyone could read it because it is easy to understand and easy to follow. If you like books on the history of the world, read this book because it is a very good reference to the Holocaust.

5-0 out of 5 stars Number the Stars
Remarkable, intense and suspenseful are just three of millions of words that describe this book. The book has a groundbreaking plot and keeps you in suspense after every chapter. Read Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. This story depicts a struggle between a brave girl named, Annemarie, trying to help her best friend, a courageous girl, Ellen, a Jewish neighbor. This touching book takes place in the year 1943 when Annemarie and Ellen are fighting for freedom from the Nazi soldiers in Copenhagen, Denmark. When the soldiers invade Annemarie's house, Ellen was disguised as Lise,Annemarie's older sister. Will the soldiers find out who Ellen really is? Lois Lowry wrote very simply, but is very well organized. She keeps you in suspense after every chapter. Read this book and you will find yourself sitting at the edge of your seat. Will Annmarie help Ellen and her family escape the Nazi soldiers?

5-0 out of 5 stars History lesson in an exciting form
As Hitler secretly prepared to round up all the Jews of Denmark, someone (to this day no one knows who, although there are some theories) warned the government. The result is that almost all of the 7,500 Jewish people living in Denmark managed to escape the country in the space of a few days, even though the country was already under the occupation of watchful Nazi troops.

This book is about that escape. Annmarie is 10 years old and lives in the same appartment building as her best friend, Ellen, who is Jewish. One day, Ellen's parents must flee and Ellen moves in with Annmarie and pretends to be her dead sister. Annmarie, her parents, and her little sister must band together with the rest of the Danish resistance to get Ellen to safety.

This is an exciting, fast-paced book about bravery and doing what's right. The characters are very realistic and human. This is an inspiring story for any child, and it teaches a very interesting history lesson to any adult who might not know the story of how practically no Danish Jews died under Hitler.

5-0 out of 5 stars girls in a really hard place to be
This book is exciting and scary. To think girls really had to llive like this is sad but it is a good book. I liked the way they took in the girl to stay with them and the way a girl had to do something scary to try and save her firend form the nazis. If you like this book you will also maybe like other books about girls in hard places to be like Camp of the angel and the bears house as well as pictures of hollis woods.

5-0 out of 5 stars Cool Book!!! Ever!!!
This is a great book it is funny at some parts, but the rest is all sad. I think it is so cool at every part!!! Ithink everyone should read this book!!! ... Read more


115. Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! (Caldecott Honor Book)
by Mo Willems
list price: $12.99
our price: $9.74
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 078681988X
Catlog: Book (2003-04-01)
Publisher: Hyperion Press
Sales Rank: 61
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (39)

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply Hilarious!
Truly a masterpiece! After many readings, this story still makes me laugh out loud. With only a few simple lines and a minimal amount of dialouge, Mo Willems has created a memorable character in this coniving pigeon who will do anything to drive a bus.

The local librarian told me that this book was a big hit at story hour, with the children actively telling the pigeon "No! You can't drive the bus!" Maybe I still have the mind set of a preschooler, because I found it just as entertaining, so much so that my best friend gave it to me for my 43rd birthday. In my opinion, it's one of the best children's books of the year.

True story.

5-0 out of 5 stars This new book is sure to become a Caldecott Medal winner
I bet this new book will be a future Caldecott Medal winner. It is sure to delight both children and adults alike. Children will love the story of that little blue pigeon and it is sure to make parents remember with a smile the willful nature of the three year old. This book is a must for your children's library. Five time Emmy Award winning writer and animator Mo Willems is sure to gain further recognition for his latest venture.

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply but Funny
This is an absolutly funny book. It's as much to read it as it is to hear it being read. It's along the lines of Click, Clack, Moo - you're children will wonder why you're chuckling more than they are

5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Read Aloud for Librarians & Teachers
The concept of this story is simple: The bus driver has left you the responsibility of watching his bus. Of course, there is a certain pigeon who would really love to take it for a spin and he will try every excuse in the book to get his way. This book is absolutely hilarious! When I read it to a group of children ages 4-11, they all loved it. Whenever the pigeon begged to drive the bus, they all responded with an enthusiastic, "No!" They laughed the entire time and not one child's attention was focused elsewhere. This book is simply a lot of fun!

5-0 out of 5 stars I love this book
Oh, my gosh. Let me start by saying (...) I love this book! My Language Arts teacher read it to my class and it is soo funny. Anyone can appriciate the cleverness and funniness of Don't Let the Peigion Drive the Bus. Don't pass it up. ... Read more


116. Fox in Socks (I Can Read It All by Myself Beginner Books (Hardcover))
by DR SEUSS
list price: $8.99
our price: $8.09
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394800389
Catlog: Book (1965-01-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 1690
Average Customer Review: 4.83 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Illus. in full color. A collection of tongue twisters that is "an amusing exercise for beginning readers."--Kirkus. ... Read more

Reviews (35)

5-0 out of 5 stars Dr. Seuss genius at work
Sure, it teaches valuable vocabulary words and rhyme schemes to tiny tots. And no doubt there's a thesis somewhere comparing hapless Knox to Stalin knocking heads against the red-white-and-blue American Fox. But *Fox in Socks* is above all other things the first instrument of torture children can use against their parents.

Take Father, tired out from a hard day at the office. "Read me a story, Daddy," coos his blond princess. Father bravely tries to wrap his tongue around "Luke Luck likes lakes./ Luke's duck likes lakes." Daddy's little angel chortles with each misspoken word -- and there are plenty of them by the time he arrives at the muddle puddle tweetle poodle beetle noodle battle paddle battle." She goes to sleep secure in the knowledge that not only can she grow up to be president, but that she's already smarter than her poor parents.

And that's the genius of Dr. Suess. His tongue teasers and outrageous Goo Gooses and Bim Bens and Tweedle Beetles don't just foster imagination -- they encourage kids to let it run rampant.

5-0 out of 5 stars Classic Seuss for Children of Any Age - Better than 5 Stars
Although Amazon advertises this book for ages 4-8, my wife and I started reading this and other Seuss books to our children from 6 months on. Always a delight, our kids would laugh at the silliness while acquiring a zest for life at the same time. We started a great habit of reading two or three Seuss books before bed, and the kids loved them. Soon, they would memorize many of the phrases, beginning a lifelong passion for reading.

Every kid should experience reading Fox in Socks while growing up. Join the Fox in Socks as he leads Mr. Knox on a zany adventure of learning and silly rhymes. Combine it with other fun Seuss books and your kids will sit enthralled as you turn the pages. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars What other Dr. Seuss book comes with a warning label?
On the front cover of "Fox in Socks," one of the "I Can Read It All By Myself" Beginner Books authored and illustrated by Dr. Seuss there appears the following warning:

"This is a book you READ ALOUD to find out just how smart your tongue is. The first time you read it, don't go fast! This Fox is a tricky fox. He'll try to get your tongue in trouble."

Just in case you missed the small print on the cover as soon as you open the book there is an even larger warning instructing you to "Take it Slowly" becaseu "This Book is Dangerous!" If that is not an invitation for young kids to read a book, then I do not know what would be. However, there is a good chance that your tongue will be numb by the time you finish read about "Knox on fox in socks in box," "Six sick bricks tick," and "Sue sews socks of fox in socks now." But if you can call something "a tweetle bettle noodle poodle bottled paddled muddled duddled fuddled wuddled fox in socks," then you need not be a-feared of anything else you ever read in the rest of your life.

"Fox in Socks" is dedicated to Mizi Long and Audrey Dimond of the Mt. Soledad Lingual Laboratories, who I suspect helped Theodor Geisel identify the specific phonetics that beginning readers would have to work on (I had to spend a week repeating some nonsense about "thirty thousand boys with thirty thousand drums" to work on the "th" sound). When you remember that the genesis for "The Cat in the Hat" was the idea of taking 220 basic words, rhyming them, and turning them into a book that would make children more interested in reading than having to deal with Dick, Jane, Sally, and Spot ("See Spot Run. Run Spot Run. Fetch the ball, Spot"). "Fox in Socks" is a clear reminder that these books are not just a lot of fun when you read "Duck takes licks in lakes Luke Luck likes" but also educational, in the best sense of the word.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fox? socks? Knox? It rocks!!!
A great book. It was my child hood favorite and I'll never forget the first time I I was able to read the book all the way through. To bad I lost it, I'd pay good money to have my book back!

5-0 out of 5 stars Fox in Socks
Do you like rhymes for just dimes? Funny characters looking odd or a smile while you nod? Get this book its great whether you are a lass or a mate, read it with a sandwich or a hoagie if you are a young spry of an old foagie. ... Read more


117. Children's Literature: Engaging Teachers and Children in Good Books
by Michael O. Tunnell, James S. Jacobs, Daniel L. Darigan
list price: $90.00
our price: $90.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0130813559
Catlog: Book (2001-08-07)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 156631
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118. Watership Down
by Richard Adams
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0380002930
Catlog: Book (1976-01-01)
Publisher: Avon
Sales Rank: 963
Average Customer Review: 4.53 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Watership Down has been a staple of high-school English classes for years. Despite the fact that it's often a hard sell at first (what teenager wouldn't cringe at the thought of 400-plus pages of talking rabbits?), Richard Adams's bunny-centric epic rarely fails to win the love and respect of anyone who reads it, regardless of age. Like most great novels, Watership Down is a rich story that can be read (and reread) on many different levels. The book is often praised as an allegory, with its analogs between human and rabbit culture (a fact sometimes used to goad skeptical teens, who resent the challenge that they won't "get" it, into reading it), but it's equally praiseworthy as just a corking good adventure.

The story follows a warren of Berkshire rabbits fleeing the destruction of their home by a land developer. As they search for a safe haven, skirting danger at every turn, we become acquainted with the band and its compelling culture and mythos. Adams has crafted a touching, involving world in the dirt and scrub of the English countryside, complete with its own folk history and language (the book comes with a "lapine" glossary, a guide to rabbitese). As much about freedom, ethics, and human nature as it is about a bunch of bunnies looking for a warm hidey-hole and some mates, Watership Down will continue to make the transition from classroom desk to bedside table for many generations to come. --Paul Hughes ... Read more

Reviews (754)

5-0 out of 5 stars Like Lord of the Rings but with Rabbits
Watership Down is a great adventure book. In case you are wondering, the book is not about some kind of battle ship sinking, as the title may seem to imply. Instead Watership Down is the name of the area where a group of rabbits live.

I know what you are thinking, "Why would I want to read 400+ pages about rabbits?" I had my doubts too; the first time I picked up this book, I only got about 20 pages into it before I gave up. Fortunately, I started reading it again about a year later and found it to be a rather engrossing tale.

A group of rabbits, including the main characters of Hazel, Bigwig, and Fiver, leave their warren to avoid being killed when it is destroyed by construction. The novel tells of their journey to a new warren, its establishment, and the trials of keeping it safe and prosperous.

Adams' use of approxiate quotes from various literary sources at the begining of each chapter gives the novel an epic appeal, and the stories El-ahrairah seem akin to popular folktales. The novel cultivates in a dramatic battle scene. No, Watership Down is not about elves and wizards, but give it a chance because it is just as entertaining as a fantasy novel.

5-0 out of 5 stars WOW!
Watership Down easily became one of my favorite novels. Its fascinating plot and beguiling characters could hook any reader, teenagers and adults alike. Richard Adams, the author, has an extremely incredible imagination. Throughout most of the story, I was on the edge of my seat, waiting to turn the page to see what befell Hazel and his followers next. At first glance, one might think that this novel is just a childish story about talking rabbits, but it's so much more. It reflects human life and character. Watership Down is tale of rabbits that leave their warren, in fear that a prophecy that their home will be destroyed is true. These rabbits, lead by Hazel-rah, encounter many hindrances and dangers in their search for a perfect warren. When Hazel's group finally finds this ideal home, they are faced with many harsh realities, including a full-fledged war with another warren. Watership Down has a little bit of everything in it: suspense, action, drama, even comedy. The list is endless! It imposes strong values of loyalty, friendship, determination, leadership, and standing up for what's right. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read, in my opinion, one of the most enchanting novels ever written. Once you read this book, you will never look at rabbits the same way again.

5-0 out of 5 stars If you like the world of Tolkien...
I first experienced the amazing lapine world in Watership Down at the age of 7 when my mother read it aloud to me. I was absolutely entranced by the different characters, the epic feel of the journey (which would seem as mere miles and months to humans), and the deeply entrenched mythos that tells the rabbits their place in the world.

If you enjoy the deep world and characters of Tolkien, you will find this book to be endearing and riveting. This novel is not just for children or for high school English; it is for everyone and is an experience to share with the ones you love.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Amazing Story
I can't remember why I ordered "Watership Down" out of the Scholastic book order catalog when I was in 7th grade back in 1974, but I am forever glad that I did. I'm sure I found the description interesting, and I am sure I was drawn by what sounded to be a more substantial story. Boy was I right.

I was utterly gripped by Watership Down, and over the years have read and re-read the book - sometimes re-reading just the El-ahrairah portions.

Just great.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not just for children
I originally read this when I was a child and loved all stories about animals, especially bunny rabbits. From a child's perspective, I remember it being sad and scary at points, but overall cheerful and fun.

It was because of Stephen King that I recently picked this up and read it as an adult. Obviously King sees this book as the classic that it is, for this book's inspiration shows in "The Stand" and various parts of the "Dark Tower" series. I'm a big fan of these books and so I had to read "Watership Down" once again because I had forgotten the social aspects and lessons of the story, remembering only the main plot.

I'm so glad I took the time to read this again! King's work is mainly about his characters and how they respond to the given situation. Now I know why he was inspired by "Watership Down." I now see that it's not so much about bunny rabbits as it is about Fiver, Bigwig, Hazel and the rest. It's about social structures and how they form. It's about forming civilizations, striving for a better life, finding leadership, building friendships and trust, and protecting life.

If you have children, don't let them read this book alone. Share the adventure with them. If you are a child, share this book with your parents. ... Read more


119. The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6)
by Lemony Snicket
list price: $11.99
our price: $9.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064408647
Catlog: Book (2001-03-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 349
Average Customer Review: 4.72 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Fans of Lemony Snicket's wonderful Series of Unfortunate Events won't besurprised to find that in the sixth installment the three Baudelaire orphans'new home proves to be something of a mixed bag. As our ever sad but helpfulnarrator states, "Although 'a mixed bag' sometimes refers to a plastic bag thathas been stirred in a bowl, more often it is used to describe a situation thathas both good parts and bad parts. An afternoon at the movie theater, forinstance, would be a mixed bag if your favorite movie were showing, but if youhad to eat gravel instead of popcorn. A trip to the zoo would be a very mixedbag if the weather were beautiful, but all of the man-and woman-eating lionswere running around loose." And so it is for the bad-luck Baudelaires. Theirfancy new 71-bedroom home on 667 Dark Avenue is inhabited by Esmé GigiGeniveve Squalor (the city's sixth most important financial advisor), and herkindly husband, Jerome, who doesn't like to argue. Esmé is obsessed bythe trends du jour (orphans are "in"), and because elevators are "out," Sunny,Violet, and Klaus have to trudge up 66 flights of stairs to reach the Squalors'penthouse apartment. (Other unfortunate trends include pinstripe suits, aqueousmartinis--water with a faint olive-y taste--parsley soda, and oceandecorations.)

As the book begins, the Baudelaires are not only frightened in anticipation oftheir next (inevitable) encounter with the evil, moneygrubbing Count Olaf butthey are also mourning the disappearance of their dear new friends from The Austere Academy, theQuagmires. It doesn't take long for Olaf to show up in another of his horrificdisguises... but if he is on Dark Avenue, what has he done with the Quagmires?Once again, the resourceful orphans use their unique talents (Violet'sinventions, Klaus's research skills, and the infant Sunny's strong teeth) in afruitless attempt to escape from terrible tragedy. Is there a gleam of hope forthe orphans and their new friends? Most certainly not. The only thing we canreally count on are more gloriously gloomy adventures in the seventh book, The Vile Village. (Ages 9 andolder) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (97)

4-0 out of 5 stars ups and downs
If you scare eaily,skip this book. The Ersatz Elevator is one of the books in a series of Unfortunate Events, Wich features count olaf as a villain.Count olaf is a really mean guy who does very nasty, mean things to the Baudelair orphans.
This book starts out with the three Baudelair orphans Violet, Klause and sonny in a penthouse at 667 Dark Ave, near where the baudelairs lived before there parents died. Many strange things happen during this story. There is a secret passage, a door man who helps Count Olaf, welding torches, an auction with unusual items, and an elevator shaft(but that's no surprise given the title of the book)
Despite the nasty, mean things that that count olaf does to the Baudelairs,there are some funny parts. For instance the penthouse is so large that when they went looking for Count Olaf they droped bread crums in each room so they new they had alredy been there.
Read this book to find out if Count Olaf will be caught and be put in jail, or get away again! There are loys of twists and turns and like the title, plenty of ups and downs.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Elevator is Out
After "The Austere Academy", I wondered whether this series of books could get any better. They can and they did. In "The Ersatz Elevator", the sixth book in this series, the Baudelaire orphans move in with a non-relative in a penthouse apartment. While you might think that a penthouse apartment (which has something like 71 bedrooms) and kitchens, and sitting rooms, and on and on, would be a lovely place to live, you would be thinking wrong, because this is one of the books in "A Series of Unfortunate Events", and those of you that have read the previous books know that little good comes to pass concerning the Baudelaire orphans.

This time the problem is that Esme Squalor (the sixth most important financial advisor in the city) and her husband Jerome are way too hung up on what is "in". Esme must go to only the "in" restaurants; she must wear only "in" clothes, which includes the children, and on and on. Unfortunately, being "in" also means multiple compromises in terms of comfort. For example, the penthouse is on the top of a building with 66 stories, and elevators are "out". So the Squalors and the Baudelaires must walk up and down the 66 stories each time the go in to and out from the building. They certainly received sufficient exercise. Before I forget, orphans are also "in".

Of course, we know that Count Olaf must eventually show up, and he does. However, there is a mystery. We find that Count Olaf went up to the apartment and did not later leave the building. Therein lies the crux of the mystery for this story.

This story climaxes with the children running briefly into old friends, and then losing them again. They also nearly catch Count Olaf, again. In the end, the children are forced to find a new home once again. Unfortunately I am unable to tell you more, because Lemony Snicket, should he ever escape from his current predicament, would hunt me down and provide me with agony should I reveal the end of this Baudelaire tale. Suffice it to say that the Baudelaires have their best adventure yet, with even better to come.

This series has had its strong points and its weak points. In general this book is one of the better ones in the series, readily matching "The Austere Academy". In addition to the direct lessons provided in the book, the children once again are masters of their own fates, and are forced to get themselves out of their predicaments with minimal adult help. I also enjoyed the moral tale provided by Lemony Snicket regarding people that must always keep up with everyone else in style or fashion. For this last point alone the book is a must-read for every teenage child.

The violence in this story is a bit more muted than in some of the previous books, and I think that an 8 or 9 year old child should be able to handle the story well. Certainly Esme could generate a great deal of family discussion of status and whether status is sufficiently important to cause people pain or to break laws.

In keeping with the trend of the last book, this book continues to expose the children to new experiences and to challenge their abilities to take care of themselves. Once again, while there are certainly negative aspects to the story, the positive aspects outweigh the negatives. This book is easily a good successor to "The Austere Academy", and sets a standard for the next books in the series. I will tell you now that the next two books are just as good as or better than this book and "The Austere Academy", thus continuing the excellence of this unconventional children's series. 5 stars again!

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book I ever read
This book is unlike any other book i've ever read.It is hard for me to say if I like Violet or Klaus more.Beacause they both really help geting away from danger (or Count Olaf).I recomend this book entirely.

5-0 out of 5 stars book the sixth rules!
this book is the best yet.it has a new badie. some traped triplets.and v.f.d.

5-0 out of 5 stars Perhaps my favorite of the entire series!
The sixth book of Unfortunate Events is probably the most enthralling of the lot because of the unbelievable creative and brilliant portrayal of its characters by Lemony Snicket.
Sunny is a real cutie and she is the greatest baby in the whole world as it's clearly portrayed in this book. My heart beat so hard when I was reading one of the fantastic encounters between the a villain and the 3 children. It was like reading a very fine mystery novel by the fireside-- only better! Wow! If you want to find out what it is I'm referring to, you'll have to read this book. It's undoubtably a rollercoaster of events here as you will find out. ... Read more


120. Star Wars: Visionaries (Star Wars (Dark Horse))
by Not Available
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1593073119
Catlog: Book (2005-04-02)
Publisher: Dark Horse
Sales Rank: 181353
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Book Description

They've been responsible for some of hte most dazzling and awe-inspiring visuals ever put to film, and now the concept artists behind the Star Wars prequels are bringing their considerable talents to comics.Just in time for Star Wars: Episode III, the wildly gifted mind of the Lucasfilm art department and visual effects powerhouse Industrial Light & Magic come together to tell their own Star Wars tales in this compilation of short stories.Given free reign to explore any and every aspect of the Star Wars universe, each artist offers a new twist or a deeper view into that galaxy far, far away.Nowhere else will you find a more pure or more different look at George Lucas' enduring creation than through the eyes of the Star Wars: Visionaries. ... Read more


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