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$10.85 $10.35 list($15.96)
21. Magic Tree House Boxed Set (Volumes
$8.09 $4.25 list($8.99)
22. One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue
$10.87 $10.53 list($15.99)
23. Rough Weather Ahead for Walter
$25.20 $19.95 list($40.00)
24. The 20th-Century Children's Book
$10.87 $8.49 list($15.99)
25. The Giving Tree
$9.74 list($12.99)
26. The Dragonology Handbook: A Practical
$23.07 $16.99 list($34.95)
27. Your Favorite Seuss : A Baker's
$11.86 $10.18 list($16.95)
28. Where the Wild Things Are
$12.23 $10.09 list($17.99)
29. Peter and the Starcatchers
$12.59 $11.28 list($17.99)
30. A Light in the Attic
$10.19 $9.80 list($14.99)
31. Cars and Trucks and Things That
$4.49 $1.06 list($4.99)
32. Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You : Dr.
$8.97 $7.75 list($14.95)
33. The Lorax
$12.21 $10.66 list($17.95)
34. The Quiltmaker's Journey
$10.87 $6.79 list($15.99)
35. Diary of a Worm
$12.56 $9.27 list($17.95)
36. Quiltmaker's Gift
$14.99 $8.49
37. Complete Hans Christian Andersen
$8.09 $2.89 list($8.99)
38. Fox in Socks (I Can Read It All
$4.99 $3.03
39. From Caterpillar to Butterfly
$5.39 $3.39 list($5.99)
40. Heroes, Gods and Monsters of the

21. Magic Tree House Boxed Set (Volumes 1-4)
by MARY POPE OSBORNE
list price: $15.96
our price: $10.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375813659
Catlog: Book (2001-05-29)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 129
Average Customer Review: 4.12 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Ten years ago, Jack and Annie found a Magic Tree House in the woods and the world of reading was changed forever. Millions of letters later (from children, parents, and teachers around the world!)the exciting and inspiring four books are available together in a keepsake-worthy boxed set. The perfect gift to encourage a struggling new reader or remind old fans of the way they first discovered the magic of books. ... Read more

Reviews (17)

5-0 out of 5 stars wonderfully imaginative..........
The Magic Tree House books are wonderful for early elementary kids. My first and second graders love for me to read these books aloud. They are simple and uncomplicated with short chapters which could cause them to be a bit boring for older kids. Each book has Jack and Annie magically going to another time and place by wishing on a book left in the tree house. This series (I have #1-24) have really turned some of my non-readers onto reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars GREAT SERIES
When I found the Magic Tree House series, I was thrilled. Mary Pope Osbourne is writting books with non-fictional details in a fictional plot!! And I love that there are pictures on every other page--it keeps the early readers entertained. My older boys read early so it was hard to find books they could read that weren't "silly" and kept their interest (and had pictures). Even when my two older boys stepped into more difficult reading books, they still wanted to follow the series! Now my 7 year old is taking over!!

I understand that the writting is for younger kids, but last year I worked as a teacher's aide, and every day I would read a chapter to the 4th grade class, before dismissal, and they were sold--found Magic Tree House more fun than Harry Potter!! When we started a new book, we would all wait until the tree house stopped spinning and the whole class would say with me "everything was still; absolutely still" (a standard line in each book)!

4-0 out of 5 stars Can't Get Enough!
I bought the boxed set 1-4 based on my sister's recommendation. She has a 5 and 3 1/2 year old and they listen to Ms. Osborne's books on tape. They looovvve the stories--yes even her younger son. I decided to give it a try. I thought my bright almost 5 year-old daughter would like to try something different and also, give her a taste of what chapter books were all about. My daughter cannot get enough of these books. They are interesting, intriguing, thought provoking and often times my daughter ends up with her fingers in her mouth because she gets so excited about what's happening in the story. What a wonderful way to broaden your child's look at the world--from Egypt to the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. I went ahead and bought books 5-8 and look forward to reading them to my daughter.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Chapter Books for First, Second & Third Graders
This is the first series of chapter books my son actually wanted to read by himself. While many of the reviewers complain about grammatical errors, etc., I feel these can be overlooked as these delightful stories keep a child's interest from start to finish. Each chapter is fairly short and has frequent pictures (a must for beginning chapter readers). The main characters have all sorts of adventures and the reader actually learns some historical facts. While the books are probably too easy for advanced readers, they should appeal to most beginning chapter readers. I think it is very important that children think reading is fun and the books from The Magic Tree House Series provide a wonderful introduction to chapter book reading!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great fun to read for both of us!
We were looking for "chapter" books for our 4 year old and a librarian recommended these. We are starting our own collection. Eventhough our daughter can't read yet, she loves them! I deliberately stop midway and discuss what she thinks will happen next. She is then very excited the next day when we finish. Great!! ... Read more


22. One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (I Can Read It All by Myself Beginner Books (Hardcover))
by DR SEUSS
list price: $8.99
our price: $8.09
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394800133
Catlog: Book (1960-03-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 390
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

"Did you ever fly a kite in bed? Did you ever walk with ten cats on your head?" Such are the profound, philosophical queries posed in this well-loved classic by Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel. While many rhymes in this couplet collection resemble sphinx-worthy riddles, Seuss's intention is clear: teach children to read in a way that is both entertaining and educational. It matters little that each wonderful vignette has nothing to do with the one that follows. (We move seamlessly from a one-humped Wump and Mister Gump to yellow pets called the Zeds with one hair upon their heads.) Children today will be as entranced by these ridiculous rhymes as they have been since the book's original publication in 1960--so amused and enchanted, in fact, they may not even notice they are learning to read! (Ages 4 to 8) ... Read more

Reviews (81)

5-0 out of 5 stars Rich in marvelous images
Dr. Seuss's extraordinary body of work is a collective treasure, but from that group of books a few stand out as his best. "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" certainly belongs in the category of Seuss's finest. Rich in clever rhymes and memorable images, this book scores a literary home run on nearly every page.

Directed towards early readers, "One Fish" uses simple language in its funny rhymes. Seuss mixes his own created words together with standard vocabulary, resulting in such memorable lines as "just jump on the hump of the Wump of Gump." And these rhymes are accompanied by a rich variety of images that can only be described as "Seussian": A mother fish pushing her offspring in a baby carriage, a bed being commandeered by a menagerie of animals, and more.

Futhermore, in "One Fish" Dr. Seuss introduces us to a wonderful assortment of Seussian creatures: the singing Ying, the hopping Yop, a truly bizarre creature known simply as "Clark," and many more. These images are sure to energize the imaginations of both children and adults.

Seuss's images range from the joyful to the eerie, from the baroque to the earthy. I give "One Fish" my most enthusiastic recommendation.

5-0 out of 5 stars IF YOU WISH TO WISH A WISH
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At least two generations of parents and their children have now been immersed in the wonderful world of Dr Suess. The fun filled fantasy world of Dr Suess has lost none of its charm. "One Fish Two Fish" is one of his best.

The theme of this book is "funny things are everywhere". Dr Suess goes on to prove this by introducing a long list of fantastic but friendly characters. The creatures are at times outrageous looking but they are never frightening. There is no chance of monster-phobia developing in children after reading these books.

Anything is possible in this book. You have to love the seven hump Wump with its eight legs. It bears an uncanny resemblance to a camel.

Children will get to love the rhyme and rhythms of the words in this book. Children will be encouraged to make their own word play. It is possible new skills in creative thinking and even musical aptitude may emerge in children after having fun in the Suess world. On thing is for sure, a love of reading will certainly be encouraged.

Spatial thinking is encouraged with humorous signposts to Near and Far, and Here and There. Young minds will adore taking the advice "if you wish to wish a wish".

"One fish two fish" makes a great bedtime book. It is long enough and exhausting enough to pacify the most agile young mind. They can go off to dream land pondering "did you ever fly a kite in bed" and then "curl up with your Pet Zeep".

5-0 out of 5 stars Prescient political pondering of our polarized prolatariat
Just as Seuss covered anti-intellectualism in Green Eggs and Ham, and alternate lifestyles in Hop on Pop, the Fish book is a trenchant political analysis. Foreseeing the red vs. blue state deadlock back in the idealistic better-living-through-chemistry early 1960s, Suess contrasts the red (as in communist) fish with the all-American blue fish. This motif weaves through the book, teaching little ones the red vs. blue tension of multiculturalism (in the form of strange animals) and isolationism of Ned in his too-small bed. While most younger children will miss the allusion to Procrustes, they may remember the literary echo in Hop on Pop: Ned joins Red, Ted, and Ed in a more appropriately sized bed, and Seuss shows his support for the UN, or at least the International Monetary Fund.

The tension is palpable when the young boy and girl bring home a large, walrus-like pet and wonder how their mother will feel about their deed; no preschooler could miss this reference to the Teapot Dome scandal. Similarly, their advice to get a pet Yink simply because of its fondness for pale red india writing product is a sardonic commentary on rampant consumerism. And the camel-like Wump shows his prophetic realization that our demand for oil would force us to deal with the Saudis on a regular basis.

Seuss warns us of the coming divide in these United States in the introduction: "From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere." It starts with the fish, red, blue, and black (but not white, showing where Geisel's sympathies lie), young and old, then proceeds up the evolutionary chain to large land mammals, eventually including the aforementioned school-aged boy and girl. They serve as the Adam and Eve as well as the Joe and Joan Sixpak of the book. They espouse embracing what is different while they reinforce doing the same.

Seuss knew where we were headed in both 2000 and 2004, and this book shows the way out. The US has plenty of (pale) red ink, so we should get a Yink. I think.

5-0 out of 5 stars Every day, from here to there, funny things are everywhere
You might think that "One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish" is a Dr. Seuss book about counting or colors (or counting and colors or even counting colors), but that would simply be the hook for something much larger. The thesis of this Beginner Book appears opposite the first page, where we are informed by a small creature with a giant mustache and a yellow star for a belly button that "From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere." If anything this Dr. Seuss book has bits and pieces from lots of other Dr. Seuss books. You have a series of opposite because fish are not only red and blue but old and new, you have Ned who does not like his bed, there is Yop who only likes to hop from finger top to finger top, and all sorts of strange looking animals. There is even a creature that looks like the Cat in the Hat except he is completely yellow, including his hat, has a polka dot bow tie, and eleven fingers.

Consequently, if "One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish" is one of the first Dr. Seuss books that a beginning reader begins reading they should go back and read it again after they have gone through the rest of the good doctor's books because they will then be better able to appreciate some of the familiar faces in this book. However, since this is not a book for early beginning readers, most kids will get to this one after they have covered the basic Dr. Seuss books and become well accustomed to his delightful volumes of rhymed absurdity. This particular book has been inspiring the imagination of beginning readers since 1960 and there is no reason for it to stop with that endeavor at this point in time.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book
Unlike most Dr. Seuss books, this book has no real plot. For the most part it is made up of unconnected pages that flow nicely into one another. The lack of plot is not something that harms the book in my eyes, I like the chance encounters with the strange creatures, and I think the lack of a plot helps to make this story special.

Throughout this book we are introduced to a number of cute creatures from fish to Wumps to Zeds. Like all Dr. Seuss creations they are very cute, bold, colorful and expressive. Another characteristic of a Dr. Seuss book is how the words flow wonderful and manage to rhyme well in a manner completely unforced and effortless. This is one of my favorite Dr. Seuss books.

Loggie-log-log-log ... Read more


23. Rough Weather Ahead for Walter the Farting Dog (Walter the Farting Dog)
by WilliamKotzwinkle, GlennMurray, Robert Bendiner
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525472185
Catlog: Book (2005-05-10)
Publisher: Dutton Juvenile
Sales Rank: 783
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Walter makes his third appearance in yet another unapologetically silly picture book, this one dedicated to "everyone who's ever felt misjudged or misunderstood." The story begins when animal gas expert Professor Kompressor pays a visit to Walter's family, equipped with a contraption that looks like a cross between a vacuum cleaner and an old phonograph: "I understand your dog has a farting disorder," he says. At first it seems as if the professor's prescription of powders and potions is working, but one day, young Billy and Betty see Walter floating like a helium balloon over the trees, so full of pent-up gas he has become airborne. Unable to release his gas, the unfortunate dog floats over hill and dale for days and days. The formula for these books requires the much-maligned Walter to redeem his gaseous self by saving the day (he gasses out burglars in the first one and helps catch bank robbers in the second). Here, even more absurdly, he saves millions of butterflies from a freezing windstorm by letting rip a warm cloud of air that melts the frost off their wings.Colorful, crisp, almost three-dimensional art, generated with a digital painting and collage technique, gives the book a bizarre, sophisticated style that both complements and elevates the cheap laughs. (Ages 6 to 9) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Very cute!
My 2 1/2 year-old daughter and I love this book! The illustrations are bright and fun and the story really is adorable! It's a fun, imaginative story and it's gotten us hooked on the Walter series.

4-0 out of 5 stars Funny, different, and a little out there!
I read this book and think Walter is very cute. I like the idea of using the farting dog to interest kids in reading. Kids enjoy farts, so why wouldn't they want to read about them? lol. The illustrations are bright, colorful, and the people in them have a photo quality. There are spiders hidden on every page and half the fun is trying to find them. The storyline is more than a little out there, but kids might buy into it more readily than adults. All in all, good book and I'd definitely recommend it to kids & parents with a sense of humor. Just imagine Grandma & Grandpa reading it aloud!

4-0 out of 5 stars appaling, but incredibly good and funny
I'm not into potty humor, i'm not into any of the other potty humor type kids books or cartoons, I just loved this book though. The subject should be really weird, I mean a book about a dog with perpetual farts? it wasn't though it was just hilarious, perhaps because of the potty humor. I liked the book almost almost more than my little sister did. ... Read more


24. The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury: Picture Books and Stories to Read Aloud
by JANET SCHULMAN
list price: $40.00
our price: $25.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0679886478
Catlog: Book (1998-09-14)
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 1627
Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Believe it or not, 44 complete read-aloud classics and future classics--from Goodnight Moon to Stellaluna--are packed in this remarkably svelte, positively historic anthology. Flipping through the 308 pages of The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury is like browsing a photo album of beloved friends and family. The familiar faces of Curious George and Ferdinand the Bull peer earnestly from the pages, and scenes from Madeline and Millions of Cats resonate as if you just experienced them yesterday. Think of the advantages of carrying this book on a vacation instead of a suitcase of single titles! (Your kids can always revisit their dog-eared hardcovers when they get home.)

This impressive collection of concept books, wordless books, picture books, and read-aloud stories was artfully compiled by longtime children's book editor and publisher Janet Schulman. Stories are coded red, blue, and green to designate age groupings from baby/toddler books such as Whose Mouse Are You?, through preschool books such as Where the Wild Things Are, to longer stories for ages 5 and older such as Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. The reason the book isn't bigger than Babar is because many of the illustrations from each story were reduced or removed to fitthe anthology's format.(Leo Lionni's Swimmy, for example, takes up 5 pages total, compared to its original 29 pages.)Brief biographical notes that are surprisingly quirky shine a little light on the 62 authors and illustrators, and an index helps, too, for the child who likes one story best. We love the idea of being within easy reach of a Star-Belly Sneetch, a William Steig donkey, and a Sendak monster at all times, and we're sure your little bookworms will, too. (Click to seea sample spread from The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury, compilation copyright © 1998 by Janet Schulman, illustrations © renewed 1997 by William Steig.) (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (66)

5-0 out of 5 stars A truly wonderful collection of classic stories!
I bought this book after checking it out at the library and being in awe at the wonderful stories in it. My boys are 2 and almost every night at dinner we read a new story. With classics from Curious George and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel to the rhythmic Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, there are surely stories to fit every need. The book also lists which stories are appropriate for different ages. Most of the stories are condensed to 4-6 pages with lots of pictures, but some have few illustrations and are great for reading in the car, at dinner, or at bedtime when your child is really sleepy.

We own several of the individual books and will probably buy more of them for the boys to be able to read and hold. This book is too heavy and awkward for small children to be handling, but it is a convenient way to expose them (and me!) to some of the great stories that have been written over the years. Besides, you'll want to keep it in good shape to hand down to your grandchildren! This collection of stories will make a wonderful gift for new or expecting parents or for older children who love to read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely amazing collections of children's favorites
Most of the 'greatest hits' collections - whether for a time period or a particular artist seem to always leave out the best song or super-star groups. This Treasury astounded me by collecting 'all' the great authors and stories (at least all of the ones I can thing of). Madeline, Dr. Seuss, Babar, Curious George, Where the Wild Things Are, The Berenstain Bears, Amelia Bedelia, Stellaluna, Pooh, etc... I am amazed that the editors managed to get the rights to publish all of these incredible favorites!

The texts of the stories are complete (as far as I can tell), but the illustration have been shrunk so that all of the stories will fit in one volume. Something is lost in the process, but I can imagine that it would be the perfect book for a trip, keeping a any kids' home-away-from-home (like grandma's house), or just to read to discover previously unknown classics (which is what my five year old and I are doing).

An added benefit is the history - the stories were all written in a historical context and to a greater or lesser extend reflect the society in which they were written. The editors wisely put the year of publication with each story. So when I read them to my daughter I can also comment (when applicable) not only about whether or not I had read the story as a kid, but also set the story in a historical context (take Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, published in 1939, for example).

Of course, for stories destined to become favorites, the full-sized editions with illustrations are really needed; but for an anthology, this book cannot be beat!

3-0 out of 5 stars Before you buy, know what you are missing
This is a good book for reference but if you intend to buy it INSTEAD OF the children's classics it includes, you will be missing out on a lot. Please read the School Library Journal review and Booklist review in entirety before making a decision to buy this, they both touch on the problem of condensing stories and missing illustrations with the effect they have on the stories' impact. It is especially noticable for stories that rely on illustrations for pacing or an element of surprise. I find that my kids, both beginning readers, do not go to this book on their own the same way that they will run to look at any of their favorite individual story books and although we use it, it is usually only as a convenience to me (to avoid hunting down and carrying several goodnight books). If it gets you to read more, great, but for fostering a love of these classics in your kids there is nothing like using the real individual books in their covers, formatted as originally intended.

5-0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING!
We have hundreds of children's books, but this is the one we turn to over and over. (Our son is 3 1/2; daughter is 6). Great at story time, and even better when you need some help entertaining the kids (e.g., doctor's office, long trip, snow day at home). The collection is a real treasure of books we knew, and books we discovered for the first time. My prediction: your children will still remember this book when they are reading to your grandkids. By far, our family's favorite.

5-0 out of 5 stars A terrific collection of classics
I'm an American journalist living in Germany and raising two bilingual kids. I've had this book for about 3 years now. It has been a wonderful source of bedtime reading for my oldest son, who is now 6. The stories offer a good variety of reading levels, so it has really grown with him. Yes, some of the illustrations are small, but I found that a small price to pay for the convenience of having a single book to grab at bedtime when we are both very tired, but needing a great story. ... Read more


25. The Giving Tree
by Shel Silverstein
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060256656
Catlog: Book (1964-06-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Sales Rank: 168
Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

To say that this particular apple tree is a "giving tree" is an understatement. In Shel Silverstein's popular tale of few words and simple line drawings, a tree starts out as a leafy playground, shade provider, and apple bearer for a rambunctious little boy. Making the boy happy makes the tree happy, but with time it becomes more challenging for the generous tree to meet his needs. When he asks for money, she suggests that he sell her apples. When he asks for a house, she offers her branches for lumber. When the boy is old, too old and sad to play in the tree, he asks the tree for a boat. She suggests that he cut her down to a stump so he can craft a boat out of her trunk. He unthinkingly does it. At this point in the story, the double-page spread shows a pathetic solitary stump, poignantly cut down to the heart the boy once carved into the tree as a child that said "M.E. + T." "And then the tree was happy... but not really." When there's nothing left of her, the boy returns again as an old man, needing a quiet place to sit and rest. The stump offers up her services, and he sits on it. "And the tree was happy." While the message of this book is unclear (Take and take and take?Give and give and give? Complete self-sacrifice is good? Complete self-sacrifice is infinitely sad?), Silverstein has perhaps deliberately left the book open to interpretation. (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (345)

5-0 out of 5 stars Deeply powerful
I had read and treasured The Giving Tree as a child, but I had largely forgotten it when I discovered a copy in a children's book store last year. I picked it up and showed it to my friend. "Look," I said. "I remember this book. What a cute story it was." We read it together, in the bookstore, for the first time in many years.

I nearly cried. What I remembered as a cute and slightly silly children's story is in fact an extraordinarily powerful parable of life and faith. The wisdom and simple power of this book still holds, even after all these years. We have lost a very fine author who wrote some of the greatest children's books in our language.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is Essential Reading For Fans Of Children's Literature
The Giving Tree, written by Shel Silverstein, is a controversial story for children. People either hate or love it. Like The Little Prince, The Giving Tree ultimately delivers a message which is both moving and profound. The illustrations, rendered in simple black and white line drawings, tell the story of a tree and the little boy who comes to visit her every day. As the story progresses the boy grows into a selfish adult who does nothing but take from the tree. He takes and takes until nothing is left of her but a stump. Finally one day the boy returns as a beaten down old man with no place left to go. The tree, always happy to see him, offers the old man the only thing she has left. She offers her stump for him to rest on. The Giving Tree is a powerful metaphor for the unconditional love parents and children share. Frustrating, sad, and ultimately beautiful, this is a story no child should miss reading.

Preston McClear, author The Boy Under the Bed

5-0 out of 5 stars The spirit of giving with nothing expected in return
This is my favorite book of all time. In fact, I have designed the nursery for my newborn around this book, with the main focus of the room being a mural showcasing the cover. I believe the book shows that giving without expecting anything in return can be fufilling. The last line in the book states this, "and the tree was happy", what better lesson for a parent to teach their child. Sure you can look at the dark side, and focus on the selfishness of the little boy, but I choose not to. Shel Silverstein purposely left the meaning up to the reader for interpretation.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Power of Simplicity, Taps into the Deeply Human
There's not really a "plot" in this story in any traditional sense. It is a series of vignettes in the relationship between a boy and a tree. The symbolism is pretty straightforward, the tree representing parental nurturing, but there is nothing trite about it. This illustrations are simple black-and-white line drawings. Somehow this simple book really packs a punch. All I can really say is that I have never once, ever, in dozens of readings, whether alone or to the kids, made it through this book without crying. It's simply...touching.

Further Comments: Silverstein was one weird, scary-looking dude. If you're interested in very idiosyncratic people, Google him and you'll be surprised. He has several other children's books with which I'm only vaguely familiar (I remember Where the Sidewalk Ends being on the shelf at my grade school, but I'm not sure if I ever read it. I think it's a collection of poems). I'd love to see some of those reviewed.

(...)

5-0 out of 5 stars inspirational
I first read this book 3 years ago when I started working with children...my reaction was that this kid was a selfish little (...). As I have matured I've realized that children are supposed to be selfish and as a child care worker or parent it is our job to sacrafice everything that we have for the benefit of the child and then to give a little more. Personaly I think the highest point that a parent or teacher can reach is that of a stump. Everytime I feel myself tiring as the kid next to me at the dinner table eats 2 servings of potatos and leaves nothing for me, I picture myself as a stump and I pass them the rolls. ... Read more


26. The Dragonology Handbook: A Practical Course In Dragons
by Ernest, Dr. Drake
list price: $12.99
our price: $9.74
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 076362814X
Catlog: Book (2005-05-31)
Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
Sales Rank: 30684
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27. Your Favorite Seuss : A Baker's Dozen by the One and Only Dr. Seuss
by DR SEUSS
list price: $34.95
our price: $23.07
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375810617
Catlog: Book (2004-10-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 615
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Book Description

From his very first book to his very last book, here in one big volume are 13 classic Dr. Seuss stories, everyone’s favorites. All of the words and virtually all of the illustrations are included. Each story is prefaced by a short essay by someone whose life was changed by Dr. Seuss or who is simply an unabashed admirer. Also included are photographs of Dr. Seuss, memorabilia, and original sketches from his books. The stories included are: And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, Horton Hears a Who!, McElligot’s Pool, If I Ran the Zoo, Happy Birthday to You!, Dr. Seuss’s Sleep Book, Yertle the Turtle, The Cat in the Hat, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Green Eggs and Ham, The Lorax, The Sneetches, and Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Theodor Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss) was born March 2, 1904, and died September 25, 1991.

With introductory essays to each story by:

Barbara Bader, Author and Critic

Stan and Jan Berenstain, Creators of The Berenstain Bears

Audrey Geisel, Widow of Dr. Seuss

Peter Glassman, Children’s Bookseller

Starr LaTronica, Children’s Librarian

John Lithgow, Actor and Children’s Book Author

Barbara Mason, Kindergarten Teacher

Richard H. Minear, Author of Dr. Seuss Goes to War

Christopher Paolini, Author of Eragon

Charles D. Cohen, Author of The Seuss, the Whole Seuss, and

Nothing but the Seuss

Pete Seeger, Folksinger

Christopher Cerf, TV Writer, Composer, and Producer

Lane Smith, Children’s Book Illustator ... Read more


28. Where the Wild Things Are
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060254920
Catlog: Book (1988-11-09)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 65
Average Customer Review: 4.78 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In the forty years since Max first cried "Let the wild rumpus start," Maurice Sendak's classic picture book has become one of the most highly acclaimed and best-loved children's books of all time. Now, in celebration of this special anniversary, introduce a new generation to Max's imaginative journey to where the wild things are.

Winner, 1964 Caldecott Medal
Notable Children's Books of 1940–1970 (ALA)
1981 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for Illustration
1963, 1982 Fanfare Honor List (The Horn Book)
Best Illustrated Children's Books of 1963, 1982 (NYT)
A Reading Rainbow Selection
1964 Lewis Carroll Shelf Award
Children's Books of 1981 (Library of Congress)
1981 Children's Books (NY Public Library)
100 Books for Reading and Sharing 1988 (NY Public Library)
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Reviews (195)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Children's Book, in Many Ways
Max puts on a wolf costume and feels mischievous. He breaks some rules and is sent to bed without supper. From there, his imagination takes over, a jungle grows in his bedroom, and he goes on a magical journey of (self-)discovery. The world he explores is populated by colorful, scary, and somewhat silly monsters who all get tamed by Max.

This book is beautifully illustrated, the story flows rapidly and flawlessly, and the language is simultaneously simple and loaded with meaning. While it is unlikely to happen, watch out for your children trying to write like Sendak, with his trademark run-on sentences.

This is the first book I remember reading by myself. It holds a special place in my heart.

Wow! I think that any child can sympathize with Max as he just wants to do what he wants to do, and then gets in trouble for breaking the rules. We also can understand how his frustration and anger cannot be sustained in the face of parental clarity, consistency, and calm strength. He works through his anger during his "journey" through the "jungle" and tames himself as he tames the monsters. Along the way, he discovers how lonely he is and how much he dislikes disapproval. The ending is simple, happy, and realistic.

This is a great book to read with your children, and then turn over to them to read on their own. It opens the door to discuss many simple but crucial issues of childhood. Please buy this book and use it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wild About Wild
Maurice Sendak is one of those great children's book creators who could write and draw. He helped me dream as a young boy, and I should pay him credit for helping me imagine things today.

When I was little, I'd stare at the page long after my mother finished reading it to me. Sendak seemed to have found my creative pulse, as he drew me in to wonder about his world of pretend monsters. The monsters are not quite so terrible, and could be considered friendly.

Max and I are both boys, and it must ordinary for we boys to get in a terrific amount of trouble in the process of playing. I related to Max. He sounded like a real boy. I was never quite sure what a rumpus was, but I knew it sounded like a lot of fun.

The pictures are cool. There is a rich, full-of-flavor tension in the art. The expressions and poses of the characters come across as genuine.

Don't be fooled by the amazing pictures. You'll enjoy the carefully laid story just as much, and your child can close his eyes and imagine his own version.

A wonderful book. A classic. If you've got kids, or if you read to your family's or neighbor's kids, this is one book which will be dog-eared from numerous reads.

I fully recommend "Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak.

Anthony Trendl

1-0 out of 5 stars not as good as new books
I am almost 7 and my teachre said we have to say why we like a lot of books or do not like a lot of books this summer on amazon and then print out them and give them to our new teacher next year So I am starting with this book.

My dad reelly likes this book because he said it was good when he was a kid. I dont like it. The pictures are boring and the story is not long. My dad reads this to me a lot and I like the books that are newer. New books have pictures that are pretty and the storys are funner and longer. This book has pictures that look old. I wish my dad would read this to himself and let me read something diferent. Nichole

5-0 out of 5 stars the book I loved best as a child.
My love affair with Maurice Sendak's "Where The Wild Things Are" goes back further than I think I can remember. I fell hard for the vibrant prose and unbelievable illustrations. It is a beautiful book throughout and it has absolutely withstood the test of time.

I am twenty-four years old now. I love this book as much as I did the first time I read it. This book speaks to places in the heart and the mind that you sort of forget about as you age. It's a magical book, it never fails to transform me.

Long live King Max....and all of his beautiful monsters.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book!!
I took a children's literature class a few years ago in college and I am now expecting my first child and I remembered this book and have recently purchased it. It's absolutely wonderful!! ... Read more


29. Peter and the Starcatchers
by Dave Barry, Ridley Pearson
list price: $17.99
our price: $12.23
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Asin: 0786854456
Catlog: Book (2004-08-31)
Publisher: Disney Editions
Sales Rank: 292
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Amazon.com

Humorist Dave Barry and suspense writer Ridley Pearson have clearly taken great delight in writing a 400-plus page prequel of sorts to Scottish dramatist J.M. Barrie's beloved Peter Pan stories. The result is a fast-paced and fluffy pirate adventure, complete with talking porpoises, stinky rogues, possible cannibals, a flying crocodile, biting mermaids, and a much-sought-after trunk full of magical glowing green "starstuff." Ever hear of Zeus? Michelangelo? Attila the Hun? According to 14-year-old Molly Aster they all derived their powers from starstuff that occasionally falls to Earth from the heavens. On Earth, it is the Starcatchers' job to rush to the scene and collect the starstuff before it falls into the hands of the Others who use its myriad powers for evil.

On board the ship Never Land, an orange-haired boy named Peter, the leader of a group of orphaned boys being sent off to work as servants in King Zarboff the Third's court, is puzzled by his shipmate Molly's fantastical story of starstuff, but it inextricably binds him to her. Peter vows to help his new, very pretty friend Molly (a Starcatcher's apprentice) keep a mysterious trunk full of the stuff out of the clutches of the pirate Black Stache, a host of other interested parties, and ultimately King Zarboff the Third.

The downright goofy, modern 8-year-old boy humor sometimes clashes with an old-time pirate sensibility, and the rapid-fire dialogue, while well paced, is far from inventive. Still, the high-seas hijinks and desert-island shenanigans will keep readers turning the pages. Greg Call's wonderful black-and-white illustrations are deliciously old-fashioned and add plenty of atmosphere to a silly, swashbuckling story that shows us how Peter Pan came to fly and why he, and his story, will never get old. (Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson ... Read more


30. A Light in the Attic
list price: $17.99
our price: $12.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060256737
Catlog: Book (1981-10-07)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 532
Average Customer Review: 4.89 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Last night while I lay thinking here
Some Whatifs crawled inside my ear
And pranced and partied all night long
And sang their same old Whatif song:

Whatif I flunk that test?
Whatif green hair grows on my chest?
Whatif nobody likes me?
Whatif a bolt of lightning strikes me?...

Here in the attic of Shel Silverstein you will find Backward Bill, Sour Face Ann, the Meehoo with an Exactlywatt, and the Polar Bear in the Frigidaire. You will talk with Broiled Face, and find out what happens when Somebody steals your knees, you get caught by the Quick-Digesting Gink, a Mountain snores, and They Put a Brassiere on the Camel.

From the creator of the beloved poetry collections Where the Sidewalk Ends and Falling Up, here is another wondrous book of poems and drawings.

Notable Children's Books of 1981 (ALA)
Best Books of 1981 (SLJ)
Children's Books of 1981 (Library of Congress)
1981 Children's Books (NY Public Library)
1981 USA Children's Books of International Interest
Winner, 1983–84 William Allen White Award (Kansas)
Winner, 1983 Garden State Children's Book Award (New Jersey Library Association)
1984 Garden State Children's Book Award for Non-Fiction (New Jersey Library Association)
1984 George C. Stone Center for Children's Books (Claremont, CA) "Recognition of Merit" Award

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Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Where does the sidewalk end? In the attic.
If you don't remember these rhymes from your childhood, then it's about time you visited the attic, "A Light in the Attic," that is. Silverstein combines humorous sketches, whimsical poetry and fanciful word play in another amusing collection. "Where the Sidewalk Ends" will always be my favorite, but poems like "Spelling Bee," "Deaf Donald," "Nobody" and "Little Abigail and the Beautiful Pony" definately make "A Light in the Attic" a close runner-up.

If you know Silverstein's work, then you are familiar with his simple rhyming style. His flair for combining drawings and words make for a book that's much more than just a collection of poetry. His poems are an experience that would be diminished without the visual aspect.

Silverstein's collections are great for all ages. I read them as a kid, but I enjoy them just as much now. Silverstein has the soul of a child, but the wit of a sage.

"The saddest thing I ever did see
Was a woodpecker peckin' at a plastic tree.
He looks at me, and 'Friend,' says he,
'Things ain't as sweet as they used to be.'"
-Shel Silverstein page 83

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book of all times, exiting and very funny.
This poem book is the best yet, I have never read any poems as funny as the ones Shel Silverstein writes."A Light in the Attic" is a book for people of all ages.The whole class of seventh graders enjoyed it.We were laughing our heads out when we heard the poem,"Standing is Stupid".I recomend this book to anyone who is having a bad day and wants a moment of happiness!

5-0 out of 5 stars A MUST HAVE
I am not a big poem fan but I love this book! Drawings are great and so fun!

5-0 out of 5 stars A review by a children's author
I read Shel Silverstein when I was young and I loved his poetry. I used to read it to the kids I babysat (and I never sat on a baby) and I now read it to my own children. What can be said that hasn't been said already?

This: Shel Silverstein wrote more than just silly. Some of his greatest poems bring tears to my eyes and make me think about things like justice, death, love, and even my Creator. Pretty deep stuff. I personally believe it's that inane sense of humor he had combined with an almost philosophical take on life that mades Shel a great children's poet.

Some of my favorite poems by Shel are in this collection, The Light in the Attic.

The Little Boy and the Old Man should make any person who reads it think about aging and reaching out to our loved ones who are er, how shall I say it, a little past their prime and also to those who haven't quite reached their prime yet. And How Many, How Much is a wonderful reminder that friendship starts in your own heart.

And I wonder, was one of my favorite movies (Bruce Almighty) inspired by one of my favorite Shel Silverstein poems (God's Wheel)? Did the writer read that poem and think "What a great premise for a movie!" Could be. Whatever the case I know his work was one of my inspirations in becoming a children's writer. And now I'm writing a book of poetry for children and as I craft it I returned to all these funny, touching, ironic, wistful, poems and realized, "Uh oh, I set the bar too low. I need to kick it up a notch." I so I strive to do just that.

My nightmare is being compared by a cranky reviewer to Shel Silverstein, "This writer is an imposter to the throne of the great Shel." Let me state here and now that I don't want the throne. I would just like to sit under a oak tree in the courtyard outside the palace if that's okay. And while I'm there I'll just take a big whiff of the rosebush that stayed so very small (read the book and you shall see what I mean).

Finally, let me add this, I believe these poems expanded my creativity in my younger years and I believe they expand it to this very day. Buy a Light in the Attic for your children and read the poems together. You will expand their vocabulary, help them develop a sense of comedic timing, cultivate an interest in poetry, and give them their first lessons in philosophy, all the while having a fantastic time together. Now that's what I call maximum return on a minimal investment(...)

4-0 out of 5 stars the laughing stock
Hula eels, magic carpets and tickilish tom are all things in A Light in the Attic. This hilarios book has fun filled poems all over! such as Little Abigail and the beautiful pony. What happens to Abigail when she doesn't get what she wants?
The author Shel Siverstein uses rymes through out the whole book to make it super funny. I would recomend this book if you like fantasy and magic. You will love these poems and be rolling on the floor laughing. ... Read more


31. Cars and Trucks and Things That Go
by RICHARD SCARRY
list price: $14.99
our price: $10.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0307157857
Catlog: Book (1998-06-01)
Publisher: Golden Books
Sales Rank: 324
Average Customer Review: 4.98 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Although this book was around when many of today's parents wereyoungsters, it has remained a steadfast must-have in every toddler's library. For starters, it's a great vocabulary guide that names the many things that go (and some that haven't a prayer of going, but are great fun to imagine anyway). It's also teeming with detail-rich scenes and characters on every page, teaching children the rewards of looking long and closely (such as finding the hidden "Goldbug" in each spread). Along the way it entertains with the silly and slapstick--everything from toothpaste and toothbrush cars to six fire department vehicles that show up to extinguish a ladybug-size fire in a miniature pink convertible. What's most amazing about this book, however, is its longevity. When you purchase it for your fledgling talker, you should consider it an investment. Even 11-, 12-, and 13-year-olds are known to pore over the book nostalgically, cooing at Lowly Worm and eagerly tracking Officer Flossie's book-long chase after that irresponsible, speedster driver in a cowboy hat. (Ages 2 and older) --Gail Hudson ... Read more

Reviews (55)

5-0 out of 5 stars I agree - thank you Richard Scarry!
I started reading this book with my son when he first learned to talk a few years ago. He's not tired of it yet (and neither am I). There are so many fun illustrations (I especially like the "pickle car"), and so much going on that this book can be read again and again. Now that my son is familiar with all of the vehicles, and able to point them out when we go driving in our car (although we have yet to see a pickle car in our area) we have fun not just reading the story, but looking for the tiny "Goldbug" on every page.

5-0 out of 5 stars My 2.5 year old son's FAVORITE book
We were given this book when my son was born; he has always enjoyed the colorful and imaginative pictures, and has been finding Goldbug on each page since he was about 18 months. However, his early love for this book pales in comparison to his obsession with it now -- it's the only book he wants to hear at story time, day after day ... Luckily for Mom and Dad, it's also whimsical enough that we enjoy it, too, day after day.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Son's FAVORITE Book
I have just purchased my SECOND copy of this book. My 22 month son loves it so much that it has been through the ringer in the past months, with his favorite pages ripped out because of over use! I had it when I was little, and it brings back great memories. But, I never expected the reaction that he would have to this book! It is perfect for any who loves PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES!! If only there was a board version!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book for Generate Interest in Reading/Focus of Toddler
This was the first book my son received in 1992. I started reading it to him before he was 1 years old. He loved to sit quietly and look at the book. He continued to look for Goldbug until he was in kindergarten. Great book for spending quality time with your child and get the added bonus of an educational foundation for reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars A tradition continues
This book was a favorite of our youngest son, age 31. Now our well loved copy is a great hit with the grandchildren. I have to buy three new copies. In this day of DVD, VCR it is a thrill to have children so engrossed looking for Gold Bug. ... Read more


32. Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You : Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises (Bright and Early Board Books)
by DR SEUSS
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.49
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0679882820
Catlog: Book (1996-11-26)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 302
Average Customer Review: 4.61 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Oh, the wonderful things Mr. Brown can do! In this "Book of Wonderful Noises," Mr. Brown struts his stuff, as he imitates everything from popping corks to horse feet ("pop pop pop pop" and "klopp klopp klopp," respectively) while inviting everyone to join him in the fun. Young readers who are still learning their sounds and letters will get a wacky workout as they follow along with the very serious-looking, squinty-eyed Mr. Brown. Whether it's eggs frying in a pan or a hippo chewing gum, the skillful Mr. Brown just keeps topping himself, with a "sizzle sizzle" or a "grum grum grum." "Mr. Brown is so smart he can even do this: he can even make a noise like a goldfish kiss!... pip!" As usual, the words and pictures of Dr.Seuss make reading (and making all sorts of funny noises) impossible to resist. Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? will stay fresh through many a giggling reading. --Paul Hughes ... Read more

Reviews (89)

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful first book for your baby!
I first started reading this book to my baby at 2 months old, and she was fascinated by the sounds and the bright pictures. I've read it to her so many times that I think we both have it memorized. When my baby was 3 months old I could simply recite the book to her while I was driving in a car trip and she would be entertained.

I highly recommend this book, along with Sanda Boynton's two books "Barnyard Dance" and "Moo, Baa, La La La!" books for infants and toddlers. With books that are interesting like these, my baby will sit for 45 minutes at a time to be read to!

A great way to interact with your child and teach her to love books and read.

5-0 out of 5 stars AN ABSOLUTE MUST FOR SPEECH-DELAYED TODDLERS!
My son (now 3) is speech-delayed, and this is one of the first books that actually had him talking along! I would read, "Oh, the wonderful sounds Mr. Brown can do. He can sound like a cow, he can go..." and my son at 2 would yell "MOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" and do the same with the other sounds! It ENCOURAGES your child to speak by having them make some silly sounds! We even came up with hand gestures for several of the sounds to supplement my son's sign language (ASL) he used at the time. We read this book every night at least 4 times before bed. As his speech flourished (yay!), he began to want to say more of the words himself (we've memorized the book - not hard, and very fun to recite when waiting in lines, etc, heeheehee). Then, we bought him the Dr. Seuss video of ABCs, which has this book's "video" at the end. He watches the video with this book in hand, although the video has a few more sounds (I think this board book is a bit abridged, but not too much), and is now learning to read with the video/board book combination! I am HIGHLY pleased with this book, from it's hilarious illustrations (see lightning/thunder page) to it's musical cadence and silly sounds - it helped my son realize sounds can be fun and silly and encouraged him to play with them when speech was so frustrating for him at the time.

2-0 out of 5 stars Fun reading, but not very sturdy
I have bought several of the Dr. Suess Bright and Early Board Books, and they simply don't stand up to the abuse a toddler dishes out. None of the other board books we own have fallen apart the way these have.

5-0 out of 5 stars My 2 year old loves this book!
My daughter just loves having me read this book to her. "Boom boom boom, Mr. Brown is a wonder. Boom boom boom, Mr. Brown makes thunder!" She has memorized most of it, and has such fun making the sounds in it along with me. It really is worth buying for your little one - this is really a fun book to read!

5-0 out of 5 stars Dr. Seuss inspires parents and kids to make wonderful noises
In the old days it was Old MacDonald who had a farm and on this farm he had a cow, duck, and all sorts of other animals, each of which made a particular sound that can be imitated. But then along game Mr. Brown, a creation of Dr. Seuss, who makes Old MacDonald look like the strong silent type. That is because as we learn in "Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?: Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises," Mr. Brown can do more than "moo" like a cow, "buzz" like a bee, and go "hoo hoo hoo hoo" like an owl. Mr. Brown can go "pop" like a cork, "eek eek" like a squeaky shoe, and even make the sound of a hippopotamus chewing gum.

I think one of the reasons this is a popular book with beginning readers is not only because kids enjoy making all these noises, but also because parents and other adults get to embarrass themselves in making the sounds on these pages come alive (or a reasonable facsimile thereof). Trying to make the sound of the rain or a big cat drinking is not too hard, but doing a very hard noise to make like the sound of lighting (which is a "splatt" apparently) or a noise like a goldfish kiss ("pip") might be pushing the envelope too much.

Of course, you can make up any sound you want when you are reading this to very young children. But you have to keep in mind that the whole point of these Bright and Early Books for Beginning Beginners is to inspire them to read on their own one day, which means you can look forward to being confronted by an indignant young child demanding to know how the noise you made every time you read them the book has anything to do with what is highlighted on these pages. So be forewarned, that sooner or later you are going to be embarrassed reading this book. ... Read more


33. The Lorax
by Dr. Seuss, Theodor Seuss Geisel
list price: $14.95
our price: $8.97
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394823370
Catlog: Book (1971-08-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 730
Average Customer Review: 4.83 out of 5 stars
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When Dr. Seuss gets serious, you know it must be important. Published in 1971, and perhaps inspired by the "save our planet" mindset of the 1960s, The Lorax is an ecological warning that still rings true today amidst the dangers of clear-cutting, pollution, and disregard for the earth's environment. In The Lorax, we find what we've come to expect from the illustrious doctor: brilliantly whimsical rhymes, delightfully original creatures, and weirdly undulating illustrations. But here there is also something more--a powerful message that Seuss implores both adults and children to heed.

The now remorseful Once-ler--our faceless, bodiless narrator--tells the story himself. Long ago this enterprising villain chances upon a place filled with wondrous Truffula Trees, Swomee-Swans, Brown Bar-ba- loots, and Humming-Fishes. Bewitched by the beauty of the Truffula Tree tufts, he greedily chops them down to produce and mass-market Thneeds. ("It's a shirt. It's a sock. It's a glove. It's a hat.") As the trees swiftly disappear and the denizens leave for greener pastures, the fuzzy yellow Lorax (who speaks for the trees "for the trees have no tongues") repeatedly warns the Once-ler, but his words of wisdom are for naught. Finally the Lorax extricates himself from the scorched earth (by the seat of his own furry pants), leaving only a rock engraved "UNLESS." Thus, with his own colorful version of a compelling morality play, Dr. Seuss teaches readers not to fool with Mother Nature. But as you might expect from Seuss, all hope is not lost--the Once-ler has saved a single Truffula Tree seed! Our fate now rests in the hands of a caring child, who becomes our last chance for a clean, green future. (Ages 4 to 8) ... Read more

Reviews (58)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Lorax - Still Powerful After 30 Years
Children used to Dr. Seuss' lighthearted, whimsical stories filled with wacky names and places will undoubtedly perceive a vast difference with "The Lorax". It still contains the wacky names, places, and rhymes, so characteristic of Seuss, but with one blatant overtone. This story goes all out to show the devestating consequences of human greed, and what can happen to the environment when humans misuse and take advantage of nature and natural resources.

The story begins when a boy comes to the home of a peculair creature called Once-ler. The boy wants to know about something called the Lorax; "what it was", and "why it was there". After paying the Once-ler a small fee, he narrates the story for the boy. The pictures incorperated into the story are also poignant; for, as we see in the beginning, the small town in which the Once-ler lives is very grey and barren.

However, as the Once-ler begins his story, the pictures become brighter, more cheerful, and colorful, as we see how the town once looked, long, long ago. There were animals, birds, green grass ... and trees!

The Once-ler says, "I came to this glorious place. And I first saw the trees. The Truffula trees". Transfixed by these trees, the Once-ler cuts one down to make a "Thneed". Now, a Thneed is supposed to be a useful thing, which people can find many uses for. Shortly after the first tree is cut down, the Lorax appears. He explains that he talks on behalf of the trees, because the trees cannot talk for themselves. "They have no tongues".

The Lorax is very upset at what the Once-ler has done. But the Once-ler ignores him, and continues to cut down the trees to make Thneeds, until all the trees have been cut down. This action, of cutting down the trees, building a factory to make the thneeds, and releasing waste residue into the water is greatly illustrated in the pictures, showing the cause and effect of polluting the environment.

Eventually the pictures return to the grey, morbid colors we see in the beginning. The Lorax has had to make all the birds, animals and fish leave the town before they die of hunger and starvation, and before they choke to death on all the smog generated by the Once-ler's factory.

As we can clearly see in "The Lorax", Dr. Seuss is making a very defined political statement about how humans have manipulated and destroyed our natural surroundings for their own personal greed. "The Lorax" was written in 1971, in the hayday of environmental activism, and one year after the first Earth Day.

Still, Dr. Suess does not make this story into a gloomy one. He gives us hope. The Once-ler tosses down a seed to the boy; the one last remaining Truffula seed. With this one seed, Dr. Seuss tells us the possiblities are endless, and hope is not lost.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Serious Message in Classic Suess Style
I grew up on Dr. Suess books(I even learned to read with one), and I think he is one of the greatest children's authors ever. His hypnotic phrasing and wonderful illustrations are enough to delight children and adults as well (my brothers and I still enjoy looking through our old Suess favorites). In my senior year of high school, I had the opportunity to go with two other classmates to a local elementary school on a weekly basis to teach basic lessons on honesty, friendship, etc. When we taught our lesson on the environment, I brought "The Lorax" to read to the class. To my surprise, when I asked who in the class had read the story, only three out of the 28 students had. Many looked skeptical, thinking it was a little kid's book, but once I started reading, the entire class was mesmerized. After I was finished with the story, we had the most lively question-and-answer session that we had ever had-the story really hit home with the kids and brought our planet'! s ecological crisis into terms that they could understand. Afterward, many of the children asked where they could get a copy of "The Lorax". Thank you to Dr. Suess for a masterpiece of children's literature!

5-0 out of 5 stars Inspiring for a lifetime
When I was in elementary school in the mid-1970s, probably around the age of 7 or 8, all the students in the school were assembled and shown the film of the Lorax. The film was very similar to the film of The Grinch that was made at about the same time and is now a video classic - - wonderful animation and great word-for-word narrative reading of the text. I had been unaware of the book before that. I remember very clearly being very moved and inspired by the tale, and I can trace part of my development as an environmentalist to it. I now work in environmental outreach/education, and every once in a while I get out the book of The Lorax and get re-inspired, especially by the line "UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not." I still find the book very relevant to today. It's not extremist in any way. Even its depiction of the Once-ler is not as an evil man, but someone very recognizable. He doesn't mean harm, but "Business is business, and business must grow." Sound familiar? He doesn't recognize the damage he's causing, or understand just how painful and permanent it will be, until too late. This book reminds all of us to not take our beautiful world for granted, but to take responsibility for it.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the best Seuss books there is!
This story about being a steward for our world and environment is a job for parents and kids alike. My two year old has is memorized (as I do) but we never tire of reading it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Lorax
My children love this book. By the time my son was two, I had read it to him so many times that he had memorized it! He, as well as my daughter, just love this story. ... Read more


34. The Quiltmaker's Journey
by Jeff Brumbeau
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.21
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439512190
Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
Publisher: Orchard
Sales Rank: 5697
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Escaping from the protective walls of wealth and privilege, a young girl discovers the harsh world outside, where some people don't have as much as others. When she realizes that she has the power to help them, the young girl finds a strength and peace she never knew before. Making the loveliest quilts in all the land, the young girl decides to give them away.
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Another Great Quiltmaker Story
Jeff Brumbeau has another potential award winner with The Quiltmaker's Journey.A great story about how the Quiltmaker came to be, he continues the theme of the original book that giving of oneself and caring for others illuminates our lives with love.Gail de Marken's illustrations are, again, timeless and her familiarity with the art of quilting lends authenticity to the quilt blocks dotting the pages of this wonderfult story.The Quiltmaker's Journey will win the hearts of young and old alike and if you happen to be a quilter, too, that just sweetens the deal. ... Read more


35. Diary of a Worm
by Doreen Cronin
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 006000150X
Catlog: Book (2003-09-01)
Publisher: Joanna Cotler
Sales Rank: 344
Average Customer Review: 4.66 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Doreen Cronin (Click, Clack Moo: Cows That Type) and cartoonist Harry Bliss (illustrator of A Fine, Fine School) shed a whole new light on a creature that spends most of its time underground: the earthworm. Written in diary form, this truly hilarious picture book tracks the ins and outs of a worm's life from the perspective of the worm family's young son. Take June 15's entry: "My older sister thinks she's so pretty. I told her that no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end. Spider thought that was really funny. Mom did not." Except for the fact that he can't chew gum or have a dog, the boy likes being a worm. He never has to go to the dentist ("No cavities--no teeth, either"), he never gets in trouble for tracking mud through the house, and he never has to take a bath. As long as he can remember Mom's rule "Never bother Daddy when he's eating the newspaper," all is well. Bliss's endearing cartoonish illustrations of anthropomorphized worms are clever visual punchlines for Cronin's delightfully deadpan humor. For example, "June 5: Today we made macaroni necklaces in art class" sounds normal enough until you see the worms wearing one piece of macaroni around their necks, taking up a good part of each worm's body. Children and adults alike will adore this worm's eye perspective on the world. (Ages 6 and older) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (29)

5-0 out of 5 stars Humorous and different
My 3 1/2 year old son loves this book, and so do his parents! I bet my son will think twice next time he wants to step on a worm. I really recommend this book because it's really funny; some of the things I have to explain to my son, in a humorous way of course, but that's part of our bonding while book-reading. It's a great book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Worms aren't so "oooo-yucky" after all
This is an excellent book for both boys & girls. In a whimsical manner the reader/listeners are taken through a worm's world showing all from the trivial to the most important aspects of their lives. With his little red baseball cap, our subject says good morning to a line of ants one at a time taking him all day. He points out the dangers he faces and explains his most important jobs. What an excelent way to learn about such an unusual creature in our world. Good for story times for 5 & 6 year olds as well.

3-0 out of 5 stars Why Play on Fears
The author and illustrator are both terrific in imagination and talent. My only criticism is in the one part that plays on children's minds in a negative way. We are told that there are "three reasons" that it is good to be a worm - 1- you don't have to worry about tracking in mud (Fine - that's fun!); 2 - you don't have to take a bath (but kids love baths, until we start to instill this cultural idea that one should resist taking a bath ); and 3 - you don't have to go to the dentist (this is really annoying. Children are so afraid of dentists as it is, why make it worse) Surely there could be 2 other items for this scenerio besides dentists and baths. Just my opinion and, yes, it may be a cultural norm for kids views, but why botch an otherwise fun book. Not for me.

5-0 out of 5 stars Hilarious!
My daughter and I borrowed this book from the library yesterday and I have to say it's the first book in a long, long time that has sent the both of us into giggling fits. It reminded me of Gary Larson's The Far Side, but for kids. Also some of the humour is pretty subtle for a new 4 year old, but knee-slappingly funny when you get it. The illustrations are a perfect fit for the story in terms of style and content. Don't forget to check out the inside covers of the book - the snapshots and captions are just as hysterical as the rest of the book.

We both highly recommend this book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great for beginning readers
My grandson is a beginning reader. He loved Diary of a Worm. He read it with some difficulty at first and then reread it about 5 times,with much laughter each time. After the 2nd time he could read it easily. This is the kind of book which makes a child want to read. ... Read more


36. Quiltmaker's Gift
by Jeff Brumbeau, Gail De Marcken
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.56
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439309107
Catlog: Book (2001-03-01)
Publisher: Scholastic
Sales Rank: 2734
Average Customer Review: 4.96 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Quiltmaker's Gift celebrates the quilting tradition, the value of generosity, and the spirit of community in a beautiful and touching fable for our times. This richly illustrated picture book celebrates the joy of giving and gently emphasizes the age-old truth that material wealth does not necessarily buy happiness. The Quiltmaker's Gift is a heartwarming children's fable, a celebration of quilters and quilting, and a challenging adult parable all wrapped into one.

A wise and generous quiltmaker, with magic in her fingers and love for humanity in her heart, sews the most beautiful quilts in the world-and gives each one away for free to a needy recipient. A greedy king, his castle overflowing with riches and treasures, never smiles-and yearns for the one thing that will bring him laughter and happiness. As the story unfolds, the reader watches the king learn the most valuable lesson of his life. Under the quiltmaker's guidance, the king is transformed as he gives away his precious things all around the world. He learns the true meaning of happiness by bringing joy to the lives of others. He finally begins to smile.

This charming fable is brought to stunning visual life by the beautiful bursting illustrations, which leap off every page of the book. The artist's years working for the Peace Corps are richly reflected in her art work, showing characters and adventures in all the colors of the world-as rich and varied as the crazy quilts made by the quiltmaker. Each page also highlights a different traditional quilt block pattern , the name of whichrelates to the unfolding story. Hundreds of subtle messages and intriguing substories are embedded in the art, inviting new discoveries reading after reading.

The reverse side of the book jacket features a dramatic puzzle poster showing the king's amazing collection of stuff. Gail de Marcken has pictured 250 different quilt block names among the treasure trove. ... Read more

Reviews (28)

5-0 out of 5 stars Not Just for Children - A Gift for the Giver in Your Life
I'm not surprised to find this book listed as a Children's Book - who else is supposed to enjoy beautiful illustrated fables?

The answer, of course, is the grown-up who reads it aloud. The detailed illustrations in this book will fascinate the fortunate child who hears the tale. The fortunate adult reader and the child will enjoy following this story about an unhappy king, laden with "things" he thought would make him happy.

A classic consumer, he "gets" more and more - his closets and rooms are burdened with beautiful treasures that bring him little joy. He thinks the only thing he doesn't have - one of the quiltmaker's quilts - will bring him that elusive happiness. But she only gives to the poor - despite his threats and angry attempts to show her who has the power - she will not give him a quilt.

She tells him how he can get that quilt - the answer of course is simple, once he figures it out.

A wonderful gift for that person you know who always gives (s/he might like reading it to children or grandchildren) or the quilt-lover on your list. The colorful quilt patterns shown and named inside the front and back covers, and inside the dustjacket(! ) are fantastic.

Like "Old Turtle," this is a beautifully illustrated book with rich layers to be enjoyed by children and adults, year after year.

5-0 out of 5 stars a valuable treasure
Though my children are grown, I still enjoy brousing the children's book section of the local bookstore. I was drawn to remove The Quiltmakers Gift from it's resting place on the shelf because of the beautifully rendered, inviting illustrations on it's cover. And what a pleasant surprise when I opened the book to find a wealth of the same along with a most touching and tenderly written story about a king living in unhappy greed amongst the finest of splendor. Yet this same greed allows his path to cross with that of a loving, giving soul who has the gift to help the king learn how to find his own happiness. It is apparent that both author and illustrator have a deep understanding of the gift of giving, and have given us a wonderful story to share with our loved ones. I found myself sitting in the bookstore wiping away the tears from my eyes and I knew this book was a must even though I may save it for years before having grandchildren to read it to.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book for Old and Young Children
The illustrations are really good. For the younger children 2-4 years old, possible paraphrasing the story and looking closely at the illustrations would good. The older children will really benefit from the lesson about giving and consequences of greed, plus really enjoy the illustrations. Since I do not celebrate Christmas or Easter, I did not like the one page that made reference to these holidays. It's a very nice quality and colorful book with a great message. It's the type of book to pass on to generations.

5-0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book, both in illustrations and in writing
What an addition this has made to my second grade library. The children love to look at the intoxicating illustrations, and I love to hear the story again as I read it to them each time. It is a beautifully told story with an important moral...don't let your child miss out on this lovely book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Speechless (nearly!!)
This book is incredible. I love it. The artwork is almost intoxicating; every time I read it with my 3 year old son I see something I missed the first million times we read it!! My 4 month old likes to look at the paintings as well. The story is beautifully written also. This is one to leave on the coffee table. ... Read more


37. Complete Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales
by HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, LilyOwens
list price: $14.99
our price: $14.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0517092913
Catlog: Book (1993-05-10)
Publisher: Gramercy
Sales Rank: 5390
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Lilly Owens, ed. Illustrated edition of 159 cherished tales that have enchanted readers for generations. Includes The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Clothes, Snow Queen, all uncut with beautiful illustrations by Arthur Rackham, Hans Richter, et al. 60 B&W illustrations. 816 pages. ... Read more

Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Tales
Grimms-You call the Best but Hans Anderson, You call it a 'Classic of the classics' coz the beautiful stories lets your imagination go surfing on 'cloud nine' and these tales conveys moralistic message. Though the illustrations are in black and white, it doesn't matter as long as the stories are well read. Children learn to explore and imagine by listening and this is a book that every parent would love to read and narrate the stories to their loved ones. The Princess and the Pea is my fav' story and so is the 'Emperor's clothes' - Totally, an amazing fairy tales of Hans Anderson that grips you delightfully reading even as an adult. It would have been much better if more attention was given to make the book more trendy n new mod edition. Hans Anderson is so popular read that one can't resist a pick of any book that has his tales. An enchanting collection by bedside to read out to kid, any time, any day - A nice Pick 'Content is king' I would say!

4-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book for adults and children
I have always been a fan of the original versions of fairy tales, so I picked this book up a few years ago, just to read for myself. A few weeks ago my six year old found it hidden among my millions of other books, and asked me to read it to her. While easy to read silently, it is a bit hard to get into the rythm of the wording at first, but after stumbling through a few paragraphs, it becomes much easier to handle.

Since the discovery of this book, my children have been requesting stories from it almost every night. At first my three year old complained about the lack of pictures (it really isn't "fully illustrated"), but she quickly got over that and enjoys listening to every story. Both of my older children like to compare these stories to ones they've seen on TV, or read in the few modernized fairy tale books we own (given to us by friends and relatives). Maybe my children are warped - which is very likely - but they prefer the original stories, with their not-so-happy, and often times violent, endings.

I've never been one to believe children need to have their reality padded... real life doesn't always end the way we hoped, so neither should stories. Hopefully this book, and ones like it, will be a bedtime favorite for years to come.

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't even bother.
While I'm sure the stories are great, I can't get past the poor type setting, and cheap paper which is practically newsprint. The words and illustrations bleed through from the next page making reading very difficult. And to make matters worse, the stories are set in a terrible, hard to read font and tight leading. This book is NOT kid-friendly at all.

5-0 out of 5 stars The true story of "The Little Mermaid" will surprise you!
If you remember Thumbelina, The Nightingale, The Ugly Duckling or The Princess and the Pea, they are all here in a wonderful collection of stories written by Hans Christian Anderson. Unlike the Brothers Grimm, who collected and recorded popular tales, Hans Christian Anderson wrote his own "folk" tales, which also contain Danish history and foreign literature.

Not all of his stories end well, yet this is a side of life children should learn about so they can be aware of it later in life. Your child might be horrified to learn that not everything ends up quite as magical as it would in a Disney movie. My favorite tale has always been "The Little Mermaid." She wanted to be something she was not meant to be and for me that is a lesson of how we should be who we really are. She actually ends up not marrying the prince. I quote:

The little mermaid lifted up glorified eyes towards the sun, and felt them, for the first time, filling with tears. On the ship, in which she had left the prince......she saw him and his beautiful bride searching for her; sorrowfully they gazed at the pearly foam, as if they knew she had thrown herself into the waves.

Some of the stories are very moralistic, yet he retains a mischievous sense of humor in some stories. His stories always reflect his fertile imagination. This particular collection was translated by Mrs. H. B. Paull, H. Oskar Sommer, Jean Hersholt and several other unknown translators. Six distinguished artists helped to illustrate this book. These are black and white illustrations and there are not really very many of them. To me a fully illustrated book should be fully illustrated. Nonetheless, this is not a book just for children. In fact, I see this more as a book which should be read to children by their parents. In this way parents and children can discuss items of interest. This book on its own would most likely not appeal to a child, due to the lack of pictures. It is meant to be read to them as far as I can tell. I also would recommend it to adults who remembered these stories as I did and want to read them again.

Perhaps I also remember the story about the tinder box very well. It is a magical story of a soldier who goes into a hollow tree and finds a passage with doors which lead to chambers. It sounds frightening at first but has a lovely happy ending.

Books can take us to another world and this one will take a child to many places they will never forget. And so the first story begins: "Far down in the forest, where the warm sun and the fresh air made a sweet resting place, grew a pretty little fir-tree; and yet it was not happy, it wished so much to be tall like its companions¯the pines and firs which grew around it. The sun shone, and the soft air fluttered its leaves, and......."

2-0 out of 5 stars Expected Better Quality
Andersen and Grimm are supposed to be classics. While I like having the collection and while the illustrations are very nice - the pages themselves are much closer to newspaper-stock than what I'd expect from a durable, long-lasting book. Very thin, gritty, and easily tearable. It was kind of disappointing. This also applies to the Grimm book from the same editor. ... Read more


38. Fox in Socks (I Can Read It All by Myself Beginner Books (Hardcover))
by DR SEUSS
list price: $8.99
our price: $8.09
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394800389
Catlog: Book (1965-01-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 1690
Average Customer Review: 4.83 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Illus. in full color. A collection of tongue twisters that is "an amusing exercise for beginning readers."--Kirkus. ... Read more

Reviews (35)

5-0 out of 5 stars Dr. Seuss genius at work
Sure, it teaches valuable vocabulary words and rhyme schemes to tiny tots. And no doubt there's a thesis somewhere comparing hapless Knox to Stalin knocking heads against the red-white-and-blue American Fox. But *Fox in Socks* is above all other things the first instrument of torture children can use against their parents.

Take Father, tired out from a hard day at the office. "Read me a story, Daddy," coos his blond princess. Father bravely tries to wrap his tongue around "Luke Luck likes lakes./ Luke's duck likes lakes." Daddy's little angel chortles with each misspoken word -- and there are plenty of them by the time he arrives at the muddle puddle tweetle poodle beetle noodle battle paddle battle." She goes to sleep secure in the knowledge that not only can she grow up to be president, but that she's already smarter than her poor parents.

And that's the genius of Dr. Suess. His tongue teasers and outrageous Goo Gooses and Bim Bens and Tweedle Beetles don't just foster imagination -- they encourage kids to let it run rampant.

5-0 out of 5 stars Classic Seuss for Children of Any Age - Better than 5 Stars
Although Amazon advertises this book for ages 4-8, my wife and I started reading this and other Seuss books to our children from 6 months on. Always a delight, our kids would laugh at the silliness while acquiring a zest for life at the same time. We started a great habit of reading two or three Seuss books before bed, and the kids loved them. Soon, they would memorize many of the phrases, beginning a lifelong passion for reading.

Every kid should experience reading Fox in Socks while growing up. Join the Fox in Socks as he leads Mr. Knox on a zany adventure of learning and silly rhymes. Combine it with other fun Seuss books and your kids will sit enthralled as you turn the pages. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars What other Dr. Seuss book comes with a warning label?
On the front cover of "Fox in Socks," one of the "I Can Read It All By Myself" Beginner Books authored and illustrated by Dr. Seuss there appears the following warning:

"This is a book you READ ALOUD to find out just how smart your tongue is. The first time you read it, don't go fast! This Fox is a tricky fox. He'll try to get your tongue in trouble."

Just in case you missed the small print on the cover as soon as you open the book there is an even larger warning instructing you to "Take it Slowly" becaseu "This Book is Dangerous!" If that is not an invitation for young kids to read a book, then I do not know what would be. However, there is a good chance that your tongue will be numb by the time you finish read about "Knox on fox in socks in box," "Six sick bricks tick," and "Sue sews socks of fox in socks now." But if you can call something "a tweetle bettle noodle poodle bottled paddled muddled duddled fuddled wuddled fox in socks," then you need not be a-feared of anything else you ever read in the rest of your life.

"Fox in Socks" is dedicated to Mizi Long and Audrey Dimond of the Mt. Soledad Lingual Laboratories, who I suspect helped Theodor Geisel identify the specific phonetics that beginning readers would have to work on (I had to spend a week repeating some nonsense about "thirty thousand boys with thirty thousand drums" to work on the "th" sound). When you remember that the genesis for "The Cat in the Hat" was the idea of taking 220 basic words, rhyming them, and turning them into a book that would make children more interested in reading than having to deal with Dick, Jane, Sally, and Spot ("See Spot Run. Run Spot Run. Fetch the ball, Spot"). "Fox in Socks" is a clear reminder that these books are not just a lot of fun when you read "Duck takes licks in lakes Luke Luck likes" but also educational, in the best sense of the word.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fox? socks? Knox? It rocks!!!
A great book. It was my child hood favorite and I'll never forget the first time I I was able to read the book all the way through. To bad I lost it, I'd pay good money to have my book back!

5-0 out of 5 stars Fox in Socks
Do you like rhymes for just dimes? Funny characters looking odd or a smile while you nod? Get this book its great whether you are a lass or a mate, read it with a sandwich or a hoagie if you are a young spry of an old foagie. ... Read more


39. From Caterpillar to Butterfly (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 1)
by Deborah Heiligman
list price: $4.99
our price: $4.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064451291
Catlog: Book (1996-05-31)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 1693
Average Customer Review: 4.83 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A caterpillar comes to school in a jar. The class watches the caterpillar each day as it grows and changes. Soon, it disappears into a hard shell called a chrysalis. Then the chrysalis breaks, and a beautiful butterfly flies out of the jar! This is a perfect beginner's guide to the mystery of metamorphosis.

Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children 1997 (NSTA/CBC) ... Read more

Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Perfect Butterfly Book for Preschool-Third Grade
I am the director of a lower school (pre-k-2nd) and we have used this book for years. It is the perfect way to introduce children to the wonderful world of metamorphosis. And if you can also actually get the Painted Lady Butterflies and "grow" them in your class, it is an invaluable experience. We have our children keep journals and then buy them each a copy of this great book (it's cheap in paperback) and they get to keep the experience forever. One correction to another review: painted ladies and all butterflies do spin chrysalids, not cocoons. They look similar, but the chrysalis usually has little specks of gold in it, which is where the name comes from. Yes I am a huge fan of this book--and a huge fan of butterflies. This author also has a lovely book about honeybees, called Honeybees.

5-0 out of 5 stars THE Book to accompany Butterfly Houses, Pavillions
We got this book in addition to a home "Butterfly Pavillion" by InsectLore. It prepared my son and us for what to expect as the Painted Lady Butterflies were developing through each stage. So even during the lulls in the action, we could spark some anticipation. Which heightened the whole process for my 5 year old.
We also found out this book is used at his kindergarten for their butterfly learning.
This is the first Let's-Read-And-Find-Out book we've bought and were impressed enough to want to get the other books in the series.

4-0 out of 5 stars lovely story, but...
The only complaint I have about this book is that the caterpillar disappears into a chrysalis -- not a cocooon. The last Painted Lady butterflies we had (a watch-your-caterpillar-change-into-a-butterfly kit) all spun cocoons - no chrysalis!

5-0 out of 5 stars A peek inside a mystery
This book is the perfect accompaniment to spring! Even if you can't bring a caterpillar into your classroom, you can still share the magic and mystery of their turning into butterflies with this wonderful book. The tone is so kid-friendly, kids will be learning without even realizing it. A great resource!

5-0 out of 5 stars I share it with all of my classes!
This book is perfect for 3rd grade and under. I normally use it as a read-aloud, although this would be just fine for them on their own. Great book! ... Read more


40. Heroes, Gods and Monsters of the Greek Myths
by BERNARD EVSLIN
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0553259202
Catlog: Book (1984-10-01)
Publisher: Laurel Leaf
Sales Rank: 5043
Average Customer Review: 4.79 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (14)

5-0 out of 5 stars Extremely Useful and Entertaining
This text was my first major teaching assignment and both I and the students enjoyed this book of mythology. Evslin is an easy read and a very compelling storyteller. It's wonderful beginners book as well as an excellent reference. The book contain all of the major gods, concentrating on their origins and major myths that involve each one. Heroes such as Perseus, Theseus, Atalanta, and Daedalus are included. I was disappointed that Hercules was not included; however, his mythology is rather long and widely known, which is probably why it was left out. Other myths included: King Midas, Pygmalion, Echo and Psyche, Phaethon and many others. This is an excellent source for beginners and students. If you are already versed in Greek mythology, you may find the lack of certain myths discouraging, but I do encourage you to revisit a wonderful telling of myths that probably got you interested in Greek mythology in the first place.

5-0 out of 5 stars I LUV THIS BOOK!
For a totally long time my mom has been bugging me to read this book. I didn't want to caus' it was all shriveled and old-looking. A typical classicy kind of book. It was all YELLOWISH, the color of cury. (Did I spell that right? Whatever.) Anyways I started reading to get her off my back and I got totally hooked! I had absolutely no idea that this shredded up lump of paper would be so good! It was great! Okay I know I sounding a bit over-eager but this book is so cool. I read it over and over again. Well not REALLY but I did read SOME of the stories twice. I like Hermes, he sounds really sharp and funny. I think I can actually picture him as a cute little baby and Apollo making a deal in a large airy cave. The uniqueness (it took me a long time think up a word,) about greek stories is that they rarely end happily. Though the punishments for the bad and usually the innocent are kind of exciting. Somebody nice always has to die. Zeus sounds like avery funny person, always running off and seducing women-I feel sorry for Hera though. But I think what she did to Echo was really mean. I like Poseidon and Hades. They sound really... I don't know. Interesting? Maybe. I don't really understand the story of Eros and Psyche. If you know, please tell me. Dinner time, gotta go.

4-0 out of 5 stars The book
I didn't think that the book was all that great... the author alludes to other Gods, but then doesn't include them in the book. He does this with other types of stories too. For the purpose of the book, as an informational book, it hits the topics dead on. It's not that bad, but I don't think that it deserves 5 stars

5-0 out of 5 stars The beginning of a lifelong passion
I first met this book through a series of LP records in my local library as a child; I later read the book. It's still my favorite telling of the Greek myths, and it spawned a facination for the folklore and mythology that has been a great source of pleasure for my entire life (I'm now in my late thirties). I can't recommend this book enough, regardless of the reader's age; Evslin's telling of them gives life and personality to the characters that can't be found in any other version of the myths.

5-0 out of 5 stars Enthralling
I picked up this book at the library on a whim one day, when I just happened to be poking around the non-fiction section (very uncharacteristic of me). Now, this book may be non-fiction because the writer didn't invent the stories, but it reads just as interestingly as a fiction book. I knew a bit about Greek mythology, and was vaguely interested in it, but after reading this book, I want all the Greek mythology books that I can get my hands on and am even considering studying it in college.

Don't let the low reading level discourage you--I found this in the adult section, and it's undoubtedly where it belongs! This book can aid in understanding words and references to Greek myths in everyday life, and I never knew there were so many of them! If you're interested in learning more about Greek mythology, this would definitely be a GREAT place to start. ... Read more


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