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$10.87 $9.78 list($15.99)
1. Russell the Sheep
$7.99 $1.24
2. The Little Engine That Could
$11.16 $8.99 list($15.95)
3. Walter, the Farting Dog (Walter
$4.95 $3.38
4. Love You Forever
$10.87 $8.49 list($15.99)
5. The Giving Tree
$10.87 $9.64 list($15.99)
6. Knuffle Bunny : A Cautionary Tale
$9.71 $5.99 list($12.95)
7. The Red Book
$16.89
8. Sleepy Cadillac : A Bedtime Drive
$11.53 $10.68 list($16.95)
9. Zen Shorts
$11.53 $10.32 list($16.95)
10. Girls Hold Up This World
$10.87 $10.53 list($15.99)
11. Rough Weather Ahead for Walter
$25.20 $19.95 list($40.00)
12. The 20th-Century Children's Book
$10.88 $5.99 list($16.00)
13. How I Became a Pirate (Irma S
$10.39 $8.54 list($12.99)
14. The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog!
$23.07 $16.99 list($34.95)
15. Your Favorite Seuss : A Baker's
$11.86 $10.18 list($16.95)
16. Where the Wild Things Are
$13.59 $8.40 list($19.99)
17. Who Moved My Cheese? For Kids
$6.99 $4.26 list($7.99)
18. Zoom (Picture Puffin)
$5.39 $2.99 list($5.99)
19. Harold and the Purple Crayon 50th
$11.55 $6.85 list($16.99)
20. All the Places to Love

1. Russell the Sheep
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060598484
Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 790
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This is Russell.

Sometimes Russell is just a little bit out of step with the rest of the flock.

All the sheep are falling asleep -- except Russell.

What's a sheep to do?

Russell tries everything ... until, at last, he falls asleep. ... Read more

Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars too cute
Russell is a sheep who just can't seem to fall asleep one night.He tries everything from counting the stars to locating the perfect sleeping spot.Nothing works for him.That is until he decides to count sheep!This works and Russell is finally asleep.By this time it's morning and all the other sheep are ready to start their day!

The cartoon like illustrations are full of detail.Lots for little eyes to llok at while the story is being read!
We would recommend this book to others.We feel that the book will entertain children in a wide variety of age groups.There is a little green frog that shows up though out the book.It's fun to discover what the will be up to next!

5-0 out of 5 stars Richie's Picks: RUSSELL THE SHEEP
"Last night I didn't get to sleep at all, no, no.
I lay awake and watched until the morning light
Washed away the darkness of the lonely night
And last night I didn't get to sleep, didn't get to sleep,
No, I didn't get to sleep at all."
--The Fifth Dimension

Between meetings, workshops, zigzagging between the various publisher booths, morning and evening social events, and late night nibbling at the new ARCs I've just scored, I don't get much sleep when I'm off at the various book-related conventions.

Five-plus years ago, Shari and I were strolling around the exhibition hall at ALA Midwinter in San Antonio. The best part of being "on the floor" at ALA Midwinter is the abundance of editors in attendance. It is always exciting to get an earful of what these frequently unsung heroes of the children's publishing industry actually have their hands on, along with what they've just completed in collaboration with their talented authors.

Anne Schwartz is one of those brilliant and charming editors with whom I love to chat. When Shari and I encountered Anne in San Antonio at that 2000 Midwinter convention, I immediately asked her what hot new literary magic she had up her sleeve for the distant fall season, then eight or nine months down the road.

When Anne responded that I HAD to see the picture book she'd just finished I was momentarily disappointed. The best thing you have for the entire fall season is a picture book? I said to myself, my hope having been that she'd instead be raving about the manuscript for some spectacular novel for eight-to-twelve-year-olds.

But my skepticism instantly evaporated as she opened a manilla file and pulled out a paste-up of OLIVIA. I'll never forget that first reading, including the ending when:

"Olivia's mom gives her a kiss and says, 'You know, you really wear me out. But I love you anyway.' And Olivia gives her a kiss back and says, 'I love you anyway too.' "

"Close your eyes and I'll close mine, goodnight sleep tight
Now the moon begins to shine, goodnight sleep tight
Dream sweet dreams for me, dream sweet dreams for you."
--The Beatles

I recall the OLIVIA incident because Rob Scotton's RUSSELL THE SHEEP is the cutest and funniest and best illustrated animal character I've seen in a picture book since OLIVIA. And while RUSSELL THE SHEEP won't officially come to the attention of the Caldecott committee the way OLIVIA did (being that Rob Scotton is British not American), I will be shocked if Russell does not similarly grab the Book Sense Illustrated Book of the Year award after he grabs the hearts and imaginations of large herds of American kids, young and old.

Rob Scotton is certainly no unknown quantity in Britain. Not only a celebrated illustrator of greeting cards and posters, his animal characters even adorn a series of Portmerion china.

But the exploits of Russell and the expressions of the various sheep characters in his first picture book go far beyond anything Scotton's accomplished previously. Within just one of the book's first illustrations ("...night fell and the sheep got ready for bed."), you have Russell prancing atop a tree while one sheep is brushing its teeth, one is holding a steaming mug of cocoa, one is heavy-eyed and clutching a teddy bear, and one old lady sheep (wearing spectacles and an old-fashioned night hat) is lying under a quilt with four feet straight up in the air and a glass containing a solution and her false teeth beside her.

Russell goes through all sorts of delightful misadventures trying to get to sleep. And then, by the end of the story when everyone is getting up (Granny putting in her teeth, another sheep reading the Daily Bleat), Russell, of course, is fast asleep.

Good night, Russell!

5-0 out of 5 stars Adorable
This beautifully illustrated book combines humor with the charming
tale of a sleepless sheep. I was won over from the first page, showing the adorable Russell playfully swinging from a tree!
Every illustration is rich with detail (personally I am a big fan of the frog). I'm hoping to see Russell merchandise to follow,
he would make a delightful toy!

5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding!
This is a beautifully illustrated book. It makes me laugh just to look through it. There are slight details to be found in all the illustrations and it is positely beautiful to look at. It is a story of Russell the sheep who can't go to sleep - "Not tired," he says. The other sheep in the flock are all fast asleep under their cute homemade quilts, but Russell is counting his feet, trying to sleep in vehicles and other various locations and counting all the stars in the sky trying to make himself tired. Very entertaining.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!
This book is delightful! My three year old and I both love it. The illustrations are wonderful and the story is so cute! ... Read more


2. The Little Engine That Could
by Watty Piper, George Hauman, Doris Hauman
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0448405202
Catlog: Book (1978-06-01)
Publisher: Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 1042
Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

The unknowing progenitor of a whole generation of self-help books, Wally Piper's The Little Engine That Could is one of the greatest tales of motivation and the power of positive thinking ever told. In this well-loved classic, a little train carrying oodles of toys to all of the good boys and girls is confronted with a towering, seemingly impassable mountain. As nicely as they ask, the toys cannot convince the Shiny New Engine or the Big Strong Engine--far too impressed with themselves--to say anything but "I can not. I can not." It is left up to the Little Blue Engine to overcome insurmountable odds and pull the train to the other side. The Little Engine That Could is an entertaining and inspirational favorite, and the Little Blue Engine's rallying mantra "I think I can--I think I can" will resonate for a lifetime in the head of every child who hears it. (Ages 4 to 8)) ... Read more

Reviews (41)

5-0 out of 5 stars History of Little Engine that Could
When I began reading this book to my kids, I was suprised that the broken down engine and the little engine that can were both female, while the unhelpful engines are male. I remembered the little engine being male. I was interested in the feminist message of such an classic children's story. A little research on the web gave a lot of info. Apparently, this version of the story was published in 1930 with the male and female references as they are in this current printing. This story was pulled from an slightly earlier version in which the characters were all gender neutral. If you'd like to learn more about the historical background, you may want to look at http://tigger.uic.edu/~plotnick/littleng.htm which does a nice job of giving an historical overview of the evolution of this wonderful tale of self strength.

4-0 out of 5 stars Too bad it is abridged
The current self-help genre tends to be dwelling on hurts and self-pity, then finding magical solutions. Our Little Engine just has healthy self-confidence and determination. And please don't stress even that when reading it to the kids who will love it, since they find their own more imaginative interpretations.

The unabridged version is a lifetime favourite of mine, and, for classroom use or that with older children, find a copy at all costs. This version does retain much of the essence, however, and is great for the pre-school set. The only "negative" I can think of is that the kids so love the repetition that parents may grow a bit tired of the daily requests for it to be re-read, especially if the particular child wants to hear only certain sections (I knew one who always wanted "the clown part," the other "the food part.")

The same enjoyable repetition makes this a favourite story to read to children in primary grades. Yes, be sure you don't stop the kids from all joining in "I think I can..."

This remains one book that every favourite kid of mine receives as a present. If it disappoints any of your children, that will be a first, in my experience!

4-0 out of 5 stars The Little Engine that Could
This story is a childrens classic. A wonderful tale about a little helpful train that overcomes great physical adversity through sheer will power. A great moral teaching story for young impressionable children. This story teaches our children especially our daughters that they too can be successful if they
work hard and think positive. This is a story I'll read to my daughter many times. The little engine represent a positive female role model without flaunting its femininity. In fact I had forgotten the engine was female until I read it again recently. A great story worth checking out.

5-0 out of 5 stars A CHILDRENS SUCCESS CLASSIC
As a parent of three, one of the most important things I can give my children is motivation.

The attitude that he or she CAN DO ANYTHING IF THEY THINK THEY CAN DO IT.

By reading this story over and over again, the message will go into their conscious and subconscious mind and my hope is that they will follow their dreams and become all they are able to become.

Zev Saftlas, Author of Motivation That Works: How to Get Motivated and Stay Motivated

What better gift can a parent give their child than believing in them?

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect! My daughers were both mesmerized.
My second daughter has now fallen in love with this book, at about the same age as her older sister did (3 and 1/2). So, we are reading it every single night, often multiple times. If her older sister is any guide, this will probably continue for about 6 months.

This is simply an absolutely perfect children's story. The plot has some tension to keep the child's interest to the end of the story. The story shows how small people (or trains, if you want to be literal) with a good heart (like a child) can make a big difference in the world. The illustrations are extremely colorful and magical. The only fault (this is incredibly minor) I can find is the one-time usage of the word "indignantly", which no child is going to know. Other than that, I wouldn't change any other word or aspect of this book.

It's also a fun story for an adult to read outloud. I enjoy using different voices for the arrogant Shiny New Engine, the gruff Freight Engine, and the tired Old Engine, as well as helpful Little Blue Engine's famous repetitive cadence ("I think I can").

It will be a sad day when my youngest outgrows this book. Don't deny yourself or your child the pleasure - buy it! ... Read more


3. Walter, the Farting Dog (Walter the Farting Dog)
by William Kotzwinkle, Glenn Murray, Audrey Colman
list price: $15.95
our price: $11.16
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1583940537
Catlog: Book (2001-10-10)
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
Sales Rank: 150
Average Customer Review: 4.23 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

We hold this truth to be self-evident: farting makes kids laugh. Walter,an apologetic-looking dog adopted from the pound, passes gas morning,noon, and night, no matter what he eats, whether it's a 25-pound bag oflow-fart dog biscuits, cat food, or fried chicken. On the bright side,"If Uncle Irv let one slip, he just went and stood near Walter." WhenFather reaches the limit of his patience with Walter's flatulence, hedecides the pooch is once again pound-bound, despite Betty and Billy'spleading. Poor Walter knows his days are numbered and "He resolved tohold in his farts forever." That very night, two burglars break intoWalter's family's house, and (you can see where this is going) Waltergasses the burglars with a "hideous cloud" that forces them to droptheir loot and run into the clutches of the police officers, "chokingand gasping for air." The next morning Father and Mother discoverWalter has saved the day--or at least their silverware andVCR. "And so the family learned to live with Walter, the hero dog. Andthat is the end of our tail." (Or is it? Fans will be pleased todiscover the next book Walter the Farting Dog:Trouble at the Yard Sale.) Audrey Colman's highly stylizedillustrations, imbued with a surreal, Monty Pythonesque collage look,are as absurdly comical as this silly story that is purely powered bynatural gas. (Ages 5 to 8) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (74)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Real Gas!!
I ran across this book one day while looking through the shelves of children's books at a local bookstore several weeks ago, and I still chuckle to myself every time I think about it. Even though my son is only 2 and a bit young for the text, I plan to purchase the book and keep it for myself until he's old enough to appreciate it!!! I couldn't stop laughing the entire time I was reading the book, and the illustrations are amazing and captivating!!! Anyone with a sense of humor should treat themselves to this wonderfully hilarious book or give it as a gift to someone who could use a serious laugh!!

5-0 out of 5 stars Hilarious!
I know a gassy little girl who loves this book. She and I just read it in the book store and she was bawling with laughter. She farts a great deal, so she really identified with the character. Even though I didn't buy the book, she can't stop mentioning Walter, so I guess I'm going to have to purchase it for her! It had a wonderful moral, fascinating and fun illustrations, and was hilarious. I was raised with discomfort about farting, and I find that I don't feel as well-off as those kids who just farted and said "Pardon" without a blush (nor were those kids ever teased by other children as long as the gassy individual fessed up with a note of pride.) I think anybody who objects to the farting theme is being far too uptight. Maybe they just need to pass some wind.

5-0 out of 5 stars Laughed until I cried
The title caught my eye at the book store and when I started to read this book I laughed until I cried! I kept snorting with laughter right there in the store. Walter is an average dog with an unfortunate problem.....gas. This book is sure to delight all who read it. The adults(?) I work with also got a kick out of the illustrations(we played Find the Spider). It also has such a sweet message...we all have a place in this world, a talent all our own. A wonderful book that is sure to delight all readers.

5-0 out of 5 stars Funny book with a great message!
It really is a cute book with a good theme...besides farting, that is. It's all about accepting folks as they are, the not-so-good traits along with the good. The dad in the story threatens to get rid of Walter unless the kids can resolve his unfortunate gas problem. They change his food and everything, but the poor dog just can't help it. Just as the father is about to give them the final ultimatum, Walter saves the family home from robbers, and the dad realizes that he really is a good dog, smell and all! It's hilarious and heart-warming all at the same time.

My 6 and 4 year olds loved the book. Yes, they laughed over the dog's tendency to pass gas, but they also understood the underlying premise of unconditional love and acceptance. Their manners have not suffered any from reading this book!

2-0 out of 5 stars inappropriateness agreed
I have seen this book everywhere! As I am looking for a book to help teach my (3 year old) manners. I have not purchased it, nor will I. I cannot see how using toilet humor encourages any manners in the preschool set or otherwise. Preschoolers are notorious mimics! Someone mention tolerance, but even that should not be relegated to farting! I could only see how this books shock humor would only be appreciate by adults, or older children with an understanding (the difference between what is acceptable and what is not). Hopefully ... I will soon discover a book more appropriate. ... Read more


4. Love You Forever
by Robert N. Munsch, Sheila McGraw
list price: $4.95
our price: $4.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0920668372
Catlog: Book (1986-10-01)
Publisher: Firefly Books Ltd
Sales Rank: 650
Average Customer Review: 4.17 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A young woman holds her newborn son
And looks at him lovingly.
Softly she sings to him:
"I'll love you forever
I'll like you for always
As long as I'm living
My baby you'll be"

So begins the story that has touched the hearts of millions of Americans. Since publication in l986, "Love You Forever" has sold more than 15 million copies in paperback and the regular hardcover edition (as well as hundreds of thousands of copies in Spanish and French).

Now this bestseller is available in a bigger hardcover edition. Made from new film with a dust jacket added, this 10" x 10" new edition will be appreciated by all of the book's fans who want a bigger, keepsake edition of their favorite book. ... Read more

Reviews (428)

5-0 out of 5 stars The very best story a parent can read to their child
This story has been sort of a family tradition for us. It was shown to me by my grandmother just before she died and the message was so touching that I went out and bought it for my daughter; only it remains with all my personal keepsakes! I defy any parent to read this story to their child and not come away from it with a tear in their eye and squeezing their child just a little bit tighter. It is the amazing yet true story of how a child can drive a parent crazy with their behavior but the parent can still love them with all their hearts, no matter how old they get. It also shows how that love is shared in the feelings of the child. It reminds me of what my mother always said to us "I may not like the things you do, but I will always love you". Someday I will pass this book on to my daughter; maybe when she has children of her own, but for now I'm buying it for a young friend of mine who with her new baby boy is just beginning to know a love so strong as one has never known before they look at the face of their "very new baby... and rock them back and forth... and sing 'I'll love you forever, I'll like you for always, as long as I'm living my baby you'll be.' "

4-0 out of 5 stars all-age appropriate
This book was given to me by my mother when I had a house-full of 4 children under the age of 4. I was busy, and set it aside for a day or two, until she said, " Read the book today, then call me." I read it, called her, and was told that she had terminal lung cancer. This book was the only way my mother could tell me how she felt about me. She was never one to be open about her feelings, and I honestly cannot remember her telling me she loved me, until the last 6 months of her life. By then I was over 35, and she started with this book.
I would recommend this book for any age, any gender. The love it speaks of is one we all need to remember, and share with those close to us, even if we have to do it by sharing this book.
Yes, there are a couple of extremes...climbing in her grown son's window?....but the message is one of importance. Read it.

5-0 out of 5 stars A 15 year old girl's perspective.
I adore this book! My mom read it to me all the time when I was little. This is a wholesome book that sends a message of love, not death to a child. I'm sure there are a handful of children who focus on the ending, but not many. And the adults who focus on the ending are obviously unable to handle the concept of death. This book doesn't send a message of incest or inappropriate interaction between a mother and child. It tells the story of a loving relationship between a mother and son that lasts beyond the realm of childhood. In fact, when I have children of my own, I will buy my own copy (perhaps sooner) and read it to them.

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful story of unconditional love...
This is a wonderful story. It brings tears to my eyes each time I read it to my girls - and my girls love to hear it. I give a copy to each and every friend and relative who gives birth and they have all loved it too. I have never read another book that so clearly defines unconditional love. Shame on those individuals who harbor so much unhealthy mental garbage that they cannot see the true emotional beauty in this story.

5-0 out of 5 stars A True Classic
I have loved this FICTIONAL story of unconditional love since the moment I read it 15 years ago. My sons love it, as it reminds them of how their parents will always be there for them.
However, if you harbor sick, twisted feelings against Mother/Mother-In-Law or if you still need more therapy to sort out your "baggage", this might not be the book for you. ... Read more


5. The Giving Tree
by Shel Silverstein
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060256656
Catlog: Book (1964-06-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Sales Rank: 168
Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

To say that this particular apple tree is a "giving tree" is an understatement. In Shel Silverstein's popular tale of few words and simple line drawings, a tree starts out as a leafy playground, shade provider, and apple bearer for a rambunctious little boy. Making the boy happy makes the tree happy, but with time it becomes more challenging for the generous tree to meet his needs. When he asks for money, she suggests that he sell her apples. When he asks for a house, she offers her branches for lumber. When the boy is old, too old and sad to play in the tree, he asks the tree for a boat. She suggests that he cut her down to a stump so he can craft a boat out of her trunk. He unthinkingly does it. At this point in the story, the double-page spread shows a pathetic solitary stump, poignantly cut down to the heart the boy once carved into the tree as a child that said "M.E. + T." "And then the tree was happy... but not really." When there's nothing left of her, the boy returns again as an old man, needing a quiet place to sit and rest. The stump offers up her services, and he sits on it. "And the tree was happy." While the message of this book is unclear (Take and take and take?Give and give and give? Complete self-sacrifice is good? Complete self-sacrifice is infinitely sad?), Silverstein has perhaps deliberately left the book open to interpretation. (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (345)

5-0 out of 5 stars Deeply powerful
I had read and treasured The Giving Tree as a child, but I had largely forgotten it when I discovered a copy in a children's book store last year. I picked it up and showed it to my friend. "Look," I said. "I remember this book. What a cute story it was." We read it together, in the bookstore, for the first time in many years.

I nearly cried. What I remembered as a cute and slightly silly children's story is in fact an extraordinarily powerful parable of life and faith. The wisdom and simple power of this book still holds, even after all these years. We have lost a very fine author who wrote some of the greatest children's books in our language.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is Essential Reading For Fans Of Children's Literature
The Giving Tree, written by Shel Silverstein, is a controversial story for children. People either hate or love it. Like The Little Prince, The Giving Tree ultimately delivers a message which is both moving and profound. The illustrations, rendered in simple black and white line drawings, tell the story of a tree and the little boy who comes to visit her every day. As the story progresses the boy grows into a selfish adult who does nothing but take from the tree. He takes and takes until nothing is left of her but a stump. Finally one day the boy returns as a beaten down old man with no place left to go. The tree, always happy to see him, offers the old man the only thing she has left. She offers her stump for him to rest on. The Giving Tree is a powerful metaphor for the unconditional love parents and children share. Frustrating, sad, and ultimately beautiful, this is a story no child should miss reading.

Preston McClear, author The Boy Under the Bed

5-0 out of 5 stars The spirit of giving with nothing expected in return
This is my favorite book of all time. In fact, I have designed the nursery for my newborn around this book, with the main focus of the room being a mural showcasing the cover. I believe the book shows that giving without expecting anything in return can be fufilling. The last line in the book states this, "and the tree was happy", what better lesson for a parent to teach their child. Sure you can look at the dark side, and focus on the selfishness of the little boy, but I choose not to. Shel Silverstein purposely left the meaning up to the reader for interpretation.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Power of Simplicity, Taps into the Deeply Human
There's not really a "plot" in this story in any traditional sense. It is a series of vignettes in the relationship between a boy and a tree. The symbolism is pretty straightforward, the tree representing parental nurturing, but there is nothing trite about it. This illustrations are simple black-and-white line drawings. Somehow this simple book really packs a punch. All I can really say is that I have never once, ever, in dozens of readings, whether alone or to the kids, made it through this book without crying. It's simply...touching.

Further Comments: Silverstein was one weird, scary-looking dude. If you're interested in very idiosyncratic people, Google him and you'll be surprised. He has several other children's books with which I'm only vaguely familiar (I remember Where the Sidewalk Ends being on the shelf at my grade school, but I'm not sure if I ever read it. I think it's a collection of poems). I'd love to see some of those reviewed.

(...)

5-0 out of 5 stars inspirational
I first read this book 3 years ago when I started working with children...my reaction was that this kid was a selfish little (...). As I have matured I've realized that children are supposed to be selfish and as a child care worker or parent it is our job to sacrafice everything that we have for the benefit of the child and then to give a little more. Personaly I think the highest point that a parent or teacher can reach is that of a stump. Everytime I feel myself tiring as the kid next to me at the dinner table eats 2 servings of potatos and leaves nothing for me, I picture myself as a stump and I pass them the rolls. ... Read more


6. Knuffle Bunny : A Cautionary Tale
by Mo Willems
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786818700
Catlog: Book (2004-09-01)
Publisher: Hyperion
Sales Rank: 1148
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Book Description

Trixie, Daddy, and Knuffle Bunny take a trip to the neighborhood Laundromat. But the exciting adventure takes a dramatic turn when Trixie realizes somebunny was left behind… Using a combination of muted black-and-white photographs and expressive illustrations, this stunning book tells a brilliantly true-to-life tale about what happens when Daddy's in charge and things go terribly, hilariously wrong. ... Read more


7. The Red Book
by Barbara Lehman
list price: $12.95
our price: $9.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0618428585
Catlog: Book (2004-09-27)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Sales Rank: 5285
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Book Description

This book is about a book. A magical red book without any words. When you turn the pages you"ll experience a new kind of adventure through the power of story. In illustrations of rare detail and surprise, The Red Book crosses oceans and continents to deliver one girl into a new world of possibility, where a friend she"s never met is waiting. And as with the best of books, at the conclusion of the story, the journey is not over. ... Read more


8. Sleepy Cadillac : A Bedtime Drive
list price: $16.89
our price: $16.89
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060730218
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins
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9. Zen Shorts
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.53
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439339111
Catlog: Book (2005-03-01)
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Sales Rank: 838
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

"Michael," said Karl. "There's a really big bear in the backyard."This is how three children meet Stillwater, a giant panda who moves into the neighborhood and tells amazing tales. To Addie he tells a story about the value of material goods. To Michael he pushes the boundaries of good andbad.And to Karl he demonstrates what it means to hold on to frustration.With graceful art and simple stories that are filled with love and enlightenment, Jon Muth -- and Stillwater the bear -- present three ancient Zen tales that are sure to strike a chord in everyone they touch.
... Read more

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful
Zen shorts is a wonderful book. The story is fantastic and the illustrations are sensational. Very well done!

5-0 out of 5 stars Best kids book purchase in some time
I picked this up on a whim because of the title and the gorgeous illustrations. I got a real treasure! My five year old son loves to have it read to him, and I love reading it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Luminous paintings and pleasant retellings of Zen stories.
Muth's beautiful watercolor paintings are the perfect accompaniment to the Zen stories told by Giant Panda Stillwater.
Every word is chosen perfectly in the stories, which are then discussed by Stillwater and the three children he befriends.

This is a book both parents and children can enjoy again and again.

5-0 out of 5 stars real books for children
This is a thoughtfully written story that teaches real life lessons in a gentle way. Based on Buddist teachings and stories, the books central character (Stillwater, a giant panda) draws in even the youngest readers. Muth's other book The Three Questions does the same thing. How refreshing it is to read a childrens book that embraces some profundity and is not afraid to go deep into the well of CONCEPT.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not just for zen kids . . .
This book presents lovely and entertaining retellings of three famous Buddhist stories in a way that makes them appropriate for children from about 3 up (and way beyond).Not just for zen kids, though--these are wonderful stories for kids (and parents) of any persuasion.The panda telling the very short stories to three neighbor children is neither condescending nor preachy, and Muth ably resists whacking you over the head with the morals--when kids get the point themselves (and even young readers will),the gentle teachings will be be more meaningful.Beautiful illustrations, too--this is one your kids will bring to you to "read it again." ... Read more


10. Girls Hold Up This World
by Jada Pinkett-Smith
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.53
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0439087937
Catlog: Book (2004-11)
Publisher: Cartwheel
Sales Rank: 564
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

"We are sisters of this Earth -- members of one powerful tribe. /Every color, shape, and size, we're united by beauty inside." Artistic photographs enhance the positive message of Jada Pinkett Smith's inspiring poem. A renowned actress and loving mother, Smith brings warmth and heart to this celebration of young women. While so many girls today struggle with self-doubt, this poem focuses on the power ALL girls have within them, regardless of color or creed. This is the perfect book for mothers, daughters, sisters and friends to give and to share again and again.
... Read more

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great message for girls
Jada Pinkett-Smith is a terrific role model for girls.She is accomplished in her professional and personal life.Her book is another testimony to her great attitude for girls to follow.Any book that aims to help girls feel better about themselves and to stand up for themselves is commendable.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Must
this book is a book everyone who has a daughter, niece, granddaughter, cousin..or even know a young girl or child should own. i would definitely recommend this book to EVERYONE!

4-0 out of 5 stars pretty good
I found this book to be pretty good indeed, Nothing like a book to make one feel worth while, a truly feel good about yourself book, I would recommend this book to many females that just don`t have the self esteem that they should have, FOR WE ARE ALL WONDERFUL PEOPLE.

A recommendation from my point of view:
Poetry that holds, Stories untold,
Another wonderful book, that I would recommend to any and everyone!

5-0 out of 5 stars A Luminous Tribute To Girls And Women Everywhere
"We are sisters of this Earth-members of one powerful tribe. Every color, age, and size, we're united by beauty inside." With girls comparing everything about themselves to others - and often forced to take a back seat to boys - books like this one are a treat. Author Jada Pinkett Smith celebrates women's diversity as well as our unity. We are magnificent, the author seems to be saying, each and every one of us. It's a thoroughly inclusive book; women and girls of all ages and ethnic backgrounds are lovingly photographed here. Delightful photographs illuminate the author's lovely, lyrical poem and show the many faces of girlish and womanly beauty. The effervescence of one cartwheel-performing child is simply delightful.

This is a book about warmth, caring, love, and the strength we get from female friends and family members. It's perfect for mothers and daughters to read together, and for girlfriends to share.

But it's not just a feel-good book. Feeling good about ourselves also takes effort: "We girls hold up this world as we build our self-esteem. We know that discipline will turn a princess into a queen."

Those who enjoy this book may also enjoy another picture book entitled: Ruby Lee the Bumble Bee - A Bee's Bit of Wisdom. In it, a young girl is encouraged to believe in her own abilities and inner strength. Books like Girls Hold Up This World and Ruby Lee the Bumble Bee are valuable tools in teaching children (especially girls) the importance of developing a strong character.

... Read more


11. Rough Weather Ahead for Walter the Farting Dog (Walter the Farting Dog)
by WilliamKotzwinkle, GlennMurray, Robert Bendiner
list price: $15.99
our price: $10.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0525472185
Catlog: Book (2005-05-10)
Publisher: Dutton Juvenile
Sales Rank: 783
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Walter makes his third appearance in yet another unapologetically silly picture book, this one dedicated to "everyone who's ever felt misjudged or misunderstood." The story begins when animal gas expert Professor Kompressor pays a visit to Walter's family, equipped with a contraption that looks like a cross between a vacuum cleaner and an old phonograph: "I understand your dog has a farting disorder," he says. At first it seems as if the professor's prescription of powders and potions is working, but one day, young Billy and Betty see Walter floating like a helium balloon over the trees, so full of pent-up gas he has become airborne. Unable to release his gas, the unfortunate dog floats over hill and dale for days and days. The formula for these books requires the much-maligned Walter to redeem his gaseous self by saving the day (he gasses out burglars in the first one and helps catch bank robbers in the second). Here, even more absurdly, he saves millions of butterflies from a freezing windstorm by letting rip a warm cloud of air that melts the frost off their wings.Colorful, crisp, almost three-dimensional art, generated with a digital painting and collage technique, gives the book a bizarre, sophisticated style that both complements and elevates the cheap laughs. (Ages 6 to 9) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Very cute!
My 2 1/2 year-old daughter and I love this book! The illustrations are bright and fun and the story really is adorable! It's a fun, imaginative story and it's gotten us hooked on the Walter series.

4-0 out of 5 stars Funny, different, and a little out there!
I read this book and think Walter is very cute. I like the idea of using the farting dog to interest kids in reading. Kids enjoy farts, so why wouldn't they want to read about them? lol. The illustrations are bright, colorful, and the people in them have a photo quality. There are spiders hidden on every page and half the fun is trying to find them. The storyline is more than a little out there, but kids might buy into it more readily than adults. All in all, good book and I'd definitely recommend it to kids & parents with a sense of humor. Just imagine Grandma & Grandpa reading it aloud!

4-0 out of 5 stars appaling, but incredibly good and funny
I'm not into potty humor, i'm not into any of the other potty humor type kids books or cartoons, I just loved this book though. The subject should be really weird, I mean a book about a dog with perpetual farts? it wasn't though it was just hilarious, perhaps because of the potty humor. I liked the book almost almost more than my little sister did. ... Read more


12. The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury: Picture Books and Stories to Read Aloud
by JANET SCHULMAN
list price: $40.00
our price: $25.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0679886478
Catlog: Book (1998-09-14)
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 1627
Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Believe it or not, 44 complete read-aloud classics and future classics--from Goodnight Moon to Stellaluna--are packed in this remarkably svelte, positively historic anthology. Flipping through the 308 pages of The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury is like browsing a photo album of beloved friends and family. The familiar faces of Curious George and Ferdinand the Bull peer earnestly from the pages, and scenes from Madeline and Millions of Cats resonate as if you just experienced them yesterday. Think of the advantages of carrying this book on a vacation instead of a suitcase of single titles! (Your kids can always revisit their dog-eared hardcovers when they get home.)

This impressive collection of concept books, wordless books, picture books, and read-aloud stories was artfully compiled by longtime children's book editor and publisher Janet Schulman. Stories are coded red, blue, and green to designate age groupings from baby/toddler books such as Whose Mouse Are You?, through preschool books such as Where the Wild Things Are, to longer stories for ages 5 and older such as Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. The reason the book isn't bigger than Babar is because many of the illustrations from each story were reduced or removed to fitthe anthology's format.(Leo Lionni's Swimmy, for example, takes up 5 pages total, compared to its original 29 pages.)Brief biographical notes that are surprisingly quirky shine a little light on the 62 authors and illustrators, and an index helps, too, for the child who likes one story best. We love the idea of being within easy reach of a Star-Belly Sneetch, a William Steig donkey, and a Sendak monster at all times, and we're sure your little bookworms will, too. (Click to seea sample spread from The 20th-Century Children's Book Treasury, compilation copyright © 1998 by Janet Schulman, illustrations © renewed 1997 by William Steig.) (All ages) --Karin Snelson ... Read more

Reviews (66)

5-0 out of 5 stars A truly wonderful collection of classic stories!
I bought this book after checking it out at the library and being in awe at the wonderful stories in it. My boys are 2 and almost every night at dinner we read a new story. With classics from Curious George and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel to the rhythmic Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, there are surely stories to fit every need. The book also lists which stories are appropriate for different ages. Most of the stories are condensed to 4-6 pages with lots of pictures, but some have few illustrations and are great for reading in the car, at dinner, or at bedtime when your child is really sleepy.

We own several of the individual books and will probably buy more of them for the boys to be able to read and hold. This book is too heavy and awkward for small children to be handling, but it is a convenient way to expose them (and me!) to some of the great stories that have been written over the years. Besides, you'll want to keep it in good shape to hand down to your grandchildren! This collection of stories will make a wonderful gift for new or expecting parents or for older children who love to read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely amazing collections of children's favorites
Most of the 'greatest hits' collections - whether for a time period or a particular artist seem to always leave out the best song or super-star groups. This Treasury astounded me by collecting 'all' the great authors and stories (at least all of the ones I can thing of). Madeline, Dr. Seuss, Babar, Curious George, Where the Wild Things Are, The Berenstain Bears, Amelia Bedelia, Stellaluna, Pooh, etc... I am amazed that the editors managed to get the rights to publish all of these incredible favorites!

The texts of the stories are complete (as far as I can tell), but the illustration have been shrunk so that all of the stories will fit in one volume. Something is lost in the process, but I can imagine that it would be the perfect book for a trip, keeping a any kids' home-away-from-home (like grandma's house), or just to read to discover previously unknown classics (which is what my five year old and I are doing).

An added benefit is the history - the stories were all written in a historical context and to a greater or lesser extend reflect the society in which they were written. The editors wisely put the year of publication with each story. So when I read them to my daughter I can also comment (when applicable) not only about whether or not I had read the story as a kid, but also set the story in a historical context (take Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, published in 1939, for example).

Of course, for stories destined to become favorites, the full-sized editions with illustrations are really needed; but for an anthology, this book cannot be beat!

3-0 out of 5 stars Before you buy, know what you are missing
This is a good book for reference but if you intend to buy it INSTEAD OF the children's classics it includes, you will be missing out on a lot. Please read the School Library Journal review and Booklist review in entirety before making a decision to buy this, they both touch on the problem of condensing stories and missing illustrations with the effect they have on the stories' impact. It is especially noticable for stories that rely on illustrations for pacing or an element of surprise. I find that my kids, both beginning readers, do not go to this book on their own the same way that they will run to look at any of their favorite individual story books and although we use it, it is usually only as a convenience to me (to avoid hunting down and carrying several goodnight books). If it gets you to read more, great, but for fostering a love of these classics in your kids there is nothing like using the real individual books in their covers, formatted as originally intended.

5-0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING!
We have hundreds of children's books, but this is the one we turn to over and over. (Our son is 3 1/2; daughter is 6). Great at story time, and even better when you need some help entertaining the kids (e.g., doctor's office, long trip, snow day at home). The collection is a real treasure of books we knew, and books we discovered for the first time. My prediction: your children will still remember this book when they are reading to your grandkids. By far, our family's favorite.

5-0 out of 5 stars A terrific collection of classics
I'm an American journalist living in Germany and raising two bilingual kids. I've had this book for about 3 years now. It has been a wonderful source of bedtime reading for my oldest son, who is now 6. The stories offer a good variety of reading levels, so it has really grown with him. Yes, some of the illustrations are small, but I found that a small price to pay for the convenience of having a single book to grab at bedtime when we are both very tired, but needing a great story. ... Read more


13. How I Became a Pirate (Irma S and James H Black Award for Excellence in Children's Literature (Awards))
by Melinda Long
list price: $16.00
our price: $10.88
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0152018484
Catlog: Book (2003-09-01)
Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books
Sales Rank: 171
Average Customer Review: 4.93 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Young Jeremy Jacob is plucked from obscurity while innocently constructing a sand castle and is thrust into a brand-new life as a pirate. Captain Braid Beard and his crew recognize Jeremy as an exceptionally talented digger and they happen to be in desperate need of a digger to help them bury a treasure chest. Jeremy thinks a pirate life sounds like fun, as long as he’s back the next day in time for soccer practice, and so he goes along with the ragtag group of seafaring thugs (with hearts of gold, naturally). And while Jeremy adores the pirates’ lack of table manners and opposition to vegetables, he comes to realize that a life away from his parents lacks some of the niceties to which he’s become accustomed. Nobody tucks him in at night, for instance, and the only book available to read is a treasure map. Melinda Long’s story, narrated with a sense of boastful exaggeration by Jeremy, is full of a sense of high adventure that's lovingly evocative of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tales. David Shannon's illustrations, full of a goofy vibrancy, are a perfect accompaniment to the story. (Ages 4 to 8) --John Moe ... Read more

Reviews (14)

4-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful illustrations & cute story
'How I Became a Pirate' is about a little boy who goes away with pirates one day. He learns how to live like a pirate, the joys (eat anything you want, don't brush teeth, go to sleep whenever) and the pitfalls (no one to comfort you, no one to tuck you in). Finally he decides to go back to his family.

This story is fun to read and the illustrations even capture my babies's eye :) I do like the importance based on having a family & having someone to comfort you & read to you.

The only potential drawbacks & why I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars (and I might be being critical) is that:
1.) it might give the message that it is okay to leave your family to go off with strangers
2.) also it is fun to not brush your teeth & eat like a slob.

Overall, though, I would recommend this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best Little Boys Book
I bought this book for my 3 y.o. son this past February. It has by far become not only his favorite book but the favorite book of my five year old daughter. They love screaming the words of the crew when we read this book together. The story line is wonderful - a small boy who joins a crew of pirates, learns what he likes and doesn't like about the pirates, lots of exciting adventures, a shark, a bad storm, and a treasure to bury. It's precious, and the illustrations are superb. This is perhaps the best little boys book I have ever bought (I should know - I'm a kid's book junkie), and it's a great book for little girls as well.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best Pirate Book
2 boys at home almost 4y and just 2y. They love pirates and this is the best pirate book I have found (and we have several) My opinion on other pirate books. Pirate Pete 2.5 ; Everything I know About Pirates (would be better for older kids) 3.5; Pirate School 4; Do Pirates Take Baths 4.5; Pirates (by Anastasio) not a story, just "facts" 4.5. But How I Became a Pirate is the most fun to read aloud.

5-0 out of 5 stars AYE MATEYS! My 4yo Daughters Favorite Book!
Great Book! My 4 year old daughter wants to hear this book every night! So Cute! Buy It your child will love it

5-0 out of 5 stars Golden Trap Award Winner
This book is great. I ran out and bought it as soon as I heard it for the first time. This book won the Golden Trap Award winner for all of the islands in our area. My son loves it! ... Read more


14. The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog!
by Mo Willems
list price: $12.99
our price: $10.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786818697
Catlog: Book (2004-05-01)
Publisher: Hyperion
Sales Rank: 881
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Sesame Street veteran and Emmy Award-winner Mo Willems returns with a fast, funny follow-up to Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!--only this time, the short-tempered pigeon faces his perfect foil in a "special guest star" duckling.In the previous Pigeon book, author and illustrator Willems expertly distilled the escalating emotions of preschoolers all too anxious to get their way. The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog--also a simple and sparsely illustrated story--explores the flip side of that coin, exposing the poker-face persuasive powers of young negotiators. The pigeon just wants to greedily eat the hot dog that he's found: "Oooooh! A hot dog! Yummy! Yummy! Yummy!" Then along comes the duckling, "scooty scoot scoot!" with his insistent questions about hot dogs: "What do they taste like?...Would you say that it tastes like chicken?...Hey, I'm a curious bird." At first, the pigeon entertains the duckling, "Each morsel is a joy! A celebration in a bun!", but then he soon suspects the little bird might have designs on his delicious dog. In the end, of course, the clever duckling gets his way--and half of the hot dog: "You know, you're pretty smart for a duckling." (Ages Baby to Preschool) --Paul Hughes ... Read more

Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars What luck!
Poor Pigeon. He has the good fortune of finding a hotdog. It's just sitting there. So what's the problem? (Special guest star) Little Duckling won't give Pigeon a moment's peace to eat the hotdog. "Does it taste like chicken?" Duckling asks. The discussion escalates until it is finally resolved with a happy ending and a fairly understated lesson. Mo Willems' lively pastel colored drawings are simple but still expressive. A thoroughly enjoyable, excellent book. Karen Woodworth-Roman

5-0 out of 5 stars HOT DOG THIS BOOK IS DE-LICIOUS!
I was shopping today for my nephew's birthday. I already had picked out an armload of children's picture books when I spotted The Pigeon Finds A Hot Dog. Not only did I laugh hysterically out loud in the middle of the regularly quiet bookstore, but I was also very impressed with the story dialogue and the simple, but unique style of illustration. At any rate, I put all the other books back on the shelves, and rushed to the counter to purchase the book. Now, I'm debating going back and buying a few more copies, one for my collection and a couple more for some friends. I highly recommend adding this to your library.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great lesson in simple words.
Who couldn't like the pigeon and now we meet a new friend. We weren't as thrilled with this book as we were with "Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus" but the lesson at the end makes up for that. Mo Willems has made two very lovable characters with strong personalities!! It's amazing that a book with such little dialogue can catch your heart. I miss the interaction of the first book but the lesson of sharing is one that you can't beat.

4-0 out of 5 stars A New Comedy Team Kids Will Love
From Abbott and Costello to SpongeBob and Patrick and everyone in between, all great comedy duos have worked with a simple but effective formula: The straight man who sets things in motion, and the source of comedy who is either easily furiated (such as Costello in the "Who's on First?" routine) or dumber than the straight man (such as the bumbling starfish Patrick). Now, animator Mo Willems adds another duo to this long list: Pigeon and Duckling.
Pigeon was the star of Willems' first book for children, DON'T LET THE PIGEON DRIVE THE BUS!, in which he interacted with the reader by constantly pleading to drive a bus. Now, he has someone else to play off of, the cute but annoying Duckling. Duckling plays the part of the straight man as he approaches Pigeon, who is ready to greedily eat a hot dog he has found. Duckling distracts Pigeon by asking him a number of silly questions ("Would you say that it tastes like chicken?") Will Pigeon give in? Is there a possible solution to this conundrum?
There is a simple lesson to be learned from this book, but it is also unique in its comedic style. An easily angred character such as Pigeon isn't seen very often in books for young children, and is a refreshing change from the goody-two-shoes, Dick-and-Jane type characters who always do the right thing. Children (and their parents) will most likely enjoy this simple story featuring a new comedic team who are sure to go far. Abbott and Costello were able to make audiences laugh with a routine about a baseball team. A routine about something as simple as a hot dog doesn't seem that far off.

5-0 out of 5 stars The pigeon flies again!
This clever story is sure to delight fans of Willems first book as well as newcomers to the pigeon character. The book has simple illustrations that children love to draw with each character having its own unique charm. In addition to this the story will make both the young and young at heart laugh out loud. Six time Emmy award winner and Caldecott honoree Mo Willems looks to have the right mix to gain further recognition with this new book The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog. This is a must have for your childrens library. ... Read more


15. Your Favorite Seuss : A Baker's Dozen by the One and Only Dr. Seuss
by DR SEUSS
list price: $34.95
our price: $23.07
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375810617
Catlog: Book (2004-10-12)
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 615
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Book Description

From his very first book to his very last book, here in one big volume are 13 classic Dr. Seuss stories, everyone’s favorites. All of the words and virtually all of the illustrations are included. Each story is prefaced by a short essay by someone whose life was changed by Dr. Seuss or who is simply an unabashed admirer. Also included are photographs of Dr. Seuss, memorabilia, and original sketches from his books. The stories included are: And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, Horton Hears a Who!, McElligot’s Pool, If I Ran the Zoo, Happy Birthday to You!, Dr. Seuss’s Sleep Book, Yertle the Turtle, The Cat in the Hat, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Green Eggs and Ham, The Lorax, The Sneetches, and Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Theodor Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss) was born March 2, 1904, and died September 25, 1991.

With introductory essays to each story by:

Barbara Bader, Author and Critic

Stan and Jan Berenstain, Creators of The Berenstain Bears

Audrey Geisel, Widow of Dr. Seuss

Peter Glassman, Children’s Bookseller

Starr LaTronica, Children’s Librarian

John Lithgow, Actor and Children’s Book Author

Barbara Mason, Kindergarten Teacher

Richard H. Minear, Author of Dr. Seuss Goes to War

Christopher Paolini, Author of Eragon

Charles D. Cohen, Author of The Seuss, the Whole Seuss, and

Nothing but the Seuss

Pete Seeger, Folksinger

Christopher Cerf, TV Writer, Composer, and Producer

Lane Smith, Children’s Book Illustator ... Read more


16. Where the Wild Things Are
list price: $16.95
our price: $11.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060254920
Catlog: Book (1988-11-09)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 65
Average Customer Review: 4.78 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In the forty years since Max first cried "Let the wild rumpus start," Maurice Sendak's classic picture book has become one of the most highly acclaimed and best-loved children's books of all time. Now, in celebration of this special anniversary, introduce a new generation to Max's imaginative journey to where the wild things are.

Winner, 1964 Caldecott Medal
Notable Children's Books of 1940–1970 (ALA)
1981 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for Illustration
1963, 1982 Fanfare Honor List (The Horn Book)
Best Illustrated Children's Books of 1963, 1982 (NYT)
A Reading Rainbow Selection
1964 Lewis Carroll Shelf Award
Children's Books of 1981 (Library of Congress)
1981 Children's Books (NY Public Library)
100 Books for Reading and Sharing 1988 (NY Public Library)
... Read more

Reviews (195)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Children's Book, in Many Ways
Max puts on a wolf costume and feels mischievous. He breaks some rules and is sent to bed without supper. From there, his imagination takes over, a jungle grows in his bedroom, and he goes on a magical journey of (self-)discovery. The world he explores is populated by colorful, scary, and somewhat silly monsters who all get tamed by Max.

This book is beautifully illustrated, the story flows rapidly and flawlessly, and the language is simultaneously simple and loaded with meaning. While it is unlikely to happen, watch out for your children trying to write like Sendak, with his trademark run-on sentences.

This is the first book I remember reading by myself. It holds a special place in my heart.

Wow! I think that any child can sympathize with Max as he just wants to do what he wants to do, and then gets in trouble for breaking the rules. We also can understand how his frustration and anger cannot be sustained in the face of parental clarity, consistency, and calm strength. He works through his anger during his "journey" through the "jungle" and tames himself as he tames the monsters. Along the way, he discovers how lonely he is and how much he dislikes disapproval. The ending is simple, happy, and realistic.

This is a great book to read with your children, and then turn over to them to read on their own. It opens the door to discuss many simple but crucial issues of childhood. Please buy this book and use it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wild About Wild
Maurice Sendak is one of those great children's book creators who could write and draw. He helped me dream as a young boy, and I should pay him credit for helping me imagine things today.

When I was little, I'd stare at the page long after my mother finished reading it to me. Sendak seemed to have found my creative pulse, as he drew me in to wonder about his world of pretend monsters. The monsters are not quite so terrible, and could be considered friendly.

Max and I are both boys, and it must ordinary for we boys to get in a terrific amount of trouble in the process of playing. I related to Max. He sounded like a real boy. I was never quite sure what a rumpus was, but I knew it sounded like a lot of fun.

The pictures are cool. There is a rich, full-of-flavor tension in the art. The expressions and poses of the characters come across as genuine.

Don't be fooled by the amazing pictures. You'll enjoy the carefully laid story just as much, and your child can close his eyes and imagine his own version.

A wonderful book. A classic. If you've got kids, or if you read to your family's or neighbor's kids, this is one book which will be dog-eared from numerous reads.

I fully recommend "Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak.

Anthony Trendl

1-0 out of 5 stars not as good as new books
I am almost 7 and my teachre said we have to say why we like a lot of books or do not like a lot of books this summer on amazon and then print out them and give them to our new teacher next year So I am starting with this book.

My dad reelly likes this book because he said it was good when he was a kid. I dont like it. The pictures are boring and the story is not long. My dad reads this to me a lot and I like the books that are newer. New books have pictures that are pretty and the storys are funner and longer. This book has pictures that look old. I wish my dad would read this to himself and let me read something diferent. Nichole

5-0 out of 5 stars the book I loved best as a child.
My love affair with Maurice Sendak's "Where The Wild Things Are" goes back further than I think I can remember. I fell hard for the vibrant prose and unbelievable illustrations. It is a beautiful book throughout and it has absolutely withstood the test of time.

I am twenty-four years old now. I love this book as much as I did the first time I read it. This book speaks to places in the heart and the mind that you sort of forget about as you age. It's a magical book, it never fails to transform me.

Long live King Max....and all of his beautiful monsters.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book!!
I took a children's literature class a few years ago in college and I am now expecting my first child and I remembered this book and have recently purchased it. It's absolutely wonderful!! ... Read more


17. Who Moved My Cheese? For Kids
by Spencer Johnson
list price: $19.99
our price: $13.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0399240160
Catlog: Book (2003-05-01)
Publisher: Putnam Publishing Group
Sales Rank: 14439
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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Motivational author Spencer Johnson (The One Minute Manager, Who Moved my Cheese? for Teens) may have finally found the perfect format for his popular parable on the importance of anticipating and adapting to life changes.

Critics of Johnson's best-selling Who Moved my Cheese? for grownups complained about its oversimplification and lack of substance (and the fact that glad-handed managers sometimes gave the book to employees fearing for their jobs didn't help). But in a kids' book, that simplicity doesn't grate as much, and Johnson's cartoonish characters--sneaker-wearing mice Sniff and Scurry, and the tentative Hem and Haw, ever in search of "cheese" in the "maze"--look right at home alongside the rest of Steve Pileggi's crude illustrations.

Of course, Johnson's homily might seem even less applicable to kids than it is to adults, and some of Haw's "Handwriting on the Wall" (again, lifted directly from the grownup version) will likely prove too abstract (like "Smell the cheese often so you know when it's getting old"). But then again, kids face more changes than most adults, and they often have fewer tools to deal with them. If nothing else, Johnson's message on "How to deal with change--and win!" is at least a slight improvement on the more time-honored "Shut up and deal." (Ages 9 to 12) --Paul Hughes ... Read more

Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars On their level - and ours too!
I am a fan of the adult version of this book, so when I saw it came out in a children's version, I had to have it. We're a military family, so change is one constant in our lives. We're about to make a move which will be the first one my 5 year old daughter is really aware of. I introduced this book to her, and even though she doesn't quite understand the real meaning of the story, I'm hoping it will be a way to remind her that change is a good thing. She'll already have the lessons tucked away in her mind, so hopefully when she's in the midst of a change, it will mean something to her. The pictures are wonderful, as is the story. My kids love it and I'd highly recommend it to anyone who is dealing with change. It's an optimistic view of whatever changes come into our lives.

4-0 out of 5 stars The right audience
At last, "Who Moved My Cheese?" has found its target audience--children.

It is a simple parable that illustrates the natural tendency to resist change. The uncertainty that generally accompanies change provides a level of discomfort that some try to escape. Rather than take the necessary steps for change, some people cling to old notions and actions that produce little or no results.

These are good concepts to learn at an early age, as long as it is undertood that reducing such a simple little concept into practice is the hard part. Knowing that we need to "search around the maze for new cheese" doesn't help much, without guidelines for determining when we are "moving around the maze" or simply "sitting at the cheese station."

Hopefully, parents can provide some insight where the book doesn't.

5-0 out of 5 stars About dealing with change and brand new opportunities
Impressively enhanced with the cartoon style artwork of Steve Pileggi, Who Moved My Cheese? For Kids is a thoroughly entertaining story by Spencer Johnson about dealing with change and brand new opportunities. Four little friends who live in a maze live off of seemingly never-ending magical cheese; one morning the cheese is gone and the four must work together to explore, search, and help each other cope in this involving tale. ... Read more


18. Zoom (Picture Puffin)
by Istvan Banyai
list price: $7.99
our price: $6.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0140557741
Catlog: Book (1998-07-01)
Publisher: Puffin Books
Sales Rank: 5728
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (8)

5-0 out of 5 stars Attention!
This book will grab your attention as you are drawn into the details of a story without words. I have used this book with primary aged students and they are delighted in the depth of the details in a story without words. Really gets them to look at things a little more closely!!

5-0 out of 5 stars VideoBook
It may take a while to understand HOW the book actually works, but that's only part of the story, the transitions will make your child imagine how they happened. The book works in several levels, provoking thought and commentary from its reader, or in this case "visualizer".

5-0 out of 5 stars This is an excellent coffeetable book!
I was introduced to this book last night when it was given as a gift to my 50 year-old cousin. All of the aduts present were intrigued with this near-wordless masterpiece. None of us read the inside jacket before 'reading' the book and that is the way it should be read to be truly appreciated. I think the book would be 'wasted' on very young children who would see it as just another picture book. Excellent gift. I'm ordering them for all my (grown) children this minute!

5-0 out of 5 stars Cool! Unique! Fun for all ages
What a unique, thought provoking book. Just shows what you see is not "as it appears". LOVED IT! Giving it to everyone I know at Christmas.

5-0 out of 5 stars You never know what your going to get!
My friend recently brought this book to school. She got it off of here. I loved it! Your always wondering what you'll find next. This book is definitley a "page turner" and thats what people like the best.

P.S. I'm 13 and I loved it so take away that 6-8 age limit because your losing ALOT of customers! ... Read more


19. Harold and the Purple Crayon 50th Anniversary Edition (Purple Crayon Books)
list price: $5.99
our price: $5.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0064430227
Catlog: Book (1981-05-20)
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Sales Rank: 342
Average Customer Review: 4.84 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

One evening Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight. But there wasn't any moon, and Harold needed a moon for a walk in the moonlight. Fortunately, he had brought his purple crayon. So he drew a moon. He also needed something to walk on. So he drew a path...

And thus begins one of the most imaginative and enchanting adventures in all of children's books. The creative concept behind this beloved story has intrigued children and kept them absorbed for generations, as page by page unfolds the dramatic and clever adventures of Harold and his purple crayon.

... Read more

Reviews (73)

5-0 out of 5 stars Power and a Purple Crayon
*Harold and the Purple Crayon* mesmerized me as a child. My 5 year old adores it, and my ten year old can't hide his continuing enthusiasm. With his purple Crayon, sensible Harold creates the moon so that he can see where he's going. He accidentally creates the sea (his drawing hand shakes, thus making waves appear) but soon negates this potential danger by drawing a boat and, finally, land. When hungry, Harold draws a delicious picnic with purple food. Harold copes.

The central idea is that a child, no matter how small, can exert control over the world, and when that child makes mistakes -- drawing a choppy sea, for instance -- those mistakes can be remedied. This book gives a child power. Grown-ups don't count; Harold makes what he needs without help. Under the influence of this book, at the ripe age of 11, I created a club called "The Purple X", in which, using purple markers to send letters, I set out to right all wrongs. Harold goes one better; he makes light and land. And the book makes children who feel empowered to tackle the problems of a big, scary world.

5-0 out of 5 stars Harold harold bow-berald, banna fanna foe-ferald...
There's something about Crockett Johnson (real name David Johnson Leisk) that is instantly recognizable. Like Matt Groening of "The Simpsons" fame, Johnson had a particular style of drawing that was both simple and infinitely adaptable. Though he drew the comic strip "Barnabus" and the incredibly simple, "The Carrot Seed", it is "Harold and the Purple Crayon" that won Johnson the fame he has today. The story has been ripped off a million times in a million different ways, but we can all credit this original as the first of the first. All hail that spunky Harold and his oh-so purple crayon.

When we first meet Harold he and his magical purple crayon are already well acquainted. No picture in this book appears that Harold does not draw himself (aside from Harold himself). Our intrepid hero sets off on a series of small adventures that are both intentionally and unintentionally caused by his crayon. Drawing everything from the moon (which makes a point to appear on every single page that Harold finds himself on) to dragons to flying balloons to a policeman, Harold has a gay old time.

Wanna hear a petty complaint? A petty, insignificant, hardly-worth-listening-to complaint? Okay, here goes..... it bothers me that Harold's crayon never gets smaller. By logical extension it should, shouldn't it? Of course, by logical extension I should remember that this is, after all, a MAGIC purple crayon. Maybe magic crayons don't get smaller. Obviously I don't know the rules that govern crayons particularly well. If I did I wouldn't be having these problems. In any case, that's my only objection to this book. It is, I know from personal experience, a heavily adored and respected story. People will carry copies of this book with them all their lives. There is something about Harold and his tiny adventures that speaks to the hearts of millions. If you've never had the pleasure of reading a Crockett Johnson book, this is the place to start. If you have read this book, read it again. It's just that good.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the best bedtime books ever!
My 3.5 year old son adores this book and I do too. We read it nearly every night. Harold is an imaginative little boy who draws a world of his own. My son is always talking right along with the book about all the wonderful things he is going to draw. I think every child should have this book. I can't wait 'till my son can read it for himself!

5-0 out of 5 stars Story of a Little Boy with a Huge Imagination
This classic little book is a lovely reflection on childhood imagination and the joys of creativity.

Tiny wide-eyed Harold, in his one piece jammies and purple crayon in hand, wanders through the night using the dark canvas of sky to draw whatever fanciful dreamscapes his curious young mind can conjure.

No dummy is our Harold. He is an inventive little fellow who devises his own path, invents his own moon to light his way, makes a boat when he finds himself enveloped in a purple sea, creates pies when he is hungry, and so on until he is tired. Thanks to cleverly leaving behind special images as pointers to guide his way, he makes it back home in one piece and with lots of exciting stories to tell.

This is such a delightful book for children and one of the reasons is that it can be used interactively. Read the story with your kids then give them some crayons and a huge sheet of paper and let them loose to design and explore their own magical worlds.

5-0 out of 5 stars Harold et la differance
Under an everpresent crescent moon, Harold's signifying crayon implies the metacritique immanent in all eschatologies: Outcoding the text beneath him, he at once embraces and negates the subject's death in a meeting of poststructural praxis/(post-)modern framing with narrotological desire. Harold, purple crayon firmly in hand, rises from the smoking ruins of continental thought; but having been "written", will our protagonist find fortitude to "write" his way out of the aporias inherent in a de-centered, post-historical dasein?

There is hope....The trace, in erasure of its present presence, loops back from Harold to Johnson, engendering ample clues for resistance to our clinical gaze...But the specter of psychoanalytic eschatology haunts his every gesture. Every slippage is deferred, in its deferral, of Harold's problematized Lacan, leaving no indivisible remainder, defying the fatal strategies of his feints (forgetting Baudrillard) to attempt that final erasure of Derrida's (cottage) industry through a (re)sound(ing) metanarratalogical poetic. Outdistancing at every step all Derridean slippage, Harold's gestures in the dark problematize the infinite substitution and free play within a field of signifiers (themselves privileged signifieds of the wall/not-wall of the enclosing space/page), resisting inevitably all attempts at reconstituting envelopes of perfomative (de-)coding. With startling metaphysical elan, Harold slips the bounds of our logocentric world to inscribe traces of an essentialist foundation light-years beyond the binary opposition (re)inscribed by la differance: beyond Freud, with (in) Freud, with(out) Freud, to be about Freud, forgetting Freud.

All in all, this "Harold" represents a remarkably vigorous (re)covery of Saussurean categories.

This is no boy scribbling terse graffitos to a lost master narratology; this is the newly minted currency of our retinal field. ... Read more


20. All the Places to Love
by Patricia MacLachlan
list price: $16.99
our price: $11.55
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060210982
Catlog: Book (1994-05-30)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 13859
Average Customer Review: 4.87 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Within the sanctuary of a loving family, baby Eli is born and, as he grows, "learns to cherish the people and places around him, eventualy passing on what he has discovered to his new baby sister, Sylvie: 'All the places to love are here . . . no matter where you may live.' This loving book will be something to treasure."'BL. "The quiet narrative is so intensely felt it commands attention. . . . a lyrical celebration."'K.

1995 Teachers' Choices (IRA)
1995 Notable Trade Books in the Language Arts (NCTE)
Notable 1995 Children's Trade Books in Social Studies (NCSS/CBC)
... Read more

Reviews (15)

5-0 out of 5 stars LOVE this book!
My 5 year-old daughter has hundreds of books, but only a select few sit on the "special shelf" in her room, and this is one of them. I bought it for her a couple of years ago, and it has been my favorite ever since. Everything about this book is beautiful.... the illustrations, the story, and the message. I simply cannot read through this book without crying...........the second to the last page does me in every time!! This book is a lovely reminder to enjoy and appreciate the simple things that surround all of us. If you are looking for a special book that your children will love and you will treasure, this is the one.........BUY THIS BOOK! If I had to pick only one of my daughter's books to save forever, this would be it.

5-0 out of 5 stars We bought this story for EACH of our childrens' families!
Adults and children both will identify with this story. It is especially powerful for any 5 - 9 yr. old boy who is adjusting to the idea of having a new baby sister.

His big-brother role is defined in a delightful way which enhances his esteem and belongingness to the basic family. He becomes "protector" and "teacher" for his new sibling just as he has been protected and taught since his own birth.

The beautiful paintings, which must be "read" along with the words, are masterpieces.

5-0 out of 5 stars This book reminds me of home!
It's funny how you read a book sometimes and you think the author must have lived your same life. I used to pick blueberries on what we always called "Blueberry Hill" I built bark boats with my Gram. The barn actually looks like my Grandfather's barn and our milk cow April was exactly like the one in the picture. I planted potatoes with my dad every spring and remember shaking the dirt from my pockets. This book is beautiful, especially if you grew up in a rural setting. I've given as a gift to every friend in honor of their first baby. It was the first book I bought when I found out I was pregnant. READ this book and share it with others!!!

3-0 out of 5 stars Pretty pictures, pretty words, pretty unrealistic
I love many of Patricia MacLachlan's books. However, this picture book has what I consider a flaw. The protagonist is a young child and the words he uses sound like a sentimental grandmother. I love it when children try to be sentimental. But when they do it sounds child like and that's what's so touching.

The words of this book are beautiful. The child describes being born and his grandmother holding him next to the window so that the first thing he would hear is the wind. He describes his grandfather crying and carving his name in the loft. He describes growing up and all the places to love and various scenes of quiet beauty in a country setting. Here's a quote: "My grandfather's barn is sweet-smelling and dark and cool: Learther harnesses hang like paintings against old wood." Lovely, no? But it all comes off sounding "coached" because the reality is that no child would say these things. An adult looking back on childhood would say these things, and that's really what Ms. MacLachlan is doing in the interpertation of this character. Obviously that works for a lot of folks. The book has gotten great reviews. It doesn't work for me. What does work for me are the absolutely stunningly beautiful pictures throughout the book. Glorious color, absolute realism...this is museam quality art in my opinion.

Patricia MacLachlan is a wonderful writer for older readers. This picture book didn't hit the mark in my opinion. A few better choices of sentimental "country theme" picture books are "The Relatives Came" or "When I was Young in the Mountains" both by Cynthia Rylant.

5-0 out of 5 stars A family favorite!
Oh, how I love this book! My husband and I never tire of reading it, and my son finds something new in the beautiful pictures everytime we do. A heartwarming story about the special places that make a child's small world uniquely theirs, and the joy at sharing those places with family. This would be a great book for a child expecting a new sibling, empowering him or her with the ability to show the new little one what makes this world so wonderful. While this story is set on a farm, it should be easy to help a child in any setting find the places and things that make their surroundings delightful. ... Read more


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