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    $12.23 list($17.99)
    1. Runny Babbit : A Billy Sook
    $7.99 $1.24
    2. The Little Engine That Could
    $5.39 $4.00 list($5.99)
    3. Where Is Baby's Belly Button?
    $10.87 $9.64 list($15.99)
    4. Knuffle Bunny : A Cautionary Tale
    $10.36 $2.25 list($12.95)
    5. Summer Bridge Activities: 2nd
    $5.39 $3.89 list($5.99)
    6. Where is Baby's Mommy?
    $12.59 $11.28 list($17.99)
    7. A Light in the Attic
    $10.87 $2.33 list($15.99)
    8. Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse
    $9.71 $7.49 list($12.95)
    9. Summer Bridge Activities: Kindergarten
    $10.46 $6.95 list($13.95)
    10. The Velveteen Rabbit
    $10.87 $9.50 list($15.99)
    11. Corduroy
    $9.35 $7.27 list($11.00)
    12. A Boy and a Bear: The Children's
    $26.40 $14.99 list($40.00)
    13. The Complete Tales & Poems
    $5.99 $2.95
    14. Tangerine
    $11.20 $7.75 list($14.00)
    15. Venus and Serena: Serving From
    $13.96 list($19.95)
    16. The Big Book of Boy Stuff
    $8.96 $6.38 list($9.95)
    17. Bullies Are a Pain in the Brain
    $23.10 $17.49 list($35.00)
    18. The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh
    $9.71 $7.05 list($12.95)
    19. Summer Bridge Activities: 5th
    $10.17 $9.09 list($14.95)
    20. Baby's Box of Fun : A Karen Katz

    1. Runny Babbit : A Billy Sook
    list price: $17.99
    our price: $12.23
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060256532
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins
    Sales Rank: 427438
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    Book Description

    Runny Babbit lent to wunch
    And heard the saitress way,
    "We have some lovely stabbit rew --
    Our Special for today."

    From the legendary creator of Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, and The Giving Tree comes an unforgettable new character in children's literature.

    Welcome to the world of Runny Babbit and his friends Toe Jurtle, Skertie Gunk, Rirty Dat, Dungry Hog, Snerry Jake, and many others who speak a topsy-turvy language all their own.

    So if you say, "Let's bead a rook
    That's billy as can se,"
    You're talkin' Runny Babbit talk,
    Just like mim and he.

    ... Read more

    2. The Little Engine That Could
    by Watty Piper, George Hauman, Doris Hauman
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0448405202
    Catlog: Book (1978-06-01)
    Publisher: Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1042
    Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    The unknowing progenitor of a whole generation of self-help books, Wally Piper's The Little Engine That Could is one of the greatest tales of motivation and the power of positive thinking ever told. In this well-loved classic, a little train carrying oodles of toys to all of the good boys and girls is confronted with a towering, seemingly impassable mountain. As nicely as they ask, the toys cannot convince the Shiny New Engine or the Big Strong Engine--far too impressed with themselves--to say anything but "I can not. I can not." It is left up to the Little Blue Engine to overcome insurmountable odds and pull the train to the other side. The Little Engine That Could is an entertaining and inspirational favorite, and the Little Blue Engine's rallying mantra "I think I can--I think I can" will resonate for a lifetime in the head of every child who hears it. (Ages 4 to 8)) ... Read more

    Reviews (41)

    5-0 out of 5 stars History of Little Engine that Could
    When I began reading this book to my kids, I was suprised that the broken down engine and the little engine that can were both female, while the unhelpful engines are male. I remembered the little engine being male. I was interested in the feminist message of such an classic children's story. A little research on the web gave a lot of info. Apparently, this version of the story was published in 1930 with the male and female references as they are in this current printing. This story was pulled from an slightly earlier version in which the characters were all gender neutral. If you'd like to learn more about the historical background, you may want to look at http://tigger.uic.edu/~plotnick/littleng.htm which does a nice job of giving an historical overview of the evolution of this wonderful tale of self strength.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Too bad it is abridged
    The current self-help genre tends to be dwelling on hurts and self-pity, then finding magical solutions. Our Little Engine just has healthy self-confidence and determination. And please don't stress even that when reading it to the kids who will love it, since they find their own more imaginative interpretations.

    The unabridged version is a lifetime favourite of mine, and, for classroom use or that with older children, find a copy at all costs. This version does retain much of the essence, however, and is great for the pre-school set. The only "negative" I can think of is that the kids so love the repetition that parents may grow a bit tired of the daily requests for it to be re-read, especially if the particular child wants to hear only certain sections (I knew one who always wanted "the clown part," the other "the food part.")

    The same enjoyable repetition makes this a favourite story to read to children in primary grades. Yes, be sure you don't stop the kids from all joining in "I think I can..."

    This remains one book that every favourite kid of mine receives as a present. If it disappoints any of your children, that will be a first, in my experience!

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Little Engine that Could
    This story is a childrens classic. A wonderful tale about a little helpful train that overcomes great physical adversity through sheer will power. A great moral teaching story for young impressionable children. This story teaches our children especially our daughters that they too can be successful if they
    work hard and think positive. This is a story I'll read to my daughter many times. The little engine represent a positive female role model without flaunting its femininity. In fact I had forgotten the engine was female until I read it again recently. A great story worth checking out.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A CHILDRENS SUCCESS CLASSIC
    As a parent of three, one of the most important things I can give my children is motivation.

    The attitude that he or she CAN DO ANYTHING IF THEY THINK THEY CAN DO IT.

    By reading this story over and over again, the message will go into their conscious and subconscious mind and my hope is that they will follow their dreams and become all they are able to become.

    Zev Saftlas, Author of Motivation That Works: How to Get Motivated and Stay Motivated

    What better gift can a parent give their child than believing in them?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect! My daughers were both mesmerized.
    My second daughter has now fallen in love with this book, at about the same age as her older sister did (3 and 1/2). So, we are reading it every single night, often multiple times. If her older sister is any guide, this will probably continue for about 6 months.

    This is simply an absolutely perfect children's story. The plot has some tension to keep the child's interest to the end of the story. The story shows how small people (or trains, if you want to be literal) with a good heart (like a child) can make a big difference in the world. The illustrations are extremely colorful and magical. The only fault (this is incredibly minor) I can find is the one-time usage of the word "indignantly", which no child is going to know. Other than that, I wouldn't change any other word or aspect of this book.

    It's also a fun story for an adult to read outloud. I enjoy using different voices for the arrogant Shiny New Engine, the gruff Freight Engine, and the tired Old Engine, as well as helpful Little Blue Engine's famous repetitive cadence ("I think I can").

    It will be a sad day when my youngest outgrows this book. Don't deny yourself or your child the pleasure - buy it! ... Read more


    3. Where Is Baby's Belly Button?
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0689835604
    Catlog: Book (2000-09-01)
    Publisher: Little Simon
    Sales Rank: 37
    Average Customer Review: 4.72 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Where are Baby's hands?
    Under the bubbles!

    Where are baby's eyes?
    Under her hat!

    Karen Katz's adorable babies play peekaboo in this delightful interactive book. The sturdy format and easy-to-lift flaps are perfect for parents and children to share. ... Read more

    Reviews (64)

    5-0 out of 5 stars This adorable interactive book teaches body parts and more!
    Every once in a while, I come across a book that appeals to the adult in me, because it's educational, artistic, amusing or perhaps all of the above, but what fascinates me is when my son discovers the real value in a work, and teaches me a thing or two along the way. To adults "Where is the Baby's Belly Button" written and illustrated by Karen Katz appears to be a simple 14-page book that teaches body parts, but to children it's much more.

    This nifty little board book is essentially a peek-a-boo book with flaps. It measures approximately 8 ¼" x 7 ½" x ½ ", and is constructed of cardboard with heavy card stock for the flaps. The images are simply illustrated, yet brightly colored with creatively contrasted backgrounds that produce interest. The text appears on the left side of the book with bold, solid colored backdrops that emphasis the large black printing, and compliment the illustrations on the opposing page. The writing consists of short, four or five word sentences, such as, "Where are baby's eyes?" The reader lifts the flap and it says, "Under the hat." The picture shows a baby hiding under a hat, and when the flap is lifted the baby's face is revealed. She is pointing to her eyes.

    "Where is the Baby's Belly Button" has been one of my son's most requested books for a year now; he's nearly two-years old. He lovingly refers to this book as the "baby" book, and he has taught me that he has learned where his eyes, mouth, belly button, feet, and hands are, in addition to understanding the meaning of the words, hat, cup, shirt, cat, bubbles and WHERE. The question, "Where?" comes out of his mouth probably 20 or 30 times everyday, and I am certain it's because of this book. I wish the flaps were made of a heavier card stock as they have become creased over time, which is expected with use, but also preventable with a heavier stock. This book has been a huge hit, and one I haven't gotten tired of reading over and over again. I recommend this book for one-year olds and up as the interactive feature, (lifting of the flaps) is too advanced for younger babies, however an infant would probably find the images fascinating all the same.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great fun for baby and parents!
    This is a nice sturdy book with colorful drawings of babies with some part of their body hidden. Each page asks, "Where is baby's ...?" Toddlers delight in lifting the flaps to find the hidden pictures. The pictures are bright and cute with eye-catching fabric and wallpaper patterns. A very attractive book, and perfect for that stage when toddlers become fascinated with their belly buttons! My 17 month old has really enjoyed this book. It can be very helpful in getting kids to name body parts, and it's fun for both the baby and the parents to read. Highly recommended.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Keep book out of baby's reach
    My 16 mo old daughter has loved this book since she was 12 mo., but I have to keep it out of her reach . She loves to lift the flaps but has now been tearing the flaps off when she reads the book on her own. She is only allowed to read it in my lap where I can stop her from ripping the flap off.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best book
    This was one of the first books given to our son. We loved the cute pictures and wording of the book. Our son is now 15 months old and still loves to find the different things on the baby. He especially likes Where are baby's hands....under the bubbles...maybe it is the way I change my voice when reading to him. This is a must have...along with all the other books by Karen Katz

    5-0 out of 5 stars great
    My 8 month old daughter laughs everytime we read this book. I bring it with us when we go out - I know that it will make her happy! ... Read more


    4. Knuffle Bunny : A Cautionary Tale
    by Mo Willems
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0786818700
    Catlog: Book (2004-09-01)
    Publisher: Hyperion
    Sales Rank: 1148
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    Book Description

    Trixie, Daddy, and Knuffle Bunny take a trip to the neighborhood Laundromat. But the exciting adventure takes a dramatic turn when Trixie realizes somebunny was left behind… Using a combination of muted black-and-white photographs and expressive illustrations, this stunning book tells a brilliantly true-to-life tale about what happens when Daddy's in charge and things go terribly, hilariously wrong. ... Read more


    5. Summer Bridge Activities: 2nd Grade to 3rd Grade
    by Julia Hobbs, Carla Fisher, Michele Vanleeuwan
    list price: $12.95
    our price: $10.36
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1887923055
    Catlog: Book (1996-08-01)
    Publisher: Rainbow Bridge Publishing (UT)
    Sales Rank: 252193
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good Summer Review/Comments by Professional Educator at UAB
    Engaging for the child. Mostly math and language activities of differnt types, styles, and complexities. Tasks get progressively harder toward the new school year. A good general purpose review and prep to keep skills fresh and build a few new ones before schools starts in August. Moderately well-illustrated.

    Encourages independent reading and offers a suggested reading list--though parents should review any of these books for appropriateness for their child.. In choosing books for independant reading the key is for the child to enjoy reading challenging materials--let your child choose what interests them as much as possible. ... Read more


    6. Where is Baby's Mommy?
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0689835612
    Catlog: Book (2001-04-01)
    Publisher: Little Simon
    Sales Rank: 289
    Average Customer Review: 4.87 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Book Description

    Is Mommy behind the chair?

    Is Mommy behind the plant?

    Join baby as he plays hide-and-seek with Mommy. The sturdy format and easy-to-lift flaps in this delightful interactive book are perfect for parents and children to share. ... Read more

    Reviews (15)

    5-0 out of 5 stars My daughter started crawling because of this book!
    My 7 month old daughter loves this book so much that the first time ever she started crawling was to come sit near me while I read it to her! She always laughs and giggles whenever I take this book out and she comes over to sit next to me. Other books, don't hold her attention and she wanders off after a few pages! I definitely recommend it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of Katz's best!
    I have had this book since my daughter was almost a yr old and we still read it now at 25 mos...she never tires of the bright colors, the big flaps that are easy to lift....at the beginning just lifting the flaps was exciting for her but now she is understanding the concepts and gets all excited at the end when the boy finds his Mommy...then she turns to me and says Mommy! and hugs me! : ) The book also teaches concepts like in, behind, under etc. and also teaches vocabulary (duck, tub, chair, table etc..)....It is a book that can grow with your child. I think it is one of her best.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Another favorite by Karen Katz
    I started reading this to my daughter when she was about 7 months. Listening her language and reasoning develop with each passing month is just incredible. She went from knowing when to say "no" and "yes" (after revealing Mommy's hiding spots) to knowing where Mommy is hiding, and naming all the things that Baby encounters along the way. I had to buy a second one because the first one was used and chewed and the flaps were all torn off. (You could say she ate it up.) She's now 21 months and still loving this story.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book
    I bought this book for my daughter when she was 4 months. She has loved this book from the beginning. She is now 9 months old and gets excited when it is time to read this book. We have to read it 3 or 4 times in a row and sometimes that is not enough. Absolutely her favorite book.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Our son absolutely loves this book!
    We received this book as a gift when our son was 4 months old and we have been reading this book to him ever since. He loves this book! He loves turning the pages and lifting the flaps. We have read this book so many times that I have had to glue the flaps back on several times. He is over 10 months old and this is still the book that he reaches for first. ... Read more


    7. A Light in the Attic
    list price: $17.99
    our price: $12.59
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060256737
    Catlog: Book (1981-10-07)
    Publisher: HarperCollins
    Sales Rank: 532
    Average Customer Review: 4.89 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Last night while I lay thinking here
    Some Whatifs crawled inside my ear
    And pranced and partied all night long
    And sang their same old Whatif song:

    Whatif I flunk that test?
    Whatif green hair grows on my chest?
    Whatif nobody likes me?
    Whatif a bolt of lightning strikes me?...

    Here in the attic of Shel Silverstein you will find Backward Bill, Sour Face Ann, the Meehoo with an Exactlywatt, and the Polar Bear in the Frigidaire. You will talk with Broiled Face, and find out what happens when Somebody steals your knees, you get caught by the Quick-Digesting Gink, a Mountain snores, and They Put a Brassiere on the Camel.

    From the creator of the beloved poetry collections Where the Sidewalk Ends and Falling Up, here is another wondrous book of poems and drawings.

    Notable Children's Books of 1981 (ALA)
    Best Books of 1981 (SLJ)
    Children's Books of 1981 (Library of Congress)
    1981 Children's Books (NY Public Library)
    1981 USA Children's Books of International Interest
    Winner, 1983–84 William Allen White Award (Kansas)
    Winner, 1983 Garden State Children's Book Award (New Jersey Library Association)
    1984 Garden State Children's Book Award for Non-Fiction (New Jersey Library Association)
    1984 George C. Stone Center for Children's Books (Claremont, CA) "Recognition of Merit" Award

    ... Read more

    Reviews (28)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Where does the sidewalk end? In the attic.
    If you don't remember these rhymes from your childhood, then it's about time you visited the attic, "A Light in the Attic," that is. Silverstein combines humorous sketches, whimsical poetry and fanciful word play in another amusing collection. "Where the Sidewalk Ends" will always be my favorite, but poems like "Spelling Bee," "Deaf Donald," "Nobody" and "Little Abigail and the Beautiful Pony" definately make "A Light in the Attic" a close runner-up.

    If you know Silverstein's work, then you are familiar with his simple rhyming style. His flair for combining drawings and words make for a book that's much more than just a collection of poetry. His poems are an experience that would be diminished without the visual aspect.

    Silverstein's collections are great for all ages. I read them as a kid, but I enjoy them just as much now. Silverstein has the soul of a child, but the wit of a sage.

    "The saddest thing I ever did see
    Was a woodpecker peckin' at a plastic tree.
    He looks at me, and 'Friend,' says he,
    'Things ain't as sweet as they used to be.'"
    -Shel Silverstein page 83

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best book of all times, exiting and very funny.
    This poem book is the best yet, I have never read any poems as funny as the ones Shel Silverstein writes."A Light in the Attic" is a book for people of all ages.The whole class of seventh graders enjoyed it.We were laughing our heads out when we heard the poem,"Standing is Stupid".I recomend this book to anyone who is having a bad day and wants a moment of happiness!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A MUST HAVE
    I am not a big poem fan but I love this book! Drawings are great and so fun!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A review by a children's author
    I read Shel Silverstein when I was young and I loved his poetry. I used to read it to the kids I babysat (and I never sat on a baby) and I now read it to my own children. What can be said that hasn't been said already?

    This: Shel Silverstein wrote more than just silly. Some of his greatest poems bring tears to my eyes and make me think about things like justice, death, love, and even my Creator. Pretty deep stuff. I personally believe it's that inane sense of humor he had combined with an almost philosophical take on life that mades Shel a great children's poet.

    Some of my favorite poems by Shel are in this collection, The Light in the Attic.

    The Little Boy and the Old Man should make any person who reads it think about aging and reaching out to our loved ones who are er, how shall I say it, a little past their prime and also to those who haven't quite reached their prime yet. And How Many, How Much is a wonderful reminder that friendship starts in your own heart.

    And I wonder, was one of my favorite movies (Bruce Almighty) inspired by one of my favorite Shel Silverstein poems (God's Wheel)? Did the writer read that poem and think "What a great premise for a movie!" Could be. Whatever the case I know his work was one of my inspirations in becoming a children's writer. And now I'm writing a book of poetry for children and as I craft it I returned to all these funny, touching, ironic, wistful, poems and realized, "Uh oh, I set the bar too low. I need to kick it up a notch." I so I strive to do just that.

    My nightmare is being compared by a cranky reviewer to Shel Silverstein, "This writer is an imposter to the throne of the great Shel." Let me state here and now that I don't want the throne. I would just like to sit under a oak tree in the courtyard outside the palace if that's okay. And while I'm there I'll just take a big whiff of the rosebush that stayed so very small (read the book and you shall see what I mean).

    Finally, let me add this, I believe these poems expanded my creativity in my younger years and I believe they expand it to this very day. Buy a Light in the Attic for your children and read the poems together. You will expand their vocabulary, help them develop a sense of comedic timing, cultivate an interest in poetry, and give them their first lessons in philosophy, all the while having a fantastic time together. Now that's what I call maximum return on a minimal investment(...)

    4-0 out of 5 stars the laughing stock
    Hula eels, magic carpets and tickilish tom are all things in A Light in the Attic. This hilarios book has fun filled poems all over! such as Little Abigail and the beautiful pony. What happens to Abigail when she doesn't get what she wants?
    The author Shel Siverstein uses rymes through out the whole book to make it super funny. I would recomend this book if you like fantasy and magic. You will love these poems and be rolling on the floor laughing. ... Read more


    8. Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0688128971
    Catlog: Book (1996-08-19)
    Publisher: Greenwillow
    Sales Rank: 992
    Average Customer Review: 4.81 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    The irrepressible mouse heroine of Chester's Way and Julius, the Baby of the World returns for another true-to-life and very funny episode. Lilly loves everything about school, especially her teacher, Mr. Slinger--until he takes away her musical purse because she can't stop playing with it in class. Lilly decides to get revenge with a nasty drawing of "Big Fat Mean Mr. Stealing Teacher!" but when she finds the kind note he put in her purse, she's filled with remorse and has to find a way to make things right again. Children will sympathize with Lilly's impulsive mistake and laugh uproariously at the witty and expressive pictures of the very human mice. In a starred review, Publisher's Weekly called this book "sympathetic and wise." (Ages 4 to 8) ... Read more

    Reviews (36)

    5-0 out of 5 stars HOORAY FOR LILLY!!!
    This is a book that adults will appreciate as much as children. Pay close attention to all that's happening in the illustrations. You can't help but love Lilly, she means well but like any of us she finds herself in trouble. Mr. Slinger, Lilly's teacher is a hero. This is a must read for all kids. Makes a great gift, look for a purple plastic purse and movie star sunglasses to go a long with it! After reading this book you'll find yourself looking for and falling in love with all of Kevin Henkes' books! Wow! That is all I can say. Wow!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Aesop would be proud, multi-level morals and fun
    Kevin Henkes spins a wonderful tale that appeals to many age groups with the fun story of Lilly and her new purse. Lilly loves her teacher and school, but her normally attentive nature is put to the test when she brings her new purse and accessories to class one day. Woven with lessons about the importance of patience, listening, and responsibility, the story is accompanied by colorful and simple illustrations depicting the young mouse Lilly and other characters in ordinary classroom situations every child can relate to. Your children will love reading this with you; you'll have to read every delightful caption. Something in the story will make adults laugh every time they read it too. Very well rounded and enjoyable work.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fashionista rodentia
    It is my understanding that "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse" is the book that really launched Kevin Henkes from mere picture book drudgery to children's book stardom. Though he'd been churning out stories that spoke to kids and their qualms ("Owen", "Chrysanthemum", etc.) Lilly grabbed the world's spotlight and focused it squarely on her cute little shoulders. Though she'd already appeared in two previous Henkesian creations ("Chester's Way" and "Julius, the Baby of the World"), this was Lilly's first foray as a protagonist with her name in the title. As such, the book has been turned into a stage play, been read by millions of small children, and gives spunky kids someone they can identify with and look up to. In short, she's a pip.

    Lilly is mightily pleased with her life at the moment. She loves school and she adores her teacher Mr. Slinger. Mr. Slinger (undoubtedly a relation of Miss Twinkle from "Chrysanthemum") is the coolest prof in the world. He wears crazy colored ties, refers to his students as "rodents", provides yummy tasty snacks, and has a penchant for patterned shirts. Lilly is determined to someday be a teacher all thanks to Mr. Slinger. Unfortunately, Lilly's Slinger-love takes a downturn when she brings her new purple plastic purse to class. Noisily displaying it at an inappropriate time, Slinger confiscates the item until the end of the day. In anger, Lilly draws a mean portrait of her teacher and hides it in his book bag. But when the young girl opens her returned purse outside of school, she finds a note reading, "Today was a difficult day. Tomorrow will be better", and some yummy snacks are included. Suddenly wracked with guilt, Lilly decides to make up with her teacher and by the end the two have reconciled joyfully.

    Now I was lucky enough to see the Minneapolis Children Theater's production of this particular book (combined with some of Lilly's other adventures to pad it out). And though I'm not a weepy gal by nature, I found myself tearing up during the reading of Mr. Slinger's note to Lilly (i.e. "Tomorrow will be better") as well as when I read the picture book. I don't tear up during children's stage productions and I CERTAINLY don't tear up when reading picture books. Yet here I was, all of 26 years of age, and bawling over the succinct sweetness of Slinger's comforting note. How many books have done this for you recently? How many picture books?

    The tale is filled to the brim with the Henkes touches a person expects from his work (be sure to notice the Krazy Kat reference in Lilly's dining room). As per usual there is the comfortable family containing loving parents. And best of all, that wonderful way Henkes has of bringing a happy child to life on the page. No adult reading this book would want to be anyone BUT Mr. Slinger and no child reading it wouldn't want to know him. As for Lilly, she walks the fine line between precocious and precious. And wins. If you're a Henkes fan you won't want to miss this delightful star-making turn. If you're not a Henkes fan, do what you can to cure yourself of this ailment and then immediately read and enjoy this book. It's worth the effort.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Book Cracks me Up!
    I babysit all of the time so I am always looking for great books to read to the kids. This book I read to myself. It is so funny and I love how Lilly is so ostentatious with her purse. She is exactly like I was at that age and I love the message of not impulsively taking revenge on someone before simmering down. I recommend this book to everyone and I promise you will love it! I even named my Hamster after Lilly.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great lesson in restraint, but hard to read...
    I found this book to be very difficult to read aloud again and again. When I taught Kindergarten and preschool before that, I read this book to large and small groups of children and found it tedious and too wordy. For example, why have a line like "Lilly even wanted her own set of deluxe picture encyclopedias." Perhaps some of you may love the dozens of new vocabulary words, but I would rather not have to explain for the umpteenth time what "deluxe," or "diva" means, when the story already has many other new words that are more developmentally appropriate for this target group of readers (i.e., unique, jaunty, considerate, uncooperative...). Anyway, perhaps it is just me being picky, but I didn't care for this story much as a read a-loud. There are many books that I find much more worthwhile. If you have a child who could use a lesson about self-restraint, however, this book may be better than nothing. ... Read more


    9. Summer Bridge Activities: Kindergarten to 1st Grade (Summer Bridge Activities)
    by Julia Hobbs, Carla Fisher, Michele Vanleeuwen
    list price: $12.95
    our price: $9.71
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1887923039
    Catlog: Book (1996-08-01)
    Publisher: Rainbow Bridge Publishing (UT)
    Sales Rank: 328993
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kept him busy!
    I didn't want our son to forget what he had learned in Kindergarten over the summer, so I decided to challenge him for the 3 months he was off. This book was EXCELLENT! It breaks up the months and the activities so it's not all of the same thing until they get sick of it. The reward system worked great and if we missed a day, our son knew exactly how many pages he had to make up. I will definitely buy the 1 to 2nd grade book in June next year!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good Summer Review/Comments by Professional Educator at UAB
    Engaging for the child. Early math, shapes, sound matching, simple reading and other language activities of different types, styles, and complexities. Tasks get progressively harder toward the new school year. A good general purpose review and prep to keep skills fresh and build a few new ones before schools starts in August. Pretty well-illustrated.

    Encourages independent reading (though what kids at this age can read is still fairly limited)and offers a suggested reading list. In choosing books for independant reading the key is for the child to enjoy reading challenging materials--let your child choose what interests them as much as possible. ... Read more


    10. The Velveteen Rabbit
    by MARGERY WILLIAMS
    list price: $13.95
    our price: $10.46
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0385077254
    Catlog: Book (1958-02-06)
    Publisher: Doubleday Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1269
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    A stuffed toy rabbit (with real thread whiskers) comes to life in Margery Williams's timeless tale of the transformative power of love. Given as a Christmas gift to a young boy, the Velveteen Rabbit lives in the nursery with all of the other toys, waiting for the day when the Boy (as he is called) will choose him as a playmate. In time, the shy Rabbit befriends the tattered Skin Horse, the wisest resident of the nursery, who reveals the goal of all nursery toys: to be made "real" through the love of a human. "'Real isn't how you are made,' said the Skin Horse. 'It's a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.'" This sentimental classic--perfect for any child who's ever thought that maybe, just maybe, his or her toys have feelings--has been charming children since its first publication in 1922. (A great read-aloud for all ages, but children ages 8 and up can read it on their own.) ... Read more

    Reviews (50)

    5-0 out of 5 stars It's wonderful every time I read it!
    I make sure I use this book with each class I teach--3rd and4th graders. They always get it--that love makes us real, too. Theymake the connection between the Skin Horse becoming shabby and people getting old. I always bring in my stuffed velveteen rabbit I bought years ago and it starts making the rounds and popping up on different children's laps. It is a pleasure to see them become attached to the rabbit instead of "mechanical toys that were very superior, and looked down upon everyone else." They also relate to the lessons the Velveteen Rabbit learns from the Skin Horse about how becoming real is a painful process sometimes and can take a long time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Does it hurt to be real?
    This is my all-time favorite children's book! A little boy receives a stuffed rabbit for Christmas, and they love each other until one day...This book is so true and honest in its emotion, you will not be able to read it without shedding tears. It deserves much more than 5 stars. Read it aloud with your child...share the beauty and the love.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Little rabbit in the woods
    Color me a tiny bit surprised. A tiny bit. In remembering the story of "The Velveteen Rabbit" I had placed it somewhere on par with syrupy sappy stories like "The Giving Tree" or "Love You Forever". I had believed for quite some time that this book was an old but nonetheless overly sentimental tale that even the most dewey-eyed of youngsters would have some difficulty swallowing. Then I reread it recently and I found that I was not correct in all of my assumptions. Yes, "The Velveteen Rabbit" has its flaws. It is prone to a couple ooey-gooey moments here and there, but on the whole it is a strong well-written work. This is not a book that has earned its title as one of the best known and beloved works of fiction for children lightly.

    All children wish that their toys were real and could have feelings like the rest of us. This kind of desire is what has spawned everything from the movie "Toy Story" to the classic Newbery Award winning book, "Hitty: Her First 100 Years". In the case of "The Velveteen Rabbit", this wish is taken to an entirely different level. In the beginning, a boy is given a fluffy stuffed rabbit made of softest velveteen. The rabbit is told by an old skin horse about the wonders of one day becoming real, and it becomes the rabbit's deepest wish. As the boy grows to love the rabbit and wear him down, the rabbit feels that he has indeed grown real. One day the boy comes down with scarlet fever and it is necessary to burn the rabbit along with all his other toys. Fortunately, the rabbit is saved by a magic fairy that turns him into a real rabbit. A little time later the boy is out playing when he sees a rabbit that looks just like the old toy he used to own, little knowing that his toy has come back briefly to bid him one last look.

    I'm particularly attached to the editions of this tale that are accompanied by Michael Hague's illustrations. Very popular in the 1980s, Hague has the ability to draw illustrations that are at once touching and at the same time a little realistic. His pictures are filled with little touches and details that clever eyes might enjoy locating. For example, a page displaying the velveteen rabbit and other toys shows a small frog toy looking very much like the Frog character from Hague's version of "Wind in the Willows". On the bookshelf sits his edition of "The Wizard of Oz", easily identifiable by its spine. As for the characters in the pictures, they are delightful. The rabbit grows floppier and more raggedy as the book goes on (not suprising when the boy enjoys dragging it about by one ear). The boy himself is a ruddy faced youth, as apt to tease the bunny as he is to lavish it with love and affection. Hague has a way with light and color that make these pictures virtually leap off of their pages, and the result is a beautiful and elegant series of prints.

    I am pleased to report that "The Velveteen Rabbit" is just as important today as it has ever been. This beautiful tale should always be accompanied by beautiful pictures, and so we are fortunate that Michael Hague lent it his skills. I have no doubt that your children will be entranced by this tale. I have even less doubt that you will find something in it yourself to make you pause and think over. Simple and eloquent.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Too sad for me
    I've never liked this story and I had to hear it a lot as a child since it's a "classic." The rabbit's martyrdom made me cry every time it was read to me and actually gave me nightmares as a young child. This is one book from my childhood I will not be reading to my son.

    5-0 out of 5 stars ALWAYS A FAVORITE!
    Most youngsters have a favorite toy, which may be why they have always loved The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real.

    Today small eyes and ears will respond just as eagerly to the
    reassuring story of a stuffed rabbit miraculously transformed by love.
    First published in 1922, this classic tale loses none of its power in today's brightly illustrated abridged version which is more accessible for a younger audience. Ages 3 and up. ... Read more


    11. Corduroy
    list price: $15.99
    our price: $10.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0670241334
    Catlog: Book (1968-03-01)
    Publisher: Viking Books
    Sales Rank: 663
    Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a departmentstore at night? The endearing story of Corduroy paints a pictureof the adventures that might unfold (for a teddy bear at least) insuch a situation. When all the shoppers have gone home for thenight, Corduroy climbs down from the shelf to look for his missingbutton. It's a brave new world! He accidentally gets on anelevator that he thinks must be a mountain and sees thefurniture section that he thinks must be a palace. He tries topull a button off the mattress, but he ends up falling off the bedand knocking over a lamp. The night watchman hears the crash,finds Corduroy, and puts him back on the shelf downstairs. Thenext morning, he finds that it's his lucky day! A little girl buyshim with money she saved in her piggy bank and takes him home toher room. Corduroy decides that this must be home and thatLisa must be his friend. Youngsters will never get tired of thistoy-comes-alive tale with a happy ending, so you may also want toseek out Dan Freeman's next creation, A Pocket forCorduroy. (Ages 3 to 8) ... Read more

    Reviews (45)

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is such a touching story
    This story shows that it doesn't matter what you look like or what other people think of you, someone will always love you for who you are. After reading that book I always wanted a bear just like Corduroy with the missing button and all. I thought how it was so cute that the little girl came back with all her piggy bank money and bought the tiny bear that didn't even look new. Most kids will see things in the store and beg for it then forget about it once they are told no. There must of been something about Corduroy that you will have to read to find out.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Everyone should know this lovely book!
    Cordoroy is the perfect children's book. It is a gentle, sweet tale of a little bear in cordoroy overalls waiting to be purchased in a department store. A real little girl sees him and falls in love with him, but her mother says she doesn't have money to buy him and he's missing a button. After the store closes, all the toys with faces close their eyes except Cordoroy. Instead, he travels the department store searching for a button because he didn't know he was not perfect. He does not solve his problem. Cordoroy is back on the toy shelf the next morning. The little girl, Lisa returns to buy him. She takes him home, sews on a button, and provides him with his own little bed right beside hers. "I've always wanted a friend!" he says. This beautifully illustrated book has a simple text and huge appeal to anyone with a heart.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Fuzzy wuzzy was a bear
    Children have been fascinated with the idea of dolls and toys that can talk and move, from the Newbery winning, "Hitty: Her First 100 Years" to the more contemporary (and better known) "Corduroy". This particular tale focuses on a bear, his small unassuming quest, and the girl that eventually becomes his friend. The book feels more like, "The Velveteen Rabbit" than "Toy Story", but kids will quickly come to enjoy (or at the very least, understand) Corduroy's wish for a child to love him.

    Living in a department store with other toys and dolls, Corduroy is a stuffed teddy bear in overalls. One day a doe-eyed girl and her patient mama spot the bear and the child is instantly entranced. Unfortunately, her mother points out that the bear is a little worn down and is even missing one of the buttons on its overalls. Upon hearing this, the bear is distressed and resolves to, that night, locate the missing item. After taking an unexpected ride up the escalator, Corduroy finds himself in the store's bedding area. He tries (unsuccessfully) to prise a button off of a nearby mattress, but succeeds only in alerting the local night watchman to his presence. The next day, however, the girl returns with her own allowance money and quick as a wink purchases the bear, missing button and all. She even sews a new button back onto his overalls, and the two are fast friends.

    The book, when you look at it closely, almost seems to resemble a series of woodcuts, painted with watercolors later. I don't know if this was the case, but if so the author/artist, Don Freedman, is certainly adept. I've never seen woodcut faces as well presented as the ones here. People are smooth and rounded, and Freedman apparently doesn't have any problems with round curves. Moreover, I was impressed that the little girl and her mother that view Corduroy are black. Originally published in 1968, this was a bit of a big deal back in the day.

    Today, the story of the little bear who wanted a friend is as poignant and simplistic in its telling as it was when first it came out. Anyone who read (or had read to them) this book as a child will instantly remember the scene of Corduroy tugging and tugging the button on the mattress in an attempt to remove it for himself. It's a sweet story all in all. I think people feel a great deal of affection for "Corduroy" because they can identify with the little unwanted fuzzy guy. He's a cutie, there's no question.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fun bear story
    A brown teddy bear sits in a toy shop waiting to find a real home. He catches the eye of a little girl, but her mother says she can't take him home because he's missing a button on his overalls. Determined to find a home, the bear goes on a nighttime hunt through the store for his button. The hunt almost ends in disaster. But the next morning the little girl returns to the store and takes him home at last. The book is not scary. The human characters are shown to be African Americans. The book has about 250 words.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Sweet little tale about a bear
    The Corduroy books are sweet, easy tales about a stuffed bear and his BIG adventures. Easy reading, nice pictures. ... Read more


    12. A Boy and a Bear: The Children's Relaxation Book
    by Lori Lite, M. Hartigan
    list price: $11.00
    our price: $9.35
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1886941076
    Catlog: Book (1996-06-01)
    Publisher: Specialty Press (FL)
    Sales Rank: 9027
    Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    A Boy and a Bear teaches young children how to relax and calm themselves.Written for children 3 - 10 years old, this book tells the story of a young boy who encounters a polar bear while they are both climbing a snow covered mountain.The boy and bear become friends and learn an important lesson in relaxation together. As the bear watches the boy breathing, children mirror their movements and learn valuable breathing skills to enhance their own relaxation.Children will not only enjoy the story, but will benefit by learning a self-calming technique to reduce stress, prepare for sleep, and improve self-confidence. ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars GRANMAS WILL LOVE IT!
    After a tiring day with a very cranky grandson, I decided to try reading A BOY AND A BEAR with him at bedtime (supposedly). I was pleasantly surprized that as we got into reading and doing the book, we both became more relaxed and calmer, and best of all, more loving to each other.
    Thank you Lori

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Goodnight Story I ever read!
    Now my child can calm himself down with this essential breathing technique. He followed along without me telling him what to do. Not only is he using this to fall asleep but also during the day to calm down. My whole family is breathing like A Boy and a Bear and my entire family is de-stressing and calm.We are now using Lori Lite's other 3 relaxation books. They all help!

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Most Relaxing book I have ever read!
    I bought this book for my over-active 6 1/2 year old. The first time I read it to him he was curled up ready for sleep, this from a child who would still be awake long after Daddy had fallen asleep reading to him! Even when upset, this book will settle both my children, I cannot recommend it highly enough.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great nap time reading!!!!
    My young child had lots of trouble settling down for a nap or even a quiet moment during the day. By using Lori Lite's book I was able to get my child to concentrate on breath, and breathing technque through her characters. Now we bring out the book when ever we need to relax. ... Read more


    13. The Complete Tales & Poems of Winnie-The-Pooh
    by A. A. Milne, Ernest H. Shepard
    list price: $40.00
    our price: $26.40
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0525467262
    Catlog: Book (2001-10-01)
    Publisher: Dutton Books
    Sales Rank: 2127
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Seventy-five years ago, that most beloved of "silly old bears,"Winnie-the-Pooh, came down the stairs, "bump, bump, bump," on the back of his head,behind Christopher Robin. And now, after generations of children have grown upon stories about Pooh's adventures with his forest friends, the four all-timechildren's classics from A.A. Milne and Ernest H. Shepard have been collected inone hefty, handsome volume for another multitude of generations to enjoy.Gathered together are the poems and tales that celebrate heffalumps, Eeyore'sbirthday, the unbouncing of Tigger, Disobedience, Buckingham Palace, andsneezles. The stories about Pooh getting stuck in Rabbit's doorway, Piglet doinga "Very Grand Thing," and Eeyore losing a tail (and Pooh finding one) aretimeless favorites for children--and grownups--of all ages. Four originalclassics are here, in all their glory: Winnie-the-Pooh, The House atPooh Corner, When We Were Very Young, and Now We Are Six. Thisbeautiful edition features complete, unabridged text and all of Shepard'soriginal illustrations, each hand painted in watercolors--this is a truecollector's gem. (All ages) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (15)

    5-0 out of 5 stars All the magic of Winnie the Pooh...
    This is a beautiful book. This is definitely not the Disney version of Pooh. This is the 'magical' and mysterious Pooh in all his glory. The illustrations are timeless and add depth to the characters in the Hundred Acre Wood.

    I've had friends young and old who have seen this book lying on my coffee table and have picked it up and have become like children again reading these tales.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The REAL Pooh
    No childhood - or adulthood, for that matter - would be complete without the adventures of wonderful Winnie and his friends. This 75th anniversary edition is beautifully presented, and readers used to Disney's glossily commercial drawings will be amazed by the original Ernest H. Shepard illustrations featured here. Coloured by Shepard when he was in his 90s (!), Pooh, Piglet, Christopher Robin and co have never seemed more endearing and vivid.

    But the greatest credit should surely go to A.A. Milne for creating some of fiction's most delightful characters. Reading this collection today after a break of 30-odd years, Milne's gentle wit and enthusiasm seem as fresh as ever. What a wonderful sense of life (and fun) the man must have possessed.

    Pooh is the perfect antidote to today's cynical times!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pooh Corner
    I loved Pooh as a child and know have been able to introduce Pooh to my own kids. It has a generational appeal. A few years ago, a friend of mine lost a 6-year-old son through an accident where older children were playing with a handgun. The funeral featured the boy's favorite poem from Milne with the final line, "Now that I'm six, I'm as clever as clever. I think I'll stay six forever and ever."

    The double meaning and emotions from the loss of this young Pooh fan will always be with me. Another book for bedtimes that is full of love, adventure, and wisdom is Original Animals by Horton. I encourage you to check it out. You will be glad you did.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book
    I bought this book as a baby shower gift, and couldn't have been more pleased. It has an attractive cover, sturdy pages, and a good binding -- all necessary for years of bedtime stories! Like most classic Pooh books, the only illustrations are the original drawings, so the emphasis is on the story. One note: This is a big, fairly heavy book. It's something to be read to or by an older child, maybe at bedtime, but it's not as durable for the poundings board books get.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!
    The delightful full color illustrations by Ernest H. Shepard are what separate this combined volume from all others. A must-have for Pooh fans. The large type-set will be appreciated by those needing it. ... Read more


    14. Tangerine
    by Edward Bloor
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439286034
    Catlog: Book (2001-06-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Signature
    Sales Rank: 7848
    Average Customer Review: 4.38 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Paul Fisher¹s older brother has always been the football-playing hero of the family. But when the Fishers move to Tangerine, Florida, Paul enters a place where weird is normal. And suddenly the blind can see. TANGERINE as named a 1997 American Bookseller Pick of the Lists, an ALA Top-Ten Best Book, a Horn Book Fanfare Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, and an Edgar Award Nominee. ... Read more

    Reviews (311)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Tangerine
    Peter Pan
    Genre = Contemporary/Realistic Fiction
    Tangerine
    Edward Bloor
    6th - 8th grade

    Paul Fisher is a 12 year old boy who has just recently moved with his family from Houston, TX to Tangerine,FL. The town is smaller then Houston and the people seem all the same. Paul's older brother Erik, the star football player, finds himself right at home in Tangerine because of the extreme passion for football in the area. Paul feels that his parents pay more attention to Erik than they do to him and his soccer career. Paul attempts to play for his school soccer team but because of his visual impairment, supposedly involving an incident where Paul stared at an eclipse, he is not able to play. When Paul sees the oppurtunity to go to a new school he jumps at it. When he starts befriending people at his new school, a downward spiral of unspeakable events begins to unfold. If you want to find out what happens to Paul and his family, read Tangerine by Edward Bloor.

    I would recommend this book very much to anyone looking for a good story full of rich imagery. This story shows people how it is to be visually impaired and tells a great story all the while. **** out of ***** stars. Also this book can be used in the classroom too. It is a good way to teach description and metaphor to your students. Because of the great character building, you can also do a character analysis activity with it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Tangerine
    Tangerine, by Edward Bloor, is a novel that is not like any book I'v ever read. It tells the story of Paul Fisher, a seventh-grader who has just moved form Houston to Tangerine County, Florida. Paul is legally blind- he has to wear "Coke-bottle" glasses so that he can see. His parents tell people that Paul's eyes were damaged because he didn't listen and stared at a solar eclipse too long. Paul has always been overshadowed by his older brother Erik, placekicker extrodinare. He plays a part in the "Erik Fisher Football Dream"- but just what his part is remains to be seen.

    When Paul moves to Tangerine, everything is different. Lightning knows where to strike. Schools get sucked up by sinkholes. People get killed- and no one really does anything about it. With the help of some friends, Paul sees the truth in things that other people seem blind to. Can Paul finally shake off the shadow of his older brother? In Tangerine, anything is possible.

    Edward Bloor's first novel is well written and the plot keeps moving, keeping you constantly interested. I would reccommend it to any young adult looking for a good read.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Let down by the touted Tangerine. WARNING: SPOILERS!
    I finally read this after having many people recommend it to me. I was pretty disappointed in the book for several reasons. One, I did not find the writing that great. I felt it needed to be edited, probably by 100 pages or so. There are so many repetitive passages, such as Paul trying to remember over and over how he became legally blind as a small child. Also, the plot wanders at many times, with too many quirks. Mud fires, lightning, and sinkholes all occur in this small town much too frequently, leading the reader to wonder, *WHY* would anyone ever move there?!

    The main reason I was disappointed in the book, though, was the plot line with the older brother, Eric Fisher, the football star. Erik is a star football kicker with many dark secrets. In the end, he is exposed, Paul's parents express their regret, and life is good.

    Having grown up with a violent sibling, I know that the family dynamic is never "cured" so easily. A lot of times, parents are aware of what their children are up to, but simply feel helpless. The Fisher family are all characterized as one-dimensional, and therefore, any problems and resolutions simply feel like a nice little tale, not reality.

    My advice, avoid this well-intended but disasterous book.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best book since "Holes"
    Here's a blow by blow of my experiences while reading, "Tangerine". After twenty pages I said to myself, "Hm! The man can really write!". After fifty pages I said, "Wow! This book is as good as 'Holes'!". After one hundred and fifty pages I was fully engrossed. After two hundred and fifty pages I was bodily grabbing people off of the street, forcing copies into their hands while chanting something along the lines of, "One of the greatest kid's books ever written!", or words to that extent. Now that I've finished the book and given myself a little time to reflect I can clearly decide whether or not this initial euphoria was short lived or not. Ladies and gentlemen, I am more than a little pleased to report that I was right all along. "Tangerine" is one of the greatest children's books to be written in the last ten years. It is brilliant, socially conscious, filled to the brim with sympathetic (and uniquely unsympathetic) characters, and funny to boot.

    Paul Fisher is moving again. His father is a civil engineer by trade, so Paul's a little used to picking up and leaving for the next town. In this particular case, the family's moving to Florida to live in a gated community. Once there, each member will be able to start doing what they enjoy best. His brother, Erik, will continue to wow everyone with his football skills, his father will continue to worship those skills and spend all his time with his eldest, his mother will join the community's neighborhood association, and Paul will join his school's soccer team. Paul's a goalie by training, and despite his eye troubles (he has almost zero peripheral vision due to a mysterious accident in his youth) he's the best. Not like anyone notices, of course. The rest of the family is too caught up in what Paul has wryly dubbed the Erik Fisher Football Dream. The fact that Erik is a seriously disturbed individual seems to go entirely unseen by Paul's parents and it becomes clear that when his brother's activities go from threatening to criminal, Paul's the only one who can come out with the truth. Along the way he has to battle lightning storms, sinkholes, underground fires, flash frosts, and angry neighborhood associations.

    That's the plot in its barest form. As I've copied it down here, I haven't even begun to delve into the fact that Paul transfers himself from his local hoity-toity school in the suburbs to a far more rough and tumble public facility. He makes friends with the kids in that school, faces racism on the part of his old school chums, and begins to understand a little more about white privilege. What other school age novel deals with racism, classism, social consciousness, and environmental concerns and so well at that? The precarious nature of Paul's new home becomes clearer and clearer when expensive koi fish are eaten by the native ospreys, muck fires spring up regularly in the backyard, and termites start eating the houses. The more the humans attempt to bend nature to their will, the funnier the situations become. This would not be a bad book to pair with the similarly Florida set story, "Hoot".

    I was a little surprised at the psychopathic nature of Paul's brother. Having just finished reading Diana Wynne Jones's excellent, "Archer's Goon", which contains the most evil little sister in literature, I was amazed to find that my next book, "Tangerine", contains the world's worst elder brother. Erik and his brother have exactly one conversation in this entire novel. Beyond that, all we know of Erik comes from Paul's slowly clearing memories about the accident that damaged his sight and Erik's own actions. As Paul's parents strive to prove that they're a perfect family, things become worse and worse. I liked that Paul was as mature a kid as he was. Though he certainly says words and thoughts that are a little old for a seventh grader, you feel safe with him as your narrator. When he overreacts, you understand why. The same goes for when he doesn't react at all.

    I'll skip telling you about the symbolism that also went into this tale. Needless to say, if you've a kid that needs to read a book that's rife with it, just pick this one out. I'm still amazed that this was Edward Bloor's first novel. The level of the writing is not only impressive, but also intense. This is the first book I've read (outside, I'll admit, of Harry Potter) that actually made me interested in sports. I loved reading about Paul's soccer games and how he compares them to football. Best of all are the characters in this tale. Even Paul's parents, horribly flawed but earnest, are at least trying to be good people. The book is, above all, honest. And I appreciated that.

    The highest praise I can offer "Tangerine" is this: Long after I finished a chapter or two I would find myself puzzling over the multiple meanings and layers of the text. Whole sentences and ideas kept popping up to be reread and regurgitated. If you want a children's book that will make you think about a host of different ideas and points of view, read "Tangerine".

    3-0 out of 5 stars Tangerine
    Sally Pickles
    Genre: Contemporary Realistic Ficton
    Title: Tangerine
    Author: Edward Bloor
    Publisher/ ISBN: Scholastic Inc. ISBN: 0-439-28603-4
    Grade Level: grades 6th-8th
    Gist: Paul is a twelve year old boy who has recently moved to Tangerine Florida. Paul lives wih his dad, mom , and older brother. Paul plays soccer and his brother Erik is a bug time football star. Paul enrolls in a new school and begins making new friends. Everthing seems to be going fine until a series of bad events begin to take place. If you want to know what happens to Paul and his family then read Tangerine. It is a great book and I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did.
    I would recommend this book because it is very realistic. It shows that anything can happen that you least expect. It is also scary and keeps you on the tip of your seat. All together it is a great book and I hope you read it.
    Classroom Uses: You ould do many activities with this book some of the thigns could be; a sinkhole activity where you find out how a sinkhole works. Also, you could do a character analysis activity. This would help you if you were a teacher. ... Read more


    15. Venus and Serena: Serving From The Hip : 10 Rules for Living, Loving, and Winning
    by Hilary Beard, Venus Williams, Serena Williams
    list price: $14.00
    our price: $11.20
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0618576533
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-22)
    Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
    Sales Rank: 4739
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Venus and Serena Williams have something to say. But it isn"t all about tennis. It"s about life and how to play it.

    These superstars and super sisters share their secrets in this straight-talking smart guide. Speaking candidly about their personal experiences, the sisters give you the inside scoop on:

    • What it takes to rise and stay on top.
    • Who watches their backs when the pressure is on.
    • How they spend—and save—their money.
    • Dating—their real deal on romance.
    • Book smarts—keeping grades up and study stress down.
    • Loving the skin you"re in.

    This book offers solid advice for getting an advantage in every game you play.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (6)

    5-0 out of 5 stars No Shunning Allowed
    Hilary Beard is a Philadelphia journalist who you can trust implicitly, she has a great even voice.Her previous book was the life story of enterpreneur Lisa Price, the woman who came back from financial ruin to found CAROL'S DAUGHTER the great herbal essence success story.Lisa got to meet many celebrities, in fact she knew them before they got big, and her cosmetic prescriptions, learned from her mother and Trinidadian family, helped Erykah Badu and Jada Pinkett among others,

    Venus and Serena, who have collaborated with Hilary Beard on her new book, were famous when they were still girls, so their trajectory is somewhat different than that of Lisa Price, who struggled for artistic and commercial validation for many years and told the story in the fabulous SUCCESS NEVER SMELLED SO SWEET.Hilary Beard, who lost her father several years back, was drawn to the Williams sisters partly because of the strong guidance each received from their dad, a bittersweet association for Beard that accounts for some of the strongest writing in this book, SERVING FROM THE HIP.An avid tennis player, Beard knows what she's talking about, and she can help the Williams sisters structure a book and add depth to their insights about their own game.

    Whether or not you're a Jehovah's Witness, this book has something for everyone, so don't shun the Williams girls just because their faith is a little bit different than yours!That's what America is all about--or it used to be!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great book for teens and fans of Venus and Serena!
    After seeing Venus and Serena on the Oprah show, I decided to get this book and I'm glad I did.The book talks about many of their on-court experiences so if you're a fan of Venus and Serena and have followed their careers since the mid 90's, you'll find out fascinating tidbits about their reactions to incidents on the WTA Tour.I also bought a copy for a friend's 11 yr. old daughter so as you can see this book is a great conversation-starter for parents and their daughters.All-around, well done.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Teaches Children JEHOVAH'S WITNESS CULT Religious Philosophy
    Great Book if you want your Child to grow up to be a JEHOVAH'S WITNESS. The Williams Sisters should stick to writing books in which they use their tennis background and experience to teach children the fundamentals of playing the game of tennis.This Williams Sisters book, which purports to teach children the fundamentals of life, is actually a disguised attempt to teach children the fundamental religious philosophy of their own JEHOVAH'S WITNESS religion. People who are reared as Jehovah's Witnesses have been taught only one set of "rules for living, loving, and winning", and those are the rules of the WatchTower Cult.If you want your children to grow up to be door-to-door WatchTower salespersons then SAVE YOUR MONEY and simply ask the next Jehovah's Witness who wakes you up on Saturday morning for a FREE copy of the WatchTower Society's guide for rearing children as Jehovah's Witnesses.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Motivational and Inspiring!

    I'm not a tennis fan, but you don't have to be to enjoy this book.

    While the target audience is teenage girls, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and I'm a middle-aged woman!

    It's easy to read, full of insight into the lives and motivations of Serena and Venus, and has great advice for teenage girls on dating and other issues important to adolescents. I especially liked their emphasis on the need for self-esteem.

    I agree with the reviewer who questioned the so-called reviewers who lambasted the book, since nothing in their "reviews" indicated they've read it!

    I think Serena and Venus (and their co-author, Hilary Beard) did a wonderful job, and I encourage anyone with a teenage girl to run out and buy this book.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book for adults as well as young girls!
    Wow . . . I can't believe the haters who have weighed in on this book! And nothing in their "reviews" indicate they've even read it!
    "Venus and Serena . . ." is a well-written but easy read, doling out lifestyle advice and guidance for young girls and giving insight to the motivations behind decisions made by Venus and Serena. It details why their parents decided to pull them out of certain tours (I was surprised and delighted by the explanations), and how those decisions led to other life decisions.
    I bought the book for my 17-year-old daughter, but sat down and read the whole thing. Feeling guilty, I ran out and bought another copy for my daughter. This is a book that I didn't mind buying twice.
    I LOVED their advice on dating, and how girls need to love themselves first. The book is BIG on the importance of self-esteem.
    I found "Venus and Serena . . ." to be motivational and insightful, and I highly recommend it.
    ... Read more


    16. The Big Book of Boy Stuff
    by Bart King, Chris Sabatino
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1586853333
    Catlog: Book (2004-07-02)
    Publisher: Gibbs Smith Publishers
    Sales Rank: 2599
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    There's this boy. Let's say he's somewhere between nine and thirteen years old or so. You'd like to see this kid get creative. You'd like to see him get some exercise. You'd like to see him get out from in front of the television. And you'd love for him to be motivated enough to find some stuff to do on his own. This boy NEEDS The Big Book of Boy Stuff!

    The Big Book of Boy Stuff has all the important information that boys just have to know. Collected here for the first time in one place, it holds the answers to these timeless questions:What do I do if I get a bean stuck up my nose?How can I make lightning without killing myself?Where can I find new practical jokes to play on my friends and family?What is the best way to poop outside?How do I tell a girl I like her?WHY would I tell a girl I like her?How many mosquitoes does it take to suck all the blood out of a person? . . . and many, many more! This big, thick, durable book includes fascinating chapters on gross stuff, magic, emergencies, fireworks, games, experiments, jokes, activities, insults, pets, flying things, and, of course, duct tape. This is perhaps the greatest book ever published! ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Funny and fun
    It has great practical jokes and gross stuff. Besides saying this book will make my summer a lot more fun, IT ROCKS

    5-0 out of 5 stars Boys Dream
    To every boy, and every 50 or 60 year old, boy at heart, you need this. Written by a genious, this book has everything you need to keep yourself busy. I, myself as a student in his amazing class, can certainly vouch for the fact that, in truth: This book is so well written and so funny, you will wish that YOU could write a book right now! So get on it, and take yourself on an adventure. ... Read more


    17. Bullies Are a Pain in the Brain
    by Trevor Romain, Elizabeth Verdick
    list price: $9.95
    our price: $8.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1575420236
    Catlog: Book (1997-09-01)
    Publisher: Free Spirit Publishing
    Sales Rank: 31858
    Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars No need to feel Helpless
    No child should feel helpless when it comes to the jungle of a playground. This book encourages dialogue and an internal sense of courage. The book is very kid-friendly. The language is perfect for those grade 3-6. The format and cartoon characters make the whole book and subject very approachable for kids. Whether bullied or not, this raises awareness to help all kids help themselves.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great in the Classroom!
    This book has been a valuable part of my classroom read aloud program for 3 years now. It is valuable in that it really speaks to the students on their level. It is straight-forward about the problems and realities of bullies and teasing. This book often provided a great springboard into valuable classroom discussions. Students become empowered to stick up for themselves and to understand the thought process of a typical bully.

    I would recommend this book for any classroom library.

    4-0 out of 5 stars GREAT BOOK FOR YOUNGER KIDS
    I liked the cartoon explanations in this book, and the way the author explains that bullies are "self-esteem vampires" He goes into gang violence and what you should do about it as a child. He also goes into name-calling and general nastiness. I just wished that he would not have said that most children who are picked on, are shy children. In my experience, it is the children who are different in someway (race, religion, opinions, dress, hair color, braces etc..) that brings on the teasing. This book does not address that issue very well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Bullies are more than a pain in the brain!
    Recent events in our schools have shown that bullies -- aside from being a pain in the brain -- can bring out reactions from their victims that are dangerous. Teaching our children how to deal with bullies is important for parents, just as not being bullied is important to kids.

    I bought this book three years ago, and read it to my then 6-year-old. The writing, and the cartoon-like pictures, made it enjoyable for him. We discussed the topic at hand -- bullies. At that age he was riding the bus to school, and was on the playground sometimes with older kids -- bullying was a concern he'd brought up often. I was concerned -- certainly I didn't want him to just turn the other cheek. I'd also noticed that sometimes his reaction to bullies was to 'out bully' them.

    This book gave him some ideas on how to cope. It is a great conversation starter for parents and kids. Why do bullies bully? What else could they do? What can YOU do if bullied? What ELSE could you do? Does bullying the bully work? Why not?

    A couple of weeks ago, before school began, I noticed that he'd pulled the book out and was reading up on it again.

    A good book to read with your kids, and evidently one they can also read to themselves as a refresher course!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great for both kids and parents.
    Concise, yet comprehensive. Entertaining paperback with cartoon-like illustrations. Captured my son's attention and taught me a few new things about bullies and safe strategies for dealing with them. A must read for concerned parents and kids who are tired of being pushed around. ... Read more


    18. The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh
    by A. A. Milne, Ernest H. Shepard, A.A. Milne
    list price: $35.00
    our price: $23.10
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0525457232
    Catlog: Book (1996-10-01)
    Publisher: Dutton Children's Books
    Sales Rank: 12465
    Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    When Christopher Robin asks Pooh what he likes doing best in the world, Pooh says, after much thought, "What I like best in the whole world is Me and Piglet going to see You, and You saying 'What about a little something?' and Me saying, 'Well, I shouldn't mind a little something, should you, Piglet,' and it being a hummy sort of day outside, and birds singing."

    Happy readers for over 70 years couldn't agree more. Pooh's status as a "Bear of Very Little Brain" belies his profoundly eternal wisdom in the ways of the world. To many, Winnie-the-Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, and the others are as familiar and important as their own family members. A.A. Milne's classics, Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner, are brought together in this beautiful edition, complete and unabridged, with recolored illustrations by Milne's creative counterpart, Ernest H. Shepard. Join Pooh and the gang as they meet a Heffalump, help get Pooh unstuck from Rabbit's doorway, (re)build a house for Eeyore, and try to unbounce Tigger. A childhood is simply not complete without full participation in all of Pooh's adventures. (All ages) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (50)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The original is still the best
    For all those who think that Winnie the Pooh is a Disney creation, this book will be a revelation and a delight. The ubiquitous and lovable Disney mass-market version of A.A. Milne's characters cannot compare with the simple wisdom of this children's classic. The writing and humor is far more sophisticated and subtle than the slapstick cartoon version cooked up for mass consumption.

    The book also contains an interesting and informative forward and introduction that explains the origin of Winnie the Pooh, that Christopher Robin was really Milne's son and other fascinating facts about Milne's life.

    Most importantly, it holds the original stories of Pooh and friends, and the original illustrations by Earnest H. Shepard. These illustrations provide a look at how Pooh first appeared 70 years ago.

    The recommended age for this book is four and up, but we have been reading these stories to our son (who is also thoroughly immersed in the Disney version) since he was about two and a half and he loves them. I'm sure he didn't comprehend what was going on in the stories at first, but as time went on, he increasingly continued to understand. He still loves bringing us the book.

    This book is a treasure. Anyone who has a child who loves Pooh owes it to him or her to hear the original version. It is fun for adults as well. It is the quintessential addition to any Pooh collection.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A bear of very little brains . . .
    A. A. Milne would be proud of the interpretation of his story and characters that will always live in the forest of imagination. Ernest H. Shepard's artwork makes this adventure is a visual delight. The characters represent archetypes to which children can identify and relate. As long as there are children and parents to read to them, Winnie the Pooh will remain a favorite storybook classic.

    * Pooh teaches a positive attitude; he will always get the honey, and get out of predicaments through his friends. His wisdom is simple and easy for children to understand and agree upon.
    * Eyore is forlorn, pessimistic, and surprised by the good things that come his way. He never expects to be part of the crowd, but always is included. The emotion is easy to relate to from our own adolescence, and helps adults remember the trials of childhood.
    * Tigger and his bouncy tail take us into the air in a never-ending enthusiasm for the joy in life. In addition, he shows the potential of getting into trouble because he does not think about the results.
    * Rabbit, practical Rabbit, who is also a sourpuss, shows that we can always miss the joy in life, but if we join with others then good things happen.
    * Kanga and baby Roo show the importance of love and protection for parent and child.
    * Owl is the wise old teacher who always asks "Who?" in the quest for knowledge, and shows the value of learning.
    * Christopher Robin represents the adult, the one who solves problems, and is a constant force even when not present. He is the focus, the thinker, and he shows the value of considering thought before words and actions. Since he is a child, children can see they too have control, make decisions, and find answers.

    My daughter loves her long worn out book with the torn red cover, and although this book is its replacement, the original stays in the family.

    Five stars and great thanks to Walt Disney Studios who keeps the Winnie the Pooh light burning.

    Victoria Tarrani

    5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding collector's book.
    I got this for my wife (A Pooh fan if there ever was one) when she was six months pregnant with our son. She absolutely loved the classic illustrations, and reading through the book once myself the writing is quite good. I've been reading from this book to my now two-year old son about once or twice a week (I work nights =/) when I am able to when he is in bed ready to go to sleep, and we both enjoy the quiet bonding time while I read to him. He doesn't quite understand everything, but enjoys the rather bad attempts by me to give each character a different sound/voice/accent, but of course he can't tell it's bad. ;)

    We keep this book out of his reach in a very special area, and plan to give it to him when he has his own child as a family heirloom. The book itself is beautiful, wonderfully crafted and illustrated, clearly worth saving for future generations. If you like Pooh and company at all, get it, you won't be dissapointed!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good to see the classics live on
    There is no way Disney's b*stardisation of A A Milnes characters is anything even close to the original. These stories and poems are works of art and it bothers me that they are so degraded by association with an unorignal cartoon very much pitched at the commercial realm and the lowest common denominator. But the originals live on. Do yourself and your children a favour. Buy this book. Introduce them to good literature and stories of timeless (and ageless) appeal. Turn off the TV and read to them. Then, when they go to bed, read them for yourself.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very British!
    I gave The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh to my older daughter for her 10th birthday. She reads portions of it to her younger siblings. This is one of her favorite, most cherished books.

    Don't be deceived into thinking that Pooh is just for toddlers and pre-schoolers. The humor is very intelligent, and the characters are just plain wonderful. It is written in a very British style, which I think makes it a great introduction to English literature for children.

    This is a true masterpiece, and would make a good gift for anyone who truly loves good literature, no matter what their age. ... Read more


    19. Summer Bridge Activities: 5th Grade to 6th Grade (Summer Bridge Activities)
    by Julia Hobbs, Carla Fisher, Michele Vanleeuwen
    list price: $12.95
    our price: $9.71
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 188792308X
    Catlog: Book (1996-08-01)
    Publisher: Rainbow Publishing
    Sales Rank: 326853
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars summer bridge activities- wonderful
    This book is a great book it helps kids learn over the summer and kids just love it, its interesting to. Before my son did not want to do math language or reading, but with this book its a challenge for him so he does it, and not only for that, but the activities are fun, I even think so. I recommend this book to everyone. ... Read more


    20. Baby's Box of Fun : A Karen Katz Lift-the-Flap Gift Set: Where Is Baby's Belly Button; Where Is Baby's Mommy?; Toes, Ears, & Nose
    by MarionDane Bauer
    list price: $14.95
    our price: $10.17
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0689038623
    Catlog: Book (2004-12-01)
    Publisher: Little Simon
    Sales Rank: 1009
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