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    $7.99
    1. Revenge of the Sith Movie Storybook
    $5.39 $2.25 list($5.99)
    2. The Rising Force (Star Wars: Jedi
    $5.39 $1.55 list($5.99)
    3. The Dark Rival (Star Wars: Jedi
    $6.99 $1.95
    4. Dark Apprentice (Star Wars: The
    $4.99 $2.38
    5. The Defenders of the Dead (Star
    $5.39 $3.75 list($5.99)
    6. The Final Showdown (Star Wars:
    $5.39 $3.15 list($5.99)
    7. The Mark of the Crown (Star Wars:
    $4.99 $3.00
    8. The Death of Hope (Star Wars:
    $5.99 $3.64
    9. Heirs of the Force (Star Wars:
    $4.99 $2.48
    10. The School of Fear (Star Wars:
    $5.39 $3.22 list($5.99)
    11. The Uncertain Path (Star Wars:
    $5.39 $2.32 list($5.99)
    12. Jedi Quest (Star Wars)
    $5.39 $4.18 list($5.99)
    13. The Only Witness (Star Wars: Jedi
    $5.39 $3.87 list($5.99)
    14. The Captive Temple (Star Wars:
    $4.99 $1.94
    15. The Shattered Peace (Star Wars:
    $4.99 $1.30
    16. Jedi Quest: Master of Disguise,
    $4.99 $2.99
    17. The Dangerous Rescue (Star Wars:
    $4.99 $1.99
    18. The Shadow Trap (Star Wars: Jedi
    $5.39 $3.00 list($5.99)
    19. The Deadly Hunter (Star Wars:
    $4.99 $1.00
    20. The Hidden Past (Star Wars: Jedi

    1. Revenge of the Sith Movie Storybook
    by Random House
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0375826122
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-05)
    Publisher: LucasBooks for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 145501
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    2. The Rising Force (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 1)
    by Dave Wolverton
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519220
    Catlog: Book (1999-05-12)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 17334
    Average Customer Review: 4.81 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Just before his 13th birthday, Obi-Wan Kenobi left Yoda and the other teachers at the Jedi Temple. But he wasn't supposed to become a Padawan, a future Jedi Knight, he was assigned to be a farmer! Jedi Apprentice: The Rising Force joins the headstrong Obi-Wan a few weeks before he's to turn 13, when he'll be too old to begin training as a Jedi Knight. Trying too hard to become Qui-Gon Jinn's Padawan, Obi-Wan shows his lack of discipline, and that--in addition to Qui-Gon's mysterious past--keeps them apart. But the Force keeps pulling the two together: Obi-Wan resigns himself to the Jedi Agricultural Corps on barren Bandomeer, only to find that Qui-Gon is on a mission to the same planet. Traveling there on a mining ship, the two must work together to forge a truce between the warring Hutt, Whiphid, and Arconan miners on board. The inexperienced Obi-Wan stirs up trouble but gets plenty of chances to redeem himself later--after the pirates attack and after the ship crash-lands on a hostile planet with the crew still at each other's throats. Experienced Star Wars author Dave Wolverton keeps the blasters firing and the lightsabers swinging in this fun, fast-paced adventure. (Ages 9 to 12) --Paul Hughes ... Read more

    Reviews (120)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Start to Obi-Wan Kenobi's life as a Jedi Knight!
    This story was excellently written, not to mention that it fully explains what happened to Obi-Wan Kenobi when he was young, and why Qui-Gon Jinn became so close. Well, actually, this story only begins their friendship, and it statrs off very rocky. Qui-Gon doesn't want to take Obi-Wan as his Padawan learner, but Obi-Wan has to find a Jedi Knight to take him as his apprentice whithin the next four weeks (before his 13th birthday) or he has to be a farmer! They end up going to the same planet of Bandomeer, and encounter a groupe of very routhless Hutts from a mining company called Offworld mining. They are at war with the Arcona Miniral Harvest Corperation, and a few "accidents" occour on the trip to the Outter Rim plannet. By the end, Obi-Wan has had to pilot a ship, fight off Draigons (creatures on an island they crash land on), and even call Qui-Gon using the Force, which he shouldn't be able to do because he's not his Padawan. Their kindrid destenys show up in the second book, The Dark Rival. Both are wonderfully written, and extreemly enjoyable. If you are not a big Star Wars fan, or you don't know much about Star Wars, then this would be a perfect place to start.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This book's a children's reader?
    This book opens up a whole new perspective on the apprenticeship between Qui-Gon Jinn & Obi-Wan Kenobi, and once you read the first book in the Jedi Apprentice series, you'll immediately want to read the second. This is the only book in the series written by Dave Wolverton; the rest are written by Jude Watson. This is also the longest book in the series, and it gives a rare glimpse into the life of a young Jedi trainee. It's the only literature I've read that gives a clear look into what exactly happens to a student before he is chosen to be a Padawan (or, if he's unlucky, a farm assistant or healer). You can also see what Qui-Gon & Obi-Wan were like before their adventures in Episode I. This is truly an interesting book to read, but be prepared to shell out cash for the rest of the series, because each book seems to leave you wanting to read the next.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Bedtime reading for my little Jedi....sometimes!!!
    There is no real Star Wars reading material for young readers (4-7 years) However, this first book in a series for 9-12 year olds is just amazing. It's very readable to a younger child (4-8) at bedtime. As soon as I started reading the book to my son (6 years old) it was an instant hit...with both of us.

    It starts BEFORE episode I, when Obi-Wan Kenobi is a boy of 12 years and in Jedi Training hoping to become the Padawan learner of the rebel & loner, Qui-Gon Jinn before he turns 13.

    My son got so into the book he would force himself to stay up to listen to more of the story! Obviously, this is not what you want to happen when you want your little Jedi to go to sleep. (However, it does speak volumes about the writing, the story, etc...)

    I have a sneaking suspicion that we'll be reading the entire series. This first book, was that good.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Flash back into the past...
    In the starwars movies obi-wan is over 70 years old-in this book he is 12. Obi-wan is not even a jedi yet. It is a real prolgue. If I did not read these books and then i saw the phantom menace it would not be as good. I reccomend to any starwars fan if you like the movies you will like the books more.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent must have for the Star Wars Fan!
    This book is the start of the life of one of the most famous Jedi Knights, Obiwan Kenobi. Learn how he ALMOST did not become a Jedi Knight and then finally teaming up to become a padawan under Quigon Jinn! Also read about the adventures of them against Xanatos, Quigon's ex padawan who was succumbed to the Dark Side. I guarantee you won't put the book down once you pick it up.
    Kindly note: Better have the sequel books of the Jedi Apprentice series ready or you will be sulking until they arrive. ... Read more


    3. The Dark Rival (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 2)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519255
    Catlog: Book (1999-05-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 22990
    Average Customer Review: 4.74 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    The exciting tale begun in Jedi Apprentice: The Rising Force continues in Jedi Apprentice: The Dark Rival. While thankful for Obi-Wan's life-saving help on the trip to Bandomeer, Qui-Gon must put aside his mixed feelings over the young apprentice and take care of his peace mission. But he soon finds out that he's been tricked--not only did the planet's government not call for him, but the request may have come from his former-apprentice-gone-to-the-dark-side, the sinister Xanatos. Qui-Gon stays on Bandomeer to help rival mining companies there negotiate and to find out more about his fallen Padawan. Obi-Wan, of course, pitches in again, and the bond between the two grows. A few explosions, a couple of lightsaber fights, and a prison break later, the two ... well, you'll have to find out for yourself. (Ages 9 to 12) --Paul Hughes ... Read more

    Reviews (70)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exellent! Even better than the first!
    When I first noticed these books in the bookstore I was inclined to dismiss them as 'just another kiddy Star Wars series'. A younger, cheesier version of the explosive and compelling Junior Jedi Knights and Young Jedi Knights. I must admit, I have rarely been more wrong. I actually started reading them, and they are as good, perhaps better than some other Star Wars books I've read. Definitly on an equel par with Young/Junior Jedi Knights. It is so cool to find out what Obi-Wan Kenobi was like at about twelve or thirteen. Anyway, the basic plot of this book is that Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon arrive on Bandomeer at last and are about to separate and go on their own missions. Obi-Wan is still a little sad and upset that he has to give up all hope of becoming a jedi because Qui-Gon still refuses to train him. However, Qui-Gon is still facing some inner demons of his own, and they are compounded when his former apprentice gone bad Xanatos returns hungry for revenge... Another good thing is that this book, and the one before it, flesh out Qui-Gon's character much better than even Episode 1 did. When I watched that movie I found myself really wanting to care about him, but the movie simply didn't allow us to know him well enough. These books, however, bring out aspects of his character that were barely touched upon in the movie, and make him a much more beleivable, much more endearing character. It also sheds new light on the relationship between Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon, and we can see just how heartbreaking it must have been for Obi-Wan when Qui-Gon is killed in Episode 1. I would recommend this series to any Star Wars fan, no matter what their age.

    4-0 out of 5 stars They just get better
    This story, as well as all the stories in this series is an enjoyable read for people of all ages. Yes it is simple to read, but I think it is a good little adventure that leaves you well satisfied at the end. This book marks the beginning of character developments, some of which pop up from time to time in future stories of this series. This book takes you into Qui Gons past and also begins to inform the reader of the relationship between Qui Gon and Obi Wan. As with all the books in this series, it continues building on themes and emotions set forth in the previous book. I recommend the whole series to true star wars fans.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awsome
    When I first read this book I was speechless. I never would have guessed that Qui-Gonn had ANY feelings toward his young padawan Obi-Wan! But boy was I wrong! The two Jedi are sent on a mission, and many wrong things happened. Obi-Wan was kidnapped and Qui-Gonn had to rescue him. Everything that happened was all because of Qui-Gonn's other student. Will Obi Wan Kenobi die so that his master can hunt down his dark sided student? Or will Qui-Gonn find anougher way to get out of the mining area. Find out and read The Dark Rival. Trust me, you will love it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars the relationship between Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon develops
    Considered too old to stay at the Jedi Academy, Obi-Wan Kenobi is travelling to the planet Bandomeer to work for the Agri-Corps; coincidentally, Qui-Gon Jinn, who has decided not to accept the youth as his Padawan, is also going to Bandomeer, and the two are forced to act as a team when Xanatos, a Padawan who left for the Dark Side, also appears on the mining planet and bad things start to happen.

    It's fun to see the relationship between the Jedi Knight and his student take shape, though this is not the main focus of the book. A greater weakness is the sometimes lazy writing; for example, we are told on page 1 that Qui-Gon is not affected by nightmares ('Dreams never hung on him') and yet on page 8 we read that he is "still fighting the grip of his nightmare". Still a fun read for young Star Wars fans.

    4-0 out of 5 stars the relationship between Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon grows
    Considered too old to stay at the Jedi Academy, Obi-Wan Kenobi is travelling to the planet Bandomeer to work for the Agri-Corps; coincidentally, Qui-Gon Jinn, who has decided not to accept the youth as his Padawan, is also going to Bandomeer, and the two are forced to act as a team when Xanatos, a Padawan who left for the Dark Side, also appears on the mining planet and bad things start to happen.

    It's fun to see the relationship between the Jedi Knight and his student take shape, though this is not the main focus of the book. A greater weakness is the sometimes lazy writing; for example, we are told on page 1 that Qui-Gon is not affected by nightmares ('Dreams never hung on him') and yet on page 8 we read that he is "still fighting the grip of his nightmare". Still a fun read for young Star Wars fans. ... Read more


    4. Dark Apprentice (Star Wars: The Jedi Academy Trilogy, Vol. 2)
    by KEVIN ANDERSON
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0553297996
    Catlog: Book (1994-06-01)
    Publisher: Bantam
    Sales Rank: 38998
    Average Customer Review: 4.14 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    As the New Republic takes devastating losses in the ongoingwar with the scattered remnants of the Empire, the galaxy's future depends on three small children -- among them the Jedi twins -- born to incredible powers and perils, as an extraordinary new saga unfolds...

    while the New Republic struggles to decide what to do with the deadly Sun Crusher -- a new doomsday weapon stolen from the Empire by Han Solo -- the renegade Imperial Admiral Daala uses her fleet of Star Destroyers to conduct guerrilla warfare on peaceful planets. And now she threatens the watery homeworld of Admiral Ackbar. But as the battle for a planet rages, an even greater danger emerges at Luke Skywalker's Jedi academy. A brilliant student delves dangerously into the dark side of the Force and unleashes the spirit of an ancient master of the evil order that warped Darth Vader himself. Working together, they may become an enemy greater than the New Republic has ever fought... more powerful than even a Jedi Master can face. ... Read more

    Reviews (57)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Jedi Fanatics this is a must read !!!
    I just finished reading Dark Apprentice By K.J. That book is just great it tells all about the war of the Dark Lords of the Sith and the Jedi Knights. It also explains some information on Exar Kun A very powerful Dark Lord of the Sith.The ending is kind of weird since it has a "DejaVu" kind of feeling with the book " Courtship of Princess Leia" after Luke Had fought the great battle aginst Dathomir's evil Force weilding witches.

    On other events Admiral Daala is preety unsuccessful in her attempts to Strike damage especially when Kyp Durron had something to do with it....Grand Admiral Thrawn Is A muchg better tactician and also smater in the case of knowing your enemies better than they know you.

    Overall the book is graet especiall with sudden illness of MonMothma And the departure of Admiral Ackbar. This also adds depth to the book.However Anderson's following the twins childish games with 3-PO can be very annoying especially after an eventful part with Luke's Jedi Accademy or "PRAXEUM".

    5-0 out of 5 stars THIS BOOK TAKES YOU RIGHT INTO THE STAR WARS UNIVERSE!
    This is one of the best books I have ever read! This is an exxelent read! Better than the first one JEDI SEARCH! YOU MUST READ THIS NOVEL! The New Republic is trying to decide what to do with the Sun Crusher captured from the Imperial Admiral Daala by Han Solo with the help of Kyp Durron and Imperial defector Qui Xux, a scientist who thought she was building weapons for a good cayse. Finally, the decision is made to send the Sun Crusher into the heart of the gas planet Yavin, and the New Republic figures that problem is solved, although they have another: Daala has come out of hiding to attack with her fleet of three Star Destroyers. Young Kyp, hoping to learn how to control his Force potential, heads to Luke's Jedi academy on Yavin IV. There, he encounters the spirit of Exar Kun, an ancient Sith warrior defeated by the Jedi during the great Sith War thousands of years ago. Exar Kun twists Kyp's already confused mind to his advantage, luring him to the Dark Side of the Force. Get this book you will not be dissapointed, but first read JEDI SEARCH or else you will not understand everything!

    2-0 out of 5 stars Weakest of the trilogy
    The second novel in Kevin J. Anderson's Jedi Academy Trilogy is, if anything, even more disjointed than the first. It doesn't feel like a novel so much as a series of interconnected short stories. In that way it comes across as being somewhat aimless, as if Anderson knew where he was going but only had a vague notion as to how to get there.

    The plot? Well, what there is of it centers primarily around Luke's efforts to train a new group of Jedi. But lurking in the jungles of Yavin 4, the new home of Luke's Academy, is the evil essence of a long fallen Sith Lord, who is trying to subvert the untrained students toward the dark side. And here is where the novel starts to come apart, because rather than dealing with this threat directly, Anderson has Luke be somewhat wishy-washy about the whole thing. "Oh, my students are being killed in very mysterious circumstances. I think I'll go meditate about the meaning of this a little while longer." Meanwhile, there's more intrigue between the New Republic and what remains of the Empire, Admiral Daala is causing mayhem and destruction in a guerilla war against Republic targets, Leia and Ackbar crash a spaceship into a cathedral, Han and Lando keep using the Falcon as a betting token, and Wedge gets a girlfriend. Oh yeah, and Han & Leia's twins get lost in the most blatant piece of story padding you'll ever encounter.

    This novel is all over the place. Much, much too wide a focus. It would have been a lot better if Anderson had cut out some of the incidental stuff and focused more on the ostensibly central point of the books, namely the resurrection of the Jedi as an order. Instead he skips around from one area to the next, with little more than a cursory glance at what one set of characters or another are doing at that particular moment. All in all, it wears thin very, very quickly.

    The best that can be said for the book is that it's adequate, but little more. However, it is the second book of a trilogy, so if you want to get to the climax of the series it is required reading. At the very least it's a quick read, so you won't waste too many brain cells over it.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Worst of the Jedi Academy Trilogy. That's not saying much..
    This book is the worst of the subpar and ouright terrible Jedi Academy Trilogy. Middle books usually tend to lag, and this definately lags. The story was terrible to begin with and just drones on and on. I get bored just writing about it. I have read every Star Wars book ever written so I do have a grip on what makes a good Star Wars book and Dark Apprentice is just terrible. Anderson has no coherrant plot, his characters are way too powerful and really his writing style is juvenile. In about 6 days Kyp Durron (aka Luke if he had met a 4,000 yar old dead Sith master) is able to learn more about the Force and in another 6 defeats Luke Skywalker, last Jedi Master? Come on! It took Stackpole's I, Jedi just to make this trilogy work. The story has so many plot holes that it is amazing the book is solid. Overall a terrible effort and the worst of a terrible series.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A melee of sci fi entertainment
    This is the sequel to Jedi Search. It is a little dark, and weird, as in the Empire Strikes Back. Well written and some characters from other books show up here, too. This is a good book, and I recommend it. ... Read more


    5. The Defenders of the Dead (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 5)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519565
    Catlog: Book (1999-12-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 149612
    Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (68)

    5-0 out of 5 stars OK, so they totally leave you hanging.
    I'm always ready to buy a new Jedi Apprentice book! This one was no exception, even though I'm a year over the "recommended age level" (9-12). But anyway! You aren't here to read about me, you're trying to find out more about this book, right? OK, here's my input.

    Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are on Melida/Daan, where two "tribes" of people are always fighting each other. They can't find anyone, except "The Young," an underground group of teens, who want to make peace. Unfortunately, student and master disagree on so many things that eventually, Obi-Wan decides to stay with Cerasi and Nield, his new friends. This leads you to wondering: What's going to happen to Obi-Wan? Does Qui-Gon want him back? (Which, of course, is why you go on to read The Uncertain Path {#6})!

    All in all, this was a pretty good read - the cover's pretty cool - and you'll have to read it so you can understand what happens in 6. So buy it if you think you want it! Then go get #6 and it'll leave you hanging for #7!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perspective of The Defenders of the Dead
    Excellently written, and an incredible and ironic ending give this book a total punchline for suspense in the Jedi:Apprentice series. Neild and Cerasi are two corrupt characters that when reading about their hatred, and Obi-wan's view of their passion, gave me a sense of thought that I have never had before. Explaining so much detail, not repeating information and a excellent description of Qui-Gon's emmotion when Obi-wan decides to stay on Melida/Daan. Although one thing that I must worry about is the future elements of the story in Jedi Apprentice #6. Jude Watson displays a cunning view of how kids can make so much of a difference. Never have I seen a series of books like Jedi: Apprentice. The Young and the truce of stopping the Melida and Daan from any more war is nearly a metaphoric moral that has been intrecated into the story to the point where it displays an interesting point. It's almost as if, the kids live under abusive parents, and their emmotions are so stirred up with hatred that they will stop at nothing to fix their parents relationship. In this story it's much the same. For this reason, I love the story, the book, and the moral. I have also read every other Jedi:Apprentice book except for #6. This one is the best I have read out of the entire series.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The planet Melida/Daan is under constant war
    The planet Melida/Daan is under constant war. Living in the past, they take constant vengance for things that happened 100 years ago. A band of children led by 13 year olds Nield and Cerasi known as the Young are revolting against the Elders trying to save their planet. The fight has become personal to the Jedi's Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon and they're on different sides...

    I liked the Defenders of the Dead because it's about fighting for a cause you believe in even if it costs you everything. It also has strong well-developed characters as well as a great plot and of course the fact that it's set in the Star Wars universe all these things combine to make it a great book.

    This book would be great for almost anyone. Its story is flexible and could please fans of many genres. The person I would most recommend this book to is the Sci-fi/Adventure fan as those are the most prominent genres in this or any other Star Wars book. I give Defenders of the Dead 8 out of 10 stars.

    5-0 out of 5 stars WOW! great stuff
    this book is about qui jon and obi won going on a reshue missoin to a war torn planet, the 2 sides in the conflict just keep on killing each other and jedi and padawan cant agree on anything! if ur child likes star wars and has read 1-4 no. 5 will be awosome!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Motivating
    This one book was the reason of all my Star Wars craziness. I wanted to know what happened to Obi-Wan after he left the Jedi for the Young, so I borrowed all the others from my friend E-Dean, and got hooked. I like Star Wars books by Jude Watson, like the Episode I journals, Jedi Apprentice and Jedi Quest, though I still read other Star Wars books. I actually prefer the books to the movies. ... Read more


    6. The Final Showdown (Star Wars: Jedi Quest)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 043933926X
    Catlog: Book (2004-11-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 6967
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    7. The Mark of the Crown (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 4)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519344
    Catlog: Book (1999-11-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 102606
    Average Customer Review: 4.86 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    A Queen is dying. Her son is conspiring to thwart his planet's elections and maintain his rule. But he might not be her only heir. There may be another....bearing the elusive Mark of the Crown. Qui-Gon Jinn and young Obi-Wan Kenobi came to the planet of Gala as the guardians of peace. Now they are facing a deadly battle for power and royal position. The heir must be found. The Jedi must find the way. ... Read more

    Reviews (43)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great book in the Star Wars Jedi Apprentice line!
    This is definetly a good Apprentice book, in fact, you SHOULD read it. It features many unique characters, and a good scenario. If you ever wondered why Obi-Wan is left alone so many times in Episode 1, you'll find out here. I loved reading about how Obi-Wan handles the situation in this book by himself, while his master (Qui-Gon) goes elsewhere to investigate. Betrayal, dueling, drama, its all in here.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Another great book in this series!
    After reading the first book in this series, i was hooked! i have read the mark of the crown more than 5 times, and can't wait for the next one to come out! everyone who loves star wars, and want to find out how obi-wan and Qui-gon came to be a master and apprentice should read this amazing book!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best!
    The Mark of the Crown was really an extrordinary book in the Jedi Apprentice series. The same great characters are back and are on another adventure. The plot kept my attention through the entire book. For all who like the series or are new to it, this is definitely one you'll like!

    5-0 out of 5 stars one of the best of the Jedi Apprentice series
    Jude Watson continues to write intereszing stories about the adventures of Qui-Gon Jinn and his young Padawan Obi-Wan Kenobi. He also writes about their developing relationship, with both men longing for connection and not realizing that they are coser than they think!

    In this instalment the two Jedi are sent to Gala, where the dying queen is bringing democratic elections to her planet, and her son is not at all happy about it.

    This is a well-written and interesting story in this continuing series.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A great book
    It is a great book but Obi-Wan doesn't have a good bond with his master like a reader before me said. You'll have read more of the apprentice books to find out if it inproves(I know). But it has drama, a little suspence, and some treachery. ... Read more


    8. The Death of Hope (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 15)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439139341
    Catlog: Book (2001-10-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 135927
    Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Qui-Gon Jinn just broke a cardinal Jedi rule by declaring his love for Tahl, a fellow Jedi Knight. Now Tahl has been taken captive, and Qui-Gon and his apprentice Obi-Wan must save her. Unfortunately for Tahl, nothing goes according to plan ‹ and Qui-Gon must face a devastating loss. ... Read more

    Reviews (24)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Another Awesome Book written by the great Jude Watson!
    "The Death of Hope" picks up right where #14 left off. Qui-Gon Jinn, a Jedi Knight, is enraged when his true love -- fellow Jedi Knight, Tahl -- is kidnapped. Qui-Gon has forbidden himself to tell his Padawan, Obi-Wan Kenobi, about his feelings for Tahl. Qui-Gon takes immediate action to try and rescue Tahl, before it is too late. Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan have an almost impossible journey trying to track Balog, Tahl's kidnapper -- even with the help of a probe droid. During one of their battles, one of the twins from #14 reveals that she has been following the Jedi and tells them that her other twin was in league with Balog's kind the whole time. To make matters worse, Obi-Wan's leg gets smashed underneath a boulder. The Jedi find friends, who are miners, and they take the Jedi back to give them med help. But Obi-Wan's injury is slowing Qui-Gon down. He can't wait to long, because if he does, he may never see Tahl again. And to their disadvantage, the miners' quarry is under attack by the worst kind of enemies -- the ones that show no mercy. Will Obi-Wan recover from his injury? Will the Jedi and their friends escape the miners' enemy? But the most tantalizing question of all is: Will Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan reach Tahl in time?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent
    In spite of the obvious unhappy nature of the plot of this book, it still manages to live up to it's predeccesers as far as plot development and scene description go, and I would say that it even surpasses many of them as far as character development goes. I won't give away the whole book, but basically this book begins almost immediately after Qui-Gon discovered that Tahl had been kidnapped. He and Obi-Wan immediately chase after her captors, their urgency intensified once they realize that the longer they take, the more of a potentially lethal paralyzing drug Balog (Tahl's captor) will pump into her body... Anyway, all else I'll say is that things are NOT what they seem! I noticed some people were irritated that this book focused mostly on Qui-Gon while Obi-Wan faded to the backround. I wonder why this is, since this series has ALWAYS (unlike Young/Junior Jedi Knights and other kiddy Star Wars books) focused almost equally on Obi-Wan (the child) and Qui-Gon (the adult) I always found that to be one of the better aspects of this series, since it provides a wider range of view for the story, and greater oppurtunity for
    character development. However, if my fellow Obi-Wan fans would look hard enough, they would see that in fact this book holds more character development for Obi-Wan then ever before. Sure, he gets his leg mashed under a boulder, and messes up a few other times, but where do you think Qui-Gon would have been without Obi-Wan to take up his slack, and take charge of things, and be the master when Qui-Gon's determination to save his beloved gave way to panic? To me, this shows how far he has truly come. Anyway, as to the death of ____, I was quite devestated, but I was also prepared, since she wasn't present in Episode 1, I
    could only assume that by then they had broken up (not likely) or ____ had died. Even so, I liked this new twist in the story, and the portrayal of Qui-Gon as a man in love, so I will certainly miss her, being that she was one of my favorite characters. Anyway, I recommend this book to fans of Star Wars in general, particulerly those twelve and under, thought don't get me wrong, those of us who are older (I'm almost sixteen) can love them too! May the Force be with you!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A story arc with an intricate web of twists and turns
    The two Jedi Knights Qui-Gon Jinn and Tahl have made to each other a commitment of love. But now that Tahl has been abducted while on a mission on the planet of Apsolon, Qui-Gon will push himself to the limit to rescue her. Qui-Gon is consumed by dark visions, visions foreseeing something terrible about to happen to Tahl. With his apprentice Obi-Wan, Qui-Gon must rescue Tahl before it's too late. But nothing is easy as both enemies and friends may not be trusted because everyone has something to hide...

    "The Death of Hope" is the second book of a three book story arc. By far as most people have mentioned, this book is the most sad and touching story. Again the book focuses mostly on Qui-Gon as he struggles to sort out his feelings and to save his loved one. As you continue reading the story, the true sides of both enemies and friends are revealed. It's very confusing as the Jedis have to sort out what is truth and what are lies. I love the story how no one can be trusted and everyone is a suspect. Please be sure to read "The Ties That Bind" before reading this book. Then after reading this, "The Call to Vengeance" on hand since this book ends in a cliffhanger!

    This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad.

    Plus check out the new Jedi Quest series, dealing with the master and apprentice duo of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker. Another Star Wars Series I recommend and like a lot are the Young Jedi Knights series. The stories are about Jacen and Jaina Solo (twins of Han and Leia Solo), and their friends as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights. More on the teenager level of reading. For adult readings, a few selections I enjoy reading are "The Thrawn Trilogy", "Rogue Planet", "The Jedi Academy Trilogy", "The Corellian Trilogy", and "The Truce at Bakura".

    5-0 out of 5 stars the outstanding book
    This book is problely one of the best Star Wars books. Even though the ending is a little sad but f the rest is exiting. If you have lots of imagnation and like Star Wars or starting to like it I recommend you to read it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great emotional book
    It is a great book. It makes Qui-Gon Jinn look more human then just a fictional character. You have to read book #14 to truely understand this book. It has drama and suspense. One of the best books in the series. ... Read more


    9. Heirs of the Force (Star Wars: Young Jedi Knights, Book 1)
    by Kevin J. Anderson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0425169499
    Catlog: Book (1995-06-01)
    Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group
    Sales Rank: 26881
    Average Customer Review: 4.42 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (40)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The title says it all...
    I'll start from the very beginning.

    The YJK series is a spectacular read for teens or for any Star Wars fan who doesn't mind the upper primary to middle school level reading. Hey, I'm 18 and I don't mind reading a young teen book because I LOVE THE STORY. It's a change from all the blood, gore, goose-chase plots, and meaningless sex that have frequented the shelves more and more. I own all 14 volumes in their original paperback form. ^_^ Great for passing by the time and relaxing or for a little Jedi-action - geared for teens of course. The series basically takes off where the Jedi Academy series ended -- with the introduction of the children of Lei and Han at the Yavin 4 Jedi Training grounds with Luke. Albeit it starts quite a few years later, but just the same...

    Heirs of the Force introduces the twins of the Solo family -- Jacen and Jaina, and their Jedi comrades -- Tenel Ka and Lowbacca. The story moves in different ways for different people. If you are like me and want a change from total slam-bang action and could use a little more descriptions, then you'll prolly think the beginning of the story is great. It doesn't move too fast I'll admit because Anderson and Moesta are introducing the people and places and the circumstances. TERRIFIC USE OF DESCRIPTION AND IMAGERY! If you're not all that familiar with Star Wars and didn't keep up with everything (I did! Star Wars forever!), then the long-winded intro may do you a little good. The existence of the Imperials (HA! Can't be missing for long!) are reintroduced by the means of a stranded Tie-fighter pilot and when Jacen and Jaina come across a wrecked tie-fighter and its pilot in the forests, they know that the Imperial forces may not be as dead as the Republic thought. And since this is a series, you just have to wonder exactly what's to happen next and how it correlates. And I assure you - it DOES correlate! The main ideas? JEDI TRAINING, CHARACTER AND SETTING DEVELOPMENT, AND SOME GOOD 'OLE IMPERIAL TROUBLE.

    The physical aspect of the book? I bought the book many years ago when it first came out and I am the proud owner of the first edition -- complete with the foil-embossed covers that gives it a super trendy look. David Dorman's cover artwork is AMAZING and I'll admit that in this case -- it's A-OK to judge a book by its cover! ^.^ If you collect Star Wars books -- this is a terrific series to collect -- not as hardcore, but still your Star Wars, BEAUTIFUL covers, and it's MORE JEDI! More from the teens' perspective that is. Perhaps this series is most powerful to the teen readers because all of a sudden with the intro of teen Jedi Jacen, Jaina, Tenel Ka, and Lowbaccca -- the fantasy of becoming a Jedi Knight seems closer to home... It doesn't matter how old you are -- you are never too old to dream!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great series, Kevin J. Anderson and Rebecca Moesta!
    Written by the terrific husband and wife team, Kevin J. Anderson and Rebecca Moesta, the Star Wars Young Jedi Knights series are not to be missed! These series of books center on the young twins of Han Solo and Lei Organa, Jacen and Jacen, and their friends, Lowbacca and Tenel Ka, as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights.

    The first book, "Heirs of the Force", begins on the planet Yavin 4. There, Luke Skywalker has his Jedi academy where his nephew and niece, Jacen and Jaina, are enrolled. Both of them are fourteen and are being trained as Jedi Knights, along with their good friend Tenel Ka. One day, the twin's father, Han Solo, drops by, along with Chewbacca and his nephew, Lowbacca. Lowbacca is also going to be trained as a Jedi and soon, he and the other three humans are good friends. While Lowbacca is riding his T-23 skyhopper in the jungle, he chances upon a wrecked TIE fighter. Jaina, who loves mechanics, is eager for a challenge, to try to fix the broken fighter. So along with her friends, they begin the task of repairing it, and to also install a hyperdrive which Jaina's father had given her. Little do they know that the original Imperial pilot, Qorl, is still a live and watching them as they work. He has been waiting for years for a chance to return to the Empire and it seems that his chance has come...

    I must say that I just love the Young Jedi Knights! I really like all Star Wars books but this series one of my favorites for the reasons that, 1) the characters are very interesting and close to my age, 2) superbly and well written, and 3) all books are exciting and full of adventure. The five main characters of the books are well likable because each of them have their own personalities, characteristics, and quirks.

    JACEN: He loves all living thing from plants, animals, to insects. In his own room he has his on menagerie of them. He has a special talent in using the Force to communicate with living creatures, though he doesn't know exactly how.
    JAINA: An almost complete opposite of her brother, she takes after her father, Han Solo. She is a mechanical whiz and just loves taking apart and putting together droids, machines, and just almost anything. Also like her father, she is very spirited and has a self-confidence which makes her a natural leader.
    LOWBACCA: Called Lowie by his friends, he is a Wookie and the nephew of Chewbacca. Very courageous and strong, he loves his friends very much. But sometimes he can't but just help missing his home planet Kashyyyk.
    EM TEEDEE: Very much like C-3PO (almost to a fault), Em Teedee is a miniature translating droid who is always kept on Lowie's belt. Though talkative and annoying at times, Em Teedee is a member of the five friends.
    TENEL KA: My personal favorite character, Tenel Ka is the daughter of Teneniel Djo, one of the witches of Dathomir, and Prince Isolder of the Royal House of Hapes. Loyal, a little humorless, brave, and strong, she is a warrior and most of all a true friend. Though strong in the force, she tries not to rely too much in it so she is very athletic.

    But the reason I gave only four stars for this book is not one of best in the series since, in my opinion, the books just get better. So I highly recommend you read all of the fourteen books in order. The series are divided mostly into three parts. The first six books are about the rising force of the Empire and its Dark Jedi Knights. The next five books are about how the Jedi's must stop the Diversity Alliance. And the last three books are how the Jedi's deal with Czethros and Black Sun. Another Star Wars series I very much recommend are the "Jedi Apprentice" series. Don't miss them!

    5-0 out of 5 stars a good book for younger star wars fans
    this book is the first of the young Jedi books and it is very interesting. All of your favorite characters like Han and Luke show up in this book but the Solo kids have their own adventures as well. The story about the wrecked tie fighter pilot was a pretty good one and I think it will keep all readers interested

    5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome continuation of Return of the Jedi
    This is a exciting continuation from Return of the Jedi.
    Han and Leia get married and have twin children,Jacen and Jaina, brother and sister. One day Lowbaca, Chewbaca's nephew, Tenel Ka, Jacen, and Jaina were in the jungel and found a crashed X-Wing Tie Fighter. As they search deeper into the jungle they found the pilot of The X-wing fighter and they all were scared because he was shooting at them. They knew that The Impire, Darth Vader, was evil and so if he was evil then his men were also. Tenel Ka and Lowbaca got away but Jacen and Jaina were stuck with the Imperial Pilot and they were slaves.
    Star Wars fans READ THE WHOLE BOOK!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars HEIRS of the FORCE
    This book is about two young Jedi named Jaina and Jacen that go to the Jedi Acadamy run by their uncle, Luke Skywalker. When Jacen and Jania go for a ride in their friend's ship, they see something shiny. They decide to go check it out. When the get there they find a crashed Tie Fighter. When Jacen looking around he finds a path. Jacen follows the path and finds a hutt.The owner the owner of the hutt and of the crashed Tie Fighter takes Jacen hostage. If you whant to find out if Jacen escapes read HEIRS of the Force. I like this book because it has a lot of action in it. There is a series of Yuong Jedi Knits so the action wont end so quickly. ... Read more


    10. The School of Fear (Star Wars: Jedi Quest, Book 5)
    by Jude Watson, A. Buelow, D. Mattingly
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439339219
    Catlog: Book (2003-02-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
    Sales Rank: 224795
    Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Anakin Skywalker is not an average teen.He has spent his adolescence surrounded by other Jedi.But now the son of a Senator has gone missing, and Anakin must infiltrate an elite school in order to find out what's happened.What he discovers involves a conspiracy much bigger than anyone anticipates -- a conspiracy with repercussions for the whole galaxy.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (9)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Interesting! Awesome!
    This was really a GREAT book. I my oppinion it was the best of all the Jedi Quest books. The plot was interesting and the characters were - well, they were the usual Star Wars people! The writing was good and definitely deserves a five-star rating. This is a fun read for anyone who likes Star Wars or the Jedi Quest/Jedi Apprentice series.

    5-0 out of 5 stars VERY well done
    A Senator's son, Gillam, disappeared from the elite Leadership School on Andara. The Jedi High Council sent two padawans undercover.

    Anakin Skywalker would pose as one there by scholarship. Ferus Olin (Anakin's rival) would pose as the son of someone important. The teens' mission had two parts. The first and most important part was to locate and rescue Gillam. The second part was to learn about a renegade squad of young mercenaries that used the school as a training ground.

    ***** Brava, Jude Watson! This, in my opinion, is the best of the J.Q. series thus far. Readers get to see another glimpse or two into Anakin's potential. The story is well written and the characters' traits are flawless! Highly recommended! *****

    4-0 out of 5 stars interesting short novel about Anakin's apprenticeship
    This is a short novel that takes place between the time of the Star Wars' movies Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones. Anakin Skywalker has been discovered by the Jedis and is now the Padawan of Obi-Wan Kenobi, but he is still young and impatient with the ways of the Jedi.

    While the main action revolves around Anakin and his rival Ferus being placed undercover in an elite school to find the whereabouts of a kidnapped student, more important is the relationship between Anakin and Obi-Wan. Each one makes mistakes and decisions that we know ultimately lead to Anakin's turning to the dark side. The author does a good job of laying the foundation for that later decision.

    The main story is a bit light. The characters Anakin and Ferus and Obi-Wan interact with are interesting and written well, but the plot is rather transparent and not terribly interesting. The vocabulary and grammar are appropriate for the age group, though not challenging, and the action and characters should thrill young fans. I'd recommend this book for its target audience -- young Star Wars devotees who are beginning to read longer books -- but there is probably not much here to interest an adult or older reader.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wow!!!!
    Very rarely have I seen a series get consistently better with each new volume the way this one does. And I thought we'd reached the peak three books ago! Though the error seems to be mostly fixed now, just for the record, this review is for Jedi Quest # 5, The School of Fear.

    Two years have passed since the last book, and Anakin, now sixteen, has been entrusted with the mission of infiltrating a highly exclusive school along with his chief rival Ferus, in an attempt to discover the whereabouts of a young boy who has vanished. Things quickly go awry for the two padawans, as complications arise, as well as conflict within their own strained relationship.

    As I said before, this is the best one yet, with a complex though not overwhelming plot that kept me guessing till the end; as well as myriads of character development for Anakin and Obi-Wan both. As another reviewer points out, it's easy to see all the small mistakes Obi-Wan makes with Anakin, all the ways that things could have gone differently, and how easy it would have been to make it so!

    Do yourself a huge favor, and read this entire series. Don't be deterred by its kiddy exterior, the stories are full of depth and exceed many of the adult novels hugely. The only gripe I have about it is that it was WAY TOO SHORT!! But I imagine that will be remedied as soon as I have book 6...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great book!
    Another story of Anakin and Obi Wan drifting apart and together and apart again. Another story of Anakin enraged at Ferus Olin. I think Anakin really trusted the club.I can't beleive that Anakin hates Ferus enough to let him disapear and not go look for him. I like Obi Wan, but he's too serious and is over critical.I like when he jokes. I loved the part where Obi Wan and Siri had to act like thy were married. I also loved it when the teacher sat on the custard turnover and she blames Ferus. I would recomend this book to any young Star Wars lover. ... Read more


    11. The Uncertain Path (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 6)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519697
    Catlog: Book (2000-02-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 40688
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    At age 13, Obi-Wan Kenobi resolves to quit the Jedi. He finds himself on a planet where his youth promises him power - perhaps too much power. Can he overcome the peril that faces him without the help of his Master, Qui-Gon Jinn? ... Read more

    Reviews (60)

    5-0 out of 5 stars They just keep getting better and better!
    Before this series I had read just about all the kiddy Star Wars books, and I was just about to move on to the adult ones when I came across these. At first I decided to ignore them, since Episode 1 is pretty far down on my list of favorite Star Wars movies, but I decided to give them a try anyway. Boy, am I glad that I did! They are truly awesome, far better than I could have even imagined! Though they are geared toward younger readers than myself (I'm 15) the tone is not at all condesending, and the writing and discriptions are excellent. The characters themselves seem to come alive and the story is very real and intense and even heartbreaking at times. The author crafts each character with care and expertise, and this series brings out far more in Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon than Episode 1 did, and it also gives us new insights as to what exactly Obi-Wan went through to become Qui-Gon's Padawan, and how truly heartbreaking it must have been for him when Qui-Gon is killed at the end of Episode 1. Anyway, for a brief summery, Obi-Wan, having left the Jedi to fight for peace on Melida/Daan, begins to develop a very close knit relationship with the two young leaders of the revolt, Cerasi and Nield. As they struggle to form a new government, Qui-Gon and his friend Tahl, back on Coruscant, are working to discover who might be the culprit of strange thefts that have been happening at the Jedi Temple. This book in particular is very sad and intense, as Obi-Wan sruggles with the fact that though he would like the Jedi to take him back, he knows how deeply he hurt Qui-Gon and that HE will never take him back. And we can see how Qui-Gon is struggling in turn to keep his mind on the problems at the Temple, though he truly feels bad for Obi-Wan when tragedy strikes. I thought in particular that Qui-Gon was portrayed wonderfully, since this book made him seem like an ordinary person on the inside, dispite the fact that he is a Jedi Master. Tahl is also an awesome character, and I truly wish we could have seen some of her before she was blinded so we could see what a great warrior she was. Well, I have no doubt that she can overcome this handicap and go on with life, much as Tenel Ka did after the loss of her arm in Young Jedi Knights, if anyone else has read those. Anyway, I would recommend this series to any Star Wars fan, especially those interested in finding out what happened before Episode 1.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Book!
    When I read this book I just could not stop, only when I had to shovel the drive way. I read this book one snow day and I just fell in love with it. And when the temple theif witch I can't wait to find who's behind this robbery. I also got a couple of laughs from this book, and how Qui-gon Jinn said he would not take Obi-wan as his Apprentice, Oboy is he wrong! I was sad when and shocked when Obi-wan's friend dies that red hair girl. I can't wait till Jedi Apprentice #7 comes out and what happens to Yoda in the next book? Well keep them coming Waston! P.s. If anyone wanted to know when Star Wars The Phantom Menace comes out the date.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Uncertain, You Are
    Jude Watson brings to life the choices we face everyday. It shows how Obi-Wan Kenobi had to mkae one deceision between his home and when his friends on Melida/Daan needed him most.
    When his friend is murdered and all his other friends, except two who remain loyal to him, turn into his enemies. He has no where to go and his former Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn isn't availible to protecthim, Obi-Wan must learn to be on his own with no one to help him.

    3-0 out of 5 stars A Let-down from Defenders of the Dead
    Overall, I've greatly enjoyed the Jedi Apprentice series. It's not Harry Potter, but it gets the job done. Defenders of the Dead was a highlight, with an ending that left this jaded, cynical adult gasping with shock.

    Unfortunately, The Uncertain Path leads to too much boredom. Obi-Wan mopes and Qui-Gon sulks, while the Youth on Melida/Daan regress into the children that they are. A few things salvage the book. Yoda giving Qui-Gon a chewing out (sorry, "Yoda a chewing out giving Qui-Gon, hmmmm?"), a touching scene with Cerasi's father, and the lack of quick resolution to the Obi-Wan/Qui-Gon conflict. Hope remains high for book 7.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Obi-Wan faces an 'uncertain path'.
    The bloody civil war on the planet of Melida/Daan has ended with the Young the victors. Obi-Wan has left the Jedi order to stay with his friends Cerasi, Nield, and the rest of the Young to govern the planet. But instead of having peace after so much war, the Young is starting to break up. Everyone is fighting each other, dividing friends. Taking up the chance, the Elders of Melida and Daan begin to protest. Qui-Gon himself is having many problems. After returning Tahl back to the Temple, he still feels betrayed by Obi-Wan for abandoning him. He finds it hard to forgive Obi-Wan for hurting him, can he ever be able to forgive him? Then he discovers that a series of thefts have begun in the Temple. Could it be one of the Jedi students, or someone outside the Temple? Then Qui-Gon gets the shock of his life, Obi-Wan calls for help! Will Qui-Gon go back to his former apprentice to help?

    A continuation from the previous book, "The Defenders of the Dead", the story really explores the characters of Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon. Obi-Wan has left the Jedi order willingly, yet he begins to have doubts about his choice. Will he ever be one with the Force again? And will he ever get Qui-Gon back as his Master? Qui-Gon is also hurt and betrayed, finding it hard to forgive Obi-Wan. Together they must search their hearts to find out what is the correct path for them. A good ending though you'll probably be in suspense for what is going to happen next in "The Captive Temple". Jude Watson has certainly done an astounding job, the plot and story of the book is so unique and interesting and I couldn't put it down! I still enjoy reading the books as much as I did when they first started coming out in the summer of 1999.

    This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad; young Cerasi who has seen so much pain, Nield who strongly believes in the "Young's" cause, Tahl who though is almost dying has a strong will to live, and more.

    The first Jedi Apprentice book is written by Dave Wolverton while all the rest (19 more books) are written by Jude Watson and are all very highly recommended from me. The books don't really 'end' at all, the books ends in either a cliffhanger or with a little glimpse into the future. Believe me, once you start reading them, you'll want to read the next one... ... Read more


    12. Jedi Quest (Star Wars)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439339251
    Catlog: Book (2004-07-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
    Sales Rank: 54775
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    Book Description

    The next action-packed installment in the best-selling Jedi Quest series
    ... Read more

    13. The Only Witness (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, 17)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439139368
    Catlog: Book (2002-02-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 69320
    Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars
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    Publisher

    Alas, Jude Watson's immensely popular Star Wars: Jedi Apprenticeseries draws almost to its close with the 17th out of 18 books. The OnlyWitness continues the hair-raising adventures of young Obi-Wan and his Jedimaster, Qui-Gon. After the death of his truest love Tahl, Qui-Gon is finding ithard to resist revenge and continue on as a Jedi knight. But when he and Obi-Wanare sent to protect a witness willing to testify against a crime family, he mustmake a decision that will affect the rest of his life. Don't miss the upcomingfinal adventure in the series, The Threat Within. ... Read more

    Reviews (10)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Next To Last For This Series
    "The Only Witness", is the next to last installment in this 18-book cycle by author Jude Watson. Taken, as a whole the cycle of books is a substantial contribution to the world of Star Wars. The series to date has documented the four years of Obi-Wans' training under The Jedi Master Qui-Gon, in addition to whatever period of time the final book will add.

    This storyline is self-contained and really serves to allow Qui-Gon to deal with his grief due to Tahl's death. The book also emphasizes once again that Obi-Wan no longer takes every opinion from his master and makes it his own. Both of these themes have been explored in previous books so I don't see why they had to be drawn out even further, especially with a one book story that is not one of her better books, and is definitely one of the shorter works.

    Even The Jedi Council takes little interest in the mission, as only three members are present to assign the task. It is meant as an attempt to get Qui-Gon back to being a functioning Jedi, but the story is hard to gain much interest in.

    I and many other fans have seen the cover art for the 18th book. There are a variety of conclusions that can be drawn, as the cover art is provocative in what it could represent. I don't see how the story will follow the art's more dramatic implications, for we all know this master and his apprentice have much more ahead of them. It will be interesting to see how Jude Watson brings this to a close, but installment 17 is not much of an offering.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Only Witness
    The Council has decided that Qui-Gon is finally ready for his next mission after grieving over the loss of Tahl. Even though Qui-Gon is heartbroken, he offers to go along with Obi-Wan in their current mission. They have been assigned to protect a girl who must testify against an evil crime family on her planet, and she is believed to be the only witness with the evidence to prove that her planet is corrupt. Lena lives with the fear that she will constantly be killed by those who will do anything to stop her, but she also lives with a fiery determination that is like Tahl's. Qui-Gon isn't so sure to trust her, but Obi-Wan is reluctant to trust her right away. He's certain that although they must simply escort her to safety, Lena has separate problems as well. It's up to Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan to protect her even more than they had imagined. Jedi Apprentice #17: The Only Witness is a dramatic but short book in the series, and is not as good as the previous books -- but it is still very enjoyable.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not my favorite Jedi Apprentice book...
    "The Only Witness": Qui-Gon Jinn is still grieving from the death of his loved one, Jedi Knight Tahl. Though still worried about his condition, the Council decides to finally send him on a new mission. Obi-Wan Kenobi is relieved to be on an assignment, but wonders if his master can handle it. They travel to the planet of Frego to find then escort witness Lena Cobral back to Coruscant. Since because her testimony could bring the downfall of an evil crime family on the planet, the Jedi must ensure her safety. The mission was supposed to be an easy one. Unfortunately, the two Jedi must keep their wits about them as they must try to distinguish truth from lies.

    "The Only Witness" is book 17 of the 18 Jedi Apprentice books. Sadly, I must say that this book is one of the weakest stories of the whole series. The plot was interesting but never has the climaxes, twists and turns we have come to expect from Jude Watson. The whole first part of the story is not that intriguing though fortunately the ending was very well done. On the plus side to the story, Jude Watson vividly and beautifully writes down Qui-Gon's emotion and grief on paper exceptionally well. Obi-Wan's character is also well-written, his confusion and helplessness in giving support to his Master is expressed to the reader without feeling overdone. On the downside though, I just couldn't really like the character of Lena Cobral very much. She's very much of an uneven character, and I just couldn't keep up with her changes from a strong, noble woman to a weak and emotional one. Ah well, I just guess I've been spoiled from all the previous books. :-) I still do recommend Jedi Apprentice fans to read this book, for first timers, I suggest you read from the very first book then work up through the whole series.

    A bit of info on the whole Jedi Apprentice Series. This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad.

    Plus check out the new Jedi Quest series, dealing with the master and apprentice duo of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker. Another Star Wars Series I recommend and like a lot are the Young Jedi Knights series. The stories are about Jacen and Jaina Solo (twins of Han and Leia Solo), and their friends as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights. More on the teenager level of reading. For adult readings, a few selections I enjoy reading are "The Thrawn Trilogy", "Rogue Planet", "The Jedi Academy Trilogy", "The Corellian Trilogy", and "The Truce at Bakura".

    2-0 out of 5 stars Somewhat boring
    Granted that these books are meant for a young audience. But as we have seen with Harry Potter, you don't have to disintegrate into such simpering text. This particular book ranks as one of the worst books in this series.
    Wish that Dave (the one who wrote book number one) could've written the whole series.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Gripping!
    After Qui-Gon "recovers" from Tahl's death, the Council asks him to escort a witness who plans to testify before the Senate. It turns out that the witness wishes to expose the Cobrals (a leading crime family). She requests escorts because she think someone is out to kill her.

    This gripping story is difficult to put down.

    ~ JFS ... Read more


    14. The Captive Temple (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 7)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519700
    Catlog: Book (2000-04-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 265079
    Average Customer Review: 4.85 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    When someone tries to kill Yoda, it's up to young Obi-Wan Kenobi and Qui-Gon Jinn to investigate. Everyone in the Jedi Temple is a suspect - and the true culprit may be the darkest rival of all. ... Read more

    Reviews (60)

    5-0 out of 5 stars This Is A Wonderful Book!
    Captive Temple is a great book for all Star Wars fans toread. Obi-Wan Kenobi is no longer Padawan of Qui-Gon, but fate bringsthem together when the Jedi Temple is threatened. They have to work together to find and destroy the criminal that is in charge of all the threats. This book is just as great as all the other books in the series. There is one part of killing, but the rest is fine. Although the age range is 9-12, this book is a good read for people of all ages. This is definitely a good book for Star Wars fans.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Tell the book by it's cover!!!
    This book is perfect! It's got a great cover, but the inside (though a little short) is great! Xanatoes is back (good luck Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon) and he wants revenge on the Temple, his old master, and for good mesure a boy who happens to mean a lot to Qui-Gon! (guess who?) Also he has another motive, but what is it? They must stop him, but they need a little help. Soooo enter Tahl and Bant, along with Garren Muln. Together they need to save the Captive Temple! Unfotunatly, because of bad experiences on Melida/Daan Obi-Wan has left the Jedi, and they have not taken him back, but even if they do take him back...will Qui-Gon? Maybe...but in the mean time there is a big PROBLEM, Obi-Wan feels jelous and angry and start suspecting his best friend Bant of trying to get Qui-Gon for a master...Now there is conflict EVERYWERE!!! Plleeeease read this book, you won't be disappointed! To those who have read it, I like the bit about Obi-Wan 'Leaving boots very hard to fill'! "Don't worry Garren, you'll grow!" :) -Enjoy!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Jude Watson does it again!
    Its definetly the best in the series, and I would have preferred it to end here. The ending seemed as though it was FORCED to hint about the sequal. I have a feeling that Jude Watson didnt want to continue writing it, and then had to. Its a great book, to bad about the ending....

    4-0 out of 5 stars Return to the Fantastic
    I keep thinking to myself that Jude Watson is no J.K. Rowling, but now I'm beginning to think that I'm deluding myself. The Captive Temple is, as we've come to expect from Watson, a fantastic read. Most remarkable of all is the way Watson is able to depict Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon, twelve years before The Phantom Menace. What is masterful is that these both are and are not the characters we saw in the movie; they appear exactly as they must have been in their younger days. Remarkable.

    The Captive Temple is also an improvement over the previous book. Obi-Wan is less mopey ("Mopey-Wan" . . . hmmm), and Qui-Gon less brooding. There are no quick fixes to their relationship, broken by Obi-Wan's betrayal of Qui-Gon in book 5, which is satisfyingly frustrating. Watson seems to have masterly paced the evolution of our Jedi heroes' relationship, giving us just enough development to keep us coming back for more.

    5-0 out of 5 stars On of the best books, "The Captive Temple"!
    Obi-Wan Kenobi has decided to return to the Temple after staying on Melida/Daan. But once he arrives at the Jedi Temple with his former Master Qui-Gon, he realizes that things might not go as well as he thought. The Jedi Council is harsh with him and Qui-Gon seems to ignore him. Can he ever regain the trust he had with the Council and Qui-Gon? Also, there's a threat within the Temple. Everyone is being under suspicion, everyone is in danger, and everyone is wary of others. Who could be behind these attacks? As Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan try to solve the mystery, they discover that the attacker might be someone they know, someone they've already encountered...

    In this story Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's relationships is being slowly healed though I must stress on the 'slow' part. I can't wait till their problems are resolved and they become the perfect team they become to be in Episode 1. Jude Watson has certainly done an astounding job, the plot and story of the book is so unique and interesting and I couldn't put it down!

    This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad; Obi-Wan's friend Bant with her wise ways, Tahl with her many disadvantages of being blind and many more advantages with having the Force, and TooJay, Tahl's annoying navigational droid.

    The first Jedi Apprentice book is written by Dave Wolverton while all the rest (19 more books) are written by Jude Watson and are all very highly recommended from me. The books don't really 'end' at all, the books ends in either a cliffhanger or with a little glimpse into the future. Believe me, once you start reading them, you'll want to read the next one... then the next one... I can't wait for Jude Watson's next Star Wars series, The Jedi Quest Series with Obi-Wan Kenobi as the Jedi Master and Anakin Skywalker as the Padawan Apprentice.

    Another Star Wars Series I recommend and like a lot are the Young Jedi Knights series. The stories are about Jacen and Jaina Solo (twins of Han and Leia Solo), and their friends as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights. More on the teenager level of reading. For adult readings, a few selections I enjoy reading are "The Thrawn Trilogy", "Rogue Planet", "The Jedi Academy Trilogy", "The Corellian Trilogy", and "The Truce at Bakura". ... Read more


    15. The Shattered Peace (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 10)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590520849
    Catlog: Book (2000-09-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 114895
    Average Customer Review: 3.95 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (22)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Book 10 of the Jedi Apprentice Series!
    Obi-Wan Kenobi and his master Qui-Gon Jinn are sent to keep the peace between the planets Rutan and Senali. But they have more than enough on their hands when conflict arises between the two rulers. For many years, the firstborn children of the rulers of the planets are exchanged at a certain age. Instead of promoting peace this time, the planets are on the brink of war. Leed, the firstborn heir to the throne of Rutan, does not want to go back to his home planet and his father will stop at nothing to get him back. Will Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan be able to bring peace and keep the situation from turning to war and bloodshed?

    For a children's series, each and every Jedi Apprentice book is jam-packed with excitement and suspense, at the same time giving you time to think. I love how the author makes it so even older people can read the books! "The Shattered Peace" has a flowing plot, not giving in to meaningless subplots or too much action. The ending is quite unexpected and more satisfying that I had at first thought it would be.

    This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad.

    Plust check out the new Jedi Quest series, dealing with the master and apprentice duo of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker. Another Star Wars Series I recommend and like a lot are the Young Jedi Knights series. The stories are about Jacen and Jaina Solo (twins of Han and Leia Solo), and their friends as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights. More on the teenager level of reading. For adult readings, a few selections I enjoy reading are "The Thrawn Trilogy", "Rogue Planet", "The Jedi Academy Trilogy", "The Corellian Trilogy", and "The Truce at Bakura".

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Shattered Peace
    Four words: Not enough lightsaber battles! True, that sounds rather pathetic from a book reviewer, but consider this, 'The Shattered Peace' is all about Jedi and their peace-keeping abilities, not their magnetism to break-neck action. (Not to say that this book doesn't have action...) Now, if you're wanting to have the end spoiled for you, you've come to the wrong place! I'm going to limit myself to saying that Qui-Gon Jinn is able to salvage the situation with some help from his Padawan, Obi-Wan Kenobi.

    Jude writes masterfully, getting the book to build tension early, not allowing you a reading break for fear of missing something important. Twists and turns along the way, shock you as they shock Obi-Wan. Not surprisingly, Qui-Gon Jinn expected a few of them. Older Jedi take away all the fun...

    Compared to the other books of the Jedi Apprentice Series, this one has much less raw emotion on the parts of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, leaving older readers wondering if that was the end of the emotional trip for the two.

    Not to worry, though. This book holds a preview of the next chapter in the series, No. 11, 'The Deadly Hunter', and I must say, it looks like a thrill ride compared to this one!

    So! If you're wanting a fantastic, unbelievable read... Wait for the next book. If you're just wanting a fun and entertaining read, get this one. And that's all she wrote.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Shattered Expectations
    The Shattered Peace is a dip in the road that is the Jedi Apprentice series. It is hardly as good as most of its predecessors, suffering from a mostly predictable story, and, in fact, a story that feels like one we've read a dozen (or at least nine) times before. And what there is of a plot is seriously flawed. Rutan and Senali have been exchanging crown princes for generations, we're told, yet the reigning rulers behave as if each has never left his planet! Perhaps a ten year old will not be troubled by this giant oversight, but this thirty three year old couldn't get past it.

    It would be impossible to reach a constant level of excellence over ten books, so the relative mediocrity of The Shattered Peace should not dissuade one from continuing on with the series.

    5-0 out of 5 stars One person's anger could be the start of a terrible war.
    In The Shattered Peace, Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon must travel to the planets Rutan and Senali in order to help them avoid war. For years the firstborn children of the royal families were exchanged in order to promote peace, they thought that the kings would not attack the other planet if their children were there. But Leed, the prince of Rutan, wishes to remain on Senali. His father, King Frane, insists that he is being brainwashed and sends Qui-Gon, Obi-Wan, and Taroon, his second son, to Senali to find him. They arrive on Senali and Leed tells them that he is not being brainwashed and that he truly loves it there. After Leed agrees to face his father, he is kidnapped by a mysterious group of Senalians with clay smeared all over their bodies. Qui-Gon is forced to tell King Frane, who immediately threatens to declare war if Leed is not found and brought home. Now Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan must figure out who is behind this in order to prevent war between the two planets. This book wasn't the best but it was still really good. But the only thing Obi-Wan did was think about how much he was reminded of the incident on Melida/Daan.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not too good , but O.K
    This book wasn't as good as the others, but it just goes to show what different writers imaginations are like. I'm not going to tell you what happens in this book, but if your a jedi apprentice fan I guess your going to read it anyway and find out for yourself what happens.Anyway, if you are first readers of these series, I recommend that you start reading from book one. ... Read more


    16. Jedi Quest: Master of Disguise, The
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439339200
    Catlog: Book (2002-11-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
    Sales Rank: 191233
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi find themselves caught on a hostile planet. and facing their savviest enemy yet, a master of disguise named Granta Omega. ... Read more

    Reviews (6)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Now this is Pod Racing... Again.
    This is a review of Jedi Quest Volume 3 DANGEROUS GAMES. Three Jedi teams are sent to a stone less planet that is ruled totally by 10 people. It is the time of galactic games like earths Olympics except done every 7 years. This planet was chosen for the games due to its high proportions of security personnel as the galaxy has become a more dangerous place recently. The Jedi has sent 3 teams of Jedi with their Padawan's for security. The 3 Padawans are Padawan Ferus (Padawan of Siri Tachi) Tru and Anakin.

    Anakin had not seen a Pod Race since Tatooine, but racing action combines with intrigue to equal an enjoyable read.

    The Jedi Quest series is primarily for readers aged 9 to 12 , and are the tale adventures of Obi-Wan and his Padawan, the future Darth Vader. I read them for their insights into these key SW characters and the fact that the books are fun. A pleasant surprise has been that these books are also available on Audio Cassette Unabridged. Watson is a good job weaving a story with some action and mystery to hold a readers attention while delving into the relationship between Obi-Wan and Anakin. Young Jedi Knights is another younger reader series written by Anderson and Moesta as well as the 18 book series called Jedi Apprentice about Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is also a great book.
    I like how Jonathan Davis reads this book. It's a very good book to read. I listened to it the day I got it. It's a very good book. I highly recommend this book to future Star Wars fans.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Yet!!!
    For some odd reason, it seems that all the reviews for the various books in this series are posted under all of the books. For the record, this review is for Jedi Quest Volume 4, The Master of Disguise.
    First of all, don't be deterred by this book's apparent kiddy exterior. In my opinion, they continue to outdue many of the adult novels by leaps and bounds. This one literally had me sitting on the edge of my seat, unable to put this book down until I came to the conclusion at three in the morning. I identify more with Anakin all the time, as his character continues to develop into the complicated, multi-faceted young man he is by Episode 2. Obi-Wan as well is enjoyable as ever, as are all of the supporting roles.
    This book opens on a war ravaged planet where Obi-Wan and Anakin have been sent along with another Jedi team (old favorites Soara and Darra) to find and rescue a missing team of scientists caught in the crossfire. But when one of the two padawans is badly injured, the mission must be cut short, and when it becomes apparent that old enemy Granta Omega could also be involved, things become even more complicated...
    All I can say is, this series truly is something special, good for Star Wars fans of any age.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Top 10 Percent Of The Series
    The error may be corrected by the time this is posted, but these comments are on, "Jedi Quest #4, The Master Of Disguise". There appears to be confusion between the pages showing the book together with the description of the third book in this series. Jude Watson has contributed more books to the Star Wars Saga than any other author. This is not due to the scope of her work rather that she has been the sole author for these series that are targeted at younger readers. Although meant for persons decades my junior, I have enjoyed many of her books and I am not the only ancient reader who takes these books to the checkout and is rewarded with incredulous looks by cashiers. I joined the Star Wars Universe when the first film opened and have remained a fan, and chatting with youngsters in bookstores about these books have made the experience all the more enjoyable.

    The most recent film, "Episode II", was a success by traditional standards and the envy of virtually every filmmaker. It is now in the IMAX theaters and will probably reach the all time top 10, not accounting for inflation. In terms of its box office performance as a Star Wars film it was anything but impressive, and this has nothing to due with other films that it competed with. Star Wars films do huge numbers because of repeat business, and the fans simply are not responding.

    I think at least one reason was readily apparent for the recent film falling over $100 million shy in this ,and even showing more poorly worldwide. Jude Watson corrects the defect in this book, and she is to be commended.

    These books are for kids, and PG films also are for kids, the messages they either share through words or images are important, and Star Wars has a huge influence and needs to create its products as though they are aware of this. "Charisma is a trait, not a virtue", explains one teacher in this book, accomplishing a goal via imperfect motivation is a failure, not a success as explained by the same instructor. We often hear, "the ends do not justify the means", as an indictment of questionable conduct. This is an issue with me for the statement is incomplete, and it has become accepted "wisdom" through repetition, not because there is substance to the statement.

    The statement should read, is the end justified by any means? The word, "any" changes the entire meaning, and also makes the statement worth considering. Even at this point a person needs to know what end is being sought, and what means are being used to achieve it. When these are known, the discussion can begin, and answers offered.

    These books and the three final films are showing Anakin making choices that lead him in to an abyss that will eventually cause the deaths of countless life forms, and finally will kill him. And these are his choices. Anakin is a very gifted young man who lacks the ability to control his feelings regardless of his age. This book does a wonderful job of demonstrating how easy it is to become evil, and it does so better than the most recent film.

    Anger is a legitimate emotion; it is not one that generates good decisions. When Lucas made, "Episode II", he let anger take over the film, and several characters, not just Anakin. The decapitations that were routine in the film were all unnecessary, and most were cut from the IMAX version of the film. Mace Windu still executes a human in front of his son by this method, it was not needed, and I believe it cost the film 50 -100 million dollars. Windu executed the character in front of the man's son, I believe it turned people off, and parents kept some kids away.

    The greatest Jedi of all, Yoda, was forced in to personal combat in the recent film. He did not instigate it, he did not harm much less kill his opponent. Like many martial arts, and the experts that teach them, they are for defense and not offense, the wise old master is the role model, a protector, never a seeker of vengeance.

    There are times violence becomes unavoidable, killing is supposed to be the last possible, and most regrettable, option used by a Jedi, and that should follow in life as well. This book shows how a person can loose himself to violence through bad influences, easy alternatives, and lack of discipline.

    This is a good book for young readers and Lucas should read it before he decides on the manner of violence he uses in his next film.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best so far!!
    Fourteen year old Anakin Skywalker has been a padawan for nearly six years, and in that time he has learned much, despite his lingering difficulties in controlling his anger. He and Obi-Wan are sent with two other Jedi teams, one containing Anakin's rival, on a fairly routine mission, to mediate and oversee the Galaxy Games (The Olympics, Star Wars style). It doesn't take Anakin long however, to discover another event going on, an illegal one. Podracing. To give away more of the plot would be a crime to this wonderful book, but let me just say that this one is most definatelly full of suprises. I read it in a few hours, and hated putting it down even for a minute. I recommend it to any and every Star Wars fan, young or old. ... Read more


    17. The Dangerous Rescue (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 13)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439139325
    Catlog: Book (2001-04-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 140171
    Average Customer Review: 4.15 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Qui-Gon Jinn has been captured by an evil scientist who must kill him in order to learn the secrets of the Force. It is up to young Obi-Wan and two other Jedi to defeat a vengeful bounty hunter and infiltrate the complex matrix of the scientist¹s lair before it¹s too late. ... Read more

    Reviews (20)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Touching Novel and a Page-Turner in One!
    In "The Dangerous Rescue", written by Jude Watson, Obi-Wan Kenobi is devastated when his Master, Qui-Gon Jinn, orders him and his friend Astri to leave Qui-Gon behind as a prisoner in Jenna Zan Arbor's lab. Jenna Zan Arbor is an evil scientist who will stop at nothing, including death, to learn how to harness the Force. Qui-Gon and another Jedi Knight are her prisoners and they are having blood drawn regularly. The story reunites the reader with familiar Jedi faces: Siri, Adi Galia, and Tahl; but also with the deadly bounty hunter: Ona Nobis, who seeks death-like revenge on Obi-Wan. Obi-Wan, Astri, Siri, Adi Galia, and Tahl must combine their talents and skill to rescue Qui-Gon and the other Jedi prisoner, accumalate the medicine that Astri's ailing father -- Didi -- needs for recovery, save Obi-Wan from Ona Nobis, and bring Jenna Zan Arbor to justice. Are these too many tasks for four Jedi and a friend to handle at once? Will Qui-Gon and the other Jedi ever set foot outside Zan Arbor's lab? Will Ona Nobis succeed in killing Obi-Wan? Will Didi survive? Only time, and reading "The Dangerous Rescue", will tell.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A thrilling new book in the Jedi Apprentice series.
    Obi-Wan Kenobi, with the help of another apprentice, Siri, and her Jedi master, Adi Gallia, has freed Qui-Gon Jinn from the grasp of Jenna Zan Arbor. But the twisted, evil scientist still holds one Jedi captive, the elderly, ailing Jedi master Noor R'aya. Obi-Wan, Siri, and their masters are desperate to free Noor R'aya and capture Zan Arbor before she can do any more harm. But Zan Arbor has inflicted a terrible bacterial disease on a helpless planet, and only she holds the cure - and demands an outrageous price for it. Meanwhile, Astri has undertaken a dangerous quest for vengeance. As her father lies recovering from a poison that nearly killed him, Astri is determined to avenge his near-death at the hands of the bounty hunter Ona Nobis. Obi-Wan and Siri know the girl is not nearly strong enough to defeat a bounty hunter that was strong enough to defeat a Jedi. But Ona Nobis is on her own quest for vengeance. For now she has her own personal vendetta against Obi-Wan. And even the combined strength of four Jedi may not be enough to defeat her. This was a thrilling addition to the Jedi Apprentice series. I reccomend this book to all Star Wars fans.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Conclusion to Great Story
    The Dangerous Rescue brings to an end the story begun in The Deadly Hunter and continued in The Evil Experiment. Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan must track down an evil scientist and confront a deadly bounty hunter in an adventure guaranteed to satisfy even the most demanding of readers. The Dangerous Rescue also features the return of Adi Gallia (one of the council members seen in Episode I) and her abrasive Padawan, Siri. There's drama, suspense, intrigue - in short, everything one could hope for except a bit of romance (but, after all, as the ads for Episode II told us, a Jedi may not know love . . . .).

    5-0 out of 5 stars The conclusion to an exciting story arc!
    Obi-Wan Kenobi, with the help of Jedi Master Adi Gallia and her apprentice Siri, rescue Qui-Gon Jinn from the clutches from Jenna Zan Arbor, but fail to stop her escape. The evil scientist Jenna Zan Arbor will stop at nothing as she tries to discover the secrets of the Force... then use them for her own power. When escaping, she takes along with her one Jedi who remains her captive. Qui-Gon, Obi-Wan, Adi Gallia, and Siri must rescue the Jedi and at the same time rescue a planet from her evil clutches.

    "The Dangerous Rescue" is the conclusion of three books following one story arc. In my opinion, this is one of my most favorite story lines! The story is very exciting and Obi-Wan and another Jedi apprentice, Siri, go off on their own adventures when they go help Astri. Plus there's plenty more excitement as the deadly bounty hunter, Ona Nobis, is bent on having her revenge on Obi-Wan. I also love the character of Siri and am very happy that we get to read a little more about her. One problem I have is the return of the three bumbling characters, Cholly, Weez, and Tup. Somehow I found them a bit annoying but still, I guess their presence is needed somewhat. Read "The Deadly Hunter" and "The Evil Experiment" before this book or I assure you that you will be a bit confused because many of the events which take place closely tie in with the two previous books.

    This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad.

    Plust check out the new Jedi Quest series, dealing with the master and apprentice duo of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker. Another Star Wars Series I recommend and like a lot are the Young Jedi Knights series. The stories are about Jacen and Jaina Solo (twins of Han and Leia Solo), and their friends as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights. More on the teenager level of reading. For adult readings, a few selections I enjoy reading are "The Thrawn Trilogy", "Rogue Planet", "The Jedi Academy Trilogy", "The Corellian Trilogy", and "The Truce at Bakura".

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Dangerous Rescue
    I liked this book because I really wanted to know the sequel to #12. I also liked it because unlike some of the other Jedi Apprentice books, it started exactly where book #12 left off. Of all the Jedi Apprentice books, it is one of my top five favorites. ... Read more


    18. The Shadow Trap (Star Wars: Jedi Quest, Book 6)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439339227
    Catlog: Book (2003-04-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks
    Sales Rank: 86829
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Cool Series
    Isn't it amazing how a so-called children's series has adults raving about it? I do feel sorry for those that pass over these Jedi Quest books because they feel they are for younger readers. Little do they know. The one relationship in the whole Star Wars univers that has fascinated me the most is the one between Obi-Wan and Anakin. We all know what it's destined for and that makes it a very heartbreaking journey to go through with them. But these books make you almost wish that there's some magical way that Obi-Wan and Anakin will work through their feelings. Shadow Trap shows us Anakin and Obi-Wan at one of those moments in their realationship where they're feeling apart. Well, Anakin is anyways. The great thing about this book is that we see it from both of their sides, we see inside both of their minds, their feelings on the matter. If Anakin could only see that while his Master may be disappointed in an act that he commited previously, he's not cast him off to the wayside, he is simply giving him time to try to deal with it. But of course, they are thrust into a mission with this tension between them and must try to find a way to deal with it and succsesfully complete their task.

    This great little story is full of suprises and I think to say too much about it would give too much away. Suffice it to say that both Masters Yaddle and Yoda play a big part in it all. But the big question is, will the end of the story lead to Anakin and Obi-Wan closing that rift between them, or will the circumstances cause that rift to widen?

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Great Book
    This is a great book. Dont judge the book on how many pages it has. Even though it is short, you will not be disapointed on buying it. im not goin 2 write anything that happens in it cause it would ruin the major thing that happens in the book. Buy the book and read it.

    Also read the jedi apprentice books, boba fett books, legacy of the Jedi, and for the advanced star wars reader, The New jedi Order books. Other than the thrawn books, they are the best star wars books that take place after episode 6

    4-0 out of 5 stars Short but Sweet
    This is the sixth book in Jude Watson's great series "Jedi Quest". At only 125 pages it is also the shortest. A lot of surprises are in this book and some cool characters as well. Without giving too much away, Yoda, Yaddle and even Granta Omega play pivotal roles in this story. My only complaint is that it was way too short. Make sure you read the first five "Quest" books before you pick this one up. if you want a good quick read this is for you!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Revelations
    Whoa! This book was excellent. You find out some amazing stuff that I didn`t see coming. The plot is excellent with twists and turns. Some predictable, some aren`t. Get this book and the ones before it. Also try out the Jedi Apprentice series.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A twist and a great book!!
    this is one of the best of the series. in the begin is pretty prediable what is going to happen, or so i thought. yet, Jude do it again. new twists and turns and unxepected suprises happens. first of all, this books shows the dark side of anakin and the falling apart relantionship between obi-wan and anakin. they also meet up w/ their worst enemy and finds out more than they can chew. i'm not gonna tell any more, i don't want to ruin the suprise, but i do highly recommonded everyone to read it, its great. ... Read more


    19. The Deadly Hunter (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 11)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $5.99
    our price: $5.39
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0439139309
    Catlog: Book (2000-12-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 44350
    Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Reviews (32)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good, actualy too Good
    Jude Watson dose it again. Jedi Apprentice #11 was just too good, but I had a really big problem, becouse when I turned the last page there was no more to read. Jude Watson's elegant way of wording things is like reading poetry. It is wonderful to see that Qui-Gon and Obi-wans relationship is growing from master and apprentice into a father son relationship, or egleast friends. For the evil villan in Jedi Apprentice #11 I belive she might just be the worst one so far. She is a bountyhunter who will stop at nothing to finsh her evil deed, this book is a must read.

    The excitment, and action is better than ever. Obi-Wan is amazing, and so is Qui-Gon with both their action moves, and their words.I belive that this Jedi Apprentice is the best one so far. Please do not pass this book up, or any of the books in this series. These books might say that they are for a yunger audence, but these books have poetry, action, suspence, and drama in them, what more could one want in a book. Again PLEASE! do not pass these books up, THEY ARE JUST TOO GOOD!

    5-0 out of 5 stars I loved it!
    This book is excellent! Wow! I think the cover art is really cool with Obi-Wan standing there, poised for battle with the dreaded bounty hunter trying to snap her whip at him. I feel sorry for Obi-Wan, he never gets any food!! Have you noticed that Qui-Gon never eats himself? Weird! Are we sure he's even human? (j/k) Anyways, this book is probably the best JA book that Jude Watson has ever written. There are many close calls (If you've read the book you know what I'm talking about) and we get to see even closer into Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's relationship.

    Please read this book!! You will not be able to put it down! I LOVE OBI-WAN!!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Deadly Delightful
    After a relatively weak performance in The Shattered Peace, Jude Watson returns to form with The Deadly Hunter. An old friend of Qui-Gon's is being stalked by a vicious bounty hunter, and our Jedi heroes find themselves outmatched and outwitted at nearly every turn. After a climactic battle in the snow, The Deadly Hunter ends on a cliff-hanger to rival any that has come before.

    As usual, Watson is at her best in showing the dynamic between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan. Ironically, young Obi-Wan looks down his nose at the cafe dive Qui-Gon's friend owns. It's a pity Watson didn't know about Dexter's dive when writing this one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Extremely Exciting! Well worth reading!
    When Qui-Gon Jinn takes his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi, to meet a good friend of his, he never realizes adventure awaits him at the corner. His friend Didi, owner of a cafe and an informant, has been attacked by a deadly bounty hunter for no apparent reason! When Qui-Gon promises to protect him and to find out the mystery behind the hunter, he himself and Obi-Wan are turned into the next targets! Can they protect Didi and his daughter Astri and keep themselves alive long enough to solve a puzzling mystery?

    "The Deadly Hunter" is the first of three books following one story arc. In my opinion, this is one of my most favorite story lines. There are many reasons for it, because of the exciting adventure, lots of action and fighting, and a terrific mystery that you yourself will have a hard time figuring out. I also love it how Obi-Wan is able to do a lot in the story, plus fight immensely well. But one of the best reasons is because of the bounty hunter. After Xanatos was cut off from the story, I was missing a really 'good' enemy, one worthy of battling weapons and wits against the Jedi team. And the bounty hunter (her name won't revealed till the next book, "The Evil Experiment", so I'm won't spoil it!) is pretty cool. I love her weapon of choice, her deadly whip. Have "The Evil Experiment" and "The Dangerous Rescue" on hand if you want to find out how the story ends!

    This series explains a lot about how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan first meet. Their beginning is far from simple and all smooth-sailings, which would be pretty monotonous if it was. Though the books are said for ages 9-12, like many other reviewers I agree that the Jedi Apprentice Series are for anybody. Extremely well-written, the emotions, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are very well put down into words. I also like the different array of humans and aliens which are portrayed, both good and bad.

    Plust check out the new Jedi Quest series, dealing with the master and apprentice duo of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker. Another Star Wars Series I recommend and like a lot are the Young Jedi Knights series. The stories are about Jacen and Jaina Solo (twins of Han and Leia Solo), and their friends as they journey on the road to becoming Jedi Knights. More on the teenager level of reading. For adult readings, a few selections I enjoy reading are "The Thrawn Trilogy", "Rogue Planet", "The Jedi Academy Trilogy", "The Corellian Trilogy", and "The Truce at Bakura".

    5-0 out of 5 stars Real excitement and actions!
    With whole lot of exciting action, you can feel real excitement in every series. You just can't stop reading it!!!!
    I recommend this book very much especially to Star Wars Fans!!!
    Well, what's the story? Read it, and you'll know! ... Read more


    20. The Hidden Past (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 3)
    by Jude Watson
    list price: $4.99
    our price: $4.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0590519336
    Catlog: Book (1999-08-01)
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Sales Rank: 52915
    Average Customer Review: 4.76 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    After surviving the hair-raising events of The Rising Force and The Dark Rival, Jedi Knight Qui-Gon and 13-year-old apprentice Obi-Wan are officially master and Padawan. The two have been sent off on their first mission by Master Yoda, who has given them a boring assignment: overseeing the elections on Gala, where Prince Beju has been forced to submit his promised throne to a popular vote. As usual for our Jedi heroes, though, nothing goes quite as planned--on the way to Gala they get hijacked to Phindar, where the evil Syndicat rules by erasing the memories of its enemies. Faster than the flick of a lightsaber, master and apprentice find themselves back in hot water, struggling to help their Phindarian buddies overthrow the Syndicat crime lords. After a double-cross here and a blaster fight there, the two discover that even Prince Beju is involved in the Syndicat's nefarious schemes. Dark Rival's author Jude Watson (who's also helped Princess Leia and Queen Amidala tell their stories) is back in fine form to continue this excellent series. (Ages 9 to 12) --Paul Hughes ... Read more

    Reviews (46)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Jace Emero , Jedi Master
    I loved this book, read it 4 times.The action and connection between the Derida bros and Qui Gon & Obi wan was entertaining.Also liked the intertwining story line between this and Mark of the Crown.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Age group? What age group?
    This book is literally amazing. Jedi Apprentice and Dark Rival were great, but this book really outdoes itself. The plot was fairly original, which is more than I can say for certain "Adult" Star Wars authors. I wish we could have seen more into Qui-Gon's thoughts when he was afraid that Obi-Wan would lose his memory, though. Maybe then he wouldn't seem like such an icicle. But the description of the memories was great, and it really gave you an insight into Obi-Wan's past.

    Note to certain dissatisfied readers: There IS a reason Qui-Gon is so distant from Obi-Wan. Remember *Dark Rival*? A guy named Xanatos? Qui-Gon let himself care about the kid, and basically got his fingers burned. After all that, who WOULDN'T wait a little while before trying it again? It makes perfect sense to me, but them I *AM* a teenager, and therefore I know everything in the world. ;)

    May the Force be with y'all!

    5-0 out of 5 stars fine 3rd instalment about Obi-Wan's apprenticeship
    Obi-Wan has at last become the Padawan of Qui-Gon Jinn and is about to leave on his first official mission. Things couldnt be better, right? Think again! The Jedi are kidnapped and taken to Phindar, a planet ruled by a criminal who has people's memories erased. Things only get worse when one of the Jedis falls into his clutches and is slated for a memory wipe!

    This is an exciting story and explores further the developing relationship between Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon. Auxiliary characters are fun, especially the jovial Derida brothers, and Yoda is present in spirit if not body. There are a few battles but violence is not graphic.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Another winner
    This story is officially the beginning of Qui Gon and Obi Wans master, Padawan relationship. As with just about all of the books in this series, this book comes with a moral, as well as an interesting story. You get the sense of how both Qui Gon, and Obi Wan help each other to grow not only as individuals, but as Jedi knights too. The author does a good job of illustrating the fact that even though Obi Wan and Qui Gon are both loyal members of the Jedi, they both have very different, but accommodating, personality traits.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Hidden Past(Star Wars:Jedi Apprentice,Book 3)
    It's a book filled with adventure and excitment. If you love Star Wars, you'll love this book. ... Read more


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