Global Shopping Center
UK | Germany
Home - Books - Horror - British Help

121-140 of 200     Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next 20

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

list($4.50)
121. Cults of Horror
$1.79 list($3.99)
122. A Creepy Company
$8.87 list($9.95)
123. Twelve Tales of Murder (Oxford
$19.95 list($39.95)
124. Clive Barker's Shadows in Eden
$16.47 $7.99 list($24.95)
125. Beneath The Moors and Darker Places
$2.86 list($24.95)
126. Ghosts and Grisly Things
$24.95 $15.12
127. Modern Gothic : A Reader
$4.20 list($22.00)
128. The New Gothic : A Collection
$8.99 list($3.95)
129. Razored Saddles
$23.70
130. Readings on Frankenstein (Literary
$2.88 list($9.95)
131. Scary Classics: Stories from the
$8.59 list($11.45)
132. Captives
list($19.95)
133. In the Circles of Fear and Desire:
list($4.95)
134. Scare Care
$18.00 list($10.95)
135. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror
list($35.95)
136. Matthew G. Lewis, Charles Robert
$0.53 list($14.00)
137. Into the Mummy's Tomb
$29.95 $0.47
138. Love, Mystery and Misery: Feeling
$10.17 $10.12 list($14.95)
139. Bloody Irish: Great Irish Vampire
list($12.95)
140. Living in Fear: A History of Horror

121. Cults of Horror
by Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh
list price: $4.50
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0886774373
Catlog: Book (1990-07-01)
Publisher: Daw Books
Sales Rank: 2060689
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

122. A Creepy Company
by JOAN AIKEN
list price: $3.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440409934
Catlog: Book (1995-01-01)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 1895742
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

123. Twelve Tales of Murder (Oxford Twelves S.)
by Jack Adrian
list price: $9.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0192880756
Catlog: Book (1998-05-01)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Sales Rank: 1957192
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

The stories collected in this nail-biting anthology are a macabre celebration of the ingenuity of murder. Victims meet their ends in ways which are sometimes gruesome, sometimes tragic, but always imaginative, involving methods as diverse as sword swallowing, triggered bank vaults, and exploding sweets.

In Twelve Tales of Murder, Jack Adrian brings together stories by well-known writers in the genre, as well as rarer stories which have for decades been unavailable to readers. For anyone who has ever been gripped by a good murder mystery, and for those who never have but are tempted, Twelve Tales of Murder is a delightful guide to who did what to whom, and how. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Inventiveness of Murder
Jack Adrian's anthology of murder stories in the Oxford Twelves series is an agreeably fiendish collection supplying enough chills and thrills to last through many a dark and stormy night. As usual, the anthologists in this series comb through the 19th and early 20th centuries for their wares and the authors represented are both famous and obscure. The gruesomeness of the murder methods in "An Illustration of Modern Science" (1896) would meet with the approval of Hannibal Lecter himself, and Conan Doyle would be hard pressed to conjure up a more sinister portrait of London than the one we see in "Fogbound" (1903). As for the disquieting "Portrait of a Murderer" (1942), it leaves the reader with a completely new perspective on the meaning of fatherly love. I am a big fan of the Oxford Twelves series (I have them all) and heartily recommend this book as well. ... Read more


124. Clive Barker's Shadows in Eden
by Clive Barker, Stephen Jones
list price: $39.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0887330738
Catlog: Book (1991-08-01)
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
Sales Rank: 1474238
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

125. Beneath The Moors and Darker Places
by Brian Lumley
list price: $24.95
our price: $16.47
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0312876947
Catlog: Book (2002-02-09)
Publisher: Tor Books
Sales Rank: 127481
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

In addition to his stellar Necroscope series, Brian Lumley is highly regarded for his short fiction, for which he has won the British Fantasy Award. Beneath the Moors and Darker Places, a companion to The Whisperer and Other Voices, collects nine lengthy exemplars of the best of Lumley's short works, many of them unavailable for decades in any form.

The Cthulhu Mythos of the immortal H.P. Lovecraft provides inspiration for much of Lumley's work, including "Dagon's Bell" and "Big C," both included here. The explosive creation of a new volcanic island off Iceland in 1967 led to "Rising with Surtsey," a homage not just to Lovecraft but to the great August Derleth. "David's Worm"--which takes an interesting view of "you are what you eat"--was published in a Year's Best Horror Stories and later adapted for radio in Europe.

The collection also includes the macabre "The Second Wish," published here for the first time with the author's original, intended ending, and "The Fairground Horror," first published in The Disciples of Cthulhu twenty-five years ago and not seen since save for a small press edition.

The title tale, Beneath the Moors, a complete short novel, has been unavailable in the United States since its first publication by Arkham House in the early 1970s. It is considered to be one of Lumley's strongest short works; Tor is proud to restore this and the other pieces in this volume to Lumley's growing readership.
... Read more

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars a fun and scary read
this book was a blast. if youre a fan of horror (sometimes very graphic horror) order it today. Big C is one of the more original sci-fi/horror stories i've ever read. fantastic.

5-0 out of 5 stars Chaos and Crustaceans, What Lurks Beneath The Skin
Beneath the Moors and Other Places exhibits the plethora of talents that Brain Lumley, the personification of what a short story writer should be, brings with him, showcasing exactly why he is considered by some, myself included, as one of the best storytellers readers can have the been fortune of running across. Besides the fact that he can take anything that crosses his path, from the ordinary things strewn about your house, those microscopic worms that you studied in science classes, or that pesky outerworldly terror that your next-door neighbor seems to drag out on rain days, and make it frightful, he also has an inner eye for detail, one that allows him to convey surroundings with remarkable detail. This is easily seen any time he divests the surroundings of his newest horror, taking some blank canvas and giving contours and colorations most authors forget and making you, the immersed reader, actually feel its chest heaving life. Besides that, the detail within the inner workings of both the background and the characters themselves, the believability with which they are portrayed, is remarkable, making even the shortest of tales teem with a cast that you can actually feel suffering.

Within this collection itself are some highly notable pieces, including the much acclaimed Lovecraftian pieces Dagon's Bell, The Fairground Horror, the Rising of Surtsey, plus the short Novel, Beneath the Moors, and the ones I favor, David's Worm and The Sun, The Sea, and The Silent Scream. This mingle together in a lovely fashion, taking different aspects of horrors that are both physical and psychologial and placing them in a stew that o so well.
Shortly breaking down some of the inclusions and listing the rest at the end, they are:

David's Worm, a story about the lowly planarian worm that David, a scientist's son, sees upon a slide, notices is alive, and lovingly liberates by letting it go into a pond behind his home. Here it feeds and grows, taking on the abilities and mentalities of many of the things it consumes before finally wobbling onto land and confronting David and his family as well. I personally found this story entertaining because it shows why some things make good additions to a slideshow and shouldn't be freed and why I would only play fetch with a cute little blob like Planny if I had a kid to bait it with, plus the ending is wonderfully cruel device that sent a tiny shiver down my entertained spine. As a reader, I truly appreciate that.

Dagon's Bell, is a tale about the wonders of home acquisition and what sometimes lurks beneath our wonderful abodes. Here, a home once possessed by a man thought to be a bit crazed becomes vacant when he, disappearing altogether, can no longer display the wonders of shotgun love to an adoring public and a newly married couple decides that this place, an extensive fixer-upper, would be a dream come true. Little do they know that somewhere beneath the grounds the sounds of a bell, Dagon's Bell, can be heard when the tide is right, and it brings with it things that really don't make good dinner guests. This story has a lovely rendition of manifestation inside it that I enjoyed, plus a bit of background that is pretty tasty, not to mention that the story itself, teeming with a bit of madness that Lovecraft would enjoy, comes across really well.

The Sun, The Sea, and The Silent Scream, is a lovely recount depicting the joys of vacationing in places where the water isn't intestable and where tiny parasites, enjoyable crablike entities that like to get on and in their hosts, infest everything. Besides simply entertaining the reader, it actually works as a textbook of sorts, teaching you the merits of staying at places not considered "out of the way" and also showing you why your food preparers, a sometimes overlooked by the less picky of sorts, should be mistrusted without exception.

The Fairground Horror, deals with the great tentacled one's priests and the mark they bare. It begins by focusing on Hodgson's Funfair and a man named Anderson Tharpe who has recently added a new freak-house frontage called "Tomb Of The Great Old Ones." Within it are the normal oddities that freakshows like to use, the cons that have been sold throughout the ages, but there are also some other things, pieces taken from his younger brother, Hamiliton. Without delving too much into it, this is basically a lesson in why you should try to play with things belonging to the sleeping old one, and why you should never trust anyone wearing a hairpiece.

Also included in this book are The Second Wish, A Thing About Cars, Rising of Surtsey, Big 'C' and Beneath the Moors, all good pieces that deserve attention and will no doubt appeal to the outermost terror because of my careless neglect.

To say that the stories manifesting here are worth reading is, quite simply, an understatement of the foulest sort. With the mistreatment of a child's kindness, the rising of undersea horrors, fairs that have no need of falsified unicorns to have truly unique sideshows, and vile creatures that burrow under one's skin, this collection warms the heart in a way that only the most special of collections can. Personally, it makes me feel like singing Christmas carols.

5-0 out of 5 stars He's more than just the "Necroscope" guy
A marvelous anthology which allows us to see a talent grow and develop. Lumley has a very effective touch. The first story in the anthology, "David's Worm", hit so hard I had to put the book down for a few days before trying the next. Masterfully done.

I *really* appreciate the fact this book is so well-constructed. So many of today's hardbacks have a squishy feel to them; this doesn't. It's solidly put together and I am confident it will survive future readings and re-readings.

Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fabulous anthology
Many horror novelists and filmmakers have tried to capture the essence of the Cthulhu mythos, but most fail even when the effort attempts to pay homage to Lovecraft. BENEATH THE MOORS AND DARKER PLACES succeeds in achieving the essence of Lovecraft's works and paying respect to the master supernatural writer yet feels fresh. Brian Lumley includes a potent novella (BENEATH THE MOORS) not published since the 1970s (at least in the United States) and a new gripping ending to the powerful "Second Wish". The other seven stories are terse thrillers too. The reader has nine taut tales in which each one entertains the audience in a manner Lovecraft and other horror grandmasters would have been proud to claim authorship. Fans of Mr. Lumley (see Necroscope) or Mr. Lovecraft will relish this trip to darker places.

Harriet Klausner ... Read more


126. Ghosts and Grisly Things
by Ramsey Campbell
list price: $24.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0312867581
Catlog: Book (2000-10-01)
Publisher: Tor Books
Sales Rank: 863237
Average Customer Review: 3.33 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Ramsey Campbell's novels have justly won him acclaim as one of the best writers of the age.A three-time winner of the World Fantasy Award and an eight-time winner of the British Fantasy Award, his writing has struck a chord with readers worldwide.

But throughout his career he has also written insightful, terrifying, and disturbing short fiction.Ghosts & Grisly Things is a collection of the best of Campbell's short works from the past two decades.This book also features the story "Ra*e" which appears here for the first time anywhere.
... Read more

Reviews (6)

2-0 out of 5 stars Terrifyingly anti-climactic
I found this book confusing and disapointing. I like subtlety, but after reading many of these stories, I couldn't figure out what I was supposed to be scared of. I would go back and re-read the storys, thinking that I had missed something, but I never found anything, the stories were actually just not scary.

For example, one story ends with a guy giving out his ex wife's
address to a very non scary, but annoying, couple so that they can deliver some pictures. Oh but the ex told him not to! 0o0o0o0o scaaaaaaaary!

I bought this book because I was impressed by one of the stories, "Going Under", which I read in a horror anthology. A fat guy trampling a crowd of people isn't too scary, but I found it extremely funny and dark.

Anyway, if you like to be scared, and you're under the age of 50, this book might not be for you.

2-0 out of 5 stars not grisly
there were a few good ideas here. also some good writing. but the stories never seem to have a suspenceful enough climax. the stories were full of irrelevant stuff, like "he went to work", dwelling, and too long dialogues. the suspence died. some of the ideas were actually kind of interesting. inventive in a way. one story was actually good. but not enough is being invested in suspence, too much in people's actions and dialogues. if only there was more focus on descriptions and suspence. and some of the stories were also uninventive.

4-0 out of 5 stars Another fine Campbell collection.
Ramsey Campbell, Ghosts and Grisly Things (Tor, 1998)

I sometimes wonder where books get their titles. In this case, I have to lay the blame on some copy editor at Tor who hadn't even bothered reading the manuscript, or at best skimmed it a tad. There's the odd ghost in this collection of stories, and a grisly thing or two, but anyone who's read Ramsey Campbell before should be well aware by now that the horror which Campbell makes his stock in trade has far less to do with such external fear-inducing stimuli. Stephen King writes in the opening pages of Cujo about how our fears change as we grow older, how the monster in the closet becomes the horror of not knowing how you're going to pay the rent on time. Within that perspective, Campbell is very much an adult horror writer; while his characters find themselves in widely disparate situations doing widely disparate things, the horrors that plague them are usually those who invoke the same fear as not knowing whence the rent check. And perhaps this is why Campbell has yet to find the audience in America that King and his monsters or Koontz and his aliens have found. When the monster is something other than the average Joe (even if he's a serial killer or some other damaged version of humanity, he's still "other"), there's a cushion of safety against which the reader can lean. When the monster is a guy on a cell phone ("Going Under"), a return to one's hometown ("Welcomeland"), or the banal passengers you're stuck with on the train ("Missed Connection"), you can't help but identify. We've all been there and done that.

Campbell is probably better known as a novelist, but he's published a number of collections of top-quality short stories. Add this one to the list. He's the grand master of writing the type of horror that has fueled the recent careers of such lights as Kathe Koja, Lucius Shepard, and Patrick McGrath; fans of such writers should have no problems glomming onto what Campbell's doing, and those few who haven't discovered him yet deserve to. ****

5-0 out of 5 stars Campbell is still the undisputed Master of the Horror Tale
As you'd expect from Ramsey Campbell, GHOSTS AND GRISLY THINGS includes the most chilling, well written, powerful, and haunting horror tales you'll find out there today. While I don't think this collection of tales ranks with his best (eg, the horror masterpieces DARK COMPANIONS and THE HEIGHT OF THE SCREAM; both of which deserve to be considered as modern-day masterworks of the horror tale comparable to the best of M.R. James, Shirley Jackson, Fritz Leiber, Robert Aickman and H.P. Lovecraft), it is nonetheless one of the strongest collections since the Campbell retrospective ALONE WITH THE HORRORS.

The two vaguely positive reader reviews preceding this one just don't come close to doing justice to this book. It appears that the extraordinary, though often subtle, power of this collection of stories has eluded both reviewers. Furthermore, despite their claims to the contrary, there are no tales within concerned with vampires, classic horror creatures, or necrophilia (which one reviewer mistakenly claims to be the subject of "Through the Walls").

It's fair to say that many readers, especially those only used to very straightforward, more mainstream horror writers like Dean Koontz or Stephen King, may not get the full impact of a typical Campbell tale on the first reading. Campbell's style is unique, natural, and evocative--though free of the pretentious, heavy-handed flourishes that some writers seemingly confuse for a style. His technique can also be extremely subtle. Readers accustomed to the more in-your-face attempts at shock that pepper mainstream fiction might not even pick up on some of the more suggested elements in his work.

Campbell is not a writer who heaps redundant detail upon the reader. He often says much in just a few words--thus igniting the reader's imagination, rather than swamping it with excess and irrelevancies. His writing frequently captures the elusive and ambiguous feel of nightmares. The horror of his tales never feels obvious or familiar, unlike the stock villains and unimaginative ghoulies that too much modern horror writing relies on. His demons are enigmatic; they arise inexplicably, like incarnations of the ingrained violence or decay of a haunted landscape, or the manifestations of one's worst fears. His imagery is often grotesque, and sometimes stomach-churningly gruesome, but always conveyed with the flair of a master artist: capturing images through an elegant prose as fluid as the strokes of an Impressionist painter, rather than heaping overheated writing upon itself in some desperate effort to summon a response in the reader.

At the same time, Campbell's fiction is rooted in a thoroughly convincing and unsentimental realism. His characters and their relationships, and his settings, from run-down urban backstreets to sunny and remote countryside, ring true in a manner horror fiction rarely even aspires to. Only once such a solid foundation has been established does the nightmarish begin to intrude, as it does with such unnerving inevitability throughout Campbell's work. Indeed, nobody--with the possible exceptions of such noteworthy talents as Robert Aickman and M. John Harrison--rivals Campbell at blurring the lines between finely drawn reality and the frighteningly twisted logic, dread-filled atmosphere, and horrific, indelible imagery of nightmare.

GHOSTS AND GRISLY THINGS offers a number of excellently crafted tales that recall Campbell's best. Some of its best tales are "Missed Connection", "Root Cause", "The Alternative", "Looking Out", "Between the Floors", "The Sneering", and "Welcomeland": a selection outstanding not just in its diversity and the brilliance of individual tales therein, but as a demonstration of the range and power of which the best horror fiction is capable. If tales like those listed above fail to move, disturb, or haunt a reader, I'd submit that the problem is not with the writing at all, but with the reader. Meanwhile, a few stories, such as "Where They Lived" and "McGonagall in the Head", balance the darkness of their visions with an equally black humor.

That's not to say I think the entire collection is flawless. As stated earlier I don't think GHOSTS AND GRISLY THINGS packs the wallop of Campbell's best fiction collections. There's a couple of fairly lightweight pieces here, particularly "Going Under" and "A Street Was Chosen"--though the latter successfully invokes the feel of a playfully mean-spirited cartoon by Charles Addams or Edward Gorey. My primary gripe is probably with the last entry, the novella "Ra*e", which, though a fine, chilling tale, ranks as one of the least impressive works I've read by him. "Ra*e" reads like one of Campbell's less successful stabs at a more mainstream market for thriller/serial killer fiction, which I think is a major step down for a writer of his ability. But nonetheless, even the weakest material here is of a quality rarely matched in horror writing in general.

So overall this book is a must-read work of modern horror fiction. It also makes a fine starting point for anyone yet to read Campbell's work. Keep in mind, if you merely seek escapist thrills and cheap shocks: you need not look into this book or anything else written by Ramsey Campbell. However, if you're after well crafted stories that demonstrate how vital, imaginative, and powerful horror fiction can be, tales that will stay with you after you've read them, then you may thank yourself for checking out GHOSTS AND GRISLY THINGS.

4-0 out of 5 stars Grisly more than scary but quite good
Ramsey Campbell is more known for his novels such as SILENT CHILDREN and NAZARETH HILL. Still his previous anthologies have been well received (see ALONE WITH THE HORRORS: THE GREAT SHORT FICTION OF RAMSEY CAMPBELL 1961-1991 AND STRANGE THINGS AND STRANGER PLACES). So for Mr. Campbell to provide his audience with twenty tales that vary in terror (and quality) is not surprising. The subjects deviate from modern day scenarios to homage to classic horror creatures.

Not for everyone because Mr. Campbell's writing often lives up to his title, the stories are creative, quite depressing, yet often humorous. The stories diversify between physical horror (ask the charity runner, the vampires or the other alleged creatures of the night) to psychological terror (talk to the mother avenging her daughter's murder). All the stories are good, but the best contain characters forced to challenge real or imaginative phantoms. Hopefully readers will not have to wait five plus years for Mr. Campbell's next anthology.

Harriet Klausner ... Read more


127. Modern Gothic : A Reader
list price: $24.95
our price: $24.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0719042089
Catlog: Book (1997-02-15)
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Sales Rank: 1157308
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

This lively collection of essays aims to chart the survival of the gothic strain - the dark, the forbidding, the alienated, the fantastic - in a spectrum of popular and 'high cultural' forms of representation.
... Read more

128. The New Gothic : A Collection of Contemporary Gothic Fiction
by BRADFORD MORROW
list price: $22.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394587677
Catlog: Book (1991-10-15)
Publisher: Random House
Sales Rank: 506214
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

129. Razored Saddles
by Joe R. Landsdale, Pat Lobrutto
list price: $3.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0380711680
Catlog: Book (1990-09-01)
Publisher: Avon Books
Sales Rank: 1190056
Average Customer Review: 3 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (1)

3-0 out of 5 stars good stories, but expected more
I picked up my copy of this book in a used book store, the only reason for doing so, is that I knew it had a Richard Laymon contribution in it ("Dinker's Pond"), being, of course, a little bit of a Laymon fan.

The other stories in the book are by: Robert R. McCammon, Scott Cupp, Lewis Shiner, F. Paul Wilson, David J. Schow, Ardath Mayhar, Al Sarrantonio, Melissa Mia Hall, Robert Petitt, Gary L. Raisor, Neal Barrett Jr., Howard Waldrop, Lenore Carroll, Joe R. Lansdale (also co-editor with Pat LoBrutto), Richard Christian Matheson and Chet Williamson.

I have an interest in the Wild West and Horror, so i was expecting this book to be a specific combination of the two, only to find that it has sci-fi entries and several set in modern times (albeit, with a Western setting).

The mixture may appeal to others but i prefer things to be a little more specific when it comes to genre tales.

Good, well-written tales in whole, but don't expect anything spectacular. ... Read more


130. Readings on Frankenstein (Literary Companion (Greenhaven Paperback))
by Don Nardo
list price: $23.70
our price: $23.70
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 073770182X
Catlog: Book (2000-01-01)
Publisher: Greenhaven Press
Sales Rank: 680340
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Everthing You Ever Wanted to Know About Frankenstein!
A volume that every fan of horror, science fiction, English literature, and Mary Shelley should read! It consists of a bunch of articles written by various scholars about the book "Frankenstien" (by Mary Shelley), that does not mean that they are too scholarly for the average person to understand. As a matter of fact they are all very easy to read. The editor (Don Nardo) also included a helpful overview of Mary Shelley's life in the front of the book. He also has an excellent bibliogrophy telling the reader many other books to check about Frankenstein and Mary Shelley. ... Read more


131. Scary Classics: Stories from the Greatest Horror Writers of All Time
list price: $9.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0737304383
Catlog: Book (2000-09-01)
Publisher: Lowell House
Sales Rank: 1044250
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Dickens, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and William Hope-Hodgson are just a few of the literary masters of horror and suspense gathered together in Scary Classics. This absorbing collection of suspenseful tales is sure to satisfy all horror buffs. Each story in this creepy compendium includes an introduction about its author. Also contains a glossary of difficult terms and detailed full-page illustrations. ... Read more


132. Captives
by Shaun Hutson
list price: $11.45
our price: $8.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0751500046
Catlog: Book (1992-01-01)
Publisher: Acacia Press, Inc.
Sales Rank: 2195650
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Detective Inspector Frank Gregson must investigate a series of savage and apparently motiveless murders. Moreover, they are carbon copies of killings committed years earlier - committed by men currently incarcerated in one of Britain's maximum security prisons. How could this be? ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars can't put it down!!
Very gory, very detailed like all of his books. It's hard to try to put the book down once you've started reading it. I envisioned the book's imagery in my mind even after I finished the book. He is the best author if you like horror because it gets straight into the plot without side-tracking, unlike Stephen King.

I recommend this book to anyone who's ever liked a horror book before. ... Read more


133. In the Circles of Fear and Desire: A Study of Gothic Fantasy
by William Patrick Day
list price: $19.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0226138909
Catlog: Book (1985-08-01)
Publisher: Univ of Chicago Pr (Tx)
Sales Rank: 1427181
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

134. Scare Care
list price: $4.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0812510976
Catlog: Book (1990-09-01)
Publisher: Tor Books
Sales Rank: 1256523
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (3)

1-0 out of 5 stars Dedicated to Abused Children, but NOT for children
On the one hand, Masterton came up with a really terrific idea -- dedicate the proceeds of a scary book to helping abused children.And he makes a good point, too, what we might read in horror stories is literally NOTHING compared to the real horrors abused children face every day.

On the other hand, I wonder if some of the stories in his collection might be better suited to other, less nobly designated forums
Perhaps it's just me, but I've always assumed that any event or object dedicated to the funding of children's causes would be more or less tailored so that children could actually participate in or enjoy it to some degree as well.It would seem odd, after all, if something dedicated to children is something children shouldn't touch.
The story selection in Scare Care is uneven. A few are truly great, such as the one by Harlan Ellison in which a man goes off in search of a truly original father. I could read them over and over again. Others are terrible, both in quality and in content, and I have to wonder what Masterton might have been thinking by including them in what could have been an otherwise stellar collection.
There are at least four incredibly gruesome stories included here, all prefaced by Masterton's declaration that although he had misgivings at first, he decided to override himself and put them in, since they did not REALLY contain very much in the way of gory themes.I'd like to make a point here: If, in a story, someone wanders around hacking and stabbing a family to pieces with various sharp objects, one by one by one, and if that someone happens to be a little child, it is VERY gory (and hugely inappropriate to a book dedicated to Helping Children). If, in a story, an evil character takes apart people's bodies to build a doomsday machine, it is VERY gory. And if, in a story collection, the editor makes identical excuses for every other story, readers have to wonder just exactly how serious that editor's standards were.
At any rate, I assume an editor of a horror collection would be responsible enough to know the difference between a good fright story and something that is merely a gorefest. Or perhaps I'm being too strict. After all, Hollywood can't seem to tell the difference, either, and if they can't do it, why should anybody else?
Two other things stick in the mind about this book -- the longest and the shortest stories in the collection. "The Changeling" is written by Masterton himself. The story is laden with repetetive moralistic musings on What a Hard Time Beautiful Women Have Being Beautiful and What Amoral Slobs All Men Are, and unnecessary descriptions of nudity (meaning, the descriptions are long and detailed and do nothing to forward the story; again a hugely inappropriate detail to include in such a book).I can't help thinking that it was included mostly because the guy who wrote it was also the guy in charge of selection.The other story is a two-page horror-puzzler written by his ten year-old son.Masterton, Jr.'s story is pretty good, but again I have to wonder if it would ever have gotten published anywhere if his father hadn't happened to be the editor of the book.
I'm doling out some pretty harsh criticism here, and I make no apologies. I feel that as an editor a person has a certain responsibility to his audience, and an editor of a for-charity book has an even bigger responsibility to make sure that book is the best it could possibly be, for the sake of the people he's doing it for.
Personal taste is always going to be a factor in any editor's selection of stories for publication; that much is a given. Jane Yolen and Isaac Asimov, for example, both frequently include(d) their own work in anthologies they themselves have worked on. However, an editor's personal interests should not be allowed to overwhelm or distract from the overall quality of the thing he's working on.
That Masterton used Scare Care even in part as an opportunity to get his and his son's work published, and took very little real care in the rest of the collection's selections cheapens the book, and the cause he was ostensibly working for.

4-0 out of 5 stars A good read for lovers of short horror stories.
Scare Care is worth buying simply because the intent of the editor, Graham Masterton, in compiling these stories was to help children in desperate need.However, Scare Care also stands on it's own feet as a genuinely good read for those of us who love this genre.Mommy, the first story in thebook, is more of a feel good horror story than truly frightening, butsprings from a very interesting concept nevertheless.You might, as I did,find a lump in your throat after reading Things Not Seen, and The Avengerof Death asked interesting questions about man's ability to mete out"justice".There were one or two stories included, such as MannyAgonistes and Changeling, which have been seen elsewhere and were more thanworthy of a second, third or fourth read.(And) of course there were theusual stories which, while the endings were rather obvious, still make foran entertaining half hour before you turn out your light!

Several storiesfound their way into this book which we all really could have livedwithout, but what would a short story compilation be without a fewclangers?

My recommendation - as an avid reader of short horrorfiction - is; buy the book, be entertained but don't expect miracles.

4-0 out of 5 stars A good read for lovers of short horror stories.
Scare Care is worth buying simply because the intent of the editor, Graham Masterton, in compiling these stories was to help children in desperate need.However, Scare Care also stands on it's own feet as a genuinely goodread for those of us who love this genre.Mommy, the first story in thebook, is more of a feel good horror story than truly frightening, butsprings from a very interesting concept nevertheless.You might, as I did,find a lump in your throat after reading Things Not Seen, and The Avengerof Death asked interesting questions about man's ability to mete out"justice".There were one or two stories included, such as MannyAgonistes and Changeling, which have been seen elsewhere and were more thanworthy of a second, third or fourth read.(And) of course there were theusual stories which, while the endings were rather obvious, still make foran entertaining half hour before you turn out your light!

Several storiesfound their way into this book which we all really could have livedwithout, but what would a short story compilation be without a fewclangers?

My recommendation - as an avid lover of short horror fiction- is; buy the book, be entertained but don't expect miracles. ... Read more


135. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror (Best New Horror Series, No 7)
by Stephen Jones
list price: $10.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786703725
Catlog: Book (1996-12-01)
Publisher: Carroll & Graf Pub
Sales Rank: 1198702
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

As always, Stephen Jones does an excellent job of collecting the year's best horror--1995 in this case. At nearly 600 large-format pages, with 25 stories, one novella, and an overview of the horror field (including magazines, movies, television, etc.), this volume delivers great value for the money. Especially welcome is Jones' coverage of British and Australian horror writers. The stories average in the three to three-plus range on this reviewer's five-star rating scale (where five is rarely awarded), with no duds in the bunch. Included are tales by Lisa Tuttle, Ramsey Campbell, Steve Rasnic Tem, Thomas Ligotti, Norman Partridge, Neil Gaiman, Graham Masterton, and Brian Stableford. ... Read more


136. Matthew G. Lewis, Charles Robert Maturin & the Germans: An Interpretative Study of the Influence of German Literature on Two Gothic Novels (Gothic studies and dissertations)
by Syndy M. Conger
list price: $35.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0405126522
Catlog: Book (1980-09-01)
Publisher: Ayer Co Pub
Sales Rank: 1166413
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

137. Into the Mummy's Tomb
by John Richard Stephens
list price: $14.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0425176649
Catlog: Book (2001-04-01)
Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group
Sales Rank: 801301
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

The Mummy. The first thing that comes to mind is the curse...reanimation... and revenge. But what further mysteries are there to be unwrapped in the tombs of the Ancient Egyptians?

This exciting new anthology from the editor of Vampires, Wine and Roses features a diverse selection of remarkable talents, from major bestselling authors like Anne Rice (famous for her vampire and mummy novels) and Elizabeth Peters (mystery's master of Egyptology), to all-time favorites such as Bram Stoker (who wrote one of the first mummy novels) and Agatha Christie (queen of the sealed "tomb" mystery). Into the Mummy's Tomb even includes a few surprises-a short story by Tennessee Williams (his first professional sale), an actual translation of a tale written in 300 B.C. by an Egyptian priest, and nonfiction pieces by famous Egyptologist Arthur Weigall and the discoverer of King Tut's tomb, Howard Carter. You never know what you might find when you venture Into the Mummy's Tomb-for century-spanning tales of horror, fantasy, romance, and history.

Includes contributions from:

• Anne Rice
• Elizabeth Peters
• Bram Stoker
• H.P. Lovecraft
• Tennessee Williams
• Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
• Agatha Christie
• Edgar Allan Poe
• Ray Bradbury
• Mark Twain
• Sir H. Rider Haggard
• Louisa May Alcott
• Rudyard Kipling
• Sax Rohmer
• and more
... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Fascinating Anthology
This volume is one of those rare anthologies that collects different genres of literature together dealing with the subject of mummies and ancient curses. We have horror (Lovecraft), detective stories (Christie and Peters, travel literture (Twain), history (Williams) and archaeology (Carter and Weigall). Many other contribution make this an interesting book.

Also included are abridged versions of Kipling's "Dead Kings", Rice's "Ramses the Damned" and Stoker's "Jewel of the Seven Stars." "Jewel of the Seven Stars" certainly deserves to be read in its entirety, so I hope readers unfamiliar with that novel pick it up.

I particularly enjoyed the contribution of Arthur Weigall. Aside from being present at some of the most important finds made in Egypt, he was a wonderful writer. His descriptions of experiences he had with curses and mummies were a highlight of this book. I have been seeking out his other books on Egypt and ancient history. All in all, this is a volume of discovery of our fascination with mummies.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very entertaining.
This proved out to be a very entertaining book. It combines historical facts with horror fiction and mystery.

For the horror fan, there are several stories of this genre. The best of them, in my opinion, is the one by Lovecraft. Very original and very creepy.

For the mystery fan, there's Agatha Cristie's story. I believe she needs no introduction for this small masterpiece.

And after you've read the fiction stories, after you've seen the famous movies, there's a chance to learn the facts. This books gives you the chance to read some real mummy hauntings as well as another view on the mummy curses, dispelling many of the myths around them.

I really enjoyed this book, and I think so will you.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great theme-great read
With last years' very good movie and the sequel coming out shortly, mummies are popular. This collection centers on mummies and will surprise the reader with its vast range of tales. Then again, the fourteen authors contributing short stories read like a college literature book. If nothing else grips the audience, notables such as Twain, Doyle, Alcott, Williams, Lovecraft, Christie, Haggard, Poe, Kipling, Stoker, Bradbury, Rohmer, Rice, and Peters have entries. Also included are commentaries by archeologist Howard Carter of Tut fame, an ancient Egyptian Priest, Egyptologist and Carter peer Arthur Weigall, and other noted Egyptologists. This anthology is excellent for its fiction alone, but turns ultra-superb with its enlightening look at real mummies, their tombs, and their "curses". INTO THE MUMMY'S TOMB is a great collection that horror readers and fans of Ancient history will enjoy in one sitting.

Harriet Klausner ... Read more


138. Love, Mystery and Misery: Feeling in Gothic Fiction
by Coral Ann Howells
list price: $29.95
our price: $29.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0485121115
Catlog: Book (1995-03-01)
Publisher: Athlone Press
Sales Rank: 1121108
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

139. Bloody Irish: Great Irish Vampire Stories
by Bob Curran
list price: $14.95
our price: $10.17
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1903582199
Catlog: Book (2002-09)
Publisher: Merlin Publishing
Sales Rank: 816238
Average Customer Review: 3 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Did you know that the oldest recorded vampire story comes from Ireland?This book discusses the ancient Celtic beliefs about death and how these were assimilated by Christianity; the importance which the ancient Celts and early Christians placed on blood; and how the Christian Church transmuted the vampire from an ancestor's ghost to a malevolent demon.Stories of spooky, mystical, and bloody tales are relayed throughout. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

3-0 out of 5 stars contemporary ghost stories
Run of the mill contemporary ghost stories, good for a train journey or holiday, suitable for over 14 year's old.
Definitely NOT in the same category/league as his other opus - Celtic Myth by Bob Curran ISBN: 0304358983, which set
the standard. I had been expecting something along the lines of Celtic myth - a selection of historic stories, including
some historical context. How sadly disappointed I was, there was nothing regarding the old Irish legend of
Abhartach & Droch Fuil ('bad blood' in Irish Gaelic), which could be one of the ingredients for two Irish men's more
famous novels, nor for that matter on 'Feile na Marbh' (feast of the dead or Holaween to the Americans).
Thank god Bram Stoker & Sheridan shifted the blame elsewhere, (Transalvenia) hope nobody notices. ... Read more


140. Living in Fear: A History of Horror in the Mass Media (Quality Paperbacks)
by Les Daniels
list price: $12.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0306801930
Catlog: Book (1983-03-01)
Publisher: Da Capo Pr
Sales Rank: 1349647
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Every Horror Fanatic Should Have This Book
A superb treatise on horror as developed in all of the artistic media of Western civilization from remotest antiquity to the "Creature Features" of 50's and 60's TV and the Satan craze in films of the 70's. Daniels in a sense updates H.P.Lovecraft's excellent essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature", although he addresses film, music, TV, and comic books with equal erudition (HPL, unfortunately, did not live long enough to witness the flowering of these media forms, however). The book was originally published in 1975, and I can't help but wonder if Mr.Daniels has any plans to update this remarkable work (it would be interesting to see his take on the "slasher films" of the 80's and the "death metal" scene in rock, among other subjects). All in all, a very well done survey of the manifestations of a society's anxieties via its diverse media throughout the ages. ... Read more


121-140 of 200     Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next 20
Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

Top