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181. Problems in Health Care Law
$29.95 $28.45
182. Law without Nations? : Why Constitutional
$27.75 $26.50
183. A Documentary Companion to A Civil
$99.00
184. Caribbean Constitutional Law (Commonwealth
$45.00 $43.11
185. Guardians of the Moral Order:
$55.67 $7.50
186. Making the Case: An Argument Reader
$23.99 $21.84
187. Democracy and the Rule of Law
$36.86 $14.41 list($44.95)
188. The Paralegal Handbook
$16.97 $13.39 list($24.95)
189. The Myth of Moral Justice : Why
$18.45 $4.39 list($27.95)
190. The Real Trial of Oscar Wilde:
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191. How to Change Your Name in California
$65.25 $17.94
192. Introduction To Law And Legal
$20.00
193. The History of the Common Law
$29.70 $27.50 list($45.00)
194. American Bar Association Family
$120.00 $88.08
195. Conflict of Norms in Public International
$77.95 $67.98
196. American Law and the Legal System::
$35.95 $32.00
197. Sales and Leases: Examples and
$24.50 $17.50
198. Nihilism And Emancipation: Ethics,
$91.00
199. In Search of Europe's Borders
$25.00
200. Cops, Teachers, Counselors : Stories

181. Problems in Health Care Law
by Robert D. Miller, Rebecca C. Hutton, Miller
list price: $72.95
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Asin: 0763727725
Catlog: Book (2004-04)
Publisher: Aspen Publishers
Sales Rank: 257029
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Book Description

The Eighth Edition of Problems in Health Care Law has been extensively reorganized and revised in response to the sweeping changes in health care since the publication of the last edition in 1996. New chapters on managed care, compliance, and criminal law are included. New sections address the legal implications of emerging areas of medicine, such as the human genome project, genetic therapy, and cloning. An appendix helping readers locate and understand the interrelationship of statutes, bills, and court decisions is included. An Instructor's manual is available. ... Read more


182. Law without Nations? : Why Constitutional Government Requires Sovereign States
by Jeremy A. Rabkin
list price: $29.95
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Asin: 0691095302
Catlog: Book (2005-01-24)
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Sales Rank: 202313
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Book Description

When and to what extent should the United States participate in the international legal system? This forcefully argued book by legal scholar Jeremy Rabkin provides an insightful new look at this important and much-debated question.

Americans have long asked whether the United States should join forces with institutions such as the International Criminal Court and sign on to agreements like the Kyoto Protocol. Rabkin argues that the value of international agreements in such circumstances must be weighed against the threat they pose to liberties protected by strong national authority and institutions. He maintains that the protection of these liberties could be fatally weakened if we go too far in ceding authority to international institutions that might not be zealous in protecting the rights Americans deem important. Similarly, any cessation of authority might leave Americans far less attached to the resulting hybrid legal system than they now are to laws they can regard as their own.

The book begins by reviewing the philosophic roots of American doctrine, which follow from the basic premises of liberal political thought: only a sovereign state can make and enforce law in a reliable way, so only a sovereign state can reliably protect the rights of its citizens. It then contrasts the American experience with that of the European Union, showing the difficulties that can arise from efforts to merge national legal systems with supranational schemes. In practice, international human rights law generates a cloud of rhetoric that does little to secure human rights, and in fact, is at odds with American principles, Rabkin concludes.

A challenging and important contribution to the current debates about the meaning of multilateralism and international law, Law without Nations? will appeal to a broad cross-section of scholars in both the legal and political science arenas.

... Read more

183. A Documentary Companion to A Civil Action (Revised Edition)
by Lewis A. Grossman, Robert G. Vaughn, Jonathan Civil Action Harr
list price: $27.75
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Asin: 158778422X
Catlog: Book (2002-07)
Publisher: Foundation Press
Sales Rank: 189429
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This documentary supplement contains official documents from Anderson v. Cryovac, the toxic tort case portrayed in Jonathan Harr's bestseller, A Civil Action. Use the supplement in conjunction with Harr's book and any first-year civil procedure casebook or as the text for an advanced litigation class. Content is arranged topically to take students through an actual litigation process from start to finish, from setting the litigation to pretrial process and trial and post-trial motions. The authors, who extensively interviewed the lawyers involved, provide notes, commentary, and analysis of, as well as thought-provoking questions about, the legal, tactical, and ethical issues. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Teaching Tool
I have used this book very successfully to introduce business students to the realities of law. It's a particularly useful supplement for business law texts which tend to treat law as a set of rules to be memorized. ... Read more


184. Caribbean Constitutional Law (Commonwealth Caribbean Law Series)
by Fred Phillips
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Asin: 1859416918
Catlog: Book (2002-01-01)
Publisher: Cavendish Publishing (UK)
Sales Rank: 750893
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185. Guardians of the Moral Order: The Legal Philosophy of the Supreme Court, 1860-1910
by Mark Warren Bailey
list price: $45.00
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Asin: 0875803202
Catlog: Book (2004-01-01)
Publisher: Northern Illinois University Press
Sales Rank: 230327
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186. Making the Case: An Argument Reader
by Laurence Behrens
list price: $55.67
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Asin: 0130154008
Catlog: Book (2000-11-01)
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Sales Rank: 669491
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Book Description

Focusing on legal issues, this book promotes the skills of written argument by stimulating readers to think and write about actual, compelling court cases. Its application of general rules to specific disputes provides an ideal approach to the development of logical thought and argument. Each chapter features broad and narrow issues of conflict to help explore the roles of jury members, prosecutors, and defense attorneys—and explain how to make claims (i.e., arrive at verdicts), based on support (the facts and evidence of the case itself), applying standards (the relevant laws).General issues include law and society, arguing effectively, emotional distress, homicide, freedom of speech, search and seizure, and sexual harassment. Sub-issues cover law and engagement rings, hot coffee spills, parental failure to control children, skiing accidents, barroom brawls, and high school sports injuries.For individuals interested but untrained in the law, fascinated by human drama, and curious about our duties and responsibilities to other people and our society at large. ... Read more


187. Democracy and the Rule of Law (Cambridge Studies in the Theory of Democracy)
list price: $23.99
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Asin: 0521532663
Catlog: Book (2003-07-21)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Sales Rank: 146473
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Book Description

An international group of specialists from the fields of law, politics, economics, and philosophy address the question of why governments act or do not act according to laws. The authors interpret the rule of law as a strategic choice of actors with powerful interests, rather than as an exogenous constraint on politicians. The rule of law emerges when no group is strong enough to dominate the others, and political actors seek to resolve their conflicts by recourse to law. Law is thus deeply rooted in politics. ... Read more


188. The Paralegal Handbook
by Brittain, TerryL. Hull
list price: $44.95
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Asin: 076680772X
Catlog: Book (2002-12-16)
Publisher: Thomson Delmar Learning
Sales Rank: 137510
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Book Description

This practical guide provides a framework for the paralegal profession - how it is defined, how paralegals are utilized, professional organizations, ethical guidelines, and important issues facing the profession.It includes practical information for drafting resumes and preparing for interviews, as well as job search strategies. In addition, this book incorporates articles on a number of ethical and professional issues, written by various contributors, to provide readers with diverse opinions on current issues in the paralegal profession.It is the only book that provides all this information in one source. ... Read more


189. The Myth of Moral Justice : Why Our Legal System Fails to Do What's Right
by Thane Rosenbaum
list price: $24.95
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Asin: 0060188162
Catlog: Book (2004-04)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 40205
Average Customer Review: 3 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

American culture is obsessed with the law, the legal system, and lawyers. Much in our everyday lives revolves around the law, and we are bombarded daily by cultural images of lawyers and the legal system at work. We indulge in dramatic television shows and feature films about lawyers, we read legal thrillers, and observe trials as they unfold. Many of us wish for our children to attend law school and become lawyers.

At the same time, most people report that they don't trust lawyers and hold them and the legal system in very low esteem. Those who have had unfavorable experiences with the law have walked away bitter and resentful. Some have observed that lawyers operate according to their own professional worldview, one that is emotionally detached and unfeeling, overly logical, technical, narrow, bureaucratic, and insensitive to basic human emotions and moral principles.

We are, paradoxically, both fascinated and repulsed by our legal system. The dramatic allure of judgment keeps us enthralled; the absence of moral conviction in the law makes us furious.

In The Myth of Moral Justice, law professor and novelist Thane Rosenbaum suggests that this paradox stems from the fact that citizens and the courts are at odds when it comes to their definitions of justice. Individuals seek out lawyers and enter courtrooms because they have an emotional grievance as well as a legal complaint. They expect the law to do the right thing. Yet our legal system, bent on separating the legal from the emotional, willfully ignores basic moral criteria. As a result, the justice system undermines truth, perpetuates secrets and lies, prevents victims from telling their stories, promotes adversarial enmity over community repair, and fails to equate legal duty with moral responsibility. Legal outcomes that make sense to lawyers and judges feel simply wrong to most people and enrage others.

With a lawyer's expertise and a novelist's sensibility, Rosenbaum tackles complicated philosophical questions about our longing for moral justice. He also takes a critical look at what our legal system does to the spirits of those who must come before the law, along with those who practice within it. Rosenbaum reinforces his themes with artistic representations of lawyers and legal systems from the classic works of Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, and Franz Kafka, along with various important feature films that illuminate why our legal system fails to do what's right.

... Read more

Reviews (2)

1-0 out of 5 stars Law as therapy? (Yup.) Care to explain yourself? (Nope!)
I am the type of reader who, even if I think i will disagree with an author's stance, like to give the book a fair shake. Who knows? The author might present a case I've not seen and in the end, it may be worth my time and effort. (It has happened before.) Not this time. I came away from these 300+ pages thinking the book a complete and total waste of my time.

The authors case - if I may be so polite - is that the law should be more moral; it should focus on doing the 'right' thing. Lawyers and judges should become morally sensitive. Law should become more embracing of moral tenets over strict rules and focus on 'healing' the parties involved rather than being an adversarial system focused on settlement for settlements sake.

Here's the problem; the author keeps saying all of these things and NEVER actually explores the ins and outs of this thesis. For instance, when he talks of why judges and lawyers need to focus on 'rightness' rather than procedural minuteia, on 'healing' rather than settlements, he never - not once - gives a glimpse at how such a system would work, whether it is practical, or tackles objections that, at least to me, are simply obvious.

While my objections are too numerous to go into, let me give you a taste of what you are getting with this book. The author writes:

"The winner-take-all structure of the legal systemis moraly deficient because it creates a presumption that justice has been achieved when morally it has not. Sometimes the ultimate winner should not have been victorious... [O]ften, the best moral result would... approximate some measure of victory in both parties - to send them both home healed rather than ambivalent or enraged." (p. 22)

But how do we KNOW who should be morally victorious (when we were not there to know that the alleged defendant did IN FACT commit the crime)? How can a legal system function other than adversarially (can it function communally?) How can a judge (who is not a psychologist) know when both parties are healed (and, say, in a murder, is there ANYTHING that could heal the victim's family in full? Surely not a forced apology!) And how can we measure (as the judge would have to do) when both parties are 'sufficiently' healed? Is it just measured by both parties say-so? If so, does that mean the trial could last 15 years?

My point is simple: the author DOESN'T EVEN TRY to map out either a positive case or handle any of these (what I think are) obvious objections. In the interest of giving the author a fair shake, it would have been nice to hear an argument. I did not. The book merely rehashes paragraphs like the above as if the positive case is self-evident (it is not) and objections don't exist (they do).

Another flaw is that the author cites (almost exlusively) fiction books and movies to make his case. "Since in x movie, we know that x was guilty and got off, the legal system is not fair." But the flaw is that there is a difference between fiction and life. In movies, we often KNOW who is guilty. Thus, it is easy to say, "the morally right decision is x because this character did it; we saw her do it on screen." In life, we rarely come in knowing who is guilty like in the movies. Thus, citing movies is simply too easy; saying, "X is the right answer becasue we know SHE did it," presumes... that we know she did it! Thus, making the 'morally right' decision is easy in the movies; but sadly, the author does little to differentiate the fantasy land of movies from real life quandaries.

It is no exaggeration to say that I could go on for pages citing errors like these! While I can somewhat sympahtize with the author's plight on a 'gut level,' his failure to explain a positive case, sheer repetitiveness of claims he simply ASSUMES to be self-evident, and absolute failkure to handle ANY objections left me dissapointed. Simply put, this is one of the few books I can say was wasted time.

5-0 out of 5 stars Every lawyer should read it
I agree with the NY Times reviewer - all law students should be required to read this book, but would add that all practicing lawyers should read it too. An excellent and well written book, which just might make lawyers slightly more humane. ... Read more


190. The Real Trial of Oscar Wilde: The First Uncensored Transcript of the Trial of Oscar Wilde Vs. John Douglas, (Marquess of Queensberry), 1895
by Merlin Holland
list price: $27.95
our price: $18.45
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Asin: 0007156642
Catlog: Book (2003-11-01)
Publisher: Fourth Estate
Sales Rank: 88655
Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

London's Central Criminal Court Sessions Papers for April 1895 were blunt, declaring that "the details of this case are unfit for publication." The case was Oscar Wilde's first trial, a libel action brought against the Marquess of Queensberry for publicly calling him a homosexual. What unfolded in the court was one of Victorian London's most infamous scandals: the great, doomed love affair between Wilde and Lord Alfred "Bosie" Douglas, the Marquess's son. When it became public, it cost Wilde everything.

Merlin Holland, Wilde's grandson and a noted researcher and archivist, has discovered the original transcript of the trial that led to his grandfather's tragedy. Here for the first time is the true, uncensored record, free of the distortions and censorship of previous accounts.

On 18 February 1895, Bosie's father delivered a note to the Albemarle Club addressed to "Oscar Wilde posing as a somdomite [sic]." With Bosie's encouragement, Wilde decided to sue the Marquess for libel. As soon as the trial opened, London's literary darling was at the center of the greatest scandal of his time.

Wilde's fall from grace was swift: having lost this case, he was in turn prosecuted and later imprisoned. Bankrupted, he fled to Paris never to see his family again. Within five years he was dead, his health never having recovered from the years in Reading gaol.

This remarkable book reveals Wilde on trial for his life, though he did not know it -- his confidence ebbing under the relentless cross-questioning, the wit for which he was so celebrated gradually deserting him under the remorseless scrutiny. The tragic climax falls when Wilde is betrayed by his own cleverness, unconsciously playing into the prosecutor's hands. With that his cause is lost.

... Read more

Reviews (5)

3-0 out of 5 stars Life Was A Trial For Oscar Wilde.
Oscar Wilde was a handsome man in 1892, as the photo of him in this books clearly indicates. He was a brilliant playwright and daubled in poetry. However, as the drawing of his arrest at the Cadogan Hotel on April 13, 1895, he was an arrogant, dandified "gentleman." He had been accused of a horrible charge and should have accepted his fate. To crave justice from libel, he laid himself and his reputation open to scrutiny and disaster.
Why his grandson would want all of this sordidness known now is impossible to comprehend. Some things are better left forgotten or not said. Wilde felt that the charge (however right it might be) called for a defense of justification. It turned out to be the opposite as the self-destructive genius only continued to lie with charm, entertaining the audience but not the court.

Those who start libel actions often emerge with their reputations and lives in tatters. Libel actions are meant to be cases for re-establishing reputations, confounding gossip and allowing the litigant to emerge in a state of unblemished purity (John Mortimer). The most famous libel case of all led Oscar Wilde directly to jail. He left behind a devoted wife and two sons. The grandson who released this detailed account of the trial to try to figure out "Why on earth did you do it?"

There are photographs of some of the persons involved and of the evidence used against him. It is proposed that perhaps he really didn't think he had done anything wrong. After all, many important people of that time got away with the same thing of which he was accussed. To learn what it is, you must read this book.

I'd heard rumors about his sexual persuasion previously, but this stuff went a little too far to please my sensibilities. The Judge maintained that men who could do as he did were 'dead to all sense of shame' and declared that this offence was 'the worst I have ever tried.'

Poor Oscar, his ego got in the way; his pride was too great to accept the fact that he had been 'found out.' In going to court, he laid open his past and destroyed his future. He hurt not only himself but his family as well. Why can't people just let the sordid past lay dormant?

3-0 out of 5 stars Life Was A Trial for Oscar Wilde.
Oscar Wilde was a handsome man in 1892, as the photo of him in this book clearly indicates. He was a brilliant playwright and daubled in poetry. However, as the drawing of his arrest at the Cadogan Hotel on April 13, 1895 shows, he was an arrogant, dandified "gentleman." He had been accused of a horrible charge and should have accepted his fate. To crave justice from libel, he laid himself and his reputation open to scrutiny and disaster.

Why his grandson would want all of this sordidness known now is impossible to comprehend. Some things are better left forgotten or not said. Wilde felt that the charge (however right it might be) called for a defense of justification. It turned out to be the opposite as the self-destructive genius only continued to tell lies with charm, entertaining the audience but not the court.

Those who start libel actions often emerge with their reputations and lives in tatters. Libel actions are meant to be cases for re-establishing reputations, confounding gossip and allowing the litigant to emerge in a state of unblemished purity (John Mortimer). The most famous libel case of all led Oscar Wilde directly to jail. He left behind a devoted wife and two sons. The grandson released this detailed account of the trial to try to figure out "Why on earth did you do it?"

There are photographs of some of the person involved and of the evidence used against him. It is proposed that perhaps he really didn't think he had done anything wrong. After all, many important people of that time got away with the same thing of which he was accussed. To learn what it is, you must read this
book.

I'd heard rumors about his sexcual persuasion previously, but this stuff went a little too far to please my sensibilities. The Judge maintained that men who could do as he did were 'dead to all sense of shame' and that the offence was 'the worst I have ever tried.'

Poor Oscar, his ego got in the way; his pride was too great to accept the fact that he had been 'found out.' In going to court, he laid open his past and destroyed his future. He hurt not only himself but his family as well. Why can't people just let the sordid past lay dormant?

Genius needs to be appreciated for what it was, not for the human who made mistakes. I knew such a one named Bob Meir who threw his life away -- and he was so talented.

3-0 out of 5 stars A Book to Avoid
This is a wonderful book if you are only interested in reading the actual transcript from Oscar's trial. Indeed, the book is excellent in that respect. However, I would say it is a book to avoid if you are a fan of Lord Alfred Douglas. It seems to me that this book, like so many before it, is trying to make Alfred Douglas the scapegoat. There was a reason Bosie wanted Oscar to take his father to trial, they WOULD have won. It was a carefully laid out plan and Oscar, not Bosie, is the one who went astray from it. Lord Alfred was to take the witness box and testify against his father. When he was finished telling all that his father had done, what sort of man he was, they felt sure no jury would side with him. However, just before Bosie was about to take the witness box, Oscar refused to allow him. He knew what it would mean by his refusing to allow Bosie to take the stand, he understood very well what it would mean, but he said Bosie should never have to do such a thing. Lord Alfred himself spent a great deal of time lamenting Oscar's decision, and wondering why on earth he changed his mind. He seems to think that Oscar had been talking to Robert Ross and he and Ross had come up with another plan. Ross however, is a compulsive liar, and was probably the worst person Oscar could have trusted.

Oscar's sons, and his grandsons, lived with a false impression of Robert Ross, and therefore with a false impression of Lord Alfred Douglas. I am sickened that these misconceptions live on even now, so long after their deaths. I am sick of Lord Alfred being made out to be a monster, some evil, wicked boy who destroyed Oscar Wilde. Oscar was a very intelligent man, was he not? Don't you think he knew what he was doing? "I must say to myself that I ruined myself and that no man great or small can be ruined but by his own hand."-Oscar Wilde. I'm just tired of the blame being shoveled solely onto Lord Alfred. He wasn't a monster, and I wish people would stop trying to portray him as if he was one.

5-0 out of 5 stars An amazing reading experience
What's amazing is that, we have heard for many years about the unparalleled wit and charm of Wilde in conversation, yet until now we of course have been denied this experience. Reading these verbatim transcripts, hundreds of pages long and recently unearthed, we are given the opportunity to do this almost virtually, for the Wildean voice comes through loud and clear, with perfect crispness and distinction. This libel trial, the first of three of the Oscar Wilde trials, is almost a conversation between two persons, and the defence counsel, Carson, though incredibly scornful and insolent, is almost as intelligent and quite as good at debate as Wilde, so it's a splendid match of brains. The outcome is disheartening, though, and throughout you can't help pounding the desk and murmuring out loud, oh, Oscar, how could you have been so stupid! Or -- don't go there! So he becomes real in a way he hasn't previously, not even in the best biographies available. Queensberry and Alfred Douglas come off, in hindsight, as monsters of privilege in only quasi-human form. And poor Edward Shelley, it is plain, deserves a book of his own.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Genuine Tragedy
It wasn't a capital trial, but the 1895 libel proceedings of Oscar Wilde against the Marquess of Queensberry were in their way tragic and terrible. Entering the trial, Wilde was a celebrity and a playwright with the magnificently silly _The Importance of Being Ernest_ in successful performance in London and New York. Afterwards, he was pursued, tried, convicted, and imprisoned at hard labor for the then crime of homosexuality. It is a story that has been told many times and turned into dramas. Those of us who love Wilde's writing and outrageous wit will always wonder what would have happened if he had been able to write and live as he wished, instead of being ruined and sent to an early death. Amazingly, the trial record has until now been unavailable. There were summaries, and publication of extracts, but only with _The Real Trial of Oscar Wilde: The First Uncensored Transcript of the Trial of Oscar Wilde vs. John Douglas (Marquess of Queensberry)_, 1895 (Fourth Estate) do we have a full record. In 2000, an anonymous source donated a transcript of the trial to the British Library. It was authenticated, and has now been edited by Merlin Holland, Wilde's grandson. Anyone interested in Wilde's life and writing will be fascinated by this verbatim record which puts judge, prosecutor, defender, and of course Wilde himself on the stage of the Old Bailey to play out their roles verbatim.

Holland has a useful introduction to recall the details of how Wilde was snared into legal doom, spurred by his young man Lord Alfred Douglas ("Bosie") to bother Bosie's abominable father Queensberry. When, after several skirmishes, Queensberry left his calling card at Wilde's club, with the words "To Oscar Wilde posing as somdomite" (spelling was one of the Marquess's shortcomings), Wilde should have thrown it into the fire. Instead, egged on by Bosie, he took Queensberry to court for libel. It was the mistake of his life.; as Holland writes, "If I could ask my grandfather a single question, it would have to be, 'Why on earth did you do it?'" Wilde did not take advice that he leave the country, and so sealed his own doom. Most of the pages of this book are the words from the trial, and most of those words come from the bouts with Wilde in the witness box. Initially he seemed to enjoy his role in the events, and gave as good as he got. For much of the repartee reported here, the transcriber notes: "(_laughter_.)" and "(_more laughter_.)" But an eventual flippant answer overthrew Wilde on the stand, although his case could not have been won. When Carson asked about a companion, "Did you ever kiss him?" Wilde replied, "Oh, no, never in my life; he was a peculiarly plain boy." It was not long after that Wilde and his lawyers withdrew the charges, and Queensberry was declared not guilty.

If Queensbury was not guilty of libel, it was reasonable to think that his accusations were truthful, and with the evidence already gathered, Queensberry assisted in a speedy arrest of Wilde, who once again had refused advice that he leave the country. The subsequent trials, one with a hung jury and one finding him guilty of gross indecency, are not covered in this volume. Wilde had two years of hard labor, and three sad years of exile before his death in Paris in 1900. He produced the mordant "Ballad of Reading Gaol" but little else during these years, and while there are plenty of examples that his wit remained in conversation, we were robbed of subsequent examples of the delicious laughter that had come from each of his successively improving plays. This is a useful book as full documentation of the first trial, and Holland has given helpful notes throughout. Those who admire Wilde, however, will find it more than useful. Wilde was brilliant at Greek and admired Greek drama and life, and it is no exaggeration that the transcript of the trial, reading as it does like a piece of period theater, has all the marks of a classic tragedy. ... Read more


191. How to Change Your Name in California (How to Change Your Name in California, 8th ed)
by David Ventura Loeb, David W. Brown, David V. Loeb, David Wayne Brown, Shae Irving, Patricia Gima
list price: $34.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0873375238
Catlog: Book (1999-08-01)
Publisher: Nolo
Sales Rank: 998953
Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Divorce, complicated spelling, tricky pronunciation, personal preference -- any of these may convince you that it's time for a new name. And although the rules have changed recently, it's still a relatively simple procedure.

How to Change Your Name in California provides step-by-step instructions and all the forms you need to:

*choose a name and make it your own

*change back to your former name after divorce

*change your child's name

*get a new or amended birth certificate for you or your child

*get identification in your new name, including a driver's license, Social Security card and passport

*get a court to recognize a change of gender

The 10th edition reflects the latest rules and regulations stemming from 9/11 and the rise of identity theft, and provides the latest forms as tear-outs. ... Read more

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Straight forward and to the point!
Well written, containing all the neccessary information and forms, this book is an invaluable resource for those individuals who are interested in legally changing their name in California.

Pro's and con's are examined about Court Ordered Name Changes and Common Usage methodologies. Well thought out and written in a very readable and comprehensive style...this book answers almost any question you may have regarding the implications of changing you name.

Highly recommended....by far, the best book I have seen on the market around this issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars perfect guide
This book packs a wallup!
It was complete, concise, and easy to follow.
I definately could not of made the change without the help of this book.
I do not recommend trying to change your name without this - it walks you through from A to Z, not missing a beat.

Excellent book.

5-0 out of 5 stars great book
clear, concise...a pleasure. made my name change easy. thanks nolo!

5-0 out of 5 stars You can do it yourself!
I'm really enamored of Nolo Press's self-help legal guides. This one saved me $400 in legal fees. Just follow the steps outlined and it will guide you safely through even a court hearing, if you want to be able to change your passport. If, in the process, you decide you want to change any deeds your old name appears on, you can use their quite inexpensive guide to updating Deeds in California. As for typing up the forms -- neat printing does the job, too.

4-0 out of 5 stars This did the job.
The 7th edition of this book was my main reference as I successfully completed a legal name change. It did a good job helping me through the process without the assistance of a lawyer ("In Pro Per"). I would also suggest finding a good paralegal to help in typing up the forms. ... Read more


192. Introduction To Law And Legal Reasoning (University Casebook Series)
by Jane C. Ginsburg
list price: $65.25
our price: $65.25
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Asin: 1587787660
Catlog: Book (2004-05-04)
Publisher: Foundation Pr
Sales Rank: 543716
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193. The History of the Common Law in England (Classics of British Historical Literature)
by Sir Matthew Hale
list price: $20.00
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Asin: 0226313050
Catlog: Book (2002-11-15)
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Sales Rank: 360376
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Book Description

This volume includes the complete text of the third edition of 1739.


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194. American Bar Association Family Legal Guide, Third Edition
by American Bar Association
list price: $45.00
our price: $29.70
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Asin: 0609610422
Catlog: Book (2004-04-27)
Publisher: Random House Reference
Sales Rank: 727720
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Book Description

The American Bar Association Family Legal Guide is the most comprehensive and authoritative legal resource available for the layperson. Revised and updated, it helps readers steer clear of legal pitfalls and achieve a better understanding of their rights and responsibilities under the law.

·Covers a wide range of legal areas, including family law, home ownership, small business, consumer credit, wills and estates, and the rights of older Americans
·Revision includes new chapters on computer law and health law
·Follows a straightforward question-and-answer format featuring sidebars, bulleted focal points, and charts and graphs
·Thoroughly prepared and reviewed by top legal experts
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195. Conflict of Norms in Public International Law : How WTO Law Relates to other Rules of International Law (Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law)
by Joost Pauwelyn
list price: $120.00
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Asin: 0521824885
Catlog: Book (2003-07-31)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Sales Rank: 768492
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Book Description

How do trade agreements interact with agreements on human rights or the environment? In case of conflict, which agreement should prevail? Must trade disputes be examined only from the angle of trade rules or should account be taken also of non-trade values?Joost Pauwelyn considers these questions and reveals how the different rules of international law interact, with the aid of procedural guidelines when conflict occurs.This book interests trade diplomats, international civil servants, lawyers, NGOs and scholars of public international law and international trade law. ... Read more


196. American Law and the Legal System:: Equal Justice under the Law
by Thomas VanDervort
list price: $77.95
our price: $77.95
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Asin: 0766817407
Catlog: Book (1999-12-13)
Publisher: Thomson Delmar Learning
Sales Rank: 658759
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Book Description

This overview of the system of law and government in the United States is a revision of the successful "Equal Justice Under the Law", that provides the conceptual tools needed to prepare individuals for their roles as citizens, paralegals, lawyers, teachers, law enforcement agents, government employees, and judges. ALSO AVAILABLE INSTRUCTOR SUPPLEMENTS CALL CUSTOMER SUPPORT TO ORDER Instructors Manual, ISBN: 0-7668-1741-5 COMING SOON West Paralegal Comprehensive CTB-2000-II, ISBN: 0-7668-1773-3 ... Read more


197. Sales and Leases: Examples and Explanations (Examples & Explanations Series)
by James Brook
list price: $35.95
our price: $35.95
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Asin: 0735527210
Catlog: Book (2003-02-01)
Publisher: Aspen Publishers
Sales Rank: 262679
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Must have for Law Students
Abolutely outstanding examples. Clear and concise writing from one of the foremost experts on the topic makes this class a breeze. ... Read more


198. Nihilism And Emancipation: Ethics, Politics, And Law (European Perspectives:a Series in Social Thought and Cultural Ctiticism)
by Gianni Vattimo, SANTIAGO ZABALA, William McCuaig
list price: $24.50
our price: $24.50
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Asin: 0231130821
Catlog: Book (2004-10-31)
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Sales Rank: 255928
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199. In Search of Europe's Borders (Immigration and Asylum Law and Policy in Europe, V. 5)
list price: $91.00
our price: $91.00
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Asin: 9041119779
Catlog: Book (2002-12-18)
Publisher: Springer
Sales Rank: 656737
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200. Cops, Teachers, Counselors : Stories from the Front Lines of Public Service
by Steven Williams Maynard-Moody, Michael Craig Musheno
list price: $25.00
our price: $25.00
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Asin: 0472068326
Catlog: Book (2003-05-12)
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Sales Rank: 428435
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Book Description

A penetrating look at how government workers make sense of their work, ascribe identity to the people they encounter, and account for their decisions and actions
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