Global Shopping Center
UK | Germany
Home - Books - Literature & Fiction - History & Criticism - United States - Native American Help

1-20 of 200       1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next 20

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

$12.24 $5.99 list($18.00)
1. The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the
$33.33 $15.00
2. Native-American Literature : A
$24.95
3. Natural Mysticism: Towards a New
$12.21 $10.00 list($17.95)
4. Speaking for the Generations:
$29.95 $13.50
5. Now I Know Only So Far: Essays
$59.95 $48.47
6. Les Sauvages Americains: Representations
$17.95 $12.80
7. Narrative Chance: Postmodern Discourse
$18.95 $2.98
8. Keeping Slug Woman Alive: A Holistic
$19.95 $6.77
9. Reading the Fire: The Traditional
$10.46 $2.24 list($13.95)
10. American Indian Women: Telling
$47.30 list($55.00)
11. Translating Native Latin American
$21.95 $18.61
12. Searching for Safe Spaces: Afro-Caribbean
$70.00
13. Native American and Chicano/a
$24.95 $17.99
14. Speak to Me Words: Essays on Contemporary
$13.57 $12.95 list($19.95)
15. Other Destinies: Understanding
$13.57 $13.31 list($19.95)
16. Murder on the Reservation: American
$6.95 list($22.95)
17. Caribbean Women Writers: Essays
$24.95 $18.95
18. Rain Forest Literatures: Amazonian
$21.95
19. Red Matters: Native American Studies
$14.95 $1.00
20. Writing As Witness: Essay and

1. The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Traditions : With a New Preface
by Paula Gunn Allen
list price: $18.00
our price: $12.24
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0807046175
Catlog: Book (1992-09-01)
Publisher: Beacon Press
Sales Rank: 103331
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

This pioneering work, first published in 1986, documents the continuing vitality of American Indian traditions and the crucial role of women in those traditions. ... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars a white feminist finds eye-opening
This white feminist found The Sacred Hoop eye-opening and mind-expanding. While I cannot presume to be able to truly understand tribal thinking, I nonetheless found the concepts and philosophies described here to be completely pertinent to my place in existence. I am struggling to realize my place in a multifaced, complex web-world and have never felt comfortable with the typical feminist need to stand out in the foreground. It is also very empowering to see that there have been many versions of woman-based cultures. Unlike those in Crete, for example, tribal cultures were fully functioning in North America less than 500 years ago! It is unfortunate (though not at all surprising, given the difficulty of writing about concepts in the language of the patriarchy) that this gospel of hope and renewal is not reaching many, many people--especially our young people in colleges and universities. Don't take this wrong, Paula Gunn Allen, but you go, girl!

4-0 out of 5 stars Valuable but annoying.
Being a white male (although one who's interested in Native American literature) certainly influenced my reaction to this book. That said, I think it's invaluable reading--probably a "must read" for those really interested in the field of Native American studies. I found it extremely interesting and useful. I also found it unsettling and even offensive in places. In spite of attacking white culture for reducing everything to ethnocentric formulas (a point she illustrates very persuasively), Allen seems to me to do the same thing throughout the book. While criticizing white academics for robbing Native Americans of thier complexity as individuals, she tends to see every possible issue through a polarized perspective--Native American=Good, White culture=bad. Doesn't this, in fact, rob Native Americans of their complexity as individuals and lead to the very romanticizing that Allen objects to?

Still, as irritating as I find this reductive way of arguing, I have to admit that this is a very valuable book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply Brilliant
As a young American Indian woman, reading PGA's book was like finding my own personal bible. Finally, someone who was telling me the same things about myself that my mother had taught me. Excellent chapters like "The Red Roots of White Feminism" and "When Strong Women Throw Down Bundles" are not to be missed. PGA your my shimasaani! ... Read more


2. Native-American Literature : A Brief Introduction and Anthology (Harpercollins Literary Mosaic)
by Gerald Vizenor
list price: $33.33
our price: $33.33
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0673469786
Catlog: Book (1997-01-07)
Publisher: Longman
Sales Rank: 429132
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Native American Literature: A Good Selection
This important anthology makes available a range of Native American writings from the early nineteenth century to the present. Genres covered include fiction, poetry, auotobiography, and drama, making this text a fine choice for introduction to literature classes as well as for courses focused specifically on Native American literature. Luther Standing Bear's autobiographical account of his time at the Carlisle school for Indians is a particularly interesting selection for its historical perspective on the push for "Indians" to assimilate via white modes of education. Vizenor's introduction provides a useful historical framework as well. Some of the selections are relatively well-known in the field of Native American literary studies, while others (including Vizenor's own drama) do not appear in other anthologies I've seen. Overall, this anthology represents a fine if somewhat idiosyncratic representation of the broad diversity of Native American literary voices. ... Read more


3. Natural Mysticism: Towards a New Reggae Aesthetic
by Kwame Senu Neville Dawes, Kwame Dawes
list price: $24.95
our price: $24.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1900715228
Catlog: Book (1999-04-01)
Publisher: Peepal Tree Press
Sales Rank: 689035
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

4. Speaking for the Generations: Native Writers on Writing (Sun Tracks , Vol 35)
by Simon J. Ortiz
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.21
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0816518505
Catlog: Book (1998-02-01)
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
Sales Rank: 531230
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

Whether reared in Amarillo, Texas, or on the Six Nations Reserve in southern Ontario, the nine Native writers anthologized here cite amazingly similar influences. Each claims a deep connection to the land. The urge to tell stories, they say, stems from being raised in a culture that is rich in storytelling--that has relied, in fact, on storytelling. "The ancient Pueblo people," writes Leslie Marmon Silko in the book's opening essay, "depended upon collective memory through successive generations to maintain and transmit an entire culture."

Now, though, they find themselves writing in a language that is not culturally their own. In fact, it is the language of the colonialist. Unlike Okanagan, says Jeannette C. Armstrong, which, having never been written down, is "devised solely for use by the human voice and the human body," English "is deaf to music and only chances on it through the diligent work of writers." Many of these writers feel an obligation both to protect and promote their Native culture, and to educate the outside world about that culture. "I consider it a moral responsibility of the Native writer," says Victor D. Montejo, a Mayan from Guatemala, "to be a voice for the people and to let the world know about not only the achievements of his or her people but also the crimes committed against them." And finally there is the conflict of audience (is one writing for Natives, or for other readers?) and the feeling sometimes that one is less a member of one's community than a spokesperson for or interpreter of it. "Once," says Elizabeth Woody, a Yakama-Warm Springs- Wasco-Navajo Indian, "a friend tried to coax me into going to a distant powwow with her by saying, 'Why read and write about Indians when you could just be one for a while?'"--Jane Steinberg ... Read more


5. Now I Know Only So Far: Essays in Ethnopoetics
by Dell Hymes, Dell H. Hymes
list price: $29.95
our price: $29.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0803273355
Catlog: Book (2003-07-01)
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
Sales Rank: 652002
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

6. Les Sauvages Americains: Representations of Native Americans in French and English Colonial Literature
by Gordon M. Sayre, Gordon Sayre
list price: $59.95
our price: $59.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0807823465
Catlog: Book (1997-08-01)
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Sales Rank: 2437672
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

7. Narrative Chance: Postmodern Discourse on Native American Indian Literatures (American Indian Literature and Critical Studies, Vol 8)
by Gerald Vizenor
list price: $17.95
our price: $17.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0806125616
Catlog: Book (1993-10-01)
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Sales Rank: 564066
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

8. Keeping Slug Woman Alive: A Holistic Approach to American Indian Texts
by Greg Sarris
list price: $18.95
our price: $18.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0520080076
Catlog: Book (1993-08-01)
Publisher: University of California Press
Sales Rank: 232681
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

This remarkable collection of eight essays offers a rareperspective on the issue of cross-cultural communication. Greg Sarris isconcerned with American Indian texts, both oral and written, as well aswithother American Indian cultural phenomena such as basketry and religion.Hisessays cover a range of topics that include orality, art, literarycriticism,and pedagogy, and demonstrate that people can see more than just "whatthingsseem to be." Throughout, he asks:How can we read across cultures so astoencourage communication rather than to close it down? Sarris maintains that cultural practices can be understood onlyintheirliving, changing contexts. Central to his approach is an understandingofstorytelling, a practice that embodies all the indeterminateness,structurallooseness, multivalence, and richness of culture itself. He describesencountersbetween his Indian aunts and Euro-American students and the challenge ofreadingin a reservation classroom; he brings the reports of earlierethnographers outof museums into the light of contemporary literary and anthropologicaltheory. Sarris's perspective is exceptional: son of a Coast Miwok/Pomo fatherand aJewish mother, he was raised by Mabel McKaya renowned Cache Creek Pomobasketweaver and medicine womanand by others, Indian and non-Indian, inSantaRosa, California. Educated at Stanford, he is now a university professorandrecently became Chairman of the Federated Coast Miwok tribe. His ownstory iswoven into these essays and provides valuable insights for anyoneinterested incross-cultural communication, including educators, theorists of languageandculture, and general readers. ... Read more


9. Reading the Fire: The Traditional Indian Literatures of America
by Jarold Ramsey
list price: $19.95
our price: $19.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0295977876
Catlog: Book (1999-07-01)
Publisher: University of Washington Press
Sales Rank: 1336641
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

10. American Indian Women: Telling Their Lives
by Gretchen M. Bataille, Kathleen Mullen Sands
list price: $13.95
our price: $10.46
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0803260822
Catlog: Book (1987-05-01)
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
Sales Rank: 440836
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars American Indian Women-Telling Their Lives
This book is full of moving and eye opening stories. Many American Indian Woman share their lives in these breath taking journies. Learn the ways and customs of the Women while hearing of their brave and trying tales. ... Read more


11. Translating Native Latin American Verbal Art
list price: $55.00
our price: $47.30
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1560989378
Catlog: Book (2000-05-15)
Publisher: Smithsonian Books
Sales Rank: 1683302
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Outsiders can best appreciate Native Latin American cultures through their verbal art. The translations in this book use myths, stories, conversations, and magical chants to show how indigenous discourse from Mexico to Argentina shapes social knowledge and experience. Situating each performance in its cultural and personal context, the translators discuss the linguistic issues they confronted as they documented oral performances in writing, rendered Native American languages in English, and represented the voice qualities and semantic patterns of the originals. ... Read more


12. Searching for Safe Spaces: Afro-Caribbean Women Writers in Exile
by Myriam J. A. Chancy
list price: $21.95
our price: $21.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1566395402
Catlog: Book (1997-09-01)
Publisher: Temple University Press
Sales Rank: 440980
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Home. Exile. Return. Words heavy with meaning and passion. For Myriam Chancy, these three themes animate the lives and writings of dispossessed Afro-Caribbean women.

Understanding exile as flight from political persecution or types of oppression that single out women, Chancy concentrates on diasporic writers and filmmakers who depict the vulnerability of women to poverty and exploitation in their homelands and their search for safe refuge. These Afro-Caribbean feminists probe the complex issues of race, nationality, gender, sexuality, and class that limit women's lives. They portray the harsh conditions that all too commonly drive women into exile, depriving them of security and a sense of belonging in their adopted countries—the United States, Canada, or England.

As they rework traditional literary forms, artists such as Joan Riley, Beryl Gilroy, M. Nourbese Philip, Dionne Brand, Makeda Silvera, Audre Lorde, Rosa Guy, Michelle Cliff, and Marie Chauvet give voice to Afro-Caribbean women's alienation and longing to return home. Whether their return is realized geographically or metaphorically, the poems, fiction, and film considered in this book speak boldly of self-definition and transformation. ... Read more


13. Native American and Chicano/a Literature of the American Southwest: Intersections of Indigenous Literatures (Indigenous Peoples and Politics)
by Christina M. Hebebrand
list price: $70.00
our price: $70.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0415948886
Catlog: Book (2004-03-01)
Publisher: Routledge
Sales Rank: 1304660
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

This book studies Native American and Chicano/a writers of the American Southwest as a coherent cultural group with common features and distinct efforts to deal with and to resist the dominant Euro-American culture. ... Read more


14. Speak to Me Words: Essays on Contemporary American Indian Poetry
by Dean Rader, Janice Gould
list price: $24.95
our price: $24.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0816523495
Catlog: Book (2003-10-01)
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
Sales Rank: 348378
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

The first collection of critical essays on the genre, highlighting various aspects of poetry written by American Indians since the 1960s.This wide-ranging anthology balances the insights of Natives and non-Natives, men and women, old and new voices and includes landmark articles by Paula Gunn Allen, Carter Revard, and Simon Ortiz, plus new contributions by Elaine Jahner, Robert Nelson, Janet McAdams, and others. Together these writings establish a new foundation for the study--and enjoyment--of this vital art. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Essential Teaching Text
This book is essential to all those teaching and learning about Native literature. It is currently the only critical collection devoted to contemporary Native poetry. My only hope is that editors Gould and Rader edit future anthologies like this, so that we can continue to have critical work regarding Native poets and poetic traditions.

This collection includes essays by Eric Gary Anderson, Paula Gunn Allen, Marilou Awiakta, Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez, Qwo-Li Driskill, Janice Gould, Elaine A. Jahner, Daniel Heath Justice, Janet McAdams, Robert M. Nelson, Simon J. Ortiz, Dean Rader, Carter Revard, and Patricia Clark Smith. ... Read more


15. Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel (American Indian Literature and Critical Studies, Vol 3)
by Louis Owens
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0806126736
Catlog: Book (1994-09-01)
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Sales Rank: 578881
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars This sets the standard for examining American Indian Lit.
Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel is solid, a real powerhouse of thoughtful readings and appropriate critical theory applied to highlight the diverse stories analyzed in this text. Owens examines the novels of Mourning Dove, Ridge, McNickle, Momaday, Dorris, Erdrich, Silko, and Vizenor while using an accessible voice and with generous notes, index, and bibliography. In his analysis he visits many of the social and political struggles each writer has encountered in their lives and represented in their writing. Other Destinies is not intended to serve the political ends of issues such as sovereignty, though it does examine the complex political climates in which these works were written. The biographical information on the political circumstances influencing Mourning Dove and John Rollin Ridge are particularly interesting for this reason. There are a few critics, both Indian and non-Indian, who wish that Owens had chosen different baseline issues, (their own political issues), to highlight in his critical examination of these novels. Owens chose, however, what he knows best and what was important to these particular texts.

For decades, centuries, the will of white America has largely expressed the desire of the politically powerful to erase American Indians from the North American landscape. Today even, if one views the efforts of such as Slade Gorton, the senator from Washington State, the effort continues. And in many ways, they have been successful. More than 50 percent of those who identify as American Indians do not live on what is today considered "Indian land," and too many have lost all contact with the land and cultures and stories of their people. But many still do retain at least vestigial and often much larger pieces of the old stories and traditions, and are working to place them back into a communal whole. For them, the mere prospect of identity must come before they would even consider the land to which their people were moved decades or centuries earlier. For everything there is a season.

In Other Destinies Owens analyzes the writings of a number of full and mixedblood Indians authors whose collective voice is growing louder with each passing year. These writers illustrate issues important to themselves; some authors are strongly rooted in place, others are only just discovering their places following the disastrous relocation Diaspora. Owens has built a sound historical and critical framework from which to examine all of these stories. These authors, like Owens, all write of their family stories and belief systems, and of the importance of place, when they know that place or adopt a new one. They are working to graft those connections into their modern lives through the power of their words.

3-0 out of 5 stars Overrated
I've been struggling with this book since it was first published. I've seen it influence dozens of other scholars who, for the most part, rave about its merits. When I read this book for the first time I was deeply immersed in study of many of the books Owens writes about. My initial experince in reading the book was quite mixed. I would find myself saying "right on" in one paragraph, followed by "nonsense" in the next.

Louis Owens writes well and communicates a perspective regarding the creative work of Native American Indian writers that is widely shared by many who study these writers professionally. His own novels are worth reading, and he seemed like a warm and friendly person when I've met him at conferences.

With all these positive attributes, why does this book deserve three stars? I disagree with Owens critical emphasis; his argument has been influential. He claims that "identity" is the central theme of Native writing. He argues that all Native writers must come to terms with their own mixedblood identity, and with consequent marginalization in two worlds. There is no question that identity is an important issue, but it is far from the central one. For many Native writers it is insignificant. For some, it is central. For others, it is an issue subordinated under other more significant issues. Identity is part of a complex of issues (land, resources, spirituality, images, and stereotypes) that are ultimately concerned with issues of self-control by individuals and communities. For tribal peoples in the United States the central issue, if there is one, is sovereignty. Because of the results of histories of denationalization (a word employed by Cherokee writers in the 1830s) many Native American Indian people are trying to find their way home (as some writers have put it). But, many others have never left home and have never suffered a crisis of self-identity. The academy, by and large, finds issues of identity a quite palatable way to accept literatures of difference because doing so does not require recognizing systemic problems in some of the fundamental assumptions of American colonization.

5-0 out of 5 stars An essential reference/critical text for Native Am. fiction.
Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel stands alone in its completelook at the history of fiction written by Native American writers. Though(fortunately) there are now so many Indian writers that this book could not include them all, Owens give a good account of many who broke new ground in their relatively recent day of producing literary fiction. Including N.Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Michael Dorris, Gerald Vizenor, Leslie Marmon Silko and others, this text, written by Dr. Owens, himself Native American of Choctaw, Cherokee and Irish descent, holds Indian texts to the same literary standards as other modern literature and finds them of equal quality. Though authoritative, this is a very readable text which received a good review in the New York Times Review of Books. Owens also writes good fiction, and could have included his own works in here, but didn't. See Wolfsong, Sharpest Sight, Bone Game and Nightland. ... Read more


16. Murder on the Reservation: American Indian Crime Fiction: Aims and Achievements (Ray and Pat Browne Book)
by Ray B. Browne, Ray Broadus Browne
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0299196143
Catlog: Book (2004-05-15)
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Sales Rank: 389043
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

In Murder on the Reservation, Ray B. Browne surveys the work of several of the best-known writers of crime fiction involving Indian characters and references virtually every book that qualifies as an Indian-related mystery. Browne believes that within the genre of crime fiction all people are equal, and the increasing role of Indian characters in criminal fiction proves what an important role this genre plays as a powerful democratizing force in American society. He endeavors to both analyze and evaluate the individual work of the authors, and at the same time, provide a commentary on the various attitudes towards race relations in the United States that each author presents. Some Indian fiction is intended to right the wrongs the authors feel have been leveled against Indians. Other authors use Indian lore and Indian locales as exotic elements and locations for the entertaining and commercially successful stories they want to write. Browne's analysis includes authors and works of all backgrounds, with mysteries of first-class murder both on and off the reservation. ... Read more


17. Caribbean Women Writers: Essays from the First International Conference
list price: $22.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0870237322
Catlog: Book (1990-12-01)
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press
Sales Rank: 557845
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

18. Rain Forest Literatures: Amazonian Texts and Latin American Culture (Cultural Studies of the Americas, V. 16)
by Lucia Sa
list price: $24.95
our price: $24.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0816643253
Catlog: Book (2004-05-01)
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
Sales Rank: 882419
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

Native texts of the Amazonian rain forest have been viewed as myth or ethnographic matter—the raw material of literature—rather than as significant works in their own right. But in this unprecedented study, Lúcia Sá approaches indigenous texts as creative works rather than source material.

Disclosing the existence and nature of longstanding, rich, and complex Native American literary and intellectual traditions that have typically been neglected or demeaned by literary criticism, Rain Forest Literatures analyzes four indigenous cultural traditions: the Carib, Tupi-Guarani, Upper Rio Negro, and Western Arawak. In each case, Sá considers principal native texts and, where relevant, their publication history. She offers a historical overview of the impact of these texts on mainstream Spanish-American and Brazilian literatures, detailing comparisons with native sources and making close analyses of major instances, such as Mário de Andrade’s classic Macunaima (1928) and Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Storyteller (1986).

A redrawing of the lineage of Brazilian and Spanish-American literatures, this book advocates an understanding of the relationships between cultures as a process of "transculturation" rather than "acculturation"—a process that emphasizes the often-ignored impact of the peripheral culture on the one that assumes dominance. ... Read more


19. Red Matters: Native American Studies (Rethinking the Americas)
by Arnold Krupat
list price: $21.95
our price: $21.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0812218035
Catlog: Book (2002-04-01)
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Sales Rank: 510282
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

20. Writing As Witness: Essay and Talk
by Beth Brant
list price: $14.95
our price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0889612005
Catlog: Book (1995)
Publisher: Women's Press, Ltd. (UK)
Sales Rank: 1163209
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Book Description

This liberating collection of essays is infused with the healing power of political activism, the lyricism of a skilled storyteller and a fundamental comprehension of the sacred. ... Read more


1-20 of 200       1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next 20
Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

Top