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1. The Cunning Linguist : Ribald
$25.00 $16.40
2. A Guide to the Oxford English
$80.00 $22.95
3. The Story of Webster's Third :
$8.00 list($14.95)
4. Wordplay: A Curious Dictionary
$28.67 $27.54
5. Idioms in American Life
$9.71 $3.64 list($12.95)
6. The Right Word!: How to Say What
$11.20 list($14.95)
7. 1500+ Keywords for $100,000+ Jobs
list($10.95)
8. 1100 Words You Need to Know
$15.99 list($24.99)
9. English Through the Ages
$21.99 $17.95
10. The Making of Johnson's Dictionary
list($9.00)
11. Word Resources.
$1.99 list($5.99)
12. 21ST CENTURY MANUAL OF STYLE
list($30.95)
13. Vocabulary 1000: With Words in
$4.00 list($21.00)
14. Adventures of a Verbivore
list($13.95)
15. Words
list($25.53)
16. Words and Their Meaning (Learning
list($14.95)
17. Every Cliche in the Book
list($5.95)
18. Misnomers
$6.95 list($5.95)
19. Dimboxes, Epopts, and Other Quidams:
$4.95 list($17.95)
20. The Logophile's Orgy

1. The Cunning Linguist : Ribald Riddles, Lascivious Limericks, Carnal Corn, and Other Good, Clean Dirty Fun
by Richard Lederer
list price: $13.95
our price: $10.46
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Asin: 0312318138
Catlog: Book (2003-12-17)
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Sales Rank: 24326
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Have some fun with your native tongue!

In The Cunning Linguist, renowned language expert Richard Lederer shows us the naughtier side of wordplay, revealing hundreds of hilarious, ingenious, unabashed, and adults-only puns, jokes, limericks, one-liners, and other adventures in sexual humor. This book of "good, clean dirty fun" will delight word hounds, punsters, bachelor-party goers, and anyone who likes a clever grown-up joke.

Here's a taste of The Cunning Linguist:

Q: What does a man have in his pants that you can also find on a pool table?
A:Pockets.

Have you heard about the incompatible couple?
He had no income, and she wasn't pattable.

The four stages of a couple's sex life:
Under 35: Tri-weekly
35-45: Try weekly
45-55: Try weakly
55 and over: Try, try, try.

For much more, sneak between the covers of this unique and laugh-out-loud book.
... Read more

Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Simply Sinfully Punny
I had lots of fun with this book. Mr. Lederer, I blame you for the lost hours of sleep! :-) There are parts of the book that I wouldn't want kids to see, but it's mostly harmless. My favourite is the poem where the last line of each stanza is missing a word which based on the rhyme would be quite risque, but it's a riot when you see what happens at the beginning of the next stanza.

Oh, speaking of risque, if I understand this correctly, this book was previously known as Nothing Risque, Nothing Gained. So if you already have that one, you don't need this one. On the other hand, if you'd been looking for it, this is your chance to get it. ... Read more


2. A Guide to the Oxford English Dictionary
by Donna Lee Berg
list price: $25.00
our price: $25.00
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Asin: 0198691793
Catlog: Book (1993-07-01)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Sales Rank: 72470
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Very Helpful
This book is a very nice supplement to the 20 volume OED. It has 2 main parts:

"Part One is a step-by-step guide to understanding the kinds of information found in, and the conventions of, typical OED entries, including pronunciation, word origins, grammatical function; the organization of historical changes of meaning; and the role of the many illustrative quotations."

"Part Two is an A-Z Companion to the OED, covering its history, the individuals who have shaped it, its terminology and methods, and a wealth of fascinating facts and figures."

There is also a 7 page chronology of the OED, a facts and figures section, and a bibliography.

5-0 out of 5 stars Indispensible guide for the new OED user
I had the compact edition of the first edition of the OED for several years, but I rarely used it. The print was pretty small, but the main reason was that I apparently didn't understand the arrangement scheme and methods employed by the OED. I bought this guide recently, just to see if I was missing anything crucial. It cleared up my understanding in so many ways; I was persuaded to buy the full 20 volume set of the 2nd edition. I recommend this book to anyone who uses the OED or is thinking about using it, and wants to use it to its fullest capacity. ... Read more


3. The Story of Webster's Third : Philip Gove's Controversial Dictionary and its Critics
by Herbert C. Morton
list price: $80.00
our price: $80.00
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Asin: 0521461464
Catlog: Book (1994-08-26)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Sales Rank: 1143451
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The publication of Webster's Third New International Dictionary in 1961 set off a storm of intense controversy in both the popular press and in scholarly journals due to widespread disagreements about the nature of language and the role of the dictionary. This is the first full account of the controversy, set within the larger background of how the dictionary was planned and put together by its editor-in-chief, Philip Babcock Gove.Based on original research and interviews with the people who knew and worked with Gove, this is a human story as well as the story of the making of a dictionary. The author skillfully interweaves an account of Gove's character and working habits with the evolution of the dictionary. In spite of its rocky initial reception,Webster's Third is now widely regarded as one of the greatest dictionaries of our time. ... Read more

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars The most significant U.S. dictionary of the 20th century
If you're one of those people who consider a well done dictionary to be good early-morning reading material (and really, who isn't?) then this book is for you. Seriously, the Merriam-Webster Third Edition created a huge controversy when it was first released in 1961, being the first major U.S. dicitonary that took a mainly DESRIPTIVE rather than PRESCIPTIVE approach to the english language. Never mind that European dicionaries had been doing much the same for a hundred years or more, to many Americans this was heresy. The ripples from this storm are still bouncing about today. Too bad that Philip Gove, the editor and virtual godfather of the Third, was such a poor defender of it. Also too bad he didn't live long enough to see his editorial philosophy largely vindicated. Morton gives equal attention to Philip Gove, the dictionary itself, and the G. & C. Merriam Company. The historical section on Noah Webster and his dictionary, how it was acquired by the Merriam brothers, and the subsequent history of the company is most informative and fascinating. So is the discussion at the end of the lasting effects of Webster's Third. As it should be with any book about dictionaries, the material is well-organized, with everything clearly and logically laid out. A good read, and a must for lexiphiles.

5-0 out of 5 stars The American Big Dictionary
Philip Gove spent his career producing this magnum opus. Morton traces the work and the explosion that occurred when the dictionary was published. It's the American version of "The Professor and the Madman". ... Read more


4. Wordplay: A Curious Dictionary of Language Oddities
by Chris Cole
list price: $14.95
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Asin: 0806917970
Catlog: Book (1999-03-01)
Publisher: Sterling Pub Co Inc
Sales Rank: 895714
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars A must for any Word or puzzle fan!
This book worths 6 stars. It contains a glossary of "special" words and interesting charts of words, in the puzzle and the-word-it-self sense. For example, what is the longest common word containing most consecutive letters in the alphabet after letter c? You can look up the glossary and find the answer is "disenfranchising" What word repeats most s's? the answer is possessionlessnesses. For a word or a puzzle fan, this is a must. For common readers, even merely skip some pages, you can wonder at so many words with its special property. ... Read more


5. Idioms in American Life
by Julie Howard
list price: $28.67
our price: $28.67
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Asin: 0134502078
Catlog: Book (1987-02-27)
Publisher: Pearson ESL
Sales Rank: 740760
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Idioms
Learning idioms is an essential element for English as a Second Language students. This book not only contains an extensive list of useful and commonly used idioms but, in contrast to others, includes exercises with each lesson helping ensure that the material is remembered. ... Read more


6. The Right Word!: How to Say What You Really Mean (Right! Series)
by Jan Venolia
list price: $12.95
our price: $9.71
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Asin: 1580085075
Catlog: Book (2003-08-01)
Publisher: Ten Speed Press
Sales Rank: 207882
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7. 1500+ Keywords for $100,000+ Jobs
by Wendy S. Enelow
list price: $14.95
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Asin: 1570230897
Catlog: Book (1998-04-01)
Publisher: Impact Pubns
Sales Rank: 572761
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The definitive guide to selecting and using Key Words to build powerful resumes for today's job market. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting approach to the 21st Century job market
In the high tech world where resumes and cover letters are pre-processed electronically, every edge you can get is worthwhile. Nowadays a highly qualified candidate can be completely shut out of the interview process simply by the words that they use in their correspondance with the company.

This book is primarily a directory of keywords that one should use in various fields if they are seeking a job. These "buzzwords" are not replacements for actual content in the documents but rather should be used like spices to add flavoring to the piece.

I know from personal experience, both as a candidate and a hiring manager that missing some of these buzzwords will mark you as unqualified before you even get a chance to be seen by the company.

If you are new to the job market, changing careers, or just having trouble being seen, this book might help you add some of the necessary spices to make resume just that much more attractive to potential employers. The cost of this book, which should be less than 1 hours pay for a typical applicant is more than worthwhile to someone in need. ... Read more


8. 1100 Words You Need to Know
by Murray Bromberg, Melvin Gordon
list price: $10.95
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Asin: 0812016203
Catlog: Book (1993-07-01)
Publisher: Barrons Educational Series Inc
Sales Rank: 587857
Average Customer Review: 4.42 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A Barron's bestseller for years, this book is better than ever in a brand new fourth edition. In addition to its standard vocabulary lists, this edition includes a new section called Panorama of Words. In this feature, each of the 1100 words appears in a sentence selected from among well known novels, plays, poems, and even newspaper editorials and TV broadcasts.The book is a vocabulary builder aimed directly at college-bound high school students, as well as college students who need extra vocabulary help. Students will find word lists with definitions, analogy exercises, entertaining word games, and fascinating words-in-context exercises. ... Read more

Reviews (12)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent book
I would say this is one of the best books in the market. You learn 5 words a day with context taken from newspapers and books.There are exercises at the end of each day and at the end of each week.Like this they make up 1100 words.15 minutes a day is what we need to spend on this book. This is all we all need. Another good book is The Wizard Of OZ Vocabulary Builder.

5-0 out of 5 stars big vocabulary in bite-sized chunks
This vocabulary book is fantastic!

You work on 10 words for each of 5 days, and then a weekly quiz. The text stimulates and preps your mind to soak up the definition of each word by first showing you its use in a paragraph, then testing you with fill-in-the blank sentences. Finally,you learn the definitions via a matching quiz. But, after the paragraph and blank sentences, you almost know the definitions already! Also, each day a language idiom is presented as a further boost to a highly functional vocabulary.

This is a great vocabulary book. I highly reccommend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars 1100 words you need to know
it is very helpful to my son. He copies the stories every morning. He got excellent scores at sat test.

3-0 out of 5 stars not a good book
Read Read Read! Think books are for geeks only? If you think you have no reason to read, think harder. You like staring at the sun? Maybe there're audio books out there that share your interest in that pastime. You like staring at ants building dirt mounds--damn right there's books out there on that too! "I like to read, but my limited vocab inhibits me from reading anything with substance, so I just watch TV." I hear ya buddy, that's why I picked up the book " Barron's 1100 Words You Need To Know." Besides the fact that reading and writing skills are absolutely necessary in my college career, both of which depends directly on my vocab, I hated the fact that every damn thing with substance that I read, I had to look every other word up in the dictionary. So I said," hmmk, only 15 minutes of my day and I drastically improve my vocabulary huh?" UH UH, just another one of those magic pills that supposedly make you lose weight, increase sex drive, decrease age, and boost your IQ(!). If you don't want to build your vocab naturally (by doing a whole lot of reading), be prepared to grease up and work hard. "Work??!?Oh My God did you just say work?!!?" Well sir, building your vocab depends on one of the two things: How much you actually use the word, or how ingrained it is in your past knowledge. And since you probably won't be using the majority of those tasty words that allow you to read comfortably anything with substance in your daily life, e.g., while ordering fast food, your best bet is to find ways to ingrain those damned words. What do I mean by ingrain? I mean you have to connect the words to anything that you know that has a relation to it! Simple? Not. The best way to to connect words with what your past knowledge is to fit it into context--read sentences using the words! This won't be hard, since the book's "panorama of words" has sentences for each word in the book. This is lacking, however. If you can somehow draw the multiple meanings words often have from the 2 sentences and a definition composed of just two or three words, then this is the book for ya. If you also shun learning synonyms, you've got your book right here. However, if you truly want to make drastic improvements to your vocab, you best look up the multiple meanings of words from a dictionary, find the synonyms and compare the nuances, and make at least 2 sentences for each word. Then again, you might be Mr./Ms. Super Tenacious( In "1100 words," it says tenacious means "touch, stubborn." Guess you would never think it also meant "Capable of absorbing and retaining a large store of info and of recalling details accurately" eh? both meanings are rich, but you only get one from our book here). If you are, then i'm sure you can retain words easily just doing the mediocre exercises in this book. If your like everyone else, however, you'll probably end up making flash cards to facilitate learning. Now, if you follow the steps I listed to compensate for the books shortfalls, your probably talking about 4x the amount of time recommended on the front cover to learn these words sufficiently." But everything worthwhile takes time to accomplish." Ya, but we can also be EFFICIENT! That hour to compensate for our book "Barron's 1100 words You Need To Know" can be cut in half. Now, you have 30 EXTRA minutes to stare at the sun!( plz ppl don't stare at the sun; I've tried it b4 and I totally got sun burns=]. Or! You can just get a book that provides full definitions for words AND SYNONYMS AND SENTENCES WITH THE WORDS! I've gotten called "Word Power Made Easy," by Norman Lewish, and already it's superior to "1100 words something something." "Word Power Made Easy" focuses on the etymology (history) of words, which is a gr8 way to expand your overall knowledge AND your VOCAB and your ability to discern the meanings of WORDS YOU DON'T KNOW. Sound to good to be true? Learning the etymology of word groups can help you make vast improvements to your vocab, but it has its limits, like everything else(Besides me. Hehe, just pulling your yankee doodle/ette). If you also want to eschew everything I mentioned above, you should also look at a book called "Verbal Advantage: 10 Steps to an Impressive Vocabulary" by Charles Harrinton Elster. "Verbal Advantage" lists the Synonyms, the nuances, and a clear definition of all the words! You must check it out on this site. But listen, take it from this nascent omniscient reader, the best way to increase your vocab DRASTICALLY is to read something that you really enjoy and has plenty of tasty words. What did it for me was Joyce Carol Oates's "Marya: a Life." Even though when I read it, I really didn't learn the vocab, I've picked up another one of her books called "What I live For," and ever since then, my vocab has been bling blinging. When I go to the english tutoring center at my college, the tutors are like "You have a mature vocabulary." I usually just coolly reply "I'd graduated from Princeton" or something very unclose to that. But really, there is indisputable evidence that you learn quickest when you enjoy learning. And take it from me, most words Ms. Oates uses in her book that I look up, I retain with the slightest of effort. So i've laid down the options you must take, the last being the wisest to take. And remember, audio books are expensive!"Marya: A life" by Joyce Carol Oates

3-0 out of 5 stars Excellent idea, BUT
I recently purchased the 2000 edition to use with my college-bound students who need more vocabulary work, as, for many of them, English is not their first language. The presentation and layout are excellent, the extracts are interesting and informative, and the "Panorama" section is relevant. I am concerned, however, about the errors in the answer section and the occasional typo. I have found a total of 21 errors - surely too high for a text which aims to "improve college grades" and to help you "score high on the SAT1". Check the answers carefully - the errors are pretty obvious and so should have been spotted before publication. These spoil an otherwise excellent book which should have had 5 stars. ... Read more


9. English Through the Ages
by William Brohaugh
list price: $24.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0898796555
Catlog: Book (1997-12-01)
Publisher: Writer's Digest Books
Sales Rank: 430737
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

"Laptop," "quality time," "politically correct," "wannabe," and "spin doctor"--these terms are all such mainstays of our modern-day vernacular that it's hard to believe they are only about 15 years old. It seems equally unlikely that, even in the year 1150, a person could live life in the "fast lane," eschewing his own "flesh and blood" and "sleeping with a comely whore" at his "summerhouse." Such a "witless turd" could even "tap" an "ice-cold keg," after which he might just "spew" his "guts" out. This hefty volume is sure entertainment for anyone interested in knowing that the word "smooch" is about 350 years older than the word "oink," that in the 1600s a "prick" was a nice guy, and that women were getting "knocked up" by the year 1665 (a good 30 years, for what it's worth, after the first recording of the phrase "women's rights"). --Jane Steinberg ... Read more

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Plenteous and Pure Tome of the English Tongue
This book belongs in your collection if you are interested in word useage through time. This book is particularly useful when you want to give your historical writing that extra oomph, and you want to use the right word for the right time.

How about a quick insult? Flip to the proper time frame, say 1350, and Lo! Words like "Lurdane" (dull, heavy, stupid, sluggish) and "Gig" (Sorry, this is a family website, you'll have to read the book)abound anon.

You can also use the index to locate a particular word. The page numbers will tip you off as to where the word falls in the timeline.

A very helpful, but not always employed, feature is the notation "u", meaning the word was in use until a particular time. This way, you can be confident that "gig" was a good insult "u1700".

We are bounden to William Brohaugh.

3-0 out of 5 stars Hefty, but Specific Reference
A fine, if special purpose, reference. The first half of the book contains a cronological listing of words broken down by category (War, Interjections, Emotions, Colors). This is interesting for questions like: "What words would a modern man of the 1590's use?" The latter (and more specifically useful) half contains an alphabetic index of all words (but sadly indexed without date -- requiring some paging back and forth): "Is this word appropriate for a Lady of the 1880's?" This is the sort of reference that cries out for CD-Rom, but the flexibility of paper far outweighs the limited possibilities of some cd ui. "Brief Musings" about English evolution break up the index monotony and add some "why" rather than just what. ... Read more


10. The Making of Johnson's Dictionary 1746-1773 (Cambridge Studies in Publishing and Printing History)
by Allen Reddick
list price: $21.99
our price: $21.99
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Asin: 0521568382
Catlog: Book (1996-01-26)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Sales Rank: 700476
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11. Word Resources.
by Thomas E Walker
list price: $9.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0024238503
Catlog: Book (1979-01-01)
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Co
Sales Rank: 3435037
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12. 21ST CENTURY MANUAL OF STYLE
by Barbara Ann, Ph.D. Kipfer, Princeton Language Institute
list price: $5.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440220742
Catlog: Book (1995-04-02)
Publisher: Laurel
Sales Rank: 1267047
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13. Vocabulary 1000: With Words in Context
by Morton J. Cronin
list price: $30.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 015594987X
Catlog: Book (1981-08-01)
Publisher: Harcourt
Sales Rank: 1097661
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14. Adventures of a Verbivore
by Richard Lederer
list price: $21.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0671709410
Catlog: Book (1994-03-01)
Publisher: Pocket Books
Sales Rank: 738800
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15. Words
by Paul Dickson
list price: $13.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0385291639
Catlog: Book (1982-08-01)
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Sales Rank: 1755698
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Dictionary for the Rest of Us...
Merriam Webster's may be the authority on the words we should use. This book offers the first and last word on those that we do use (and want to use). In a variety of chapters grouped by theme ("Curses," "British Words," "Acronyms" and so on), the author presents us with a special and funny collection of terms that are exotic, funny, quirky and ribald. Who knew that "Trigamy" involved having one more spouse than a bigamist? Who knew that there existed a person who cleans feathers for reuse in pillows? Or that his job title is "Feather Renovator"? Or that there were at least 2,231 words and phrases available to describe drunkenness? I am 20 years into a career of journalism and law and have had this book on my desk the entire time. It has proven invaluable many, many times -- on some occasions only for a pleasant diversion. On others to find just the right phrase for an argument or an article. It is a true treasure. ... Read more


16. Words and Their Meaning (Learning About Language)
by Howard Jackson
list price: $25.53
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0582291542
Catlog: Book (1989-02-01)
Publisher: Longman Publishing Group
Sales Rank: 1528151
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17. Every Cliche in the Book
by Peggy Rosenthal, George Dardess, Peter Lavigna
list price: $14.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0688061133
Catlog: Book (1987-02-01)
Publisher: William Morrow & Co
Sales Rank: 711565
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars You'll Smile, You'll Laugh, You'll Cringe...
...at every cliche in this book. Ms. Rosenthal and Mr. Dardess quizzed every in law, every outlaw, every aunt and uncle, parent and grandparent available, scribbled on the back of cocktail napkins, woke up in the middle of the night to scratch on the back of a light bill envelope to get all the cliches anyone could ever imagine and some that no one would ever have thought of...the cartoons, (listed as being done by the CRAG and Peter Lavigna) are hilarious, too. A chicken depositing eggs on the highway divider is "laying it on the line" and Bowser in his canine residence while consuming a frankfurter shows us "it's a dog eat dog world" (rimshot!).... Anyhoo, there are hilarious dialogs like "Mr. Arbuthnot and the Meaning of life" and "Mom and Pop And Sis And Junior" arguments that will make you sick with glee and tickled pink on how cleverly several cliches are placed in context of a conversation or two or three...the index alone is a wealth of information. Or a cavern of puns, however you look at it. You will fully enjoy this one. And when you finish, hand this book over to a friend, so he/she can get a kick out of it, also. (You know stacking my reviews with a boat load of cliches is right up my alley. Why did you think I could not resist tossing a few more logs in the fire in 'this' review ...?) ... Read more


18. Misnomers
by Mark Dittrick, Henrik Drescher
list price: $5.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0020136706
Catlog: Book (1986-11-01)
Publisher: Collier Books
Sales Rank: 2021128
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19. Dimboxes, Epopts, and Other Quidams: Words to Describe Life's Indescribable People
by David Grambs
list price: $5.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0894801554
Catlog: Book (1986-10-01)
Publisher: Workman Pub Co
Sales Rank: 1054547
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20. The Logophile's Orgy
by LEWIS BURKE FRUMKES
list price: $17.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0385313527
Catlog: Book (1995-03-01)
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Sales Rank: 783271
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