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1. The Dhammapada
by Eknath Easwaran, Easwaran
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Asin: 0915132370
Catlog: Book (1986-06-01)
Publisher: Nilgiri Press
Sales Rank: 61676
Average Customer Review: 4.73 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

According to Eknath Easwaran, if all of the Buddhist sutras had been lost except the Dhammapada, it alone would be enough for readers to understand and appreciate the wisdom of the Buddha. Easwaran's version of the Dhammapada goes a long way toward proving this. In a lengthy introduction, Easwaran summarizes the life of the Buddha and the main tenets of his thought, including key concepts such as dharma, karma, and nirvana. The language of the Dhammapada is as lucid and flowing as the Psalms or the Sermon on the Mount, and this is why it is one of the most loved and remembered of all Buddhist sutras. Its subject matter, succinctly, is about training the mind, which leads to kind thoughts and deeds, which bring peace and freedom from suffering. If you are interested in reading one of the gems of Buddhist literature, this is a good place to start; and if you are looking for a great version of this beloved scripture, you can't do better. Like all great world scripture, the verses here reward rereading and reflection, prompting you to "strive for wisdom always." --Brian Bruya ... Read more

Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wisdom in words..
Eknath Easwaran's translation of "The Dhammapada" is superb. I'm not a Buddhist and you don't have to be to glean an ounce of wisdom from these pages. The Buddha's words can apply to anyone and everyone who reads with an open mind and heart.

Easwaran begins with a fantastic, lengthy, introduction detailing the Buddha's life. The concepts of Karma, Dharma and Nirvana are also explained.

The Bhudda's words are comprised in 25 chapters, grouped by topic. Each chapter recieves an introduction by Stephen Ruppenthal.

If you enjoy this version of "The Dhammapada", might I also recommend "The Bhagavad Gita" and the "Upanishads", also by Easwaran. These two books provide a wonderful spiritual and philosophic look into the Hindu religion.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Dhammapada to travel.
"Our life is shaped by our mind," the Buddha tells us in the opening lines of The Dhammapada, "we become what we think" (p. 78). This is the essence of Buddhism, and the central theme of The Dhammapada ("the path of dharma"), a collection of teachings preserved most likely by the Buddha's original students in the sixth century before Christ. And as Eknath Easwaran tells us, it is a collection of discourses "meant for everyone," not just monks and nuns (p. 75). "If everything else were lost," Easwaran observes in his excellent, 65-page Introduction to this translation, "we would need nothing more than the Dhammapada to follow the way of the Buddha" (p. 7). Although I'm not qualified to comment on his abilities as a translator, Easwaran succeeds at conveying the essence of the Buddha's teachings that point the way down a path less traveled, but a path that makes all the difference when it comes to self-realization. In my opinion, Easwaran's translation is the one to travel.

G. Merritt

5-0 out of 5 stars Eternal Freedom from Suffering. A MUST Read!
The Dammapada went to the core of my being like few books have done before. This book literally transformed previous pain into genuine compassion and understanding. The work of Eknath Easwarren is a noble gift to humanity. His introduction brings you into the life of Buddha, where you "feel" what He went through, and how he overcame the same doubts, anxieties, and responses from ego that we all strive to overcome.
There is no preaching in this tradition, only the heartfelt and breathtaking teaching of the way out of pain.
This book reads like a jewel that brings light to your mind and your soul. It encompasses the greatest teachings of Buddha, and will show you exactly how to achieve Nirvana. This is not a religion, it is a way of life, paved with the eightfold path, that is for all of humanity equally, even if you subscribe to another religion. It will reach your human mind, and help you transform into an "awakened" one. HIGHLY Recommended for the everlasting peace you deserve.
Barbara Rose, author of 'Individual Power' and 'If God Was Like Man'

4-0 out of 5 stars Just a good book
I just liked this book. I like that the introduction has a brief on the four noble truths and the eightfold path, encouraging one to look deeper. I also like the explinations and or insites that come before the verses, not in-between the verses like some other publications which tend to muddy the lesson. Its just a very comfortable book to read and re-read time and again, and because of this I think the lessons unfold in a more natural fashion. No hurry, just relax.

5-0 out of 5 stars Buddhism defined
Another soothing gem by Easwaran. I had earlier read The Upanishads by the same author, and was inspired into further exploration of his writing. A few words on the author before the book is due here. Easwaran can definitely be counted as one of those individuals who has made a sincere and thorough attempt to understand numerous religions and draw out their common parallels and apply them to his life, in an almost saint-like manner. Easwaran influence on thought can be said to be similar to Parthasarathy's, another great writer more focused on Hinduism. It is in reading such authors, that we are left with an indelible impact on our psyche, and within a few weeks of regular reading, can see our daily lives transformed by the power of our own tranquil thinking.

In The Dhammapada, Easwaran now embarks on a similar voyage of peace and calm in the exploration of Buddhism, as he did with the Upanishads. The introduction of the book once again gives a brief backrgound into the life of Siddharta, the prince and charts his transformation into the Buddha, the "one who is awake". The book then goes on to describe one of the fundamental "religious-books" of Buddhism, the Dhammapada and its teachings. The parallels with the Upanishadic teachings, the mystic sufis and the Sermon on the Mount is often illustrated, thus underlining Easwaran's belief of the unity of fundamental thought across religions.

Every two chapters are preceeded with an introduction to the concepts and principles enshrined in them, and hence makes reading and comprehension and indeed, personal thinking and evaluation that much more effective. Buddhism in the end, comes out as it should, another monumental religion based on very basic truths and grounded in infallible and extremely rigorous logic. The book is a pure delight to read and has an almost immediate impact on the reader's approach to life itself.

Incidentally, another wonderful book and religion on similar lines is "The way of Zen", by Alan Watts, and I am out to procure it. This is supposed to describe the confluence of Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism to create the Zen.

Somewhere out there lies the truth, our own selves shining in the dark. ... Read more


2. Classics of Buddhism and Zen, Volume 5 : The Collected Translations of Thomas Cleary: Dhammapada, The Buddhist I Ching,Stopping and Seeing, Entry into ...Buddhist Yoga (Classics of Buddhism and Zen)
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Asin: 1570628386
Catlog: Book (2002-10-08)
Publisher: Shambhala
Sales Rank: 683748
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3. The Dhammapada: The Path of Truth
by Rose Kramer, Balangoda Ananda Maitreya
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Asin: 0938077872
Catlog: Book (1995-11-01)
Publisher: Parallax Press
Sales Rank: 73765
Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Dhammapada by Ananda Maitreya, Rose Kramer
The best, unquestionably, as compared to the Ram Dass and John Ross Carter versions. The impact of original translation without fancy revision is as important as each drop which fills our cup. This is the one translation that uses word for word and that's what makes it the best. Perhaps I should be compensated for this review, ha, ha. Truly, this is the one to read if there's any question. And if a reader thinks this version is dry, it's because he is not yet at the level to understand truth and should stick to fiction. I can't emphasize the importance of original translation as without, the result is loss in important teachings, however subtle. What could be worse than a half truth?

5-0 out of 5 stars The Dhammapada : the wisdom of Buddhism
The Dhammapada is the essence of Buddism as taught by Buddha. This translation by Ven. Maitreya's translation, with Rose Kramer, is perfect one.

Anyone who wants to understand the wisdom of Buddhism should read this version, which has been translated by one of the most respected monks of all time!

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitely one for the collection!

I have been reading several translations of the Dhammapada recently and came across this one and found it offers some things that the others do not.

Since the original written form of the Dhammapada is in Pali, others have needed to take the time to translate it for us in the West. As in any translation, there are many words that offer multiple meanings. One person may interpret 'dhukka' as 'suffering', another may choose 'stress', and yet another may decide 'unsatisfactoriness'. As you can see, each can then be interpreted in our mind as one thing or another. By having several translations available I have been able to derive a deeper understanding.

To begin with, the size makes this translation ideal for carrying in a shirt pocket or for having on hand in the car for a little Dhamma between red lights. Another feature I enjoy is this translation is from a monk. The editor is a layperson however, after her edits she spoke with the monk and explained why she made certain changes, (to make specific words more accessible to us in the West) and he agreed with the new updates. The monastic community obviously spends more time than most laypersons studying the Pali Canon so their translations, I have found, tend to be quite meaningful. Overall, the translations offered here are meaningful and poetic.

Drawbacks? The introduction is a little shorter than other offerings and there are only a limited amount of notes. There is an interesting background to how the Dhammapada fits within the Pali Canon and the use of notes is helpful in understanding certain meanings, etc. Since the size would have been affected I'm sure this may have been one of the reasons they were not included. Again, by reading several translations you will be rewarded.

In addition to this translation I have found Cleary's translation helpful, however the notes and his comments were not. (see my review of his translation) I have also found Thanissaro Bhikkhu's translation very helpful, although it is offered as dana and as such is not available for sale. Recently I obtained S. Radhakrishnan's translation, which offers the original Pali text along with his translation, but I have not yet been able to thoroughly read through it to offer any meaningful review.

Whether you have read other versions, or if this is your very first exposure to the Dhammapada, I think you will be pleased with this translation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Clear, Concise, Lovingly Translated
This recent translation of this core text of Buddhism is wonderfully clear and concise. The translation seems both careful and modern. The translators avoid the common pitfall of attempting a "scriptural" diction or tone. I was very impressed with the clarity of this slender volume. Buy it. Read it. You won't be able to stop. It is THAT good.

5-0 out of 5 stars Very good
Simple, concise, smooth and pleasant to read. I have read academic and detailed versions of the Dhammapada, and yet I feel the words in this one are enough to keep me thinking and pondering individual lines. In all teachings, it is the idea and feeling that is most paramount, and if it can be done in less words, it definitely has succeeded at its task. This little book is well worth its price, and many readings thereafter. ... Read more


4. Dhammapada: The Path of Perfection (Penguin Classics)
by Juan Mascaro
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Asin: 0140442847
Catlog: Book (1973-06-01)
Publisher: Penguin Books
Sales Rank: 325121
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and inspiring
The Dhammapada is one of the world's great religious classics, and its pithy, poetic style makes it very direct and inspiring. Like some of the other reviewers, I don't read Pali, and it's probably true that this isn't the most literal translation. However, I've read several translations of the Dhammapada and this has been my favorite for a long time. In any translation of a poetic nature, the translator must choose a certain balance between a strictly literal translation of the source material and a poetic rendering of the material in the target language, and Mascaro leans a little toward the latter. I've been a student of Buddhism for some years, though, and I find very few places where Mascaro's translation seems to be inaccurate --- even though there are other translations that may be a little more precise and literal. In any case, there are many Buddhist philosophical works where precision of terminology is critical, but, since the Dhammapada is a more general work consisting mainly of aphorisms, it's one work where a little poetic license seems acceptable.

3-0 out of 5 stars Poetic but outdated translation
Having read Max Muller's over 100 year misleading translation, Carter's and Palihawadana's philosophical, dry, but excellent translation, which, with annonations builds up whole buddhist philosophical system, Mascaro's translation is deeply disappointing. While I can't understand Pali, Carter's translation is -or at least seems to be very convincing translation. Mascarara's translation is beatiful and poetic but has same grave philosophical errors than Muller's outdated translations. Let's see one example.

Chapter one, verse one is translated by Muller as:
All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with an evil thought, pain follows him, as the wheel follows the foot of the ox that draws the carriage

Mascaro's also misleading translation goes like:
What we are today comes from our thoughts of yesterday, and out present thoughts build our life of tomorrow: our life is the creation of our mind.
If a man speaks or act with an impure mind, suffering follows him as the wheel of the cart follows the beast that draws the cart.

But Carter's et al. translation reveals the (propably) true (philosophical) meaning of the verse:
Proceeded by perception are mental states,*1
for them is perception supreme,
from them perception have they sprung.
If, with perception polluted*2, one speaks or acts,
Thence suffering follows
As a wheel the draughts wheel ox's foot.

annonations of Carter's book:

*1 perception...mental states: the pure event of seeing, hearing, smelling etc. an object is Â'perceptionÂ'; the concurrent rise of attachment, hate, anger, desire etc. with regard to it ís the mental states.

*2 polluted: that is, with mental states such as anger.

5-0 out of 5 stars A work of timeless insight and gentle beauty
The Dhammapada is one of the essential works of Buddhist scripture, and this book represents Juan Mascaro's translation of that timeless classic from Pali into English. Not knowing Pali, I cannot judge the linguistic accuracy of Mascaro's translation. But as a lover of both poetry and spiritual philosophy, I can say that this English text is a quiet masterpiece.

The text is divided up into 423 short verses, each of which represents a teaching of the Buddha. This is one of those marvelous books which one can open at any page and begin reading. Often poetic, often practical, but always intriguing, the Dhammapada invites the reader to return again and again. Through its verses we can hear the Buddha challenging us to look at life from a radically new perspective; we hear him encouraging us to break free from the psychological prisons which we too often help build ourselves.

Also fascinating is Juan Mascaro's substantial introduction, in which he discusses the life of the historical Buddha and puts his legacy in a broad context that is both multifaith and multicultural. Scholars of comparative religion will probably be as interested in Mascaro's introduction as they are in the actual translation of the Dhammapada.

In the Dhammapada, we read, "Better than a thousand useless verses is one single verse that gives peace" (verse 101). Juan Mascaro's version of the Dhammapada is certainly a beautiful work of literature. But it is also a profoundly moving spiritual classic. Whatever your religious inclination (or lack thereof), you just might find in this wonderful book some verses that do indeed bring you closer to inner peace.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good translation
I have not read the Dhammapada in the original Pali, and therefore cannot comment about this particular translation's accuracy. What I can say is that this is certainly one of the most readable and fluid translations that I have read. A very enjoyable read.

1-0 out of 5 stars Penguin should provide a new version
It may read well but it is one of the worst translations of the Dhammapada available and you're better off finding any other translation but this.

It is more an interpretation using poetic terms than a translation of the original which is often more grave or more subtle.

The editors of Penguin should update their Dhammapada Penguin classics version without insulting readers' credibilities for too long. ... Read more


5. Dhammapada (Shambhala Pocket Classics)
by THOMAS BYROM
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Asin: 0877739668
Catlog: Book (1993-11-09)
Publisher: Shambhala
Sales Rank: 53773
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Dhammapada is one of the most popular and accessible books of Buddhist scripture. Undoubtedly one of the greatest teachers in history, the Buddha has had an immeasurable influence on the human race. He taught that our suffering stems from desire and that the only way to remove desire is to purify the heart. Dhamma means law, discipline, justice, virtue, truth -- that which holds things together. Pada means way, path, step, foot. So, The Dhammapada is the path of virtue, or the way of truth. Thomas Byrom’s lyrical and aphoristic rendering of the Buddha’s teaching reveals its practical and timeless simplicity.

Bell Tower’s Sacred Teachings series offers essential spiritual classics from all traditions. May each book become a trusted companion on the way of truth, encouraging readers to study the wisdom of
the ages and put it into practice each day.
... Read more

Reviews (12)

5-0 out of 5 stars greatest book I've read
I saw a large copy of this book in an herb shop in Maryland a number of years ago and bought it. It is the most inspirational book I've ever read. The Buddha is so deep! His line: "It is better to conquer yourself than to win a thousand battles" just about says it all for this world of violence and separation. Byrom's translation is far superior to any other. I tried to contact Byrom a few years ago to tell him how much I loved the book but found out he had passed away much to my dismay. The bigger book is out of print. If you are in any way a spiritual person and seeking Enlightenment, please read this book. You will treasure it forever. I've given many copies to friends. And don't skip the intro by Ram Dass which is great also.

5-0 out of 5 stars An incredible translation. Concise and easy to read.
Shakyamuni Buddha (Siddhartha) lived 2500 years ago and left this set of sayings or Dharmapada. Dharma means "Laws, truth, virtue" and "pada" means "way or path". Byrom's fantastic translation makes it so captivating for the reader because it is concise without verbosity, easy to read and easy to relate to. Shakyamuni's message is not tainted with overbearing explanations but comes as quick and sharp with great wit and logical sense. In addition to this, this translation openly embraces all walks of life---making it relevant to both the laity and the ascetic. Purchase this book and read Shakyamuni's wisdom so that you may apply it to your own.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dhammapada: Book Review
Dhammapada is a collection of early sayings in Sanskrit from the Buddha translated by Thomas Byrom. The founder of the Buddhist religion and a prince who abdicated his crown in Northern India to live the life as an ascetic, Buddha (563-483 B.C.) left his teachings in the form of oral discourses. These were in turn passed down through generations by means of oral transmission. Because of this attribute many such teachings (now known as Sutras) are metered as repetitive poems made easy for oral recitation.
Dhammapada differs from other Sutras in that it ventures little into the metaphysical nature of reality or life. Instead, it is a simple treatise that reminds us about the many virtues of life that we should practice daily. Thus, lessons about "living purely" (104), "blissful awakening" (78), "[letting] go of anger... [and] pride" (59), "living in honesty and strength" (88), "living in love" (100), and many others abound throughout the text. It contains a treasure of aphorisms that will make the reader stop, think over, and radically confront the truths held therein. Because of its positive affirmation of life and all its virtues, it is an uplifting Sutra that purifies the heart and enlightens the mind.
The English translation rendered by Byrom is exceptional in that it captures the poetic eloquence and fluidity of the original text with its own metered tempo. As presented, the translation is a masterpiece in its own right, with the translator juggling with words that take the reader to dizzying heights of poetic contemplation. Byrom's masterful choice of words strikes a deep resonance with this reader. When further weighed with Buddha's teachings in the background, this small text unfolds as a jewel of mystic and enlightened literature that stands second to none.
Although the text teaches mainly the practice of the virtues in our daily lives, it does not lose sight of the ultimate aspiration for all of us, namely liberation or nirvana. Thus by meditating on love, purifying the heart, and freeing the mind from "passion, enmity, folly" (6), "from desire and sorrow" (27), "from attachment and appetite" (26), it teaches that we will at last reach "freedom without bounds" (27).
A few of my all-time favorites include:

In this world
Hate never yet dispelled hate.
Only love dispels hate,
This is the law,
Ancient and inexhaustible (2).

and

However young,
The seeker who sets out upon the way
Shines bright over the world (102) .

... day and night
The man who is awake
Shines in the radiance of the spirit (104).

Meditate.
Live purely.
Be quiet.
Do your work, with mastery (104).

Like the moon,
Come out from behind the clouds!
Shine (102).
(my own arrangement of sequence)

This heartening sutra can be read thousands of time and yet with each reading it will still remain fresh as something new arouses the mind.

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect
This translation captures all the depth and complexity of this teaching in sparse poetic lines. My life had been enriched immeasurably by contact with this text. Its meaning grows with every encounter.

5-0 out of 5 stars A classic
Whether a practicing Buddhist or just interested in comparative religion, I can recommend this for your shelf. If you can find the larger format previous edition in hardback, get it instead for the beautiful photographs that illustrate it. But this little version is wonderfully compact and makes a good companion while traveling. ... Read more


6. The Dhammapada (Oxford World's Classics)
by John Ross Carter, Mahinda Palihawadana, John Carter
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Asin: 0192836137
Catlog: Book (2000-09-01)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Sales Rank: 433751
Average Customer Review: 4.25 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

TheDhammapada, the Pali version of one of the most popular texts of the Buddhist canon, ranks among the classics of the world's great religious literature.

Like all religious texts in Pali, the Dhammapada belongs to the Therevada school of the Buddhist tradition, adherents of which are now found primarily in Kampuchea, Laos, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Dhammapada, or "sayings of the dhamma," is taken to be a collection of the utterances of the Buddha himself. Taken together, the verses form a key body of teaching within Buddhism, a guiding voice along the struggle-laden path towards true enlightenment, or Nirvana. However, the appeal of these epithets of wisdom extends beyond its religious heritage to a general and universal spirituality.

This edition provides an introduction and notes which examine the impact that the text has had within the Buddhist heritage through the centuries. ... Read more

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Translation
This is one of the finest versions of the classic Theravada text out there. Carter and Palihawadana managed to strike the perfect balance of getting the timeless message of the Buddha's teaching across while at the same time presenting it in a straight foward, easy to understand manner. Those who are unfamiliar with The Dhammapada will find this translation very accessible while those who are will greatly appreciate beautiful wisdom-filled verses that Carter and Palihawadana have so eloquently preserved. The Introduction and explanatory notes throughout the text also provide a great deal of rich knowledge which adds even more depth to this most cherished of work of Buddhist literature.

4-0 out of 5 stars Fine translation
I have previously read classic Max Muller's version and some translations foud at numerous web-pages. I think this is clearly
the best of them. Carter and Palihawadana have retained texts lyric style but still their ambition is to bring autentic text as such to us. Hence reader have to use glossary where most importánt words and referensees are. I may be a bit annoying but
If you really want know exactly what what is in original dhammapada you has to use such method. Some at web "intreprete"
too much, then the text may look easier but It may go also wrong.
Only negative comment is that people to which english is not native language, text may have too mamy many fine but unfamiliar words. I recommend this book. It is one of the classics of Worlds religious teachings.

5-0 out of 5 stars Infinitely better than the Penguin Classics version
It is not easy to translate an ancient Indian language (Pali) to flowing English and retain the original meanings and senses.

This is a meticulous translation and it is clear the authors have spent time and effort to try and get it right. One of the authors being Sinhalese (which is also a language close to Pali)would have better understood the meanings and senses of terms more than most Western scholars, and the joint authorship suggests a polished and balanced approach to attain near perfection.

No translation could articulate the experiential meanings behind the verses or hope to equal the ancient material, but this one gets close representing an honest attempt at a challenging goal. The English may appear somewhat academic but the work represents a thoroughly modern translation and OUP have done their homework in bestowing authorship.

The publisher is to be congratulated and this book deserves the shelf of any good library. Penguin ought to update its totally inaccurate version without delay to retain credibility.

3-0 out of 5 stars A dissappointment.
The introduction was helpful as was the short bibliography but the text itself lacked any sense of poetic fluidity or clarity. A disappointment.

I enjoyed the translation by Eknath Easwaran. ... Read more


7. The Still Point Dhammapada : Living the Buddha's Essential Teachings
by Geri Larkin
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Asin: 0060513705
Catlog: Book (2003-04-01)
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Sales Rank: 239748
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The Dhammapada holds a special place in the hearts of those following the Buddhist path and is read and recited daily in temples and homes across the world. A collection of verses that the Buddha is said to have spoken on more than three hundred occasions, it is believed to be the most representative collection of his teachings.

Over the millennia, the Dhammapada has been translated numerous times, in various languages. But Geri Larkin wanted to find a rendition that rang true to an inner-city sangha. And so, she decided to embark on creating a contemporary rendition to be used at The Still Point Zen Buddhist Temple -- a new temple in the heart of Detroit. Staying true to its purpose, this fresh version of the beloved text points the way to living with both compassion and wisdom, and is the first Dhammapada to use intentionally inclusive language. Rendered simply and beautifully, the Buddha's teachings are complemented with inspiring stories about the surrounding community as well as the challenges of getting a temple and abbey off the ground in such an unlikely setting. The Still Point Dhammapada is a book for anyone -- lifelong practitioners as well as those new to Buddhism -- hungry for a contemporary rendition of the Buddha's teachings.

... Read more

Reviews (4)

4-0 out of 5 stars Making "Buddhism" our own
A book like this is a window into a process. This is not an introduction to meditation practice itself (that territory is amply covered elsewhere) but a look at a young community of practitioners findings its way, and the Way, in 21st century Detroit.

This community worked together on an adapted translation of the Dhammapada, a much-beloved collection of sayings of the Buddha which provide day-to-day, moment-by-moment encouragement that it is possible to let go of greed, anger, and delusion, and live a life that lists to deep awareness and compassion like a current that carries an empty boat.

This is not merely a literary project, however. This version of the Dhammapada, which breathes with fresh language and terms easily acceptable to new students in the United States, comes to us through the personal practice of the members of this community, whom we get to know through the short, anecdotal chapters that follow each canto of the text. Ancient wisdom, and the bumpy business of everyday life, interact in something almost approximating parallel text.

So it is a window into a process, a process by which a new Zen community matures, and by which an American Buddhism is slowly taking form. How wonderful to find this tradition finding its roots in our soil.

5-0 out of 5 stars Providing a haven for the world...
P'arang (the Buddhist name of author Geri Larkin) does what very few other writers are able to do these days: Write a compelling, sometimes humorous, always fiercely insightful book that's hard to put down.

In fact, I finished The Still Point Dhammapada: Living the Buddha's Essential Teachings in just two evenings -- and I'm sure I'll refer to it repeatedly in days to come.

The purpose of the book is two-fold: (1) It includes a very smooth-flowing, inclusive-language rendering of the Dhammapada, and (2) Interwoven with the Dhammapada is Ms. Larkin's observations about everything from what it's like to provide a haven for the folks in downtown Detroit, to daily struggles to abide by the Buddha's teachings to meetings with everyday (albeit fascinating) people.

P'arang's tone is always self-effacing, earthy and compassionate. Real. Sincere. She comes across as someone you'd like to chat with over a cup of tea.

For the record, I'm a Christian. Yet, I have recently become fascinated by Zen and have read many books on this ancient worldview. Why? Because I appreciate its philosophy of "mindfulness," which means to be fully awake and aware of life and to relish every minute, every thing, and every person along the way.

Zen is a simple worldview, yet it can be as deep and vast as you'd like it to be.

So it's no wonder I enjoyed Ms. Larkin's book so much. Her writing exemplifies what Zen has to offer.

If you're wondering how Zen Buddhists live their lives, you ought to consider reading The Still Point Dhammapada. It's one of the best books I've read on the subject -- although I don't think Ms. Larkin's goal was to write an apologetic for Buddhism. I think she just wanted to share her observations and comments about life as a Zen Buddhist teacher. Take 'em or leave 'em.

I took 'em. And really enjoyed The Still Point Dhammapada. I found it to be a wonderful peek into the world of Zen Buddhism from someone who knows it well. I highly recommend it -- along with The Still Point Zen Buddhist Temple web site.

5-0 out of 5 stars Shine One Corner
Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike: read this book!! The Still Point Dhammapada is moving and wise - the translations of the Buddha's words are simple (in the best sense) yet, of course, profound. Equally compelling are the stories from the streets around the Still Point abbey and temple. There are lots of stereotypes about Detroit - and Larkin & co. add voice and vision so that readers can really get a feel for the life of the neighborhood and the practice of "guerilla kindness." But don't mistake this for some pollyanna-ish text; the stories are alternately heartbreaking, funny and gritty. Coupled with the verses from the dhammapada, they teach by showing.
This is a lovely book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Zen in the City
She's done it again. This book is a wonderful tribute to the teachings of the Buddha and my spiritual home, Still Point Zen Buddhist Temple. The timeless teachings of the Buddha are interwoven beautifully with tales of everyday people living and breathing the dharma in Detroit. I love you and keep shining our corner, P'arang... ... Read more


8. Wisdom of the Buddha : The Unabridged Dhammapada (Dover Thrift Editions)
list price: $1.50
our price: $3.49
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0486411206
Catlog: Book (2000-03-24)
Publisher: Dover Publications
Sales Rank: 221591
Average Customer Review: 3.17 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Few sacred texts present their wisdom with the clarity of the Buddhist Dhammapada, or Path to Virtue. These ancient verses offer a compelling introduction to Buddhist thought, revealing the Four Truths—concerning the nature of the world and our lot in it—and the Eightfold Path to enlightenment, the means by which to overcome the essential suffering revealed by the Four Truths as the essence of life. Expressed with great beauty and translated with painstaking scholarship, this volume offers stimulating, challenging, and inspiring reading.
... Read more

Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Majestic Gift Beautifully Translated
The Dhammapada (in Pali/the Lankan scriptural language as derived from the original Pankrit), or the Dharmapada (in Sanskrit), the Pali being the original, in this case, is a pocket-size selection of the "essence" of Gotama Buddha's thought (the dhamma, or dharma) culled from the massive Tripitaka, the comprehensive collection of all of the Buddha's recorded discourses. The selection was made by the Sangha (the Buddhist community (in those days monks and nuns) somtime between 200 to 700 years after the death of Gotama Buddha in the fifth century B.C. The succintness, gravity, and beauty of these verses has more than stood the test of time.

The Dhammapada is, in my opinion (I first heard the dhamma formally in this lifetime in 1970), the best introduction to the buddha/dhamma: a bedside book, a wake-up book, a wonderful and lifelong friend.

This translation was among the first in a European language. Muller was an enormous figure in religious studies, who in the late nineteeth century conceived, edited, and contributed to the encyclopediac fifty tome collection of translations of Sacred Texts of the East of which this work is one volume. The original companion texts seemed to have been deleted for this paperbound edition. In any case, Muller's notes have been included and are useful, though at times, obscure.

The translation is strictly nineteeth century prose, and exhibits both pros and cons of the genre. At times the translation may not suit our criteria for either accuracy or aesthetic refinement. However, as Gracian has said, to be first is to be great, and Max M was most definitely, along with Szekeley the elder . . . first.

Which ever translation of the Dhammapada you choose, please do chose one. The work is exqisite and explains the dhamma (if possible) better than any book I know (Shobogenzo 2nd at this moment). Although I still have my Muller, I myself prefer the diminuitive translation with commentaries by The Mother (not Anadamayi, but the French sanyassin who hung out with Sri Aurobindo in the the mid twentieth century. The commentaries in this tiny book are brief talks she gave in the late fifties and always appropriate. The book can be procured through Auroville, Aurobindo's ashram, or perhaps on Amazon). However, the Muller is quite sufficient and inspiring.

4-0 out of 5 stars Diet Dhammapada
I found this edition to be more than adaquete to the casual reader desiring to become better acquainted with Buddhist beliefs. Its lack of lengthy commentary (no more than a 2-page introduction and brief, explanatory footnotes) actually serves to make it highly accessible to the casual reader. This is the Dhammapada in its rawest form, free of someone else's interpretation.

For those wishing to thoroughly research the Dhammapada, however, another edition containing scholarly annotations would be more useful. (For that purpose, I would recommend the edition by Eknath Easwaran.)

1-0 out of 5 stars The bare bones of buddhism
My gripe with this book is that there is no introduction, nor any commentary. Whilst claiming to be the Max Muller translation it avoids including any of that fine oriental scholar's discussions or commentaries.

4-0 out of 5 stars A quick translation of the Dhammapada...
This book is not a quick read if you wish to take something from it. Like most Buddhist writings, it is divided in to smaller parts for discussion (like "Old Age," "The World," and "Happiness"). Within each of these parts, there is an explanation trying to illustrate this idea of the reader. It is not intended to be scanned. If you read one of these sections a day (they are usually one or two pages), just reflect on that. You will walk away with a much better understanding. It is designed to assist your personal meditations.

I think it is a quick translation because I sometimes feel that "Western" words come into the translation rather than the intended word. For instance, I think "temple" would be a much better translation than "church." It would keep an Eastern feel to the writing.

1-0 out of 5 stars cloudy
These translations do not give the essence of this faith. You are wasting your money if you seek in this tome,enlightenment.You owe it to yourself to at least get the Penguin edition...as for this Muller copy,If you are a scholar of eastern languages,well OK I suppose, as an example of what not to do, but for the rest of us...... ... Read more


9. The Voice of the Buddha: The Dhammapada and other key Buddhist teachings
by Kulananda, Anton Lesser, Sean Barrett
list price: $19.98
our price: $13.59
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Asin: 9626343079
Catlog: Book (2004-06-01)
Publisher: Naxos Audiobooks Ltd.
Sales Rank: 410212
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10. The Dhammapada : Verses on the Way (Modern Library)
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
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Asin: 0679643079
Catlog: Book (2004-09-07)
Publisher: Modern Library
Sales Rank: 182510
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11. Dhammapada: Wisdom of the Buddha
by Dhammapada. English & Pali
list price: $17.95
our price: $17.95
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Asin: 0911500391
Catlog: Book (1980-09-01)
Publisher: Theosophical University PR
Sales Rank: 589693
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12. Dhammapada : The Sayings of Buddha
by THOMAS CLEARY
list price: $10.00
our price: $7.50
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Asin: 0553373765
Catlog: Book (1994-12-01)
Publisher: Bantam
Sales Rank: 343610
Average Customer Review: 3.17 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Of all the Buddhist writings, the Dhamma-Pada - -known for its accessibility--is perhaps the best primer of teachings on the dhamma, or moral path of life.It is also one of the oldest and most beloved classics, cherished by Buddhists of all cultures for its vibrant and eloquent expression of basic precepts.Buddha's beautiful, concise, and accessible aphorisms profoundly illustrate the serenity and unalterable dignity of the Buddhist path of light, love, peace, and truth.

Thomas Cleary provides an enlightening introduction that puts the work into historical, cultural, and religious perspective.In each section, he offers helpful and insightful commentary on the beliefs behind the wisdom of the Buddha's words, translated from the ancient, original Pali text.Its 423 practical sayings are grouped under eclectic and useful headings such as Vigilance, Evil, Happiness, Anger, Craving, and Pleasure.In its unique and lovely two-color Wisdom Editions design, these timeless sayings of Buddha will join the Tao Te Ching as a classic gift book and keepsake. ... Read more

Reviews (6)

1-0 out of 5 stars OK Translation, Condescending Commentary
I picked this book up because of Cleary's wide reputation for translating Asian religious classics. The translation is pretty good, but the commentary is woefully insulting to Theravada Buddhism. In this book, Theravada is not referred to as Hinayana as it is in older Mahayana Buddhist books, but it is referred to exclusively as the Lesser Journey, essentially a literal translation of Hinayana. We are told that the Dhammapada, a staple of Theravada Buddhism, really belongs to the Greater Journey. (It should be remembered that Buddhism has no equivalent of the Bible, the Quran, or the Bhagavad Gita. Each Buddhist movement has its own favorite suttas. Some like the Lotus, others the Diamond, etc. However, the Dhammapada may be the most well known Buddhist primary scripture. Therefore, in Cleary's thinking perhaps, it has to be reclaimed for the Greater Journey.) It is translated, Cleary says, in that light. Truly, the translation is adequate, but it is the commentary that tries to force the work into Mahayana Buddhism. And it should be noted, only Zen Mahayana is mentioned, no word about Tibetan, Pure Land, or any other type of Buddhism, including, in Cleary's own estimation, the priggish and pessimistic Lesser Journey. We are told Cleary has a vast knowledge of spiritual wisdom from east and west, but truly his commentary shows his knowledge is of Zen, pre Buddhist Chinese works, and Islam. Impressive, but given that easy parallels with Christianity, Judaism, Hindu, and other forms of Buddhism could be made with the Dhammapada, it is hardly vast. Much of the work shows Cleary's abysmal knowledge of Theravada. We are told in Chapter X that compassion is ordinarily considered the hallmark of the Greater Journey, not usually associated with the Lesser Journey. Has he not heard of metta, the Theravada meditation practice of lovingkindness? I assume compassion is the hallmark of Mahayana only in Cleary's mind, and this bias has prevented him from clearly seeing the great goodness of Theravada. His summation of Theravada, the Lesser Journey, is found in the introduction. We are told that it is sterile and morbid, priggish and pessimistic. At least it is in the view of the Greater Journey...
Overall, I cannot recommend this book at all except to Mahayana chauvinists who feel certain that Theravada is beyond hope, but feel some Theravada works should be salvaged before the ship goes down completely. And those Mahayanists should probably be of Zen as lovers of Tibetan culture will find nothing here. This book is a dud: get the superb, commentary free Dhammapada published by Parallax and translated by Maitreya and Kramer instead. Interestingly Parallax is the publishing organ of Thich Nhat Hanh, about the only Mahayanist I know who actually likes Theravada Buddhism. One notices that he almost only quotes from the Pali canon, yet he is firmly in the Vietnamese Zen Buddhist tradition.

3-0 out of 5 stars Translation is helpful, Cleary's comments are not

Since the Dhammapada is a translation from the original Pali language, I have found it helpful to have several translations to better understand the true meaning. Here's an example:

From Thomas Cleary's translation:

Everything has mind in the lead, has mind in the forefront, is made by mind. If one speaks or acts with a corrupt mind, misery will follow, as the wheel of a cart follows the foot of the ox.

From Thanissaro Bhikkhu's translation:

Phenomena are preceded by the heart,
ruled by the heart,
made of the heart.
If you speak or act
with a corrupted heart,
then suffering follows you --
as the wheel of the cart,
the track of the ox
that pulls it.

From Ajahn Munindo's translation:

All states of being are determined by mind. It is mind that leads the way. Just as the wheel of the oxcart follows the hoof print of the animal that draws it, so suffering will surely follow when we speak or act impulsively from an impure state of mind.

As you can see, having several translations can offer a deeper meaning. Based on that, this book can be helpful.

Then "Why?" you may think, did I rate it only 3 stars?

I think of books on Buddhism, and the Buddha's teaching, in my own mind, by placing the book on one of 4 levels.

Level 1

These are written by someone with little knowledge on Buddhism, and seem to treat it as New Aged. These books are like: "Top 10 Things Buddha Would Do", "If The Buddha Drove an SUV", basically, not real teachings of the Buddha, but a very washed down version. (not real titles offered, and I hope they never get used!)

Level 2

These books are written with one or two main things from the Buddha's teachings and applied to helping people today. Things like using mindfulness to help with stress, or addiction. Someone with a meditation practice typically writes these books. They are important in helping people live a life freer from suffering.

Level 3

These are books written by people with a deep practice or those who are monastic. Typically the books offer real teachings with a real life perspective.

Level 4

These are books that are translations of the Buddha's teachings. These are the discourses. Books like, The Middle Length Discourses, The Connected Discourses, and the Dhammapada, etc. These are the actual teachings of the Buddha that have been passed down for nearly 2,500 years.

With that in mind this book, by Thomas Cleary, should be in the Level 4. However, his treatment of the layout and his commentaries, cast a shadow over the book. Cleary offers notes within the flow of the book. He did not place them at the bottom of the page, or in the back of the book. This does break-up the feel of the texts. His commentaries are in a font that overpowers the font of the actual teachings. Also, he refers to other religions to help explain the meaning. I found this unnecessary and inappropriate. Again, this is a book I would put in a framework of sacred texts. Plus, in a couple of instances his comments were out of line. Here's a translation:

Giving truth surpasses all giving; the flavor of truth surpasses all flavors; the enjoyment of truth surpasses all enjoyments; the destruction of craving overcomes all misery.

Cleary's comment of this wonderful teaching?:

"How pessimistic can you get?"

Does that seem appropriate in such a book? I think not.

Based on that and the other things mentioned I offer 3 stars. Don't get me wrong, the translations are helpful, it boils down to Cleary's comments and where they are inserted that brings down the overall rating.

1-0 out of 5 stars Sayings of Thomas F. Cleary
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings attributed to the Buddha. In his translation, Cleary has choosen to interject his comments between the verses of the original text, often there is more of Cleary's words on a page than the Buddha's. This is a major distraction for the reader; foot notes would have been more appropriate. Furthermore, most of Cleary's comments are superficial comparisons to other religious traditions which does not help to understand the Dhammapada (nor is it effective comparative religion). I was flabbergasted to see Cleary's comments written in bold itialic print while the Buddha's words are written in plain text! Please, look elsewhere for a decent translation of the Dhammapada.

5-0 out of 5 stars Cleary clear!
I'm not generally a fan of Thomas Cleary's translations; I find most of them to be as impenetrable as the original texts in their original languages. But this one is an exception.

Cleary has rendered the Dhammapada into plain, lucid English, interspersing the result with helpful commentary and the occasional reference to other writings (Buddhist and otherwise). The result is very readable and genuinely helpful.

If only he'd done this nice a job on the Tao Te Ching . . .

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful and enlightening translation
This is one of the best translations I have read. Cleary has done an excellent job of making the Dhammapada clear with good references to other spiritual works. I recommend this book to any spiritual seeker. ... Read more


13. Dhammapada (Tibetan Translation Series)
by Tipitaka. Suttapitaka. Khuddakanikaya. Dhammapada. English & Tibetan
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
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Asin: 0913546984
Catlog: Book (1985-06-01)
Publisher: Dharma Publishing
Sales Rank: 623772
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14. Dhammapada : Annotated & Explained
list price: $14.95
our price: $10.17
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 189336142X
Catlog: Book (2002-02-01)
Publisher: Skylight Paths Publishing
Sales Rank: 562648
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Nearly every line of the Dhammapada, from the first "All that we are is the result of what we have thought," is quotable and worth ruminating over. Eloquent, insightful, and brief, this Buddhist scripture is the kind of book that finds its way into purses, backpacks, and briefcases for perusal anytime, anywhere. The call of the Dhammapada is to the path of awakening, to undertake the effort of meditation, and to see through the veneer of the suffering life. In this rendition by author and Zen student Jack Maguire, it retains its purity and insight while offering more in the way of textual understanding. Maguire begins with Max Muller's late-19th-century translation, which, although problematic at points, stands the test of time. He then polishes and adds numerous notes on facing pages about the text itself and about Buddhist concepts. A fluid and critical translation of a masterpiece of Buddhist literature, Maguire's Dhammapada is worth taking out of your bag anytime, anywhere. --Brian Bruya ... Read more

Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Majestic Gift /Beautifully Translated
The Dhammapada (in Pali/the Lankan scriptural language as derived from the original Pankrit), or the Dharmapada (in Sanskrit), the Pali being the original, in this case, is a pocket-size selection of the "essence" of Gotama Buddha's thought (the dhamma, or dharma) culled from the massive Tripitaka, the comprehensive collection of all of the Buddha's recorded discourses. The selection was made by the Sangha (the Buddhist community (in those days monks and nuns) somtime between 200 to 700 years after the death of Gotama Buddha in the fifth century B.C. The succintness, gravity, and beauty of these verses has more than stood the test of time.

The Dhammapada is, in my opinion (I first heard the dhamma formally in this lifetime in 1970), the best introduction to the buddha/dhamma: a bedside book, a wake-up book, a wonderful and lifelong friend.

This translation was among the first in a European language. Mueller was an enormous figure in religious studies, who in the late nineteeth century conceived, edited, and contributed to the encyclopediac fifty tome collection of translations of Sacred Texts of the East of which this work is one volume.The companion texts seemed to have been deleted for this paperbound edition. However, Muller's notes are informative although sometimes obscure.

The translation is strictly nineteeth century prose, and exhibits both pros and cons of the genre. At times the translation may not suit our criteria for either accuracy or aesthetic refinement. However, as Gracian has said, to be first is to be great, and Max M was most definitely, along with Szekeley the elder . . . first.

Which ever translation of the Dhammapada you choose, please do chose one. The work is exqisite and explains the dhamma (if possible) better than any book I know (Shobogenzo 2nd at this moment). Although I still have my Muller, I myself prefer the diminuitive translation with commentaries by The Mother (not Anadamayi, but the French sanyassin who hung out with Sri Aurobindo in the the mid twentieth century. The commentaries in this tiny book are brief talks she gave in the late fifties and always appropriate. The book can be procured through Auroville, Aurobindo's ashram, or perhaps on Amazon). However, the Muller is quite sufficient and inspiring.

4-0 out of 5 stars Easy access to Buddhist wisdom.
I read this translation of The Dhammapada ("the path of dharma") simultaneously, line by line, with Eknath Easwaran's translation. Although in the end I prefered the latter translation, I found the annotations and commentary in Muller's translation very insightful. You don't have to be a Buddhist nun or monk to appreciate the wisdom of The Dhammapada; rather, it has been said that The Buddha intended these teachings for everyone. Easwaran has observed that if all of the Buddha's other teachings were lost, The Dhammapada would be enough to understand Buddha's wisdom, and Muller's translation provides easy access to that wisdom. "All that we are is the result of what we have thought"--these opening lines set the theme of the entire Dhammapada: namely, the importance of training the mind. Muller's translation with its accompanying commentary is a good place to start down the path of Buddhist dharma.

G. Merritt ... Read more


15. The Dhammapada : A New Translation of the Buddhist Classic with Annotations
list price: $18.95
our price: $12.89
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Asin: 1590302117
Catlog: Book (2005-08-09)
Publisher: Shambhala
Sales Rank: 997122
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16. Dhammapada
by G Buddha
list price: $8.95
our price: $8.06
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0811200043
Catlog: Book (1965-06-01)
Publisher: New Directions Publishing Corporation
Sales Rank: 611817
Average Customer Review: 3.67 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

3-0 out of 5 stars spirit uncaptured
Buddhism is a wonderful religion, full of compassion and true wisdom. The Dhammapada is beautifully poetic - however, I found this translation somewhat disappointing. I am sure there are better translations out there, because as I was reading this one I did not feel the compassion, the peace that I felt while reading other Buddhist books. I have always pictured the Buddha as being gentle and tender to his disciples, kind to those that had not attained his enlightened state. I still want to believe that - but this translation made the Buddha sound cold and caught up in himself, not to mention preachy. I found myself strongly and distastefully reminded of the Christian Bible, or God with his "sin and you are damned." For example, in some places things are said about not being companion to a fool, and about a bad man going to hell. Since when do Buddhists believe in hell? At least, a man-made hell, not the Christian afterlife of fire and punishment. And, should we shun those who are not as wise as we? In my opinion, Babbit misinterpreted the spirit of the piece, used words that led to misunderstandings, and caused the text to apparently contradict itself. The other conclusion would be that the original work itself is faulty and that the Buddha was harsh and cold-hearted, something I find all but impossible to believe. I have been studying Buddhism for some time, and this is not the Buddhism I have been studying.

3-0 out of 5 stars A Manual For Monks
The Dhammapada is quite literally a manual for monks . . . it is for people who intend to leave the world altogether to seek enlightenment. This does not mean it is of no use to the rest of us, but all the same, its applicability is quite limited for someone who feels that the world is something that is not to be escaped from, but lived in. The basic ideas common to all Eastern philosophy are here . . . non-attachment, good conduct (chastity, non-stealing, non-lying and so forth), although the form of the book makes it a little duller to read than some other popular treatments of the subject. The Gita more or less says the same thing, but in a much livelier manner. Contrary to popular belief, the Dhammapada does not in any way deny the existence of the Vedic gods -- Indra is mentioned many times -- but nevertheless the emphasis is on inner self-development rather than ritualistic supplication to the gods. A very traditional heaven and hell are believed in -- quite literally it seems -- and the notion of "Mara", the tempter personified, seems the answer to the Christian devil. Still, unlike Christianity in general, the emphasis is on the inner person -- there is some very powerful material here in that sense. What one does and thinks determines one's character. The existence of the wicked is punishment in itself, and although hell is admitted to exist, it is not the primary reason to avoid sin. Preaching is looked down upon unless the person doing the preaching has mastered himself first. The mastery of the individual self and mind are the most important notions here, I think . . . the morality is mainly a means to an end. Although nothing very new or unexpected will be found in the Dhammapada, it does place a great deal of emphasis on individual responsibility and the power of the individual to affect his own destiny. Still, the eliminating of all desire, passion, and even love does not seem to be the way, to me, to achieve anything other than indifference to a world that one also has a genuine responsibility to. At what point this book can be said to be "Buddhist" rather than "Hindoo", I do not know, as the teachings are so similar -- it could very plausibly be considered an Upanishad. A good place to start one's study of Buddhism, but not very deep. Does not possess the power of allusion and suggestibility as strong as many other texts.

5-0 out of 5 stars A great place to start learning about Buddhism
The Dhammapada is basically about personal ethics. It states very concisely a viewpoint and a philosophy that can be applied right now just as well as in Buddha's time.

I have owned this book for decades. I like it very much because it's a thin little book that I was able to read in a short time --but the ideas in it have taken root and have grown in my mind over a period of many years.

This book "spoke to my condition" as the Quakers say. I knew he was talking to me.

This short book contains some powerful concepts that have stood the test of 2500 years.

The translation is very good, and I believe it is true to the spirit of the original.

For those interested in personal ethics, personal responsibility, or a concise introduction to some of Buddha's philosophy, this book is a great place to start, and may acquire a permanent home on your bookshelf for its directness and simplicity. ... Read more


17. Jewels of the Doctrine: Stories of the Saddharma Ratnavaliya (S U N Y Series in Buddhist Studies)
by Thera Dharmasena
list price: $64.50
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0791404897
Catlog: Book (1991-01-01)
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Sales Rank: 1369481
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable stories from the Sri Lankan Buddhist tradition
Obeyesekere's translations of these classical Sinhalese Buddist literary works provide English-speaking readers with an eye into Buddhism as it is taught and enjoyed by "everyday" Buddhists in Sri Lanka.Thesestories are rich, complex, funny, sad, and more.They teach Buddhistdoctrines more concretely than abtruse philosophical texts by usingparabolic and experiential narratives.Though they were once written inclassical Sinhala prose, her translation enables the contemporary reader toget a feel for the efficacious style of the original stories.One cannothelp but feel that the stories speak well to our experiences incontemporary America, even though this is not a Buddhist culture.Thoughthese and other religious stories must compete with secular novels, TV,radio, and other technological media, they remain popular in modern SriLanka.This collection of translations allows non-Sri Lankans to share intheir delightful tales and messages, as well. ... Read more


18. Dhammapada: The Way of Truth
by Sangharakshita
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
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Asin: 1899579354
Catlog: Book (2002-12-01)
Publisher: Windhorse Publications (UK)
Sales Rank: 1086844
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19. The Dhammapada
by F. Max Muller
list price: $7.95
our price: $7.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000523V5
Catlog: Book
Manufacturer: PocketPCpress
Sales Rank: 1123348
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The 423 verses in the The Dhammapada are attributed to the Buddha himself and form the essence of the ethics of Buddhist philosophy. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Is it just that simple?
I may have read and re-read this simply understandable book of sayings twelve times or more.Many of the ancient analogies are timeless and help in everyday living.

A must read for anyone interested in Buddhism, Zen, or any spiritual philosophy. ... Read more


20. Sayings of the Buddha: The Dhammapada
by Thomas Byrom, Jacob Needleman
list price: $10.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0944993834
Catlog: Book (1994-03-01)
Publisher: Audio Literature
Sales Rank: 946049
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