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61. Neurosis and Human Growth: The
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62. Info-Psychology: A Revision of
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63. Ecstasy: Understanding the Psychology
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64. Divided Self (Penguin Psychology)
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65. Listen, Little Man! (Noonday,
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66. Deep Play
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67. Flying Saucers : A Modern Myth
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79. The Study of Human Nature: A Reader
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80. Principles of Everyday Behavior

61. Neurosis and Human Growth: The Struggle Toward Self-Realization
by Karen Horney
list price: $17.95
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Asin: 0393307751
Catlog: Book (1991-05-01)
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Sales Rank: 163205
Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Truly Self-Realization
This is therapy in a book. Unbelievable work of psychoanalysis.
A person, given the chance, will develop his own feelings, thoughts, wishes, interests and potentialities. He will draw on his own resources, skills, will-power, discipline and he will develop his special abilities and unique gifts. In short, he will grow, substantially undiverted, towards what Karen Horney calls self-realization.

But through a variety of adverse influences, a child, or even an adult, may not be permitted to grow according to his individual needs and possibilities. A persistently hostile environment of people around him, especially during childhood, that are dominating, overindulgent, erratic, partial to others, hypocritical, indifferent, etc., might kill off the ability to grow and become one's real self. As a result the person, does not develop a feeling of belonging of "we", but instead develops a profound insecurity, lack of self-confidence and vague apprehensiveness, which Karen Horney refers to as basic anxieties.

The person tries to resolve the anxiety by either moving away from people (aloofness, isolation), or against people (rebelling) or moving towards people (submission and compliance). In a healthy individual, these coping trends are present and used in varying degrees depending on the situation. But in a neurotic person, these trends become very rigid and contradictory. Eventually, one of the trends will become a dominant trend, and it will become a predominant trait in the person's personality. It is destructive in that it chokes off much of the other parts of a persons personality and impedes growth.

This dominant coping trend is an artificial attempt at a solution, and it will fail. But to a person suffering from a neurosis, the trend will appear to work and even become intensified. With large parts of the person's personality undeveloped and even unavailable, the person in grips of a neurosis will then gradually become alienated from his real self. The alienation from the real self will subsequently be followed and replaced by the image of the idealized-self. The person will not see themselves as they are, but instead will see the idealized-image of themselves-the way they wished they were. The energies driving toward self-realization are then shifted to the aim of actualizing the idealized self. This shift means no more and no less than a change in the course of the individual's whole life and development.

A healthy person will see himself as he is and strive to grow and improve. A neurotic person, however, will see himself as an idealized image. Alienated from his real self, he will no longer have authentic feelings, emotions and ambitions. Instead he will feel what he thinks he should feel according to his idealized self, he will react to others the way he thinks they expect him to react from the perspective of his idealized self.

Ultimately, the neurotic person will fail to live up to his idealized-self. The discrepancy between what he really is and how he sees himself in the idealized image will emerge and it will be a constant source of conflict. Because his idealized image of himself is one of perfection, there is no way for him to measure up. What will then follow is unconscious self-hate and self-contempt.

The person will unconsciously be at war with his real self. Compulsive eating, and many other compulsive disorders, anxieties, despair, inertia and even suicide are often manifestations of unconscious self-hate. The person doesn't realize what is happening, but he is in the grips of a deepening neurosis. He is unconsciously at war with himself.

Karen Horney describes in detail the behavior and personality traits that develop in a neurosis. She explains how it develops and why it is so destructive to the real self. Understanding of one's neurosis is a key development for anyone in the grips of a neurosis, but it is not a cure. She makes it clear, the cure is a process that has to be worked upon with real effort, but knowledge and understanding are the starting point.

This book is breath taking. It is one of the most important books I have ever read.

5-0 out of 5 stars A very insightful book
A person, given the chance, will develop his own feelings, thoughts, wishes, interests and potentialities. He will draw on his own resources, skills, will-power, discipline and he will develop his special abilities and unique gifts. In short, he will grow, substantially undiverted, towards what Karen Horney calls self-realization.

But through a variety of adverse influences, a child, or even an adult, may not be permitted to grow according to his individual needs and possibilities. A persistently hostile environment of people around him, especially during childhood, that are dominating, overindulgent, erratic, partial to others, hypocritical, indifferent, etc., might kill off the ability to grow and become one's real self. As a result the person, does not develop a feeling of belonging of "we", but instead develops a profound insecurity, lack of self-confidence and vague apprehensiveness, which Karen Horney refers to as basic anxieties.

The person tries to resolve the anxiety by either moving away from people (aloofness, isolation), or against people (rebelling) or moving towards people (submission and compliance). In a healthy individual, these coping trends are present and used in varying degrees depending on the situation. But in a neurotic person, these trends become very rigid and contradictory. Eventually, one of the trends will become a dominant trend, and it will become a predominant trait in the person's personality. It is destructive in that it chokes off much of the other parts of a persons personality and impedes growth.

This dominant coping trend is an artificial attempt at a solution, and it will fail. But to a person suffering from a neurosis, the trend will appear to work and even become intensified. With large parts of the person's personality undeveloped and even unavailable, the person in grips of a neurosis will then gradually become alienated from his real self. The alienation from the real self will subsequently be followed and replaced by the image of the idealized-self. The person will not see themselves as they are, but instead will see the idealized-image of themselves-the way they wished they were. The energies driving toward self-realization are then shifted to the aim of actualizing the idealized self. This shift means no more and no less than a change in the course of the individual's whole life and development.

A healthy person will see himself as he is and strive to grow and improve. A neurotic person, however, will see himself as an idealized image. Alienated from his real self, he will no longer have authentic feelings, emotions and ambitions. Instead he will feel what he thinks he should feel according to his idealized self, he will react to others the way he thinks they expect him to react from the perspective of his idealized self.

Ultimately, the neurotic person will fail to live up to his idealized-self. The discrepancy between what he really is and how he sees himself in the idealized image will emerge and it will be a constant source of conflict. Because his idealized image of himself is one of perfection, there is no way for him to measure up. What will then follow is unconscious self-hate and self-contempt.

The person will unconsciously be at war with his real self. Compulsive eating, and many other compulsive disorders, anxieties, despair, inertia and even suicide are often manifestations of unconscious self-hate. The person doesn't realize what is happening, but he is in the grips of a deepening neurosis. He is unconsciously at war with himself.

Karen Horney describes in detail the behavior and personality traits that develop in a neurosis. She explains how it develops and why it is so destructive to the real self. Understanding of one's neurosis is a key development for anyone in the grips of a neurosis, but it is not a cure. She makes it clear, the cure is a process that has to be worked upon with real effort, but knowledge and understanding are the starting point.

This book is profound. It is one of the most important books I have ever read.

2-0 out of 5 stars Ideas are compelling, but the writing is dated & repetitious
I found it hard not to skim large sections of this book. Horney repeats herself over and over again. The entire 380 page book could easily be condensed into a single chapter. Many of her ideas are so integrated into modern thought (ie self-realization, tyranny of the should, alienation from self) that it is difficult to fully appreciate her originality today. As a piece of intellectual history, it makes interesting reading. But in terms of clinical relevance, its usefulness is quite limited. I, too, chose to read this because Yalom wrote in "Gift of Therapy" that he found it one the most helpful therapy books during his training. How times have changed! "Gift of Therapy" is a "must-read" for any therapist, but Horney's book is a "pass."

5-0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece
Her best work. A bit long in the tooth, but otherwise NEUROSIS AND HUMAN GROWTH delivers a painful message that many of us who have been plagued by personal problems secretly know all too well: we are causing many of our problems and we must change. Horney, better than anyone I know, shows us why we do what we do and how to change our behavior.

Horney is also an example of a kind of learned human being that exists less and less frequently. Incredibly well-read, she shows in her writing a variety of interests and specialties that so many psychoanalytic texts lack. Halfway between theory and self-help, this is one of the most important texts about how to live more happily published in the last century.

5-0 out of 5 stars Finding myself.
Karen Horney's book "Neurosis and Human Growth" expalins neurosis and how it is the antithesis of healthy emotional development. But more importantly it is about self realization. Irvin Yalom references this book in his most recent book,"The Gift of Therapy".Yalom states self-realization as the core concept of the book.

The individual suffering from neurosis is in conflict. The conflict is between the real self and the idealized self, a self that a neurotic creates as a way to deal with himself and others. Ultimately if an individual is to overcome their neurosis they must come to terms with the idealized self and accept their real self with love and compassion. Horney not only expalins her theory of neurosis but also describes the therapeutic process that a neurotic person must go through to heal, self-realization.

Horney a Neo-Freudian, also compares her theory of neurosis to Freud's theory effectively. In the end she advocates the optimism of her philosophy overs Freud's pessimism. The optimism that Horney advocates is self-realization.

As a student of psychotherapy and patient I found this book to be very valuable. This book and Carl Rogers' book "On Becoming a Person" have positively effected me both as a student and patient. I highly recommend this book to all students of psychotherapy and to any individual who is interested in neurosis or anyone on their path to self-realization. ... Read more


62. Info-Psychology: A Revision of Exo-Psychology (Future History Series)
by Timothy Leary
list price: $14.95
our price: $14.95
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Asin: 1561841056
Catlog: Book (1987-05-01)
Publisher: New Falcon Publications
Sales Rank: 20251
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Dr. Leary explores the real issues of our time. Space Migration, Intelligence Increase and Life Extension in this "Manual on the Use of the Human Nervous System According to the Instructions of the Manufacturers."

"The Info-Worlds our species will discover, create, explore and inhabit in the immediate future will not be reached from launch pads alone, but also through our personal computer screens." ... Read more

Reviews (2)

4-0 out of 5 stars A review of the science . . .
I am totally blown away by Leary, his intellect, large cahones, especially his humor. He is like a volcano of creativity. But then I don't use the chemical stimulants that he does (did) so that plays a big part in how things are accomplished.

However as far as his science let me say that Tim appears to be an intuit and not a scientist. And let me jump to the chase and be specific in criticism of the 8-circuit theory. Tim is exactly right through level four. How do I know? Well, it's unpublished sitting here half written but if the title sticks it will be called Neo Everything. Anyway I've spent sixteen years at it from a biological-evolutional perspective of Tim's subject, so take it as you will.
I count 16 such circuits, and I have a solid underlying theory to prove it. At the very least there are twelve, consistent with Western astrological -slash- NeoPlatonic "math." Twelve have been well known since before J. C. Biblical times. Leary has taken the first four, literally Aries through Cancer, skipped the next eight (Leo through Pieces) and cuts directly to transcendent or semi-transcendent states which are really a lack of order -- allowing the remaining order to function with less self-inhibition -- a semi-psychic-break (with color) kind of semi-super-fluidity of experience. Anyway he gets it right, though he leaves out far more than he includes.

Please excuse but I'm using the old language. I indeed use language similar to Leary's: survival for Aries for example.
This stuff isn't hard -- Leary makes it easier and more experiential than it is, however. He sees the "circuits" through a mystical filter of self-construction over which we have (ultimate) control. This could only be true in the most fantastic Ideal of being carefully engineered by gods as "divine" . . . but then there is the problem of who created the gods?
Somehow the difficult task of dealing with evolutionary theory (bio-engineering solution-opportunity basically) does not occur (what need?) in the context of the divine and wonderfully peak experience that Dr. Leary so adores.
Perhaps it's just a confusion. Leary's experiential review is a valid and entertaining simplification that I would guess appeals to more people than a far less warmly colored study of Reality.

5-0 out of 5 stars Psychotherapy for the Psychonauts convenience
I know I'm pretty liberal with the 5 star thing on amazon.com, but if I had to revise all of my previous reviews, this one would still get 5 stars. For me, this book represents an amalgamation of all the information our civilization has accumulated over the last century or so.
Based on a solid foundation of science and psychology, chemistry and biology; this book offers your every day average psychonaut the opportunity to understand both personal evolution and the evolution of humanity, as well as where we may be going. Most comprehensive in nature, the human organism take the form of an advanced bio-computational organism of eight circuits that draw from Freud, Jung, Tranactional Analysis, Darwinian evolution, Neurophysiology, psychopharmacology, and an entarouge of Leary's personal research.
As with all of Leary's books the reader should take the presentation of facts lightly. Not to say that they are false or improperly assumed details, only that it is all informtiaon filtered through the understanding of Leary himself. My use of this book - used as companion to Angel Tech, Promethius Rising, and a host of other 8-circuit oriented books - has me re-structuring the entire system from my own point of view, and relating each ciruit to all areas of my life, as well as using it as an interpretation method for better understanding of yoga, magick, science, and psychology. As a whole any book that prompts the user to better understand themselves from a wholistic point of view has my thumbs up. ... Read more


63. Ecstasy: Understanding the Psychology of Joy
by Robert A. Johnson
list price: $13.95
our price: $10.46
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Asin: 0062504320
Catlog: Book (1989-05-10)
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Sales Rank: 52142
Average Customer Review: 3.67 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Ecstasy
An Essential guide to understanding why our culture is constantly obssessed with seeking fulfillment that we never achieve.Robert A. Johnson makes us aware of why the esctasy we crave is unattainable in the ways we are seeking it and how to attain it. I have reread this book so many times and always am finding new meaning in it. Johnson is an eloquent and thorough. This book will make you think differently about life.

5-0 out of 5 stars sheerly enjoyable
this is a book to be experienced, to be savored, and read,in between the lines, so that you may recognize the god of joy within. i tried to make the book last as long as i could. johnson has a wonderful way of informing the reader of his/her heritage and gently waking them. all his books are excellant.

1-0 out of 5 stars Condescending towards psychology, religion, and spirituality
Having to read this book for a Mysticism class I was appalled at the irresponsible and totally inacurate information slanderously thrown together. This book pastes Dionisus into any form utilizing kindergarden techniques. The author claims to have spoken with Dr. C. G. Jung, but his lack of knowledge suggests strongly that he has only glanced at Jung's collected works. Ecstacy is an insult to any educated person in the ways of psychology, religion, pagan philosophies, inner spirituality and growth. Personally, it should be removed from all bookstores and book outlets as it is a pathetic excuse for writing. In short, do not read this book. ... Read more


64. Divided Self (Penguin Psychology)
by Ronald David Laing
list price: $14.00
our price: $10.50
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Asin: 0140135375
Catlog: Book (1991-09-01)
Publisher: Penguin Books
Sales Rank: 163048
Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This work is available on its own or as part of the 7 volume set Selected Works of R. D. Laing ... Read more

Reviews (15)

5-0 out of 5 stars an amazing look at mental illness
R. D. Lang starts out this intriguing book with an introduction where he gives the following statement: "a little girl of seventeen in a mental hospital told me she was terrified because the Atom Bomb was inside of her. That is a dellusion. The statesmen of the world who boast and threaten that they have Doomsday weapons are far more dangerous, and far more estranged from 'reality' than mean of the people whom the label 'phychotic' is affixed." Throughout the rest of the book Laing never stops taking into consideration not only the 'signs' of mental illness, but also what the mentally ill and feeling, thinking, and trying to say. Instead of making the mentally ill into a sub-human species, Laing, allows them to be fully human and in doing so revels more about mental illness than if he had stuck to ridged definitions and destinctions. Not only does he succeed in spreading light onto the many parts of their personalties, fears, and contingencies, but he also illuminates what it is to be a 'mentally sound' person in an unhealthy world.

More than being a book of psychology, THE DIVIDED SELF, is a book of philosophy; Laing often uses examples from the works of Sartre as well as other existential philosophers (Heidegger and Husserl) along with an unusual mix of literary influence from Kafka to Shakespear.

Although the book fails exactly where most people will exspect it to be strongest -- a clinical account of mental illness -- it makes up for its lack of medical facts and outdated information (it was orginally published in 1960) with its many wonderful insights. Laing is as much a psychologist as Frued -- however both of them do better outside of the technical arena, where, oddly enough, both of them try to hide their best philosphical insights behind technical jargon.

5-0 out of 5 stars Inside the world of the psychotic
This is Ronald Laing's brilliant first work, written by the eminent psychiatrist at the tender young age of 28. I must say that it contains one of the most eloquent and compassionate descriptions of the process by which an individual retreats from the world of consensual experience and enters the fantastic world of psychosis. Laing provides a detailed theory of this process in his dichotomy between the "false" and "real" selves (based on the existentialist notions of inauthentic and authentic existence, respectively). (Laing explains that the "false self" is best thought of as a "system of false selves".) Beginning with the eccentric neurotic and "schizoid" individuals, Laing explains how these individuals, from a sense of ontological insecurity, progress into the schizophrenic stage of acute psychosis. He harvests the profound insights of existential philosophers (Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, et al) and applies them to his psychoanalysis.

While I find his explanations of the schizoid individual pretty compelling, they become more and more difficult to follow as he approaches the schizophrenic stage. (In fact, the last case presented in his book of chronic schizophrenia, "The Ghost of the Weed Garden", is downright depressing, and his idea of the schizophrenogenic family (as opposed to schizophrenogenic mother) of this girl seems somewhat unfair to the family members of this chronically psychotic individual.) Most people today would agree that schizophrenia (or "the schizophrenias", whatever the disease/s is/are) is best explained in terms of physiology; however, Laing offers an excellent existential analysis of the "illness" and provides insight into the unique perspectives of the borderline psychotic and psychotic individuals.

All in all, this is a beautiful exposition of the schizoid/schizophrenic mode of being-in-the-world.

3-0 out of 5 stars Confusion
I read this book without having a good reason really, I saw it in the bookshop and decided it might be interesting. As it stands it was increadibly difficult to understand. Had it been written in the 18th or 19th century I may have understood it better, late 20th century again maybe I would have got it. But the period between the end of the 1st world war and the start of the 80s... I cant get into the mindset of it.

I understood and recognised in myself a lot of the mindsets of the "schizoid" in this book, yet I didn't relate or connect with it at all, which left me somewhat bewildered. The language used was too academic for me really, but I was severly sleep deprived when I read it. A further comment is that the worldveiw promoted by psychology is one I am extremely sceptical of.

It left me with many questions however, so in that respect it was a brilliant book, because any book, especially a "non-fiction" book should always leave the reader desperatly curious about the topic. On that front it did well.

5-0 out of 5 stars Self-help, Political Critique, Philosophy, Existentialism.
This book is a very clear and engaging introduction to the existential conception of the person. It uses the insights of Sartre, Heidegger and Hegel to reconsider those people generally called crazy, and shows that what is often called madness is better understood as meaningful gestures of communication from people who have been wrongly ignored. It is a great introduction to existentialism, it will help you understand yourself, it is a deep critique of the mental health profession, and it is a real pleasure to read. I often use it in courses in existentialism or intro to philosophy because of its clarity and because it shows the deep relevance of philosophy in general and existentialism in particular to everyday human life. This should be essential reading for everyone!

5-0 out of 5 stars Laing's Best Work
The Divided Self put R.D. Laing on the map as one of the most brilliant and controversial figures in psychiatry. Written around his 30th birthday in an age of post-Hiroshima and WWII angst, Laing's brilliance rings true as he crafted one of the greatest works in psychiatry and western philosophical thought.

Laing's pursuit in understanding mental illness as an existential and ontological problem was a antithesis and departure from conventional psychiatric thought at the time, and should've been awarded paradigm shifting status by serious thinkers on the subject of mental illness. Although The Divided Self is respected, it isn't respected enough. I strongly believe his challenge was so devastating, that many in the psychiatric community wanted to keep him on the sidelines for fear their own life's work would be turned upside down.

Laing possessed an uncanny and perhaps eery understanding of the world of schizophrenia, and his level of compassion and intellectual commitment and honesty is nearly unmatched. He is definitely one of the elite, and reading his works instead of reading about his works is a mind blowing education into the breadth and depth of an extraordinary and agile mind. ... Read more


65. Listen, Little Man! (Noonday, 271)
by Wilhelm Reich
list price: $12.00
our price: $9.00
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Asin: 0374504016
Catlog: Book (1974-01-01)
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Sales Rank: 136901
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Listen, Little Man! is a great physician's quiet talk to each one of us, the average human being, the Little Man. Written in 1946 in answer to the gossip and defamation that plagued his remarkable career, it tells how Reich watched, at first naively, then with amazement, and finally with horror, at what the Little Man does to himself; how he suffers and rebels; how he esteems his enemies and murders his friends; how, wherever he gains power as a "representative of the people," he misuses this power and makes it crueler than the power it has supplanted.

Reich has us to look honestly at ourselves and to assume responsibility for our lives and for the great untapped potential that lies in the depth of human nature.
... Read more

Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Not an easy read, but a valuable one
The name of "Wilhelm Reich" is not widely known today. Of those who have heard of him, most know of him from second and third hand accounts that label him a quack. "Listen Little Man" stands apart from most of his works in that it is not, specifically, about his theories. Rather it is about his observations of the world and the people who make live in it.

Much had been said about Reich's tendencies to be opinionated, excitable and at times tactless. A sense of this comes across in "Listen Lettle Man." The writing style is not (and is not intended to be) soft-handed. This does NOT, however, invalidate his message.

The book speaks to the everyday person, the one who works for a paycheck, comes home and watches the news, helps the kids with their homework and goes to bed day after day as if on automatic, simply because it is what he/she "should" do. In this book, Reich suggests, demands and at times implores the everyday person to ask "why." Why do you give up your dreams for a life of miserable "security?" Why do you look to political ideologies to set you "free?" Why do you find relief in others' pain when you watch or listen to the "news?" If you have never asked yourself these questions, you need to read this book!

Note that although Reich's voice in this book tends to be harsh he does not speak out of contempt or disgust. He emphasizes that being happy is the right of everyone, but you can never achieve happiness if your life is run on automatic. Note also that he makes frequent reference to "contemporary" issues like the first world war and the Russian revolution. Don't let that fool you into thinking that his messgae is dated. If anything, in this age of sound bites, fads and disposable pop-psychology, his message is more relevent than ever.

Thank you for reading my review

5-0 out of 5 stars Read and be inspired to independent thought!
I first read this book, as I recall, in the mid 60's. I'm now on my third copy; the previous copies were worn out from handling!"Listen Little Man" is a must read for thinking people who care about humanity, particularly in today's geo/political climate. The information is as relevant today (perhaps even more so!)as it was when first written. We just need to consider it, apply it to our own lives and spread the message--we must trust ourselves to be able to take care of ourselves rather than rely on any exernal force, particularly our leaders and governments.

You will love this little book, or hate it, but I don't see how anyone could read it and not be moved by the impassioned plea that we all assume responsibility for our lives and that we instill this responsibility for future generations. It was my first great inspiration to start thinking for myself (and this was after all the classroom teachings, college included)! I'm still inspired by it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The next level
Wilhelm Reich was far ahead of his time. Like seemingly all visionaries, he was completely at odds with mainstream thought. By the time he wrote this book, he had been completely discredited, humiliated, and even imprisoned! Despite his ruin, he still had hope for mankind, as evident by the tone of this book. Inspirational, entertaining, and most of all, empowering.

1-0 out of 5 stars A long-winded list of unrealistic and bizzarre platitudes
Sure, "War is bad" (platitude #1). However this message delivered repeatedly is a waste of paper and ink.

This sermon focuses on the nature of "the little man". This character is so-named because the Author is highly attuned to the nature of this character and blames him for all the ills of mankind. Thus, the little man is selfish, warlike, likes war movies, boxing-matches etc.

The didactic nature of this character can be completely contrasted by the natures of real people. The little man doesn't really exist outside of this book. Even the author's experience as a witness to the third reich doesn't justify most of the natures attributed to the little man.

Overall, the book is just unreadable. It is simply blase' to read a book which repremands an imaginary character for 125 pages.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sortir du Bourbier
Reich nous relève la nature mesquine du "petit homme" qui est la cause perpetuelle des problemes sociaux. Les reflexions de ce grand penseur provoque une ouverture de l'esprit et un conscience plus critique du monde qui nous entour.
Il faut considerer que ce livre est centré à la période Faciste du 20ième siècle, mais on peut toujours appliquer les concepts de Reich de nouveau en observant comme exemple, la politique étrangère Americaine ou bien les extremes actions Israelienne contre le peuple Palestinien. Reich procure une évasion de l'autorité sociale qui prive la personne de son individualité et sa liberté de penser. Si vous desirez approfondir votre comprehension du sens de la vie, lisez se live, si-non, il y a des chances que vous resterez toujours un petit homme! ... Read more


66. Deep Play
by DIANE ACKERMAN
list price: $13.95
our price: $10.46
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Asin: 0679771352
Catlog: Book (2000-08-08)
Publisher: Vintage
Average Customer Review: 3.61 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

With A Natural History of the Senses, Diane Ackerman let her free-ranging intellect loose on the natural world.Now in Deep Play she tackles the realm of creativity, by exploring one of the most essential aspects of our characters: the abitlity to play.

"Deep play" is that more intensified form of play that puts us in a rapturous mood and awakens the most creative, sentient, and joyful aspects of our inner selves.As Ackerman ranges over a panoply of artistic, spiritual, and athletic activities, from spiritual rapture through extreme sports, we gain a greater sense of what it means to be "in the moment" and totally, transcendentally human.Keenly perceived and written with poetic exuberance, Deep Play enlightens us by revealing the manifold ways we can enhance our lives.
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Reviews (18)

4-0 out of 5 stars Ackerman does it again!
Although Ackerman's Natural History of Love is by far my favorite book, this latest work comes in at a close second. It is a beautiful, moving exploration/explanation of our need for "deep play." Trust me -- four sentences into it, you will reach for your highlighter/pen to mark certain passages/phrases and take notes in the margins. Loved it.

3-0 out of 5 stars not very deep
I don't want to sound like a curmedgeon, but this book is, to put it mildly, way too self-indulgent. I too like to bike and think, "Wow, the world is a great place," but I truly didn't think anyone else would care. This is a self-indulgent recap of "neat things Diane Ackerman has done in her life" loosely tied together by this deep play idea she gets from Huizinga without ever citing the original source material. It's not that I didn't enjoy reading it -- I did. It reminds me of reading a diary or a travel-log of a friend's adventures. But, compared to her other works, this is fluff with too much of a focus on the author. If the author hadn't been well-known, this never would have been published.

4-0 out of 5 stars I loved this book.......
Diane Ackerman writes with such beauty and her examples are so rich and invigorating. I refer people to her books all the time to experience word artistry in non fiction writers.

In fact, the word "Play" was getting on my nerves with regularity until I read this book which really outlines the Sacred aspect of play.

After reading, I look at everything involving Play from a different plane. My two year old delights in Mommy's delight! How is THAT for trading spaces!

I can't understand the low rating this book has had so far. Some people who reviewed it must be cranky.

Buy it, revel in it, play with the content.

2-0 out of 5 stars deep disappointment
I've enjoyed Ackerman's other books, but this one failed to engage me. It did seem like she stitched a bunch of diary pages together and sent it to her publisher. She's a beautiful poet, but this time her thoughts seemed scattered with only the most lackaidasical attempt on her part to synthesize them.

Usually, I enjoy her style, but I was especially distracted this time trying to keep the relationship between her personal anecdotes and the deep play theory straight.

I have to admit, though, the paperback version has one of the most gorgeous covers I've ever seen. It's sad when more effort appears to have gone into a book's design than its content, though.

5-0 out of 5 stars Love this woman
Ackerman is like that great friend of yours that is always throwing interesting facts your way to inspire you. She is so smart and at the same time she is playful and fun. After reading any of her works, I always find myself looking at the world a little closer.
Enjoy this book- it should be on the shelf of every creative artist. ... Read more


67. Flying Saucers : A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies
by C. G. Jung
list price: $16.95
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Asin: 0691018227
Catlog: Book (1979-01-01)
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Sales Rank: 219582
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

While Jung is known mainly for his theories on the nature of the unconscious mind, he did have an interest in the paranormal. In this essay, Jung applies his analytical skills to the UFO phenomenon. Rather than assuming that the modern prevalence of UFO sightings are due to extraterrestrial craft, Jung reserves judgment on their origin and connects UFOs with archetypal imagery, concluding that they have become a "living myth." This essay is intriguing in its methodology and implications as to the nature of UFOs and their relation to the human psyche. ... Read more

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Aberations in the Collective Unconscious.
In a world of black helicopters flying overhead, cattle mutilations, and Y2K bugs, these cogent remarks by Jung are all the more relevant. The post-modern era is plagued by millenial hysteria, doomsday cults, and "alien visitations". What does this all mean for modern man? Psychical aberations manifest themselves in mass delusions. What else lurks in the depths of man's soul? And, what else is waiting to rise to the surface? We can only speculate.

5-0 out of 5 stars imaginal symbols of wholeness
Jung's interpretation of flying saucers as compensatory Self symbols of wholeness required by an era of psychological fragmentation is both brilliant and well-developed in this fine little book.

5-0 out of 5 stars THE BASIS FOR UFOs PSYCHO-SOCIOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION
What Jung did with this book is, fundamentally, setting the honest basis for UFO intereptation from a psychological point of view. That's why the open postulates he gained from this inquiry have generated many controversies and strumentalization among the ufologists' field. UFOs - says Jung - may be psycho-sociological phenomena which come from both the inner symbolic human subconscious AND from our technological era's imaginism. However, those hardly conventionally explainable episode may even - in Jung's own opinion - be a HARD and MATERIAL phenomenon, which may be explained with extraterrestrial visits. From this point of view, the sociological redutionism slips towards a postume status, leaving the question as open as ever. Definitely, the book you should be starting with if you like the subject. ... Read more


68. Empathy and Moral Development : Implications for Caring and Justice
by Martin L. Hoffman
list price: $25.99
our price: $25.99
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Asin: 052101297X
Catlog: Book (2001-11-12)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Sales Rank: 246317
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Book Description

Contemporary theories have generally focused on either the behavioral, cognitive or emotional dimensions of prosocial moral development. This volume provides the first comprehensive account of prosocial moral development in children. The book's focus is empathy's contribution to altruism and compassion for others in physical, psychological, or economic distress; feelings of guilt over harming someone; feelings of anger at others who do harm; feelings of injustice when others do not receive their due. Also highlighted are the psychological processes involved in empathy's interaction with certain parental behaviors that foster moral internalization in children and the psychological processes involved in empathy's relation to abstract moral principles. ... Read more


69. Bad Men Do What Good Men Dream: A Forensic Psychiatrist Illuminates the Darker Side of Human Behavior
by Robert I. Simon
list price: $37.50
our price: $37.50
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Asin: 0880486880
Catlog: Book (1996-01-15)
Publisher: American Psychiatric Association
Sales Rank: 532928
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars Successfully bridges fields of psychiatry and criminology.
"Bad Men Do What Good Men Dream" has successfully bridged the fields of psychiatry and criminology. The age-old question of 'mad or bad' has been brilliantly explained by current examples of psychopaths in crime, workplace violence, stalkers, spies, cults, and serial killers. This book provides answers previously unavailable to those who are trying to unravel the puzzle of a violent society. Robert K. Ressler, M.A./Author of "Whoever Fights Monsters" and "Justice is Served"/Federal Bureau of Investigation, Retired/Director of Forensic Behavioral Services

5-0 out of 5 stars Bad men do what good men dream
Dr. Robert I Simon's book Bad Med Do What Good Men Dream is an erudite and readable treatment of one of the knottiest questions in the history of humanity: what separates good men from bad men? Dr. Simon has applied his vast experience in clinical and forensic psychiatry to illuminate the similarities and differences between those who demonstrate remarkable psychopathology and "normal" people. He has explored the spectrum of violent and horrifying behavior, from killer cults to serial murderers to workplace violence, and provided a thoughtful discussion of the difficulties of identifying the good and evil inside us and around us. As a forensic psychiatrist, I found this book enlightening, thought provoking and well written. I highly recommend it to any professional or lay student of human nature.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Strange Case(s) of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
The artist Paul Gauguin once said that "life being what it is, one dreams of revenge." In "Bad Men Do What Good Men Dream," Dr. Robert Simon explains that all people have "bad dreams"--thoughts of suicide, or revenge, or crime--but only a very few cross the line from bad dream to bad action.

This book explores the nebulous borderline between what people think and what they do. The topics covered include serial killing, workplace violence, multiple personality disorder, killer cults, suicide, sexual misconduct by professional caregivers, rape, stalking and pyschopathic behavior.

In each area, Dr. Simon's analysis shows just how complex and surprising the human mind can be. Even apparently straightforward questions, such as whether a given criminal is likely to be dangerous in the future, or whether a "suicide" is actually an accident, turn out to be very hard to answer.

At times, Dr. Simon's style is a bit academic, but on the whole he writes clearly and does a good job of covering a wide range of complex issues.

5-0 out of 5 stars the struggle between good and evil
Bad Men Do What Good Men Dream is a fascinating and well researched account of mankind's capacity for evil. Written by a forensic psychiatrist with years of clinical experience examining the human mind, the book not only provides the theoretical underpinnings of the subject, it provides the seasoned observer's inside account of what makes us "tick". In the humanist's tradition, it recognizes that dark thoughts are latent in all of us. Dr. Simon has produced a highly educational and riveting read without ever lapsing into the usual pomposity or sensationalism often found in writings on this topic. Readers will enjoy the many thought provoking discussions not only about why we do the things we do, but about what separates "good" people from "bad".

1-0 out of 5 stars Pass on this one
...[T]his book has four or five chapters of differing criminal
behaviors (the serial murderer, the sexual deviant) told in
sensational stories with little serious discussion of the the
psychological basis or reasoning of why bad men do what good men
dream. In fact, the question of why bad men DO what good men dream is
never seriously examined. In fact, there is little, if any,
illuination of the causes or understanding of psychopathic behavior.
If this is a topic that interests you, you're much better off with
Charles Patrick Ewing's work or Henry Steadman.
... Read more


70. Religions, Values, and Peak Experiences
by Abraham H. Maslow
list price: $14.00
our price: $10.50
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Asin: 0140194878
Catlog: Book (1994-04-01)
Publisher: Penguin Books
Sales Rank: 51787
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Insightfully Laconic
In "Religions, Values, and Peak-Experiences" Maslow combines erudite lucidity with an economy of words rarely achieved in the world of the written word. Because of my unfamiliarity with any of his other works I cannot compare, but I was deeply impressed with this book.

After reading a few pages agreeing with what Maslow proffers was no longer a criteria for judging this book as everyone honest to themselves should process the thought contained on this pages. I recommend this book to all who claim any sort of belief in divinity and to all who do not.

5-0 out of 5 stars spiritually and psychologically indispensable
A tolerant humanistic overview of the psychology of religious corporations vs. that of individual believers left with "peaks" that don't always fit the established symbol systems.

5-0 out of 5 stars highly intellectual
I had a peak experience five years ago. IT was life transforming, much like an after death experience... The energy, comprehending everything about the universe, and most of all telepathic communication with a higher power. I thought I went completely mad, but finding this book a month after it happened was a miracle in itself. I found a lot of assurance in Maslows book. It happens and more frequently than you would think (and I am not mad!!!). Maslow mentioned 'peak experiences' happen during child birth and listening to classical music which I have a hard time with, but who am I to disagree? The odd thing about my peak experience is that my life improved greatly after it occurred. The sad thing is that 8 months after it happened my fiancee was killed in a traffic accident. In everyway that peak experience kept me alive. A simple knowledge that 'things happen for a reason -even though we may never comprehend it'. There is a downside to peak experiences which Maslow didn't discuss. That is the obligation one feels after it happens. I really identify with the character John Travolta played in the movie "Phenomenon". Why did it happen to me? What am I to do with this knowledge? I hate it. Anyway, if you have had a peak experience I would love to talk to you. ... Read more


71. Civilization in Transition (The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 10)
by C. G. Jung
list price: $85.00
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Asin: 0691097623
Catlog: Book (1970-08-01)
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Sales Rank: 616166
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72. Man for Himself: An Inquiry into the Psychology of Ethics
by Erich Fromm
list price: $16.00
our price: $10.88
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Asin: 0805014039
Catlog: Book (1990-11-01)
Publisher: Owl Books (NY)
Sales Rank: 33415
Average Customer Review: 4.86 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In Man for Himself, Erich Fromm examines the confusion of modern women and men who, because they lack faith in any principle by which life ought to be guided, become the helpless prey forces both within and without. From the broad, interdisciplinary perspective that marks Fromm’s distinguished oeuvre, he shows that psychology cannot divorce itself from the problems of philosophy and ethics, and that human nature cannot be understood without understanding the values and moral conflicts that confront us all. He shows that an ethical system can be based on human nature rather than on revelations or traditions.As Fromm asserts, “If man is to have confidence in values, he must know himself and the capacity of his nature for goodness and productiveness.”
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Reviews (7)

4-0 out of 5 stars A fine example of optimism
In this book the author gives an overview of his thinking on humanistic ethics, which is interesting from a speculative/philosophical viewpoint, but falls somewhat short if viewed from a scientific perspective. The book has an optimistic tone, as do many others by the author, and this makes the reading more palatable. If the ideas in it could be fleshed out with real scientific analysis, with supporting data, it would be a significant advance in the study of human psychology.

The author explains his optimism, interestingly, by reference to his experience with patients in his psychoanalytic practice. He speaks of encountering the strength of the strivings for happiness and health exhibited by his patients, which he believes is the natural embodiment of humans. "There is less reason", he says, "to be puzzled by the fact that there are so many neurotic people than by the phenomenon that most people are relatively healthy in spite of the many adverse influences they are exposed to". The statistics supporting this are overwhelming, and without a doubt are on the side of optimism.

The book is not a "pop-psychology", "self-help" book though, but instead a theoretical attempt to shed light on the problem of ethics and psychology. The author's goal is to get the reader to ask questions, and not to expect to find advice on how to obtain "happiness". The author's main goal is to find a validation for humanistic ethics that does not collapse into moral relativism but is based upon human nature and human's inherent qualities. The character structure of the mature and "integrated personality" is the origin of virtue, and vice originates from the ignoring of the self and "self-mutilation". To have confidence in values, the author argues, one must know oneself and be aware of one's capacity for doing good and being a productive human being.

The author carefully distinguishes between humanistic and authoritarian ethics, with the ethical norms of the former originating from humans themselves, while the latter some other entity. It is important for him to clarify the definition of "authority", one being "rational" authority, whose source is "competence", and "irrational" authority, whose source is always power over people. Rational authority he says, is based on the equality of the authority and the subject, with both of them differing only in the skill level in their respective fields and always having mutual respect for each other. Irrational authority on the other hand is based inherently on inequality, and denies the human capacity to know what is good or bad.

In humanistic ethics, as the author sees it, is formally based on the principle that only humans can determine the criteria for good and evil, and completely rejects any transcendent source of values. What is "good" is what is good for humans, and the "bad" is what acts to their detriment. Humanistic ethics, far from suppressing individuality and self-realization, encourages it, and there is no room in it for ethical doctrines that do not take into account the needs and nature of human beings. It is a life-affirming ethical philosophy, one that taps the human capacity for genius, and encourages responsibility for one's own existence. The crippling of human powers is the ultimate vice.

The problem then for humanistic ethics is to find out exactly what humans do in fact need in order to develop a healthy psychology. Throughout the book, the author attempts to characterize what such a psychology would be. In many instances throughout the book he makes some unexpected commentary, if judged by the overall theme of optimism in the book. For example, he views the human capacity for reason as both a "blessing" and a "curse". Viewing reason as a distinctly human capacity, not shared by other organisms (and this is troubling from the standpoint of current evidence to the contrary from biology), the author puts humans into a state of "constant and unavoidable disequilibrium". No matter what the level of accomplishment, humans will always be discontented and perplexed, and consequently driven to find new solutions, resulting in an endless restless cycle of achievement and discontent. But many humans do not fit into his sweeping generalizations here, but instead are very contented with their lives on this planet, and find the challenge of life fascinating, and who mourn only the prospect of it ending.

Because of his professional status as a psychoanalyst, it is not surprising perhaps to see a somewhat elaborate classification of what constitutes a healthy versus a non-healthy personality. There are "receptive", "exploitative", "hoarding", and "marketing" characters, which are non-productive and signs of personality "disorder" in his view. He gives detailed descriptions of these different types, but unfortunately does not quote case studies or any studies in the literature to support his views. Do individuals who have these personalities find it difficult to live and adjust in soceity? The author would probably argue that such an "adjustment" could be done, but that by itself does not mean that the individual at hand is not following a healthy course of action. The author seems to be getting quite dogmatic in his classifications here, and leaves the reader with a somewhat narrow view of what constitutes a truly healthy personality.

With more scientific research and justification put into his ideas, the author could have given the reader a more accurate view of what constitutes a healthy, integrated personality. The book is a good start though, philosophically speaking. Sometimes philosophy can encourage further scientific research, and sometimes it can clarify the issues involved in such research, but it can never take the place of science. The author's optimistic view of human nature is, to repeat, totally justified from a statistical point of view. And his view is somewhat rare, surprisingly, if one examines the statistics: the vast majority of humans are healthy, productive, and proud of their inner capacity for genius, and are without doubt fine examples of the humanistic ethic.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent
"There is no meaning to life except the meaning man gives his life by the unfolding of his powers." This sentence may be one of the most important themes in this wonderful book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Away from inhuman and legalistic ethical standards...
....and toward a celebration of human-centered values: Fromm makes his case for it in psychological terms not to be missed. (He'd have liked Herbert's distinction between law and justice.) And yet, and yet...while this book is splendid, I can't buy making man the measure of all things; somehow there ought to be a recognition that some situations may harm and even kill the self (as in "self-actualization") that nevertheless feed the soul. Anyhow, well worth the read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply too good...
The best from Fromm. I have had this book for the last ten years. Wanted a new one and was surprised to find it still in print. This speaks volumnes of the value of this book. From the first page to the last, vintage Fromm. We are also recommending this book as a text for our sophomore students at SUNY.

5-0 out of 5 stars Happiness and Mental Health is a moral matter
Along with Escape from Freedom and The Sane Society, this is one of Fromm's fundamental book. What you think about the world, life, love, etc..determines your behaviour; upon the validity of your judgement, your happiness and mental health depend. So being good is not longer a problem of heavens and God's grace, nor evil a problem of hell and fire. What it is ethically good develops life, happiness and health. Highly recommended. ... Read more


73. Man Against Himself
by Karl Menninger
list price: $23.00
our price: $23.00
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Asin: 0156565145
Catlog: Book (1985-09-01)
Publisher: Harvest Books
Sales Rank: 390440
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

In this landmark book, the impulse toward self-destructiveness is examined as a misdirection of the instinct for survival, a turning inward of the aggressive behavior developed for self-preservation. "One of the most absorbing books I have read in recent years" (Joseph Wood Krutch, The Nation). Index.
... Read more

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars the Best Starting Point
Dr.Karl Menninger was Topeka(KS)-based psychoanalytic-psychiatrist and believed the Death-Instinct in the human. Therefore some readers may think this book, which is almost-perfect based upon the Death-Instinct theory, is nothing but the pessimistic. But we shouldn't forget a simple-but-hard fact that we ourselves live in the auto-pessimistic era;the post-9.11 terrorised era. In this realistic-and-therefore-neither-sentimental-nor-romantic book Dr Menninger teaches us that some people destroy themselves with using the others and therefore they NEED the others. Of couse,not everyone may believe his theory and,ultimately,not everyone needs to believe,but-or-still this book,I believe,is the best starting point of thinking about the human;ourselves.

5-0 out of 5 stars Essential Read - especially for you Freudian theorists
Not exactly the place to start but for those interested in an easier read this is it. Karl Menninger is awfully Freudian but this becomes a bit of a page turner. Introspective, incredibly insightful and definitely worth the time and money. This is an essential for your collection. If you like this one you will love his "Love Against Hate" (but it may be out of print).

5-0 out of 5 stars Even more essential than when it was written in the 1930s
I recall smiling complacently (stupidly) at the old German saying: "I grew too soon old and too late smart." That's when I was young and "smart".

Then there was the one where the speaker recalled that when he was young his father was dumb. "It was amazing how much Dad learned by the time I was grown." I wasn't all that impressed with my dad's wisdom when I was a young punk. It was amazing how he wised up along with my growing up.

I was a corporate pilot when I first read "Man Against Himself". Karl Menninger's warning played itself out many times before my eyes as some of my businessmen passengers warred against themselves.

Want a deserved raise? Pick a day when the company stock just jumped 10%, or a good earnings statement is issued. Or ...

Gritted teeth and jutted jaws. Men against themselves stalk into the company president's office knowing in advance he's on a tear, a rampage, and demand a raise at the very WORST of moments. Sometimes they are fired. On other occasions they are earmarked for replacement. Not once have I ever seen a man get a raise on a day that the boss had Baker flying.

Why did they pick that day? "By God, I've sat here waiting for a raise all this time ..." I tried to caution a vice president once: "Jimmy, wait another day, another MONTH."

"No, by God, I've waited as long as I'm going to ..."

Nice knowing you, Jimmy. He was gone.

At some point I began to wonder -- just barely, and not seriously -- if it could happen that I would ever be a man against himself.

Yes, I had done so, and would do so again. "How," I once asked, and not idly, "did Menninger know me before I was born?" Men are just too alike for comfort.

Menninger describes that it can happen in ways that range from subtle to suicidal. Forewarned by Menninger's advice, we can do something about the phenomenon, pull a ripcord, don a life preserver, put on a gas mask ...

Do you know a good friend who is destroying himself? Give him this book, which he won't read. But then go over and discuss it with him. Friends divorcing? Perfect candidates for this book. They probably aren't in a mental state to read or understand it, but you tried. AND, it just might hit a vein in one of them.

The chances aren't much better than finding gold in the Klondike. But I've seen it work one time. Only once. But that once was worth a thousand tries.

5-0 out of 5 stars very commendable book
I really enjoyed reading this book ,it has very good readability value and is easy to follow .Good bedtime reading for the budding psychotherapist! and also for anyone interested in reading about the mind.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not the Usual Psycho-babble; A sensible look at self-violenc
Menninger discusses suicide and other forms
of self-directed violence. Although he
neatly categorizes motivations for suicide
(1. the wish to kill, 2. the wish to be killed
3. the wish to no longer exist),
he does not deny the complexity and
mystery of many of the extreme acts
used as examples. Whether or not
one agrees with his point of view,
the book provides well reasoned opinions
and a calm look at a subject that can
be too overwhelming to deal with plainly.

The book is also fascinating from a historical
perspective. It contains a zillion examples
of horrifying & bizarre self-destructive acts
that were collected from national magazines & newspapers
several decades ago (e.g. 30's & 40's).
It's enough to make one think that the "talk
show" culture of today is not something new
but just the pendulum swinging back to a place it's been before.
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74. Quantum Consciousness: The Guide to Experiencing Quantum Psychology
by Stephen, Ph.D. Wolinsky, Kristi L. Kennen
list price: $18.95
our price: $18.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0962618489
Catlog: Book (1993-09-01)
Publisher: Bramble Books
Sales Rank: 45856
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Now from the author ofcomes a step-by-step guide toexperiencing the underlying unity that is Quantum Consciousness. Dr.Stephen Wolinsky offers over fifty exercises to explore and experiencethe quantum approach to problem resolution. Designed to be done alonein pairs or in a group setting this adventure takes us into a newfrontier and pushes the envelope of even the most far-reaching currentpsychological thought. ... Read more

Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars eye opener
This book blew away my old beliefs about what my life is about.
I'm the boss ! only I didn't know it. I've had one read through and now I will go back, take my time and do the exercises and begin to create consciously the world I would like to be in. I just could not put it down once it arrived.

5-0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking
I really enjoyed this book. I can't pretend to have grasped every idea put forward, but this book goes a long way towards helping me understand more of life. It takes up where a lot of others leave or don't explain well. I will definately be reading more by this author.

5-0 out of 5 stars a coursework for spiritual practice
Wolinsky is a clinical psychologist with over a decade of serious spiritual practice. He presents a series of 85 meditation type exercises along with his spiritual philosophy. Many of these are identical to the sadhanas of various eastern practices. If Wolinsky has done nothing else he has given us a coursework for spiritual practice. I would suggest to read through the book and read and try the exercises as you come to them. When you have more time revisit the exercises as a practice.

4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Ideas on Consciousness Studies and Meditation
An excellent set of ideas on psychology and on meditation techniques. Ideas are explained here far more clearly than by most other books and teachers of meditation.

Dr. Wolinski draws parallels between eastern meditation techniques and Bohmian quantum theory that seem very speculative. The quantum physics connections are fascinating, but one would be hard pressed to take them literally. If you take them as metaphors, the book then becomes a gold mine of tools for meditation and psychology.

5-0 out of 5 stars For all who want to learn to quiet their mind..
I love this book, as well as WOlinsky's Tao of Chaos. It points out the limitations of traditional western psychology--which frequently involves moving the stuff around and while he teaches one to look at the very essence of who we are, thereby transcending our stories. This book motivated me to continue my meditation practice. I learned alot from this book and I have explored nearly every type of "growth or consciouness" group. The only training which brings one to this state has been the Avatar training in my experience. ... Read more


75. About Behaviorism
by B.F. SKINNER
list price: $12.00
our price: $9.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0394716183
Catlog: Book (1976-02-12)
Publisher: Vintage
Sales Rank: 53873
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The basic book about the controversial philosophy known as behaviorism, written by its leading exponent. Bibliography, index. ... Read more

Reviews (4)

4-0 out of 5 stars Short, sweet guide to the radical behaviorist point of view
Written late in Skinner's life, this broadly-scoped statement of Skinner's philosophy is not only an outstanding, clear, and relatively nontechnical primer to Skinner's philosophy, but it is also one of the few places where Skinner undertook to defend his positions against critics, on exactly the same points that are still widely assumed to neatly dismiss not only Skinner, but all of his ideas - and sometimes the entire notion of behavioral science - in one specious swoop.

In mid-century, Skinner became strongly associated with the word 'behaviorism' (so much so that it is now common to see famous, well-published academics confusing him with Watson, the originator of the word 'behaviorism,' whose views and approach were fundamentally different.) Skinner's views are actually called "radical behaviorism" to distinguish them from others like Watsonian S-R behaviorism, Hull's neo-behaviorism, Tolman's purposive behaviorism, and so on. Radical behaviorism, as many prior behaviorisms, held that behavior was caused in ordinary natural ways, and hence that it could be studied just as scientifically as, say, biology was, with just as little unnecessary mystery. What made it 'radical,' however, was not really that it was more behaviorist than other behaviorism, but that it embraced the existence of only-privately-observed events, like one's thoughts and feelings, in such a way that they were also considered behavior. (cf. Skinner's quote, 'The skin is not so important as a boundary.')

Skinner's philosophy had other notable and idiosyncratic properties: Skinner held that behavior was profoundly controlled by the environment (read: that what we do is done with relation to the world - compare this to Pylyshyn's absurdly contrary claim that "human behavior is stimulus free," in other words that we are so stupid that we act without regard, e.g., to what time it is, what the judge just said, or how this restaurant was awful last time.) Skinner emphasized direct application of behavioral study to political problems, was a humanist who hated coercion and punishment, and - perhaps most famously - he was excessively picky about what words were used to describe behavior (going so far as to reject, on principle, virtually any use terminology smacking of 'mentalism,' - e.g., 'thought,' even though he took pains to point out his acceptance of private life). It is the persistent emphasis of environmental influence and the persistent suspicion of anything that smelled like 'mentalism' - appeal to spirits, res cogitae, homunculi, a vis viva, or a virtus dormitiva - that are now the most noted characteristics of Skinner's philosophy.

Skinner's own words will naturally be the most reliable representation of what he thought, and this is the best place to read those words. Whether or not you have any understanding of behavioral science or of Skinner's particular take on it, this book will give you the essential and relatively authoritative philosophical views contained in radical behaviorism - unpolluted by politically motivated revisionism. With an honest reading of an accurate source, one can evaluate each idea on its own merit, without needing to take sides pro or con in order to evaluate the basic plausibility of the many and strident competing claims about radical behaviorism.

(One point is left off because Skinner's philosophy is still somewhat confusingly explained and incomplete, albeit expansive, even at its best).

4-0 out of 5 stars BEHAVIORISM IS FUNDAMENTAL
THEORIES ABOUT ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (INCLUDING HUMAN ANIMALS) COME IN AND OUT OF FASHION IN CYCLES. BFS IS NOT IN FASHION THESE DAYS - MORE'S THE PITY!

IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO BE AN EDUCATED PERSON IN THE 21ST CENTURY IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A FIRM GRASP OF BFS' BODY OF WORK. IT IS FUNDAMENTAL.

IN THIS VOLUME BFS MAKES A BRAVE STAB AT 'POPULARISING' HIS THEORIES. HE IS NOT ALTOGETHER SUCCESSFUL. FOR ONE THING, HE DOESN'T WRITE NEARLY AS WELL AS, SAY, FREUD; ALTHOUGH HE IS ON A PAR WITH, SAY, JUNG, OR EVEN JAMES.

THE 'HUMANISTS' WHO ARE ON THE RISE THESE HIGH-TECH DAYS - THEY USUALLY PARALLEL THE RELIGIONIST CYCLE - GET PRETTY SHORT SHRIFT FROM BFS, ALTHOUGH IN THIS BOOK HE GOES OUT OF HIS WAY TO BE CONCILIATORY. I WONDER IF HE DOESN'T BORDER ON CONDESCENDING?

IF YOU BELIEVE THAT "MAN IS MADE IN THE IMAGE & LIKENESS OF A SANE & LOVING GOD" YOU WON'T ENJOY THIS INFINITELY POLITE BUT UNCOMPROMISING BOOK. IT IS ALL FOR TRAINING MAN OUT OF HIS 'KILLER APS' SO TO SPEAK : YOU KNOW, SLAVERY IN THE SOUTHERN USA (THE READING LIST IS GROWING AT LAST), VIETNAM (A GROWING LIST OF FINE, DEVASTATINGLY REVEALING BOOKS), 1930/40 NAZISM ( A READING LIST AS LONG AS YOUR ARM AND GROWING RAPIDLY), STALINISM (NOT SUCH A GOOD LIST OF READINGS), MAOISM (ALSO A BIT SPARSE), ON AND ON ACROSS A PLANET AWASH IN BLOOD & CARNAGE - RIGHT UP TO THIS VERY HOUR, EVEN AS I WRITE.

BFS DOES NOT ROMANTICISE HUMANKIND, ANY MORE THAN DARWIN DID. IF HE ERRS, LIKE DARWIN, IT IS THROUGH A REALISTIC FEAR OF AROUSING THE HATRED OF A DANGEROUS SPECIES; THIS LEADS TO A TENDENCY TO SKIRT THE REAL ISSUES, HOPING THE READER CAN READ BETWEEN THE LINES.

THIS IS NOT 'LIGHT' READING FOR ALL BFS' EFFORTS TO DUMB DOWN HIS CONCLUSIONS; BUT NEITHER IS IT ESPECIALLY 'HEAVY' GOING. IT IS WELL WORTH THE EFFORT REQUIRED.

WARNING: DON'T EVEN BOTHER, IF YOUR IDEA OF SERIOUS PSYCHOLOGY (MANAGERIAL OR OTHERWISE) IS 'THE ONE MINUTE MANAGER' WHICH, BELIEVE IT OR NOT, DERIVES FROM BFS' RESEARCH.

FROM THE SUBLIME TO THE UTTERLY RIDICULOUS!

5-0 out of 5 stars although I disagree with many Skinnerian notions...
...I gave this book a five for its clarity in laying out some Skinnerian basics. It's a very well-written book and clearly presents the often-misunderstood but important distinction between behavioral psychology and behaviorism (its philosophy).

5-0 out of 5 stars Skinners clearest explanations for the non-psychologist
Skinner in this book does what he fails to do in many of his other works, make it readable for the mass audience. B.F. Skinner has made a lasting impression on the field of psychology by his unbelievable attention to detail and the bredth of applicaiton that his work has. This book covers most areas of his analysis, that are more fully described in other places, in a user friendly manner and makes accessible for the lay person his explanations in easy to follow examples. This is an excellent primmer to Skinner. ... Read more


76. Mind, Self, and Society : From the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist
by George Herbert Mead
list price: $17.00
our price: $17.00
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Asin: 0226516687
Catlog: Book (1967-08-15)
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Sales Rank: 99390
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Book Description

Written from the standpoint of the social behaviorist, this treatise contains the heart of Mead's position on social psychology. The analysis of language is of major interest, as it supplied for the first time an adequate treatment of the language mechanism in relation to scientific and philosophical issues.

"If philosophical eminence be measured by the extent to which a man's writings anticipate the focal problems of a later day and contain a point of view which suggests persuasive solutions to many of them, then George Herbert Mead has justly earned the high praise bestowed upon him by Dewey and Whitehead as a 'seminal mind of the very first order.'"--Sidney Hook, The Nation

... Read more

77. Beyond the Pleasure Principle (Norton Library (Paperback))
by Sigmund Freud
list price: $10.95
our price: $8.21
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Asin: 0393007693
Catlog: Book (1990-02-01)
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Sales Rank: 87116
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Happy, Deadly, Wild Psychology!
Sigmund Freud's "Beyond the Pleasure Principle" is a key text, not only for psychologists, or literary theorists, but anyone who thinks about why our minds work the way they do. If your mind is open to extreme possibilities, give this text a read. It is short, barely 75 pages, but give yourself time to pore over and make notes, as Freud moves very quickly.

In "Beyond the Pleasure Principle," Freud seeks to discover the causes and effects of our drives. To this end, he begins with the pleasure principle, which basically holds that the job of our 'mental apparatus' is to lower tension and move us towards pleasure and stability. Working against the pleasure principle are our baser instincts, which must be repressed by a vigilant brain. The pleasure principle can also be interrupted by the reality principle, which operates in moments when basic life functions are threatened - to wit, when maintaining life is more important than pleasure.

Examining the pleasure principle, Freud looks at scenarios which may shed light on mental processes that seem to challenge it. These include repetition compulsion, wherein adults seem to fixate and reenact moments of trauma. Seeking a more primal cause for repetition instinct, Freud analyses children's games. Interestingly, the further Freud regresses, the more speculative and intense he gets - from childhood, Freud talks about the brain itself, moving back to simple multicellular organisms, unicellular organisms, and ultimately inorganic matter - all the time looking for an explanation of the origin of instincts themselves.

Freud's queries on instinct and repetition compulsion lead him to the darkest possible places - the revelation of the death instinct. Freud posits that the repetition compulsion manifests itself in all conscious beings in the desire to return to the earliest state, total inactivity. The remainder of his treatise is spent developing the conditions of the death instinct, and trying to find a way out of this shocking thesis. Taking up Hesiodic Eros as symbolic of the life instinct, Freud attempts to argue out of the seemingly inescapable conclusion.

Freud's writing style is direct and fluid, but not necessarily straightforward. If you're not paying attention, Freud can go over your head quickly. For example, on page 50 of this standard edition, his line of argument dismisses Darwin, Marx, and Nietzsche in a matter of two paragraphs to astounding effect. His language is highly figurative, drawing on philosophy, literature, biology, and anecdote to make and illustrate his points. A critical text for anyone interested in psychoanalysis and its figurehead author.

4-0 out of 5 stars a classic not for beginners....
....but a daring example of the willingness of a thinker to make fundamental changes to his theoretical framework very late in his career. This is where Freud shifts his emphasis from ego vs. id instincts to the famous Eros/death polarity, clinically questionable but archetypally informative.

4-0 out of 5 stars Beyound Psycho-analysim
Freud did a remarkable job of reinstateing, and clearifying exsisting established beliefs, In this his finale publishcation. Although it is a bit wordy on occassions, a even a bit (dare i say) nonsenseacal. It is a enlightning and fasanating piece of work. And though I would'nt recommend it for new-comers to the world of psyco-analysim, it is diffently worth reading. ... Read more


78. Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders
by Aaron T. Beck
list price: $15.95
our price: $10.85
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Asin: 0452009286
Catlog: Book (1979)
Publisher: Meridian Books
Sales Rank: 77942
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars Feeling Good starts here
Dr. Beck provides a great introduction to his thinking and methodology for approaching depression. As opposed to psychoanalysis and psychopharmacology, he sets out a system of treating depression through cognition (changing the thought patterns that lead to harmful mood changes), that is useful for short term treatments and alleviating milder occurances. I find this approach useful for treating the symptoms of negative thoughts, but use a psychotherapist to discern, identify, and understand my long term depressive habits and origins. If you find this book of use in helping you stop a depressive cycle, then I would recommend Feeling Good by David Burns.

4-0 out of 5 stars An Accomplished Piece - but not really for lay readers
Dr Beck's book is particularly comprehensive and advances a strong argument for the establishment of Cognitive Therapy - it is, of course, accepted now as a valuable tool in the fight against the various anxiety/emotional disorders.

The book itself is directed towards the academic or professional reader and, although it is useful for the interested lay reader, I found the book to have excessive "psychobabble". On numerous occasions I found myself saying that a much simpler language would have sufficed. Furthermore there is a hint of patronisation running through the text - again indicating that the book is not really for lay readers.

Notwithstanding, the book is more than 20 years old yet is still a landmark in its field. Recommended for the student but only for the (already) well-informed lay reader.

5-0 out of 5 stars If you're considering psychotherapy, begin here!
A basic introduction to cognitive therapy by its most prominent founder. After 21 years, still the most-cited book on the subject -- and the one I most often recommend to new patients. Cognitive therapy (including its extended form, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or CBT) has an unmatched track record for getting results. In this book Dr. Aaron Beck explains clearly and persuasively just how and why it works. For additional book recommendations and other basic information on CBT, you're welcome to visit my homepage at http://www.cognitivetherapy.com ... Read more


79. The Study of Human Nature: A Reader
by Leslie Forster Stevenson
list price: $24.95
our price: $24.95
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Asin: 0195127153
Catlog: Book (1999-11-01)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Sales Rank: 92903
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This unique anthology provides an introduction to a wide variety of views on human nature. Drawing from diverse cultures over three millennia, Leslie Stevenson has chosen selections ranging from ancient religious texts up to contemporary theories based on evolutionary science. An ideal companion to the editor's previous book, Ten Theories of Human Nature, 3/e (OUP 1998), this interdisciplinary reader can also be used independently.

The second edition of The Study of Human Nature offers substantial selections illustrating the perspectives discussed in Ten Theories of Human Nature, 3/e--the Bible, Hinduism, Confucianism, Plato, Kant, Marx, Freud, Sartre, B.F. Skinner's behaviorism, and Konrad Lorenz's ethnological diagnosis of human aggression. The Islamic tradition and 17th-18th century philosophers Descartes, Hobbes, Hume, and Rousseau are also represented. Selections from Rousseau, J.S. Mill, and Nancy Holmstrom raise feminist issues, and Henry Bracken's paper deals with racial issues. Examples from E.O. Wilson's sociobiology and his critics are also included, together with Chomsky and recent examples from evolutionary psychology. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Must Have
This fascinating book consist on a compilation of the best writing on the subject of what is to be human. Since the books included here are the bible , other sacred books, Decarte, etc, it is absurd to rate the writer's talents. They have been established a long time ago. Therefore all merit goes to the editor who has done a briliant job selecting what was worth showing. ... Read more


80. Principles of Everyday Behavior Analysis
by L. Keith Miller
list price: $81.95
our price: $81.95
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Asin: 0534161464
Catlog: Book (1996-05-31)
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing
Sales Rank: 377289
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Book Description

This revision of Miller's successful text has been extensively field tested, and is ideal for the freshman/sophomore level Behavioral Modification or Applied Behavior Analysis course. Light-hearted, yet comprehensive, this text uses generalization programming to teach students how to apply behavioral concepts to complex everyday situations. The author introduces, defines, and illustrates each behavior modification concept and then immediately engages students with recall questions and vignettes that show students how to apply concepts to the real world. ... Read more


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