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    $7.19 $5.04 list($7.99)
    1. Neverwhere
    $15.98 list($16.95)
    2. Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception
    $13.57 list($19.95)
    3. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
    $11.55 list($16.99)
    4. Maximum Ride : The Angel Experiment
    $8.05 $3.84 list($8.95)
    5. Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
    $7.19 list($7.99)
    6. A Nightmare On Elm Street #1:
    $10.50 $5.00 list($14.00)
    7. The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective
    $11.86 list($16.95)
    8. Girls in Pants: The Third Summer
    $8.99 list($9.99)
    9. Gossip Girl #7: Nobody Does It
    $16.47 $14.25 list($24.95)
    10. Pretty Birds : A Novel
    $10.20 $9.88 list($15.00)
    11. Whales on Stilts (M. T. Anderson's
    $5.85 $3.20 list($6.50)
    12. The Giver
    $10.46 $7.44 list($13.95)
    13. Their Eyes Were Watching God
    $6.29 $2.44 list($6.99)
    14. Fahrenheit 451
    $13.96 $12.84 list($19.95)
    15. The Official SAT Study Guide:
    $17.13 list($25.95)
    16. Shadow of the Giant (Ender)
    $8.99 list($9.99)
    17. A-List #4, The: Tall Cool One
    $12.92 list($19.00)
    18. Cracking the SAT Math Subject
    $16.50 list($35.99)
    19. The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate
    $8.06 $4.94 list($8.95)
    20. The Second Summer of the Sisterhood

    1. Neverwhere
    by Neil Gaiman
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0380789019
    Catlog: Book (1998-11-01)
    Publisher: Avon
    Sales Rank: 2551
    Average Customer Review: 4.45 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Richard Mayhew is a plain man with a good heart -- and an ordinary life that is changed forever on a day he stops to help a girl he finds bleeding on a London sidewalk. From that moment forward he is propelled into a world he never dreamed existed -- a dark subculture flourish in abandoned subway stations and sewer tunnels below the city -- a world far stranger and more dangerous than the only one he has ever known...Richard Mayhew is a young businessman with a good heart and a dull job. When he stops one day to help a girl he finds bleeding on a London sidewalk, his life is forever altered, for he finds himself propelled into an alternate reality that exists in a subterranean labyrinth of sewer canals and abandoned subway stations below the city. He has fallen through the cracks of reality and has landed somewhere different, somewhere that is Neverwhere. ... Read more

    Reviews (420)

    5-0 out of 5 stars What a bloody marvelous novel!
    I had the pleasant encounter with Neil Gaiman himself at the DreamHaven bookstore in Minneapolis, MN. As well a large number of people turning out to see him in person. Before seeing him in person, I've read his first major novel, "Neverwhere". Wow, it's truly the best modern fairy tale novel for adults since "Alice in Wonderland"! London came really alive to me, the above world never knew about life hidden in the under world. Literally I mean way under the above world. The characters are so fascinated and I love those two crazy killers acting like some english nobles with perverse sense of humors. Neil Gaiman is very inventive and creative with the story and based on his past stories he'd written for the comic book industry, this man is destined for greatness. I've sweared that Neil Gaiman is the modern William Shakespeare! No one have ever write the stories as well and marvelous as Gaiman...not even since James Joyce and William Shakespeare. I told Neil this and he was rather flabbergasted but it's the truth! Read the novel, then read "Stardust", then read every story Neil has ever written and you'll know that we may have a William Shakespeare for the 21st century! Oh, by the way..."mind the gap!"

    4-0 out of 5 stars Gaiman is a Pro at Weaving Worlds You Get Lost In
    I read American Gods last year and loved it, eager to read what else the author of the fabulous "Sandman" graphic novels has written, I picked up Neverwhere and read it in a day.

    Here, Gaiman takes the real life "London Underground" system of subways and tube stations and adds a twist, a magical world beyond the underground, London Below where pockets of lost time and places are filled with the forgotten people of the world.

    London Below is a world of Baronies and Fiefdoms, of angels, beasts and killers. Richard Mayhew, a securities analyst gets drawn into this secret, invisible world when he helps what appears to be an injured homeless woman. Because of his contact with her and some of the people from her world, he slowly disappears from his own reality. It seems that most people aboveground cannot deal with the reality of London Below so they conveniently can't see them or anything they do.

    A classic quest follows with an interesting cast of characters. Richard and The Lady Door, together with a reprobate Marquis and a bodyguard head off through danger to find answers. You enter the world of rat speakers, sewer dwellers and secret societies. It's all very interesting and funny as well as giving the reader the occasional scare. Below is a world where nothing is what it seems and danger lurks everywhere and yet, its inhabitants seem to derive pleasure from their lives despite that.

    As with Gods, Gaiman weaves his mythical world into the tapestry of the "reality" of every day life and there are times when you aren't sure if what is happening is just a manifestation of Richard's insanity or not. It's a nice tension.

    This book will please the fantasy reader as well as those who love a good mystery. It's a worthy read.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Sorry about the confusion
    this a good book. it is reaeally good fool. It is like fantasy, but not really. it is good. it is a good book that is good and it is a book, see, it is a good book and i liked this book beacuse it was a book that was a good book that was good.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lovely dark fantasy
    Richard Mayhew, a young London businessman finds himself mixed up in the weird alternate reality of "London Below" when he rescues a strange girl named Door. He joins her and a few other denizens from London Below --- such as the (ah, hell, why not?) irrepressible Marquis de Carabbas and the rather intense Hunter --- in her search for the Angel Islington, whom Door's father told her she could trust right before he and the rest of Door's family were murdered by two henchmen named Mr. Croup and Mr. Vandemar (who were hilarious, by the way).

    Gaiman obviously had a lot of fun with names of tube stops and prominent places in London and with the possibilities for parallels between London Below and London Above. I loved the sense of wonder and the sense of humor in Neverwhere, though both were balanced by the sense of darkness in the story. Quintessential Gaiman. A wonderful and imaginative book.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great novel from Gaimen.
    From author Neil Gaimen (Sandman, Good Omens) come this enchanting novel about a world underneath London where magic and violence reigns. The novel's hero, Richard Mayhew, is a simple man with a simple life until one day he sees a bleeding girl lying in an alley. The choice he makes to help the girl opens a whole new world to him. The very next day, Richard's life, as he knows it, has drastically changed. No one seems to know who he is. All records of his life have disappeared. His only hope is to find the girl (called Door) again and see if she can offer any explanations on why his world has turned upside down. His search for the girl leads him to a whole underground world beneath modern London where nothing is at it seems.

    This novel was much better than I anticipated. Full of action and a great storyline, Neverwhere will stretch your imagination to its fullest. Great characters round out this superb story of love, vengeance, magic and escapism. ... Read more


    2. Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl (Hardcover))
    by Eoin Colfer
    list price: $16.95
    our price: $15.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0786852895
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-03)
    Publisher: Miramax
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    Book Description

    Criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl is back…and so is his cunning enemy from Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident, Opal Koboi. At the start of the fourth adventure, Artemis has returned to his unlawful ways. He's in Berlin, preparing to steal a famous impressionist painting from a German bank. He has no idea that his old rival, Opal, has escaped from prison by cloning herself. She's left her double behind in jail and, now free, is exacting her revenge on all those who put her there, including Artemis. ... Read more


    3. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
    by CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.57
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 037582670X
    Catlog: Book (2005-08-23)
    Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1770
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    4. Maximum Ride : The Angel Experiment
    by James Patterson
    list price: $16.99
    our price: $11.55
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 031615556X
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-11)
    Publisher: Little, Brown
    Sales Rank: 312456
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    5. Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
    by ANN BRASHARES
    list price: $8.95
    our price: $8.05
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0385730586
    Catlog: Book (2003-03-11)
    Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 1016
    Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Carmen got the jeans at a thrift shop. They didn’t look all that great; they were worn, dirty, and speckled with bleach. On the night before she and her friends part for the summer, Carmen decides to toss them. But Tibby says they’re great. She’d love to have them. Lena and Bridget also think they’re fabulous. Lena decides they should all try them on. Whoever they fit best will get them. Nobody knows why, but the pants fit everyone perfectly. Even Carmen (who never thinks she looks good in anything), thinks she looks good in the pants. Over a few bags of cheese puffs they decide to form a sisterhood, and take the vow of The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants . . . the next morning, they say good-bye. And now the journey of the pants–and the most memorable summer of their lives–begins. ... Read more

    Reviews (554)

    5-0 out of 5 stars I really loved this book
    I really loved this book. My friend had read it so I thought I'd give it a try. Well I did and I loved it! It's about these four girls. Lena's the pretty,keep to herself kind of girl, Carmen,nicknamed Carmen "Carmeena" is the rebel of the group, Tibby's basically the outgoing one who is "not a people person", and Bridget's the athlete who won't take no for an answer. Carmen and Lena are shopping at a thrift store when Carmen buys a pair of pants-baggy,faded jeans, nothing really specail about them. Teh day before they all depart for the summer, they decide that they're going to share the "traveling" pants. Lena takes them with her to visit her grandparents in Greece,Tibby gets them next,working home at Wallman's where she meets a girl named Bailey, who's basically a young Tibby, who's ill with leukimia,Carmen's leaving home to stay with her father , and Bridget brings them to soccer camp, where the pants bring her good luck each game. But Bridget really wants them to spark a relationship with Eric, one of the coaches, who Bridget wants to go out with.
    this book is probably for girls ages twelve and up.That is the age apropriate level. This book is definitely girly-girl,so it's not the best book for book talks if your audience is made up of a lot of boys.
    Hope you enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
    This book was very different from any book I have read before. It is about four girls who have formed a tight friendship since birth...also known as "The Septembers." Lena, Tibby, Carmen, and Bridget are spending their first summer away from one another in 15 years. Lena is going away to Greece with her younger sister to visit their grandparents. While there she discovers the boy of her dreams; Kostos. Tibby is staying home and working while she meets a 12-year-old girl that she becomes friends with that is dying of Leukemia. Carmen is off to South Carolina to visit her dad where she shockingly discovers hers and his new family and life. Finally Bridget, she spends her summer in Baja, California in soccer camp, flirty as she is she meets an older consular that she just has to hang out with. Before their summer begins they find a pair of pants that Carmen decided to buy at a used clothing store. They each try on the pants and discover their magic, they look wonderful on whomever wears them. They make rules for these pants, such as never to wash them, and then are off on their separate ways for the summer. They mail the pants to one another and keep in touch via email and letters throughout the summer and wear the pants as their interesting stories develop separately.
    I really enjoyed this book but felt frustrated when I wanted to continue reading about one girl and then it was switched to another. I recommend this book for anyone who enjoys stories about friendship or teenagers and love. It was a quick read and kept your interest. Also there is a sequal, The Second Summer of the Sisterhood, that is about their following summer.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A must read for all teenage girls
    This is one of my favorite books of all time and one every teenage girl should pick up at some time or another. Brashares skillfully weaves together the tale of 4 very different girls' adventures over one summer bringing them together by the means of a magical pair of pants representing their friendship. while the idea of the magical pair of pants may seem a bit farfetched to some, this story couldn't be more true to teenage life. Both humorous and heartwrenching, i enjoyed every page of this book. i especially enjoyed the quotes that appeared at the beginning of each chapter. i think every girl can relate to one of the characters in some way or another. I find it almost scary how much i can relate to Lena. My two best friends (who are a lot like Tibby and Carmen) also love this book and we've started our own sisterhood v. similar to the one in the book, which has made us even better friends.

    5-0 out of 5 stars MUST READ FOR TEEN GIRLS OF ALL AGES
    This book is an incredible look into the lives of 4 teenage girls as they face issues of their own and help eachother work through them. This is the best book I have ever read and I, like many teenagers do not like to read and finished this book within the first week I had it and right after I finished it I bought the sequel which is also incredible. I CAN'T wait for the third!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars I love this book!
    "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants?" you might ask.
    All the people (well, at least, me.) who have read it will say "Yes. This is a great book. The idea is very creative. (Magical Pants?). The characters are fun and believable. Carmen, Bridget, Tibby and Lena were best friends since they could remember.
    They always spend time together in the summer, but in this particular summer, they have to be apart. They discover that the pants Carmen had all along were magical!
    They decided that the pants should be passed around the world to each other so they would be together without actually being together!
    Ann Brashares is a great author, I could almost actually feel the sadness/anger/whatever emotions that the character is feeling!

    This book is not like any other!!! ... Read more


    6. A Nightmare On Elm Street #1: Suffer The Children
    by David Bishop
    list price: $7.99
    our price: $7.19
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1844161722
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
    Publisher: Black Flame
    Sales Rank: 433451
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    Book Description

    When six teenagers volunteer to test a new anti-insomnia drug, all they expect is cash and a good night's sleep. However, they are now the plaything's of Freddy Krueger, the bastard son of a hundred maniacs¨ ... Read more


    7. The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective Teens
    by Sean Covey
    list price: $14.00
    our price: $10.50
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0684856093
    Catlog: Book (1998-10-09)
    Publisher: Fireside
    Sales Rank: 450
    Average Customer Review: 4.37 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Based on his father's bestselling The 7 Habits of Highly EffectivePeople, Sean Covey applies the same principles to teens, using avivacious, entertaining style. To keep it fun, Covey writes, he "stuffed it fullof cartoons, clever ideas, great quotes, and incredible stories about real teensfrom all over the world... along with a few other surprises." Did he ever! Flipopen to any page and become instantly absorbed in real-life stories of teens whohave overcome obstacles to succeed, and step-by-step guides to shiftingparadigms, building equity in "relationship bank accounts," creating actionplans, and much more.

    As a self-acknowledged guinea pig for many of his dad's theories, Sean Covey isa living example of someone who has taken each of the seven habits to heart: beproactive; begin with the end in mind; put first things first; think win-win;seek first to understand, then to be understood; synergize; and sharpen the saw.He includes a comical section titled "The 7 Habits of Highly Defective Teens,"which includes some, shall we say, counterproductive practices: put first thingslast; don't cooperate; seek first to talk, then pretend to listen; wear yourselfout... Covey's humorous and up-front style is just light enough to be acceptableto wary teenagers, and down-and-dirty enough to really make a difference. (Ages13 and older) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

    Reviews (125)

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is it...a must read!
    We all know what the meaning of teenage means. Late-night parties, cheating on tests, and sneaking into movie theatres. It's a golden age in our life when we can just wild out and simply have fun! I have to admit the person I am now, is quite a different character from what I was before I read the book, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens". A bit like a mentor who taught me to see the light, I've learned to appreciate so much more in life. The book really reaches out and touches each person individually, and helps them find the best in themselves. Sean Covey has created 7 "habits" to help teenagers make the most out of their teenage life. Illustrated with funny cartoons, easy to read fonts, and simple language, not once was I ever bored when I read the book. Speakin from the heart, Covey brings back memories of his own personal past and shows us how we can change things before they actually happen. For example, he spends a chapter talking about the importance of being a good friend. After reading that chapter, I tried using some of the tips he mentioned into my real life senerio. And guess what? It really works! I've learned to become a much better listener, a better advice giver, and better at keeping secrets. All that was deprived from one chapter. I was just surprised to find out that a lot of the things he said related directly to me, therefore it made it really personal. If Covey was able to make a personal connection with me, I'm sure he can do so with everyone else. I speak as a teen to a teen; read it. This'll be the most memorable peice of writing you'll remember throughout your teenage career.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Book review for The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens
    As a sophomore in high school, there have been a lot of ups and downs in my life. So, during the winter break, just when I started caring about my grades and life, I saw this book and thought it might be helpful.

    This book is written by Sean Covey, the son of Stephen R. Covey. Stephen R. Covey wrote a book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, which is about 7 habits, be proactive; being with the end in mind; put first things first; think win-win; seek first to understand, then to be understood; synergize; and sharpen the saw. His son, Sean Covey, built his book around the same 7 habits, yet with ¡§teen language¡¨. Usually when books are about habits for teens or how to improve your life, they're usually dull and readers dread for the ending. This book is absolutely not like that. There's a comic illustration on nearly every single page, lots of great quotes from well-known people, along with real-life stories from teens around the world.

    At the end of each one of these chapters, there's a section called ¡§Baby Steps¡¨. Here Sean Covey gives step-by-step directions on how to improve yourself using what you had just read in that chapter.

    Some things to keep in mind while reading this book is that, in order to really learn something from this book and use it as a helpful tool, you really need to read it with an open mind and a heart willing to learn. Also, in order to move on to the next habit, you really need to thoroughly understand the previous one.

    Unquestionably, this is a fascinating book and it will definitely help you in one way or the other. So go purchase this excellent book, read it and live by the 7 habits for a while and see how it works!

    1-0 out of 5 stars expensive toilet paper
    I hate this book! I truly can't see why this book is so popular.
    Heres why i hate it: First off I can't stand covey's writing style. Its just so unsophisticated, so annoying, and very dry.
    Second the messages that covey presents are blatant. He says that we should perform random acts of kindness (Really? i don't think my grandmother ever told me to do that) he also says that we should not let our fears make our decisions (wow!!!! what a great motivator). so if you already wiped your ass today you haven't any use for this book!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great book to steer teens in the right direction
    Sean Covey is a great role model for teens! He uses the principles from his father's best-selling book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, to show teens how they too, can use them. The Covey model encourages solid character formation, and provides essential strategies for success in all areas of life. You start by mastering yourself and then you learn how to interact correctly with other people. The book is logical and the cartoons add fun.

    I must also recommend "Optimal Thinking: How to Be Your Best Self" endorsed by Dr. Steven Covey. The author of Optimal Thinking, a former teacher, interacted with teens in the classroom for a decade and truly understands them. Optimal Thinking shows all of us how to bring our best self to every situation, deal most effectively with our feelings, bring out the best from others, and make the most of every situation. Optimal Thinking should be taught in every school, and these books should be in every home.

    4-0 out of 5 stars An effective book for effective people
    I bought this book last year.What attracted me was not just the content,but the fun and interesting English language teenagers will find reading enjoyable (Note: it's not the type of super English with bombastic words and terms that'll probably send you poring through the dictionary).There are also interesting and cute little quotations that get you start laughing and giggling.

    But what is really great about this book is that it is hardly a book.It's so well-written,it's like a essential manual for all teenagers to possess! There are true-account experiences as well as well as well as accounts of scenarios which you may find familiar...like struggling to do well in an exam,coping with relationships problems and stuff.

    Frankly speaking,Sean Covey did make a point.I was quick to point out that i'm a procastinator (something i learnt over here),and is now able to control my emotions and get the better of myself.Though this book is like the one of the many thousands "self-improvement" source i've read,i think it is one over at my top ten list.Pointers,comics strips,useful hotlines,true accounts...and a really cool author,what more can you expect?

    Need help? This is the book for you! ... Read more


    8. Girls in Pants: The Third Summer of the Sisterhood
    by Ann Brashares
    list price: $16.95
    our price: $11.86
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0385729359
    Catlog: Book (2005-01-25)
    Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 2997
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    Book Description

    The Pants first came to us at the perfect moment. That is, when we were splitting up for the first time. It was two summers ago when they first worked their magic, and last summer when they shook up our lives once again. You see, we don’t wear the Pants year-round. We let them rest so they are extra powerful when summer comes. (There was the time this spring when Carmen wore them to her mom’s wedding, but that was a special case.)

    Now we’re facing our last summer together. In September we go to college. And it’s not like one of those TV shows where all of us magically turn up at the same college. We’re going to four different colleges in four different cities (but all within four hours of one another—that was our one rule). We’re headed off to start our real lives.

    Tomorrow night at Gilda’s we’ll launch the Pants on their third summer voyage. Tomorrow begins the time of our lives. It’s when we’ll need our Pants the most. ... Read more


    9. Gossip Girl #7: Nobody Does It Better : A Gossip Girl Novel (Gossip Girls)
    by Cecily von Ziegesar
    list price: $9.99
    our price: $8.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0316735124
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-11)
    Publisher: Little, Brown
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    10. Pretty Birds : A Novel
    by SCOTT SIMON
    list price: $24.95
    our price: $16.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 1400063108
    Catlog: Book (2005-05-03)
    Publisher: Random House
    Sales Rank: 2231
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    Download Description

    Praise for Scott Simon’s Home and Away

    “Home and Away may be the best memoir written by a fan I’ve ever read.”
    –RON RAPOPORT, Chicago Sun-Times

    “Extraordinary . . . a memoir of such breadth and reach.”
    –Sports Illustrated


    From the Hardcover edition.
    ... Read more


    11. Whales on Stilts (M. T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales)
    by M. T. Anderson
    list price: $15.00
    our price: $10.20
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0152053409
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-01)
    Publisher: Harcourt Children's Books
    Sales Rank: 532
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Lucky for Lily Gefelty, her two best friends are the stars of their own middle-grade series of novels: Jasper Dash (better known as the Boy Technonaut) and Katie Mulligan (beloved by millions as the heroine of the Horror Hollow series). It's going to take all their smarts to stop this insane, inane plot from succeeding.

    This first installment of a riotous and wonderfully weird new series marks the Harcourt debut of award-winning author M. T. Anderson. With Whales on Stilts, he's entering new territory, creating a smart, sassy, and self-aware comedy that fans of Lemony Snicket will snicker and snort over.

    Look for future installments of M.T. Anderson's Thrilling Tales, coming soon!
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great!
    A got an advanced reader's copy to review through a library program, and at first I was turned off by how "little-kidish" (short, small, and double spaced), but within moments, I couldn't put it down. You don't have to be a young kid to enjoy this - in fact, the older (and, I'm assuming, wiser) you are, the more allusions you're likely to catch.

    With chapter titles like, "What You Can Learn From Larry's Teeth," and a quick, witty writing style, you can't help but laugh and read on. Although it is soon obvious how the ending will turn out, it doesn't seem to matter while you're reading it; the reason why Whales on Stilts! stands out from other books is not its complex plot, but its halirity.

    Don't miss it... or the whales will crush your home and shoot lasers from their eyes at you.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great fun!
    We just finished Whales on Stilts--we'll I was reading it to my nine year old and he couldn't wait to finish it so I finished it after him--anyway--very funny, over the top--lol!We loved the end of the book "literature circle" discussion prompts and essay question starters. We spent an hour making up our own silly book club discussion questions after reading MT Anderson's and had fun using his format to lampoon other books my son had to read for literature circle this year.We hope there will be more to come!

    5-0 out of 5 stars "Monstrous Thrills! Gruesome Chills! Sidesplitting Laughs!"
    "On Career Day Lily visited her dad's work with him and discovered he worked for a mad scientist who wanted to rule the earth through destruction and desolation." Lily Gefelty has always considered herself a little drab next to her friends Katie Mulligan and Jasper Dash, who each have their own adventure book series. But when Lily uncovers a plot to take over the world at her fathers workplace in the clearly labeled Abandoned Warehouse, it's her turn to step into the limelight and save the planet. Cleverly masked as "a midsize company devoted to expanding cetacean pedestrian opportunities," the goings on in the Abandoned Warehouse are not what they seem (er, actually...). Lily and her friends discover that Mr. Gefelty's boss, Larry, is really a whale-human hybrid intent on destroying the world using whales, stilts, lazers, and mind control. And it's up to Lily to stop him.

    At first glance, you may think that "Whales on Stilts" is a silly, cheesy story geared towards ten-year-olds. You'd be right. However, "Whales on Stilts" goes so far beyond cheesy that it's positively hilarious for readers of any age, ten on up. If Douglas Adams had made a foray into juvenile fiction, this uproarious book may have been the result. Lily is so normal that she's the perfect main character to put into such a ridiculously overdone book. The other characters are uniquely strange in their own rights. The plot is straightforward and wouldn't be interesting at all in other circumstances, but the story is so stuffed with hilarity that the obvious and cliche plot is perfect. The best part of the book, in my opinion, actually occurs after the ending - an "educational" section written by one Ann Mowbray Dixon-Clarke, who seems to have a bit of trouble writing objectively ("1. How are Katie, Jasper, and Lily different? ... Do you have any friends who are different from you? What are they like? Why don't you think that Ann Mowbray Dixon-Clarke has any friends? She bought a big grill for her backyard, hoping that people would come to cook their ribs...."). "Whales on Stilts" is definitely a must read, because who knows when you'll need to know how to defeat an evil whale-human villain and his lazer-eyed whale minions?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Stilted Whales
    A got an advanced reader's copy to review through a library program, and at first I was turned off by how "little-kidish" (short, small, and double spaced), but within moments, I couldn't put it down.You don't have to be a young kid to enjoy this - in fact, the older (and, I'm assuming, wiser) you are, the more allusions you're likely to catch.

    With chapter titles like, "What You Can Learn From Larry's Teeth," and a quick, witty writing style, you can't help but laugh and read on. Although it is soon obvious how the ending will turn out, it doesn't seem to matter while you're reading it; the reason why Whales on Stilts! stands out from other books is not its complex plot, but its halirity.

    Don't miss it... or the whales will crush your home and shoot lasers from their eyes at you. ... Read more


    12. The Giver
    by LOIS LOWRY
    list price: $6.50
    our price: $5.85
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0440237688
    Catlog: Book (2002-09-10)
    Publisher: Laurel Leaf
    Sales Rank: 959
    Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear of pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12 he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.


    From the Paperback edition.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (2207)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent novel - Worth all the praise & adoration it gets!
    After Lois Lowry produced the entrancing 'Number The Stars' it didn't seem possible that she could produce a work, for children, to top it. With 'The Giver' she easily met that goal.

    'The Giver' appears to be a rather simple story of a young boy (12 years old to be exact) named Jonas who lives in a seamingly perfect society. He is given the task of becoming the 'Receiver of Knowledge'; an apprentice to the 'Giver of Knowledge'. But that is where the simpleness ends.

    The 'knowledge' spoken of in Jonas' job title is all of the memories of pain and suffering that were collected to rid all citizens of uncomfort. The Giver telepathically has to give Jonas all of these memories so he can suffer the pain of famine, war, disease, and death - to spare the community.

    The themes in this novel are profound. The thought of a 'utopia' is considered extensively, but it is clearly shown that a perfect world can not exist -- therefore, 'distopia'. The novel also deals with life, death, indivuality, and more; an amazing amount of thought-provoking subjects for a book with a grade 4.5 reading level.

    This book, however, may not be suitable for younger readers. Death is a common theme and the murder of an infant is described. There are mild nods to sexuality, but many young readers will dismiss these as benign.

    A must read for students as well as adults! Excellent job, Ms. Lowry. You gave America another profound and excellent novel - one that will be on schools' required reading lists for many years to come!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A children's version of 1984, only more entertaining
    My own personal grudge against the book comes from the extent of the writing profession, and how it beared so scary and remarkable a resemblence to one of my unpublished ramblings into the SF genre. I had plans of doing a novel where all emotion is stripped away, set in a world much like THE GIVER. Then when I read it, I was somewhat concerned for my own work.

    Anyway, this is often comparted to a children's 1984. Yes, while it does bear resemblance to 1984, this book is wonderful on its own terms. The story is the world has been taken down into a utopia, a place with no crime and no feeling, no true feeling. The family establishment is essentially nil with no sexuality at all (this resembles the dominant theme in my own work). Birth Mothers are the source of the population, though it does not give the identity of the fathers. Work and family comes about by selection. Jonas, the hero, has been selected to be the Reciever of Memory. It is here he realises how shockingly sterile and devoid of beauty his world truly is. The ending, somewhat vague, rewards the reader by not giving away to much detail.

    For those readers who will be travelling on to Orwell after this, go to ANIMAL FARM, my own personal favorite, and then 1984 for when they're older.

    Like all good children's literature, this book deserves to be read by both adults and children alike. Bravo Lowry!

    Other significant works by Lowry: Number the Stars.

    Mike London

    5-0 out of 5 stars A brilliant dystopian novel
    This is a complex, beautiful book that offers a look into a futuristic dystopia in which there is no color, no aberation, no hot or cold, and no personal choices. Drugs are taken to repress sexual urges and even out temprament, and careers are chosen for children based on their aptitude. Children are raised in prearranged family units. There is no privacy and no personal choice, but is this really a bad thing if people have no concept of those things? There is no hunger, emotional pain, violence, crime, war, or sadness.

    Growing up in this world is Jonas, a bright 12 year old who is about to receive his career assignment. He is given the important but extremely rare job of "Reciever": the keeper of "memories" of what life was like before the creation of his utopian world. Slowly, he begins to see color, to learn what love, hate, death, and heartbreak are like. He begins to understand that some of the "happy" things around him maybe aren't so happy.

    The brilliance of this book is that the world unfolds gradually. Lowry does not hit us over the head with an up-front description: in fact, the place starts out sounding fairly normal if a bit Montesori. Slowly, though, the reader realizes quite how foreign this world is. Lowry is a deft writer with an excellent sense of subtlety.

    Ultimately, this book is about the importance of cultural memory. The idea of cultural memory is probably a new one for kids, and some of the concepts of death and destruction might be a little disturbing, so I recomend that parents read this book too so that they can discuss it with their children. This in no way means that I think that it is innapropriate for kids: I just think that it is an amazing starting point for discussion about what makes us human. Please read my review of "A Wrinkle in Time" (also made today) for my thoughts on how these two books are related.

    This is a moving, thought-provoking book that is a great read for adults as well as kids. Adults might find it interesting that the idea of a drugged-to-make-them-"normal" population where everyone is encouraged to analyze and discuss every aspect of their lives sounds eerily familiar...

    5-0 out of 5 stars A brilliant dystopian novel
    This is a really brilliant book, which everyone should read.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Giver
    Kiddoes, I just finished rereading this book for about the eighth time, but I'll try to transport my mind back in time to when I first read it. I think you'll get a better perspective that way.

    It's about a society that wants to be 'perfect'. Well, actually, 'perfect' wouldn't be the best word. I suppose that they want everything to be structured and uniform. They call it in the book 'Sameness'.

    There are books and movies about futures that stink, but, let me tell you, this is an especially insane one.

    The land is climate-controlled, and completely the same. Flat; no hills, no valleys. No colors, even. And it isn't just the outside that's controlled... The people don't love, aren't sad or guilty... basically, they don't feel human emotions. Only the Receiver is allowed to experience those things, and he is the keeper for the entire community... without him, the memories would be unleashed and the community would revert to chaos.

    People have their jobs chosen for them, their mates chosen, even their children. You get to old? You're 'released'. (Releasing is killing, if you haven't figured that out.) A twin, and smaller than your brother or sister? You're released. Make a mistake, like flying in the wrong direction? Released. It's scary about what you can't do...

    Jonas is chosen as the new Receiver, and (surprise) he's the character that the book centers around. We read about his life before he is selected, during, and afterwards, and I don't know about you, but it was a major shock to me that there wasn't color.

    I'm not sure if I can say that I LOVED this book. Loving would imply that I loved the concepts, and also would imply that I wasn't horrified while I was reading it. Happy little kiddoes in America aren't really exposed to this kind of stuff... not even CLOSE to it.

    But I really respect it, and totally understand why it's a classic. Lois Lowry got a fan with this book; Number the Stars didn't quite do it for me.

    And another thing I think people need to understand about this book is that even though the text is simple and that youngsters can READ it, the concepts are meant for older kids. ... Read more


    13. Their Eyes Were Watching God
    by Zora Neale Hurston
    list price: $13.95
    our price: $10.46
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0060931418
    Catlog: Book (1998-12-01)
    Publisher: Perennial
    Sales Rank: 3113
    Average Customer Review: 4.21 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.

    Of Hurston's fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. The novel follows the fortunes of Janie Crawford, a woman living in the black town of Eaton, Florida. Hurston sets up her characters and her locale in the first chapter, which, along with the last, acts as a framing device for the story of Janie's life. Unlike Wright and Ralph Ellison, Hurston does not write explicitly about black people in the context of a white world--a fact that earned her scathing criticism from the social realists--but she doesn't ignore the impact of black-white relations either:

    It was the time for sitting on porches beside the road. It was the time to hear things and talk. These sitters had been tongueless, earless, eyeless conveniences all day long. Mules and other brutes had occupied their skins. But now, the sun and the bossman were gone, so the skins felt powerful and human. They became lords of sounds and lesser things. They passed nations through their mouths. They sat in judgment.
    One person the citizens of Eaton are inclined to judge is Janie Crawford, who has married three men and been tried for the murder of one of them. Janie feels no compulsion to justify herself to the town, but she does explain herself to her friend, Phoeby, with the implicit understanding that Phoeby can "tell 'em what Ah say if you wants to. Dat's just de same as me 'cause mah tongue is in mah friend's mouf."

    Hurston's use of dialect enraged other African American writers such as Wright, who accused her of pandering to white readers by giving them the black stereotypes they expected. Decades later, however, outrage has been replaced by admiration for her depictions of black life, and especially the lives of black women. In Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston breathes humanity into both her men and women, and allows them to speak in their own voices. --Alix Wilber ... Read more

    Reviews (293)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A good read
    "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neale Hurston is a book about the life of a Negro woman in the 1900s. The story begins with Janie telling about her life, but then the author takes over the book. In the beginning, Janie returns to see some people she used to know sitting on their porch. After they dine with food she brings, Janie begins to tell her story, with Hurston soon taking over the point of view.

    We first hear about Janie's grandmother wanting her to marry Logan Killicks, an older man. She protests her decision, but her grandmother wants her to have someone who can offer Janie the security and protection of his older age and a large potato farm. The marriage occurs in the next chapter, but soon after Janie leaves her new husband to be with another man - Joe Starks.

    Joe and Janie go off to another place in Florida. Joe becomes mayor of a new town, named Eatonville, of all black people. Joe also builds a store in this town. At first, Janie is enjoying this relationship. But after the town starts developing, Janie doesn't enjoy life with Joe as much. This is partly because Joe is becoming the man of the town and Janie feels left out. She is asked by Joe to run the store, as Joe is busy doing town duties as the mayor, such as getting a new street light installed.

    Later, many other events happen in the story, but if I told you anymore I'd spoil the book.

    The author, Zora Neale Hurston, uses the dialog of Negroes in the story. Phrases such as "Aw, Tea Cake, you just say dat tuhnight because de fish and corn bread tasted sort of good" let you imagine the dialect used by southern black people. The characters created by the author really do let us know that they were blacks. We know this because of the way they talk, and because of the life that they are living as explained to us by Hurston.

    One theme of this novel relates to man versus society. In this case, man is Janie and society is the men of the south. Janie finally realizes all the hardships she has been through and how her life has changed. In a nutshell, this novel tells the life a Negro woman trying to live a happy life through difficult times.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful language, memorable characters, amazing story
    This book was originally published in 1937 and brought back into print because of an article in MS Magazine written by Alice Walker in 1975. It is considered a classic now, and is often required reading in South Florida high schools, and elsewhere I suspect, as well as being the book selected for Read Together Palm Beach County and for Read Together, Florida, a statewide reading project in 2004. Hurston was a member of the Harlem Renaissance movement, but was abhorred by Richard Wright who criticized her severely. Nonetheless, this book was an alternate pick of the Book of the Month Club when originally published. A short time later, some very ugly charges were leveled against Hurston; she eventually cleared her name but she never really got over it. Her books went out of print and she died, penniless, and was buried in an unmarked grave. Alice Walker found what was presumably Hurston's grave and erected a monument that reads, in addition to her name and dates, "Genius of the South."

    Their Eyes Were Watching God has quite a bit of Hurston's life, and more importantly, her beliefs invested in the main character of Janie Crawford. The novel is framed by Janie's return to Eatonville, the first all black incorporated city in the United States. Everyone in town is gossiping about her, and Janie tells her story to Pheoby, her best friend, and asks her to tell the townsfolk. Janie was raised by grandmother, Nanny, a former slave, who marries her off to an older farmer, Logan Killicks, when she's 16. She's not happy in that marriage and she leaves and marries Joe Starkes, who takes her to the new town of Eatonville. He becomes mayor there, and builds a store that becomes the center of town life. Twenty years later he dies, and she hooks up with the love of her life, Tea Cake, who is much younger than she is. He takes her to the Everglades where they survive the hurricane of 1928 that wiped out the 'Glades, but Tea Cake gets bitten by a rabid dog in the process. After his death, Janie returns to Eatonville, completing the frame.

    This is the story of a strong black woman's search for happiness and independence in a time when neither of those things was easily attainable. It is written in dialect, and is not an easy read. I listened to the beginning of the book on CD, produced by Recorded Books and read by Michele-Denise Woods, which it made it much easier to read on my own. It is also available on audiocassette read by Ruby Dee. Reading it aloud also helps - hearing the dialect makes it much easier to read. It's a terrific story and the language is incredibly beautiful, making the life of Janie Crawford a memorable one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Zora as Muse
    Criticized for not writing a protest novel by some of her fellow African-American writers of the time, Zora instead wrote one of the most poetic novels ever written in the United States. Written in the vernacular of her African-American characters while narrated in standard form, this novel is a blues tale which uses both variations of the language to tranport the reader into the heart and soul of Janie, a young African-American woman in the 1930s on a search.

    Musical, heartbreaking, endearing, hilarious, and a novel where the issues of the day enter in horrific ways, this book's title has to best describe Zora as she wrote this book, divinely inspired. There is love, there is marriage, there is separation, there is an irrepressible woman who still speaks to all about the search all meaningful lives undertake.

    Alice Walker so loved this book and this author she restored her grave.

    4-0 out of 5 stars God is with us
    Sometimes it takes forty years of life, many tragedys and three marriages
    before we finally get it right.
    Janie got it right towards the end. Zora Neale Hurston was ahead of her time ... writing about a black female hero, a woman who had opinions, a woman who didn't accept tradition, a woman after my own heart.
    Janie is a black woman with attitude.
    "What does he mean I can't do that, do I not have a mind, an opinion, a soul?"
    Janie is black, not the color to be in the 30s, 40s, 50s, even now, sometimes....but she endures, lives, loves.
    Tea Cake is her shining star; the younger man, the one most likely to leave her, since she's a forty year old has-been...but
    he is her beautiful prince, her young Lolita, her life.
    Janie is a survivor, a woman we all want to be like, a believer in the human experience, a woman...(Watch me Roar!)

    "Their Eyes Were Watching God" is about a woman outliving heartache, humiliation and death...
    She is still living...
    inside every woman who believes life can be caught in mid-air, sucked up, absorbed, and changed
    if one so desires...
    How about you?

    3-0 out of 5 stars Their Eyes Were Watching God
    I was required to read this book in class. Although many of my peers disliked it, I found Their Eyes Were Watching God to be an interesting book. The vernacular dialect made it hard to read but I enjoyed the theme of love throughout the book. I was interested in the lessons that Janie, the main character, learned through each person that she met throughout her journey. I was interested in all of the African-American culture that filled this book. I would not recommend this book to everyone but it would be good for anyone who wants to broaden their horizons. ... Read more


    14. Fahrenheit 451
    by RAY BRADBURY
    list price: $6.99
    our price: $6.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0345342968
    Catlog: Book (1987-08-12)
    Publisher: Del Rey
    Sales Rank: 976
    Average Customer Review: 4.06 out of 5 stars
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    Book Description

    Nowadays firemen start fires. Fireman Guy Montag loves to rush to a fire and watch books burn up. Then he met a seventeen-year old girl who told him of a past when people were not afraid, and a professor who told him of a future where people could think. And Guy Montag knew what he had to do....
    ... Read more

    Reviews (969)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Burning on the mind
    Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, a thought-provoking book about censorship centered around book burning, seemed to get off to a slow start by following the life of the main character, Guy Montag, a firefighter who does not put out fires, but rather burns books for a living. Some of the descriptions given at the beginning of the book were confusing at first, like those of the parlor walls, which really turned out to be futuristic video screens, and the mechanical hound, a robot which is used to track and kill people by the chemical scents they leave behind. However, as I got into the book more, I felt that the almost boring way Bradbury wrote the introduction helps give the reader a sense of what Montag's life was normally like, and allows the reader to see the vastness of the changes he encounters in his lifestyle.
    I also felt that as the plot thickened, Bradbury did an excellent job of giving Guy human qualities, such as making him impulsive and sometimes hot-tempered, and showing how he strove to do what he thought was right. His interactions with other characters are very real, especially those with his boss, Beatty. When Montag starts to regret burning books, and starts to perceive that there is more to the books he burns for a living than he and most other people believe, Beatty senses Montag's change in emotion, and does his best to set him straight, telling him that books are only filled with useless thoughts and people and places created by writers that are long gone. This is the main conflict that leads to the rising action of the novel. Montag is told that books are bad, and thus by human nature becomes even more interested in them. However, the conflict is greater than this, as it is not just Montag versus Beatty. Besides also trying to get his ditsy wife interested in books, Montag faces an internal battle with himself. He has to weigh the consequences of getting caught with books with the rewards of what he could possibly gain by reading. I especially appreciated the effort Bradbury went through to bring the feelings and emotions Montag goes experiences to the reader by his word choice, and the way he showed the reader how Montag was playing a sort of tug-of-war in his mind.
    I think Bradbury did a good job surprising the reader whenever possible, such as with Montag's actions. Just when you begin to think that you might see how Guy will act in a situation, Bradbury twists the outcome, keeping you on the edge of your seat in some cases, or at least wondering what will happen next. Such is the case with Faber; a man Montag becomes friends with who also has interests in the forbidden world of books. Just as Bradbury leads the reader to believe that Faber will be somewhat in control of how Guy responds to the remarks of his boss Beatty, Montag leaves Faber in the dust, taking matters into his own hands and acting on impulse.
    Bradbury uses a serious tone throughout the novel, which helps to bring forth the importance of the subject at hand. I liked the serous way in which Bradbury presents the world Montag lives in, a world without books or leisure reading material. This made me question what I would do if I were in Montag's situation, even though in this day and age it is quite unlikely that books would suddenly be totally banned. It really got me thinking about censorship in general, and how at times in the past we made steps toward making Montag's world a reality by banning books from libraries and bookstores. On the other hand, in brought to light the fact that the bans placed on many books were lifted after such acts were declared unconstitutional, which somewhat renewed my faith in the ability of our government and society to recognize and correct some of its mistakes.
    The novel is still thought provoking, however, because no matter what kind of society we live in today, we can all imagine living in one that is totally different, one we do not feel comfortable in, one that we let our imaginations run wild in creating it, making it painful to think about let alone live in. I enjoyed how the novel made me realize how many freedoms we have nowadays, and how they can easily be taken away.
    Without spoiling the ending, I just want to say that I thought it was very fitting. As Granger says near the end of the novel, "You're not important. You're not anything." Montag and his group would have appeared to be insignificant to any unsuspecting stranger, even though they were the keys to a vast world of knowledge, one they hope someday the world will get to experience again.
    Though I do think that Ray Bradbury did a very good job of writing Fahrenheit 451, I feel that it has a few weaknesses. First would have to be a shortness of description, especially at the beginning of the novel when the reader is trying to form an image of the world Montag lives in. His short initial description of things such as the parlor walls and the mechanical hound left me somewhat confused about what they really had to do with the novel. Another case of confusion occurred with the mechanical snake that was used to empty Montag's wife's stomach and change her blood while she was sleeping after Montag found out that his wife, Mildred, had swallowed some thirty sleeping pills. It is not so confusing how this event happens but rather why it happens, and it does not seem to be important later in the story.
    Despite some weaknesses, the main point of Fahrenheit 451 is clear, and makes the book a definite "must-read."

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Prophetic Novel of Censorship
    Guy Montag is a firefighter who burns things. Specifically books, and the houses they are found in. He lives in a state where books, and possesion of them, is illegal. Guy enjoys his job until the day he meets Clarisse McClellan.

    Clarisse makes Guy doubt his motives and he soon becomes daring enough to break the law and read a book. He finds he loves litereature, he keeps steals books from the houses he's burning and reads them at home. He finally goes as far as to skip work one day, and his Fire Department Captain, Captain Beatty, shows up at his home. He tells Montag that it's normal for a Fireman to go through such doubts at a stage in his life. Then proceeds to go through a long monologue as to the history of banning books. According to him, special interest groups objected to books that criticized, belittled, or undermined their causes. For this reason, books became more and more neutral in order to avoid offending anyone. However, this still wasn't enough. So society agreed to outlaw books.

    Montag is not convinced and begins to plot with a professor he had previously met named Faber. They plan on planting books in the houses of Firemen as a way of discrediting the profession and destroying the governments unit for censorship. However, thing go when the alarm sounds at the firestation and Montag goes to the last house he'll burn in is career, his house.

    Unlike its fellow dystopia-themed predecessor, 1984, much of Fahrenheit 451's depiction of modern society came true almost prophetically. Although not outlawed, literature now holds a narrow audience. And the brainwashing televisions Ray Bradbury depicts aren't far off of today's one-eyed-boxes.

    Ray Bradbury's adjectival descriptions in this book are strong, even at times; on occasion, one could even say they became monotonous. However, the books never crawls forward for to long; the progress, although not quick, still moves fast enough to keep the reader's attention.

    Overall a strong novel censorship. Although not perfectI would recommend Fahrenheit 451 to any reader interested in either mere science-fiction, or one actually interested in a political criticism of censorship. Both will find their time well spent, the latter will definitely get more out of it, as for the previous. . .
    Maybe you would enjoy Star Wars??

    5-0 out of 5 stars Definition of a classic...
    I've heard so many people say they've been influenced by Bradbury (writers and others) and I can see why--this is simply a great novel. Bradbury is really a national treasure. If you ever get the chance to hear him speak, don't miss him. His stories are priceless. (Especially the one about his anger at people telling him for years that he was crazy to believe man would set foot on the moon in his lifetime. He said he called up every person who laughed in his face the night Neil Armstrong did--and pretty much laughed in their faces!) There is a fantastic one-on-one interview with him in the Walt Disney Tomorrowland-Disney in Space and Beyond DVD (interviewer is Leonard Maltin). His friendship with Disney (a fellow futurist) was fascinating. But it's the sense of wonder and child-like curiosity and optimism (not childish or blind optimism as he clearly understands what can create a dystopia) that make you realize why he is a national treasure. He's inspired me to look to the future, to look up, to look forward, to always be wary and alert to what can go wrong, (and the dangers of closed or lazy minds) BUT not to let any of that stop you--that anything is possible in a world willing to believe, in a free world with open and curious minds.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A book that continues to touch on modern life
    Though I was long familiar with many of Bradbury's works, I had put off reading "Fahrenheit 451" in favor of other books until a friend lent it to me recently. After reading it, I'm angry with myself for having taken so long to pick it up. This book is a fantastic tale of a future society that abandons intellectual development and destroys its books. Like all great literature, it offers insight into our society today despite having been written over a half-century ago, and it continues to reward reading today.

    This book is more than a seminal work of dystopian literature, however; it is also one of the most elegant meditations on the value of literature in modern society that I have ever read. In envisioning a society that destroys books, Bradbury has to explain what is lost as a result. His answer, as we see in Faber's expositions during Montag's visit, is the exact thing which makes this book worth reading - the insights we gain into our own world and our own lives through reading. Integral to this process, of course, is the fact that people must read them and put what they take from them to good use for a society to thrive; as Bradbury notes, the first step towards the world of his novel was taken when people stopped reading. It is this message which makes "Fahrenheit 451" essential reading, especially in a society where entertainment today bears an ever-closer resemblance to the noise-dominated media depicted in Bradbury's nightmarish future.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Reply to a response
    How does someone miss the point of a REVIEW by such a vast margin? I agree with your and Mr. Bradbury's alarm about the state of politics and culture, but my review was not concerned with his message, but with his storytelling. Just because one agrees with an author's stance does not mean that one has to like the way in which the author conveyed that stance. Mine was a literary critique, not a political one, and those who rate this book so highly simply because of the gravity of the message are deeply misguided. Message aside, it's an awfully cheesy and childish book. Admit it.

    Anyway, I said the DIALOGUE was wooden. The characters were flat. ;) ... Read more


    15. The Official SAT Study Guide: For the New SAT
    by College Board
    list price: $19.95
    our price: $13.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0874477182
    Catlog: Book (2004-10)
    Publisher: College Board
    Sales Rank: 430
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    Book Description

    In March 2005, the College Board will begin to administer a new SAT®.To help prepare all students for the new SAT and college success™, the College Board introduces:

    The Official SAT Study Guide: For the New SAT™

    Here's the successor to the College Board's #1 best seller 10 Real SAT®s. This new book is the only source of practice tests created by the test maker according to proprietary new SAT specifications. With the book's 700+ pages and 21 chapters, students:

    o Gain experience by taking 8 practice tests and receiving estimated scores.

    o Raise confidence by reviewing concepts, test-taking approaches, and practice questions.

    o Increase understanding of the new PSAT/NMSQT® and the new SAT.

    Plus, book buyers receive free online score reports and a discount on The Official SAT
    Online Course™ with auto essay scoring.

    Changes to the new SAT include:

    o The name of the current SAT verbal section will be changed to critical reading, analogies will be eliminated and short reading passages will be added to existing long reading passages.

    o A new section called the SAT writing section will be added, which will contain multiple-choice grammar and usage questions and a student- written essay.

    o The SAT math section will be expanded to include topics from third-year college- preparatory
    math (also known as Algebra II); in addition, quantitative comparisons will be eliminated from
    this section.

    The Official SAT Study Guide: For the New SAT is part of the College Board's new SAT Readiness Program™ of print, online, and professional development resources.collegeboard.com/srp.


    New SAT 2005 NATIONAL EXAM DATES:
    March 12
    May 7
    June 4
    ... Read more

    16. Shadow of the Giant (Ender)
    by Orson Scott Card
    list price: $25.95
    our price: $17.13
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0312857586
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-01)
    Publisher: Tor Books
    Sales Rank: 47561
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    Book Description

    Bean's past was a battle just to survive.He first appeared on the streets of Rotterdam, a tiny child with a mind leagues beyond anyone else.He knew he could not survive through strength; he used his tactical genius to gain acceptance into a children's gang, and then to help make that gang a template for success for all the others.He civilized them, and lived to grow older. Then he was discovered by the recruiters for the Battle School.

    For Earth was at war - a terrible war with an inscrutable alien enemy. A war that humanity was near to losing.But the long distances of interstellar space has given hope to the defenders of Earth - they had time to train military geniuses up from childhood, forging them into an irresistible force in the high-orbital facility called the Battle School.That story is told in two books, the beloved classic ENDER'S GAME, and its parallel, ENDER'S SHADOW.

    Bean wasthe smallest student at the Battle School, but he became Ender Wiggins' right hand, Since then he has grown to be a power on Earth.He served the Hegemon as strategist and general in the terrible warsthat followed Ender's defeat of the alien empire attacking Earth. Now he and his wife Petra yearn for a safe place to build a family - something he has never known - but there is nowhere on Earth that does not harbor his enemies - old enemies from the days in Ender's Jeesh, new enemies from the wars on Earth. To find security,Bean and Petra must once again follow in Ender's footsteps.They must leave Earth behind, in the control of the Hegemon, and look to the stars.
    ... Read more

    17. A-List #4, The: Tall Cool One : An A-List Novel
    by Zoey Dean
    list price: $9.99
    our price: $8.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0316735086
    Catlog: Book (2005-04-06)
    Publisher: Little, Brown
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    18. Cracking the SAT Math Subject Tests, 2005-2006 Edition (Cracking the Sat II Math)
    by Princeton Review
    list price: $19.00
    our price: $12.92
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0375764518
    Catlog: Book (2005-03-08)
    Publisher: Princeton Review
    Sales Rank: 949665
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    19. The Trouble Begins: A Box of Unfortunate Events, Books 1-3 (The Bad Beginning; The Reptile Room; The Wide Window)
    by Lemony Snicket
    list price: $35.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 006029809X
    Catlog: Book (2001-10-01)
    Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
    Sales Rank: 16
    Average Customer Review: 4.21 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Fans of Lemony Snicket and newcomers to his gleefully ghastly Series ofUnfortunate Events will be elated to discover this boxed gift set of the firstthree books in hardcover: The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, andThe Wide Window. While it's true that the events that unfold in Snicket'snovels are bleak, and things never turn out as you'd hope, these delightful,funny, linguistically playful books are reminiscent of Roald Dahl, CharlesDickens, and Edward Gorey. After they get their paws on this boxed set, there isno question that young readers will want to read the continuing unluckyadventures of the three Baudelaire orphans. (Ages 9 and older) --KarinSnelson ... Read more

    Reviews (100)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Box of Unfortunate Events: The Trouble Begins (Books 1-3:
    Dear Reader,
    This series is about three children: Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Bauldiare. The books are filled with misery and woe, the children are always followed by misfortune and a crook by the name of Count Olaf. He is always after the Bauldiares enormous fortune, and somehow never seems to get a firm grip, just like you couldn't grab a stick of melting butter with your bare hand. The children (orphans, which we are bound to call them) always find a way to escape the scraggly grip of Count Olaf... The first book started as the three soon to be orphans were walking along the beach examining strange specimens that got washed up on the shoreline. When a strange figure came up to them, it turns out that it was Mr. Poe, the Bauldiares bank manager. This started all of the childrens' misery: the fact that an enormous fire had destroyed their home, and their parents... This has been just the beginning of the first book. There are currently 13 books, where misfortune and Count Olaf follow the poor Bauldiares, trying to get control over the fortune and the their lives.The books are very negative, so I personally don't recommend them for smaller children, but they are good, if your heart doesn't melt in the midst of them. Do the orphans escape Olaf, or do they lose their fortune, and their lives. To find out, read the Series of Unfortunate Events.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Teacher's Review
    As a teacher, I am constantly looking for the newest and biggest book to read to my students. During my travels, I came across a book entitled "The Bad Beginning" by Lemony Snickett. I decided to take a chance and purchase the book. I sat down at home and read the entire book in about two and a half hours, and it was one of the most enjoyable stories that I had read in a long time! I tried the book out on the kids, and they just ate it up. The students couldn't get enough of Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire....and to be quite honest, neither could I!! Soon after reading the first book, I purchased books two and three, and not to my surprise they were just as good! I again read these books to the students, and they again ate them up!!! Unfortunately, by the time we had finished the third book, the school year was over. However, I went on to finish my collection by getting books four through nine. I love these stories! The black humor that they contain should be that of a Coen Brothers film. The kids got every joke, and they totally fell in love with Snickett's radically original storytelling - explaining things in detail, translating Sunny's baby talk, and giving hilarious backstory. My peers often make fun of me because I read so much children's literature, but I have recommended these books to all of my friends. I even believe that these books are more interesting and fun to read than the Harry Potter series...but thats just me! I would recommend this book to parents of third and fourth grade students (it might be a little unfullfilling to the fiercly loyal fifth grade Harry Potter crowd) and also to adults who are unfamiliar with the series. A truly remarkable find and the most entertaining children's novels since Roald Dahl. Summer's the perfect time to pick these up!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Books!
    I've bought these books, and I've recieved them in a short period of time. They are interesting to read. It's hard to see these children struggle, and face all the sorrow that comes their way. I thought I would not like these, because they were supposed to be depressing. If you want a series you really get involved in, try these. This collection is by far entertaining, and detailed. I can't wait to buy the next box set!

    4-0 out of 5 stars From Bad to Worse: The Story of the Baudelaire Orphans
    When I first started reading this series of books I was set back a little because these stories are not written in the style of typical children's books. These stories are dark, and the evil characters are truly evil. A number of reviewers have panned this series because they are dark, and because they often push the boundaries of what some of us may find acceptable for children to read. It is because of the dark imagery that I have typically recommended that age 9 be a minimum age. Some children may be unprepared for these books until later.

    In the first three books in this series we learn that the three Baudelaire children, Sunny, the baby, Klaus, her brother, and Violet, a young teen, have lost their parents in a terrible fire. The children are sent to live with their evil uncle Olaf, who has ulterior motives yet to be revealed in later books. The children quickly learn how evil he is, and ultimately escape. They next go to live with their uncle Montgomery Montgomery in "The Reptile Room," only to be forced to move on again. In "The Wide Window" the children live with an aunt who is afraid of everything, only to ultimately be forced to move on again, continually chased by the evil Count Olaf in a variety of disguises.

    Book 11 in this series is soon to come out, and the original plan was for there to be 12 books. These books are like potato chips. Once you start one and find it intriguing, you will want to keep reading. If you do not like the first book, plan to stop with the first.

    This series is highly creative and many children 9 and older find them enjoyable. My children read them as teens and loved them. They did think they were different and unusual, and since they could not explain why I read them myself. They are different and unusual, but they also introduce children to situations that have occurred to children in the real world. A good way to introduce scary subjects.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The first three books = Set-up....
    Well, I'll admit its been a while since I've read the first three books of the series. They are are my least favorite in the series. Because in my opinion they get much better after those three. Especially after book 5. However, since this is a 1-3 box set, I MUST review these specific ones right now, so here goes.

    Book One: The Bad Beginning - Well in book one we our introduced to the Baudelaire's, they are quite happy children that live with their parents in a large house, and are very rich. These children include: Violet, a 14 year old whom is a genius inventor, and will tie her up when in the midst of inventing, Klaus, her 12 year old brother whom is a genius of books, hecan't get enough of them, and is quite often a well of imformation, and last but not least Sunny, a small baby whom is still crawling, can't really talk yet except with made up words, but she has for EXTREMELY long & sharp teeth.

    Now, so the story goes, the Baudelare children were playing on the beach, when they became orphans(wont tell you how), this is where there misfortunes began, because they must live with a gardian now, a relative or something. Well, they end up living with Count Olaf, and really I don't want to tell you more of that book.

    NOTICE: If you DON'T want ANYTHING in the books after book one spoiled DON'T the next to descriptions of the books, skip them and read my summary.

    Book Two: The Reptile Room - In this book the Baudelaire's have escaped Count Olaf and Mr. Poe has placed them in the care of Dr. Montgomery Montgomery, or their Uncle Monty. He is a man whom studies reptiles and has many interesting and dangerous reptiles. The Baudelaire's begin to feel that they will actually enjoy living there too. But is it safe for them to get comfortable?

    Book Three: The Wide Window - After they had to leave Uncle Monty's house(I wont say why), Mr. Poe has placed them in their care of their paranoid grammar obsessed Aunt Josephine. A woman who's husband died a couple years back and wont use stoves in fear that she set the house on fire or something like that. Her house "barely" sits on a ledge next to lake Lachreymose by Domocles Dock. The Baudelaire's don't enjoy living there very much, but how long will it last anyways?

    Well, I would say that "The Series of Unfortunate Events" is for those who are morbid at heart. These books have an extremely morbid sense of humor. But it is a great sense of humor, may take some time to get used to. And even though book 4 is the lowest rated on Amazon.com, I'd say that is where the books really hit their stride, in book for. That's where I really began to enjoy the books and their unique sense of humor. So whether you are young or old, though I think older people may enjoy these a little more cause they can understand them better(and most the people I know who've read them have been at least my age, 19yrs), you'll probably still enjoy them, they're fun books. And they have some things to teach, even though they don't seem like it.

    God Bless & *enjoy* ~Amy ... Read more


    20. The Second Summer of the Sisterhood (Readers Circle)
    by ANN BRASHARES
    list price: $8.95
    our price: $8.06
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0385731051
    Catlog: Book (2004-12-28)
    Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
    Sales Rank: 22597
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