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$15.98 list($16.95)
1. Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception
$13.57 list($19.95)
2. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
$5.85 $3.20 list($6.50)
3. The Giver
$8.96 list($9.95)
4. Eragon
$5.85 $2.96 list($6.50)
5. A Wrinkle in Time
$7.19 $2.94 list($7.99)
6. Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book
$13.59 list($19.99)
7. Forest of the Pygmies
$7.19 $2.97 list($7.99)
8. The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl,
$7.19 $3.30 list($7.99)
9. The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl,
$17.99 $17.94 list($29.99)
10. The Chronicles of Narnia
$12.21 $11.82 list($17.95)
11. Stravaganza: City of Flowers (Stravaganza)
$22.05 $21.00 list($35.00)
12. The Hobbit (Leatherette Collector's
$12.21 $10.48 list($17.95)
13. The Golem's Eye (Bartimaeus Trilogy,
$9.71 $7.25 list($12.95)
14. The Artemis Fowl Files (Artemis
$7.19 $4.65 list($7.99)
15. The House of the Scorpion
$16.47 $16.37 list($24.95)
16. The Dark Is Rising Sequence: Silver
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17. Queen of the Slayers (Buffy The
$10.88 $9.82 list($16.00)
18. Messenger
$12.56 $6.79 list($17.95)
19. The Sea of Trolls
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20. The Guide to the Territories of

1. Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl (Hardcover))
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $16.95
our price: $15.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786852895
Catlog: Book (2005-05-03)
Publisher: Miramax
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Book Description

Criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl is back…and so is his cunning enemy from Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident, Opal Koboi. At the start of the fourth adventure, Artemis has returned to his unlawful ways. He's in Berlin, preparing to steal a famous impressionist painting from a German bank. He has no idea that his old rival, Opal, has escaped from prison by cloning herself. She's left her double behind in jail and, now free, is exacting her revenge on all those who put her there, including Artemis. ... Read more


2. Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
by CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
list price: $19.95
our price: $13.57
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Asin: 037582670X
Catlog: Book (2005-08-23)
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 1770
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3. The Giver
by LOIS LOWRY
list price: $6.50
our price: $5.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440237688
Catlog: Book (2002-09-10)
Publisher: Laurel Leaf
Sales Rank: 959
Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear of pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12 he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.


From the Paperback edition.
... Read more

Reviews (2207)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent novel - Worth all the praise & adoration it gets!
After Lois Lowry produced the entrancing 'Number The Stars' it didn't seem possible that she could produce a work, for children, to top it. With 'The Giver' she easily met that goal.

'The Giver' appears to be a rather simple story of a young boy (12 years old to be exact) named Jonas who lives in a seamingly perfect society. He is given the task of becoming the 'Receiver of Knowledge'; an apprentice to the 'Giver of Knowledge'. But that is where the simpleness ends.

The 'knowledge' spoken of in Jonas' job title is all of the memories of pain and suffering that were collected to rid all citizens of uncomfort. The Giver telepathically has to give Jonas all of these memories so he can suffer the pain of famine, war, disease, and death - to spare the community.

The themes in this novel are profound. The thought of a 'utopia' is considered extensively, but it is clearly shown that a perfect world can not exist -- therefore, 'distopia'. The novel also deals with life, death, indivuality, and more; an amazing amount of thought-provoking subjects for a book with a grade 4.5 reading level.

This book, however, may not be suitable for younger readers. Death is a common theme and the murder of an infant is described. There are mild nods to sexuality, but many young readers will dismiss these as benign.

A must read for students as well as adults! Excellent job, Ms. Lowry. You gave America another profound and excellent novel - one that will be on schools' required reading lists for many years to come!

5-0 out of 5 stars A children's version of 1984, only more entertaining
My own personal grudge against the book comes from the extent of the writing profession, and how it beared so scary and remarkable a resemblence to one of my unpublished ramblings into the SF genre. I had plans of doing a novel where all emotion is stripped away, set in a world much like THE GIVER. Then when I read it, I was somewhat concerned for my own work.

Anyway, this is often comparted to a children's 1984. Yes, while it does bear resemblance to 1984, this book is wonderful on its own terms. The story is the world has been taken down into a utopia, a place with no crime and no feeling, no true feeling. The family establishment is essentially nil with no sexuality at all (this resembles the dominant theme in my own work). Birth Mothers are the source of the population, though it does not give the identity of the fathers. Work and family comes about by selection. Jonas, the hero, has been selected to be the Reciever of Memory. It is here he realises how shockingly sterile and devoid of beauty his world truly is. The ending, somewhat vague, rewards the reader by not giving away to much detail.

For those readers who will be travelling on to Orwell after this, go to ANIMAL FARM, my own personal favorite, and then 1984 for when they're older.

Like all good children's literature, this book deserves to be read by both adults and children alike. Bravo Lowry!

Other significant works by Lowry: Number the Stars.

Mike London

5-0 out of 5 stars A brilliant dystopian novel
This is a complex, beautiful book that offers a look into a futuristic dystopia in which there is no color, no aberation, no hot or cold, and no personal choices. Drugs are taken to repress sexual urges and even out temprament, and careers are chosen for children based on their aptitude. Children are raised in prearranged family units. There is no privacy and no personal choice, but is this really a bad thing if people have no concept of those things? There is no hunger, emotional pain, violence, crime, war, or sadness.

Growing up in this world is Jonas, a bright 12 year old who is about to receive his career assignment. He is given the important but extremely rare job of "Reciever": the keeper of "memories" of what life was like before the creation of his utopian world. Slowly, he begins to see color, to learn what love, hate, death, and heartbreak are like. He begins to understand that some of the "happy" things around him maybe aren't so happy.

The brilliance of this book is that the world unfolds gradually. Lowry does not hit us over the head with an up-front description: in fact, the place starts out sounding fairly normal if a bit Montesori. Slowly, though, the reader realizes quite how foreign this world is. Lowry is a deft writer with an excellent sense of subtlety.

Ultimately, this book is about the importance of cultural memory. The idea of cultural memory is probably a new one for kids, and some of the concepts of death and destruction might be a little disturbing, so I recomend that parents read this book too so that they can discuss it with their children. This in no way means that I think that it is innapropriate for kids: I just think that it is an amazing starting point for discussion about what makes us human. Please read my review of "A Wrinkle in Time" (also made today) for my thoughts on how these two books are related.

This is a moving, thought-provoking book that is a great read for adults as well as kids. Adults might find it interesting that the idea of a drugged-to-make-them-"normal" population where everyone is encouraged to analyze and discuss every aspect of their lives sounds eerily familiar...

5-0 out of 5 stars A brilliant dystopian novel
This is a really brilliant book, which everyone should read.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Giver
Kiddoes, I just finished rereading this book for about the eighth time, but I'll try to transport my mind back in time to when I first read it. I think you'll get a better perspective that way.

It's about a society that wants to be 'perfect'. Well, actually, 'perfect' wouldn't be the best word. I suppose that they want everything to be structured and uniform. They call it in the book 'Sameness'.

There are books and movies about futures that stink, but, let me tell you, this is an especially insane one.

The land is climate-controlled, and completely the same. Flat; no hills, no valleys. No colors, even. And it isn't just the outside that's controlled... The people don't love, aren't sad or guilty... basically, they don't feel human emotions. Only the Receiver is allowed to experience those things, and he is the keeper for the entire community... without him, the memories would be unleashed and the community would revert to chaos.

People have their jobs chosen for them, their mates chosen, even their children. You get to old? You're 'released'. (Releasing is killing, if you haven't figured that out.) A twin, and smaller than your brother or sister? You're released. Make a mistake, like flying in the wrong direction? Released. It's scary about what you can't do...

Jonas is chosen as the new Receiver, and (surprise) he's the character that the book centers around. We read about his life before he is selected, during, and afterwards, and I don't know about you, but it was a major shock to me that there wasn't color.

I'm not sure if I can say that I LOVED this book. Loving would imply that I loved the concepts, and also would imply that I wasn't horrified while I was reading it. Happy little kiddoes in America aren't really exposed to this kind of stuff... not even CLOSE to it.

But I really respect it, and totally understand why it's a classic. Lois Lowry got a fan with this book; Number the Stars didn't quite do it for me.

And another thing I think people need to understand about this book is that even though the text is simple and that youngsters can READ it, the concepts are meant for older kids. ... Read more


4. Eragon
by CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
list price: $9.95
our price: $8.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0375826696
Catlog: Book (2005-04-26)
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Sales Rank: 123358
Average Customer Review: 3.89 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This deluxe edition of Eragon includes an excerpt from Eldest, the next volume in the Inheritance trilogy; an exclusive foldout map of Alagaësia; never-before-seen art by the author depicting Zar’roc, Eragon’s sword; and an expanded pronunciation guide to the Ancient and Dwarf languages.

Fifteen-year-old Eragon believes that he is merely a poor farm boy—until his destiny as a Dragon Rider is revealed. Gifted with only an ancient sword, a loyal dragon, and sage advice from an old storyteller, Eragon is soon swept into a dangerous tapestry of magic, glory, and power. Now his choices could save—or destroy—the Empire. ... Read more

Reviews (860)

5-0 out of 5 stars Eragon
<br />Eragon is a wonderful book about a boy named Eragon who discovers a dragon egg, and soon finds himself in a world of magic, wars, and adventure. He travels with his dragon to safety, while seeking revenge on the evil king, Galbatorix, for killing his uncle. With elves, dwarves, and warriors, Eragon and his friends help defeat the orcs sent by Galbatorix. <br />I highly recommend this book to anyone ages 9 and up.

5-0 out of 5 stars An enchanting and heroic battle between two forces
This is one of the greatest books of all time. One might call it good against evil, but the good aren't that heroic. It is a coming of age story where the main character struggles with himself and his own feelings as well as his enemies. A great epic novel much like The Lord Of The Rings, except it is not as hard to follow.

5-0 out of 5 stars It doesn't matter if you like fantasy or not. Eragon RULES!!
The suspencful and thrilling story of Saphira and Eragon is amazing, detailed, beautiful, and everything else. It was so(...)etc. GREAT and possibly the best book I have ever read!!! Why? I can't name them all but I can name a few. 1. It talks about dragon in a positive way and I love dragons alot. I'm obssessed. 2. The style of writing is great. 3. The descriptions are amazing. 3.PLEASE do yourself a favor and read this book! I can't wait for Eldest to hit the stores!!!!!!!!!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars TOTALLY 100% FANTASTICLY AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This book is definantly the best I've read since Lord of the Rings! It's totally full of action with just a hint of some romance, but it definantly does not overdo it so you will not get bored. It's filled with everything a good story needs, dragons, elves, dwarves, a little bit of magic, a totally evil villian, and a hero you will just fall in love with. You would never be able to tell that he was only 15 when he started to write it. Whoever reads it will not be able to put it down, and those who haven't, YOU HAVE TO GET IT. Can't wait for the other two books in the series. They ROCK!

5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome!
When Eragon finds a "stone" in the Spine mountains, he never imagines that it might be a dragon egg. When it hatches, Eragon must either raise the baby dragon in hiding, or leave the creature to fare for its own. Then, Eragon's uncle is killed, and Eragon searched revenge. Joined by Brom, Carvahall's storyteller, and his dragon, Saphira, Eragon tracks the Ra'zac (the non-human culprits of his uncles death). On the way he learns how to use his magic, and...well, I let you read the book and find out the rest on your own. ... Read more


5. A Wrinkle in Time
by Madeleine L'Engle
list price: $6.50
our price: $5.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0440498058
Catlog: Book (1973-04-01)
Publisher: Yearling
Sales Rank: 329
Average Customer Review: 4.44 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Everyone in town thinks Meg Murry is volatile and dull-witted, and that her younger brother, Charles Wallace, is dumb. People are also saying that their physicist father has run off and left their brilliant scientist mother.Spurred on by these rumors and an unearthly stranger, the tesseract-touting Mrs Whatsit, Meg and Charles Wallace and their new friend Calvin O'Keefe embark on a perilous quest through space to find their father. In doing so, they must travel behind the shadow of an evil power that is darkening the cosmos, one planet at a time. This is no superhero tale, nor is it science fiction, although it shares elements of both. The travelers must rely on their individual and collective strengths, delving deep within themselves to find answers.

A well-loved classic and 1963 Newbery Medal winner, Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time is sophisticated in concept yet warm in tone, with mystery and love coursing through its pages. Meg's shattering, yet ultimately freeing, discovery that her father is not omnipotent provides a satisfying coming-of-age element. Readers will feel a sense of power as they travel with these three children, challenging concepts of time, space, and the triumph of good over evil. The companion books in the Time quartet, continuing the adventures of the Murry family, are A Wind in the Door; A Swiftly Tilting Planet, which won the American Book Award; and Many Waters. Every young reader should experience L'Engle's captivating, occasionally life-changing contributions to children's literature. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (787)

5-0 out of 5 stars Space Travel at It's Best
"A Wrinkle in Time " tells the story of Meg and Charles Wallace who, with their friend Calvin, decide to look for their missing father. They meet three mysterious alien women who aid them in their search by giving them interesting powers. With the help of their new alien friends, the children enter a tesseract, a short way of traveling between worlds. They go to a world terrorized by the evil It. Their father is on this world and the children devise a plan to safely leave with him. Their plan goes terribly wrong.

This book has lots of action and it' s characters are children whose reactions are very realistic in their situations. If you like science fiction and love to read about time travel, you will love this book.

3-0 out of 5 stars An outstanding Sci-fi!
Do you know those books where you accidentally yell out loud to a character to run or hide because you're so tied into the book? Well if you do, this book is definitely one of those. The book started me off confused with Mrs. Whatsit and her involvement in the book, but soon enough the unique characters of the three children and the odd supernatural women made me want to read more.

I loved how Madeleine L'Engle wrote about the aliens and their planets. Most people believe that aliens are much smarter and stronger that us, but she described them different than us, but with a reasonable intelligence level. It makes sense that she made Earth a clouded planet because compared to Ixchel, our planet is full of hate and evil. The only downside of the book for me was the ending. I expected a showdown between good and evil in the last heart stopping scene, but the book came to an ending with the usual 'love is the best power of all."

Looking at this book and comparing it to Harry Potter wouldn't be fair. First of all because after reading both books the overall excitement of Harry Potter way beyond that of A Wrinkle in Time mostly because of the size of the book. I t would also not be fair because Harry Potter, when I was reading it, was the best book of all time and the excitement in the writing was just incomparable. If you're looking for a good Sci-fi book though to read on your free time you will love it. Then again, I guess what I am trying to get to you is that if I were to choose to read the fifth Harry Potter book or all four of the Wrinkle in Time books (I think they are about the same amount of pages) I would definitely choose Harry Potter.

Hope this helps,
Travis Robinson

5-0 out of 5 stars Really good!!
I read this a long time ago, but it's still really good! Read it! Anyway, that's not my real point.

Would all those people who are complaining about the "lack of scientific substance" stop?!?!?! This isn't supposed to be a scientific journal! It's a NOVEL! What do novels do? Tell stories! NOT give scientific facts.

So, with that aside, I recommend this book to everyone.

Have fun reading!

4-0 out of 5 stars A Wrinkle in Time
A Wrinkle in Time is a fantastic Sci-Fi young adults book. It is about discovery of one's self and accepting yourself as you are.

The story follows Meg, her brilliant brother Charles Wallace, and her new friend Calvin as they journey through space and behind an evil cloud to find Meg's father. They are assisted by Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who, and Mrs. Which, who show the children that they can do anything with the talents (and weaknesses) they have.

The reason it didn't receive 5 stars is because the story fell flat in certain places and many times it seemed rushed. Also, my favorite is A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and comparing this book to that one, this book falls short, but only just a little bit.

5-0 out of 5 stars Challenging and thought-provoking for all ages
This is one of those amazing kids books that can be read on all different levels by people of all different ages. Is it the story of a bunch of spunky kids out to save their father? Or is it one big metaphysical metaphor?

When gawky Meg, "new" Charles Wallace, and popular Calvin O'Keefe get whisked off across the universe to rescue Meg and Charles Wallace's father, they have no idea that they are part of the greater battle between good and evil.

The amazing thing is that this book does not talk down to kids. It is chock full of graduate-level science, religion, and philosophy. Classical poets and thinkers are quoted without a second thought. A relatively obscure sonnet from Shakespeare serves as an important plot point. But although it challenges, it also rewards. It is never difficult to read or understand.

I have always thought that this book would be a great starting point for a discussion if read alongside Lois Lowry's "The Giver." Both are about dystopias where there is no such thing as individuality and privacy. How are the two worlds different, and how are they the same? "Aberations" are dealt with in surprisingly similar ways. What is the role of "love" in both books? What does Meg mean when she screams "Like and equal are not the same thing" and how does that relate to the snobiness that Jonah's "parents" show towards some professions?

Everyone over the age of 10 should read this book. Grown-ups should not consider it a "kids book," because it can be read on so many different levels. It is a classic, thought-provoking book that will be read again and again. ... Read more


6. Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book 1)
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786817070
Catlog: Book (2002-05-03)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 1135
Average Customer Review: 4.13 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Four cassettes, 6 hrs

Artemis Fowl is a one of the greatest criminal minds the world has ever seen. He is heir to the Fowl family empire&mdash;a centuries old clan of international underworld figures and con artists. He is arguably the most cunning Fowl of all. He is also twelve years old.

Artemis' interest in mythology and an obsession with the Internet leads him to discover proof of the existence of "The People"- otherwise known as fairies, sprites, leprechauns and trolls. He learns every fairy has a magical Book. If he can find the Book, it will lead him to "The People's" vast treasure of gold.
With his brutish sidekick, Butler, he sets his plans in motion. Artemis tricks a drunken old fairy woman into loaning him her Book, a tiny golden volume, for thirty minutes. He scans it with a digital camera and emails it to his Mac G6 computer. Back in his mansion in Ireland, he is the first human to decode the secrets of the fairies.

Artemis needs a leprechaun to help him with this plan. He and Butler hunt down Holly Short, a tough, female LEPrecon, part of a gung-ho Fairy commando unit, who is on a reconnaissance mission.
He kidnaps her, and a major battle begins. It's satyr against gnome, man against elf, and for the first time in his life, Artemis must decide what he values most.

For fans of J.R.R.Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, and Philip Pullman, Artemis Fowl is a high-tech fantasy, mixing faries, leprechauns, and computers, in a brilliant, thrilling story that is destined to become a cult favorite.
... Read more

Reviews (599)

4-0 out of 5 stars I raced through it!
This is a very fast-paced book indeed. There is something happening on every page so that you never get bored. I read 90% of this book in one sitting and the rest the next morning (I needed my sleep). There is no over-description or indulgence here. It's a story told quickly and smartly.

And I really cannot understand any of the negative reviews here. There are no REAL good guys or bad guys in this book. Everything is rather evenly balanced. So when people moan about Artemis Fowl being a nasty little boy and a villain and so on it really puzzles me. This book is written to be accessible to all ages, so when adults cannot get into the story it's a bit odd.

The plot twists, while intelligent and clever, are NOT hard to follow. You'll be almost oblivious to them practically if you turn the pages as quickly as I did. I like the idea of setting it in Ireland and a 12 year old boy as the lead makes it appealing to kids moreso. My fave character tho was Foaly, the gadget-fixated centaur. I worry tho that maybe the presence of so much super high-tech gadgetry might date the book badly in a few years to come. It's cool to see fairies using plasma screens and surveillance cameras but the original Star Trek series looks badly dated now in retrospect and I worry that the same thing might befall Artemis Fowl. It's a shame because this really ought to be a timeless book.

I'm certainly looking forward to the sequel. And if you like fantasy novels or intelligent fiction for all ages then quickly pick up a copy of Artemis Fowl. I got the hardback copy with the glittering sparkles all over the cover. And it looks way cool.

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting!
Contrary to some of the opinions that have been expressed, one of the things I liked most about the Artemis Fowl was the lead character himself, 12-year old Artemis. His ingenuity and brilliance combined with an appalling ruthlessness makes him one of the most fascinating characters I've read in a long time. Artemis is the sort of anti-hero you would despise in real life but root for in a story. In that sense, he reminds me of Carmen San Diego who proves to be just as big a challenge to her adversaries as Artemis is to the LEPrecon unit.

Also, I have to add that comparing Artemis Fowl to the Harry Potter series doesn't really help since the two books are different in so many aspects. First of all, Artemis is definitely NOT Harry. He may be young but he's far from innocent or well intentioned. And I really wouldn't recommend him as a role model for young kids. Secondly, while the Harry Potter series is about the battle between good and evil (to put it simply), Artemis Fowl's story is about a battle of wits between the humans and the fairies where each group tries to outsmart the other. No one side can be simply classified as good or evil (although some people out there would probably disagree and promptly classify Artemis in the latter category). There are many other differences between the two but so far the only thing in common I can find for both Artemis Fowl and Harry Potter is that they both belong to the fantasy genre which really doesn't provide much of a basis for comparison.

All in all, I'd say Artemis Fowl is a pretty good read. The story is inventive and interesting with an exciting pace and an intriguing lead character to match. While it's probably not the best reading material for young impressionable kids out there, I'd definitely recommend it to young adults and everyone else interested in fantasy and sci-fi.

5-0 out of 5 stars one of the best books ever
Artemis Fowl was fun and exciting. I couldn't put this book down. Who knew fairies could be so tricky, especially the LEP officers. These aren't your regular fairytale fairies. I was so enchanted by it that I immediately started book 2 in this series. I have to know what happens next!

5-0 out of 5 stars A magical and brilliant parody
People have been known to look for gold in the strangest of places. But the twelve-year-old Artemis Fowl, a brilliant criminal mastermind, decides to beat them all. Everyone knows that faeries possess a lot of gold, and they are exactly from whom Artemis wants to steal it away. But to accomplish his evil scheme the young master Fowl will have to learn the laws and rites of those long forgotten People. He has first to get a hold of one of their Magic Books. When one day his faithful servant Butler brings him a message from their sneaky contact Nguyen Xuan it seems that they finally found what they were looking for. And indeed, what better place is there to start their search from than Ireland, the land of Goblins and Faeries?

First of all an important message: stop comparing this book to Harry Potter! It is like comparing it with Shakespeare, just because it also is published on paper. If you cannot resist comparing it to any book, then take a book written by Terry Pratchett. Maybe Artemis Fowl is in a way more a parody of life than it is a fantasy novel.
But then again, Artemis Fowl is quite unique. Contrary to the older generation of adolescent novels, it treats its readers as a smart, intelligent audience. It is refreshing to see a story unfold where the difference between good and evil is not necessarily defined on the first pages.

Although the novel is action packed and can easily be classified as a page-turner, in the end the complexity of the story is not its biggest asset. Like most first novels in a series it pays more attention to getting the characters and settings in place than it is concerned about the storyline. Even more reasons, I would say, to run to the shop and buy its sequel - something I will definitely do, right now...

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect!
This is great! It seems the author is a mastermind too! ... Read more


7. Forest of the Pygmies
by Isabel Allende
list price: $19.99
our price: $13.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060761962
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: Rayo
Sales Rank: 578788
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Book Description

Alexander Cold knows all too well his grandmother Kate is never far from an adventure. When International Geographic commissions her to write an article about the first elephant-led safaris in Africa, they head -- with Nadia Santos and the magazine's photography crew -- to the blazing, red plains of Kenya. Days into the tour, a Catholic missionary approaches their camp in search of his companions who have mysteriously disappeared. Kate, Alexander, Nadia, and their team, agreeing to aid the rescue, enlist the help of a local pilot to lead them to the swampy forests of Ngoubé. There they discover a clan of Pygmies who unveil a harsh and surprising world of corruption, slavery, and poaching.

Alexander and Nadia, entrusting the magical strengths of Jaguar and Eagle, their totemic animal spirits, launch a spectacular and precarious struggle to restore freedom and return leadership to its rightful hands.

The final installment of Isabel Allende's celebrated trilogy of the journeys of Jaguar and Eagle soars with radiant settings, spirits, beings -- and the transformation of an extraordinary friendship.

... Read more

8. The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2)
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786817089
Catlog: Book (2003-05-06)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 1509
Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Artemis is at boarding school in Ireland when he suddenly receives an urgent video e-mail from Russia. In it is a plea from his father, who has been kidnapped by the Russian Mafiya. As Artemis rushes to his rescue, he is stopped by Captain Holly Short of the Leprecon fairy police. But this time, instead of battling the fairies, he is going to have to join forces with them if he wants to save one of the few people in the world he loves. ... Read more

Reviews (175)

5-0 out of 5 stars Artemis Fowl - Die Hard With Fairies
It's one of those things such as marmite, football and shopping. Artemis Fowl. You love it, or hate it. And I'm extremely glad to be able to count myself among those you love it.

I've read both books more than five times, and every night I sit and pray that the genius Eoin Colfer brings out a third. The characters all have so much character, even those mentioned just once, the descriptions are incredible and the flow of the words is easily the greatest use of the English language in the history of literature.

My favourite character? Artemis Fowl, of course. He's quick-witted, cool in the face of dangerous and viciously intelligent. But book two showed us the softer, most vunerable side of Artemis Fowl, as the boy he didn't ever truly have a chance to be.

The best bit in number two is when he emerges from the plasma in Koboi labs. What a scene. The movie has a good chance of living up to the superb quality of the book, but if it doesn't then I'll still be the biggest fan on Earth of Eoin Colfer.

Funny story. I've started to learn Russian, even since I first read book one, just because I love this book so much.

God bless Eoin Colfer. And God bless Artemis Fowl.

4-0 out of 5 stars terrific sequel, more mature hero
The great thing about the first Artemis Fowl novel was the idea that fairies, far from being pretty little things with gauzy wings are a secret race of technologically advanced beings living deep underground. Colfer tapped deep into Irish myth and came up with the idea that fairy gold was real - and a teenage master-criminal was going to get it.
Artemis is a great anti-hero, and when the new book begins he's running rings round the school shrink (whose ... psychology books he's naturally read and despised.) This is very funny, but what's better is that underneath the cockiness, Artemis is a boy with a messed-up family who really misses his Dad, who vanished in Russia. News comes that his father isn't dead but kidnapped by the Mafia, and the only way Artemis can get him out is to join forces with his arch-Nemesis, Holly SHort of the LEPRecon unit. Currently in disgrace, Holly has a few problems of her own...like putting down a goblin rebellion.
All the great comic characters such as Muclh Diggums, the disgusting dwarf who chomps his way through the earth, expelling it out his rear end (now pretending to be a reclusive Hollywood star) are back. It's fast and funny, and if Colfer's The WIsh List (published in the US as The Eternity Code) is more moving and thoughtful, well, kids will love that too.

5-0 out of 5 stars Double, Double Fowl and Trouble
I read the first book in the Artemis Fowl series last summer and sometimes wonder why it took me so long to read the second installment. Through the very first pages of "The Arctic Incident" I was instantly transported into Colfer's imaginative world, and underworld, peopled with fairies, goblins, and an evil boy genius, who seems to have matured. I was pleased to discover that the second book lived up to the impression that the first one made.

"The Arctic Incident" begins with a look at the young Artemis Fowl stuck in a dreadful boarding school, "killing off" counselor after counselor that tries to asses what is wrong with him. Meanwhile, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon police force has to deal with a smuggling problem that involves humans and the intelligence-challenged goblins. Believing Artemis to be the culprit, she kidnaps him and his mountain of a bodyguard Butler, to little avail. They are not the suppliers but they make a deal with Holly. They will help her discover who the smugglers are if she will help Artemis find his father, who is being held hostage in the Arctic Circle. Holly is not looking forward to helping Artemis after their encounter in Book One, but she has no other choice. Their journey to fulfill both of their missions is filled with tension and humor and further explores the inner-workings of these two fascinating characters.

Colfer has created an imaginative world that is peopled with rich and vivid characters, and witty asides to the reader. Artemis is a boy genius trying to surpress his evil ways in order to find his father and turn over a new leaf; his struggle is that of any teenager's angst. But the best characters are those who inhabit the lower elements; Foaly the centaur, Captain Short, Commander Root, and best of all, the returning Mulch Diggums, the thief dwarf. And while the Artemis Fowl books may be labeled as children's books, you don't have to be a child to enjoy the wry humor that Colfer dishes out.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bundle Up, Artemis!
Artemis Fowl, thirteen year old master criminal, runs away from his oppressive boarding school when he receives a cryptic message suggesting his father is still alive and being held for ransom by the Russian Mafiya. The fact that Artemis is so anxious to rescue his missing dad shows us that underneath his emotionally detached exterior, there's a lost boy wishing for a semblance of a normal family life. At the same time, Artemis's old enemies the elves have their own problems. There's evidence of human interference in their world and of course, Artemis is their prime suspect. For once Artemis is actually innocent, but he and elves join forces to defeat their mutual enemies. Again, elf Captain Holly Short is Artemis's spunky and self-reliant equal. Artemis is pinning a lot of hopes in his reuniting with his father, but this book suggests that Artemis may have already found his true family in his elf counterparts. They share with Artemis a quick wit and a savvy sense of technology. And they're marginalized in the same way Artemis's brilliance is unseen or misunderstood by the adult world. This is an absorbing second novel that shows us more of Artemis's complicated and intriguing character.

4-0 out of 5 stars Artemis on a Mission of Mercy
Artemis, the child genius criminal, is back in his second book. His mother has been restored to health (in the first book) and now he learns that his father might still be alive and a hostage of the Russian Mafiya.

Artemis puts his brains to work to rescue his father but is interrupted when he himself is kidnaped by Holly Short for interfering with Fairy business.

Well, Artemis is quickly cleared of the charges and a deal is struck. Artemis will help Holly track down who is really trafficking with the goblins in return for help rescuing his father. Sounds easy enough. But there are plenty of plot complications thrown into the mix before each side manages to square the deal.

This is quite a different book from the first one. When we were first introduced to Artemis, he was a criminal mastermind. But now we see a different side to him as he quests for his father, helps out the underground fairy population and experiences much of life that privilege has shielded from him. He is a much more likeable character now but possibly not as interesting. Still, the plot is tight and the action fast. Four-hundred pages flew by quite quickly. Not quite the same as the first, but I still recommend it. ... Read more


9. The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3)
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786814934
Catlog: Book (2004-05-01)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 2389
Average Customer Review: 4.57 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Ever the resourceful young criminal mastermind, Artemis has found a way to construct a supercomputer from stolen fairy technology.Called the "C Cube," it will render all existing human technology obsolete.Artemis then arranges a meeting with a Chicago businessman, Jon Spiro, to offer to suppress the Cube for one year in return for gold, his favorite substance.But the meeting is a trap, and Spiro steals the Cube and mortally injures Butler.Artemis knows his only hope to save Butler lies in fairy magic, so once again he is forced to contact his old rival, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon fairy police. Miraculously, Butler is healed, but there is a catch: he has aged fifteen years.Thus, Butler's infamously ditzy sister, Juliet, is called in as Artemis's bodyguard.Together, they travel to Chicago to steal back the Cube and ensure that Jon Spiro is put out of business-permanently. ... Read more

Reviews (149)

5-0 out of 5 stars Artemis Fowl The Eternity Code
Artemis Fowl, Eternity Code
By: Eoin Colfer
Reviewed By J. Poupongtong
Period: 6

"Artemis Fowl,The Eternity Code" is a great book for ages 10-13. It gets complicated at first, but then it starts to clear up. This book is about a thirteen year old boy who has a family record of criminals. His father has a serious injury that can only be healed by Holly Short, a lep officer. The lep is an underground organization that is made up entirely of fairy creatures. The healing that Holly Short performed changed his father's personality and made him care less about his stocks and more on his family. Artemis is changed by that and is about to go straight just after he pulls of his biggest crime yet. This crime started when a meeeting with Jon Spiro, an american industrialist and also head man of Fission Chips, a stock company that is only trailing Phonetix. They were arguing about the C-Cube, a micro computer that Artemis made out of stolen Lep circuits. This argument ended when Arno Blunt, Spiro's bodyguard, shot Butler, Artemis's bodyguard. Butler was in need of a healing and Artemis called Holly Short for the healing. The healing toook some life force from Butler, making him about 50 years old. Now the quest is on to get back the C-Cube, but Artemis will need backup. Aided by only Mulch Diggums, a dwarf, Holly Short, an elf, Butler, Butler's kid sister Juliet(who is also training to be a bodyguard), can Artemis get back the C-Cube?

I liked this book a lot. You can see that this is clearly an adventure book. But this is also a science fiction, comedy, and action book. So you can also see that this book has many genres. This book's dialog is also funny. When Artemis says that quote" I'm here because this odious little man threatened to crush my skull between his teeth" is one of the funniest and smartest jokes that I have heard in all the books that I have read thus far.

The dumbness of pex and chips, two bodyguards working for Blunt is also very humerous. When Chips said" Wanna know why they call me chips" and pulled out a bag of chips AND pex didn't know why chips was called chips was very funny. Also this books has a very high level of vocabulary. The system that I've read at Fission Chips is very advance. Also, the vault that keeps the cube has five diffrent defences. There are a weightsensitive, thumbprint, voice, and eye scans. Also they have live security in an air tight room.

My favorite part was when Holly was trying to subdue four goblins. Eoin Colfer making the goblins have the ability to know how to launch fireballs was very suspending. The lep have a wide variaty of weapons including a Nutrino 2000, a nonleathal handgun, and a camfoil, an invisability cloak. My least favorite part was when Butler almost died. That part was also very suspending. I'm waiting for the fourth book and if you read this book, I think that you would to.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fun brain Buster for kids
The Eternity Code is the best book out this year. Butler has made a C- cube out of fairy technology that was left over from the time that the fairies tried to raid the fowl mansion. It is at least 50 years before schedule in the technology industry and mafia man Jon Spiro has to have it. When Artemis has a meeting with Mr. Spiro he falls right into a trap. Even though Artemis gets out alive, Spiro's main man Blunt mortally and physically wounds his dear and close friend Butler. Artemis has to think on his toes to save Butler and save his C-cube. Artemis has deciphered a brilliant plan to storm Mr. Spiro's high tech research building but it requires a little bit of help. Artemis has recruited the notaries Mulch Diggins, Butlers little sister Juliet and Holly Short. This book is a great read for children and grown-ups alike. One of the best books of the year is out and about!

3-0 out of 5 stars Not as entertaining as 1 & 2
I see that Colfer has left himself a wee opening for an Artemis Fowl #4 and if there were one, I would read it. The Eternity Code's pacing is slower than books #1 and #2 but it's just as tight and almost just as entertaining. While on the one hand I was glad to see Butler make it through to the end, the book would have been stronger in many regards if he hadn't. I was also suprised to see Artemis' parents suddenly absent after they were Artemis' raison d'etra in books #1 and #2.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Dad, Bad Dad
In this third Artemis Fowl tale, Artemis gets into a jam when he tries to sell a tricked up piece of hardware cobbled together from technology he's filched from the fairy world. In an uncharacteristic lapse of judgment, he tries to sell it to Chicago Bad Guy Jon Spiro. Artemis's dad is back from the Artic, but he's changed. Artemis doesn't know what to make of this different dad, so maybe that's why he tries to go into business with Spiro. Spiro calls Artemis "Arty"-just like Artemis's dad does. Spiro is the bad old dad that Artemis was used to (and deeply misses). Spiro is also an omen of the kind of person Artemis will turn into if he doesn't change his ways.

As usual, the LEPricon police have to pop in and help Artemis save the day-but this time, they exact a price for their services. Their exasperation with Artemis is perfectly understandable. When will Artemis get the message that he can be his own worst enemy? Another engrossing Fowl book.

3-0 out of 5 stars Good, but not needed.
(...)

I thought the first book was great, I LOVED the second one, but this is probably the most disappointing. Not bad, but disappointing.

I really thought the second book pretty much wrapped up the series by itself. All the unfinished subplots were resolved, and it was satisfying to see Artemis 'redeem' himself and make peace with Holly and the Fairies, and find his father.

I was hoping that third novel would close up in an even trilogy. Eoin Colfer actually said that there would be three books, but its obvious he changed his ideas. (For one thing, he said the final two volumes would be called "Artemis Fowl Jr" and "Artemis Fowl the second", and that the third book would take place a day after the third, which did not happen, obviously) Instead, there are so many unresolved twists in this one, that there's bound to be more.

There are two plot twists that will probably hurt the series (or change it radically). (...)

The villain of this piece, Jon Spiro is not as nearly as interesting as Opal Kaboi was, or Artemis Fowl when he was a villain himself in the first book. His henchmen are hillarious, but thats about as far as it goes.

My thoughts about this book are really complicated, so it didn't get translated too well. Get the book, its still good, just not as good as the first two. ... Read more


10. The Chronicles of Narnia
by C. S. Lewis
list price: $29.99
our price: $17.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060598247
Catlog: Book (2004-11-01)
Publisher: HarperCollins
Sales Rank: 601
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Book Description

Journeys to the end of the world, fantastic creatures, and epic battles between good and evil -- what more could any reader ask for in one book? The book that has it all is the lion, the witch and the wardrobe, written in 1949 by C. S. Lewis. But Lewis did not stop there. Six more books followed, and together they became known as The Chronicles of Narnia.

For the past fifty years, The Chronicles of Narnia have transcended the fantasy genre to become part of the canon of classic literature. Each of the seven books is a masterpiece, drawing the reader into a world where magic meets reality, and the result is a fictional world whose scope has fascinated generations.

This edition presents all seven books -- unabridged -- in one impressive volume. The books are presented here according to Lewis's preferred order, each chapter graced with an illustration by the original artist, Pauline Baynes. This edition also contains C. S. Lewis's essay "On Three Ways of Writing for Children," in which he explains precisely how the magic of Narnia and the realm of fantasy appeal not only to children but to discerning readers of all ages. Deceptively simple and direct, The Chronicles of Narnia continue to captivate fans with adventures, characters, and truths that speak to all readers, even fifty years after the books were first published.

... Read more

11. Stravaganza: City of Flowers (Stravaganza)
by Mary Hoffman
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.21
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Asin: 1582348871
Catlog: Book (2005-05-13)
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Children's Books
Sales Rank: 6497
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12. The Hobbit (Leatherette Collector's Edition)
by J. R. R. Tolkien
list price: $35.00
our price: $22.05
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0395177111
Catlog: Book (1973-10-24)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company
Sales Rank: 412
Average Customer Review: 4.59 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

This deluxe collector's edition of Tolkien's modern classic is boxed and bound in green leatherette with gold and red foil rune stamping on the spine and cover. The text pages are printed in black with green accents. It includes five full page illustrations in full color and many more in two color in addition to Thror's map -- all prepared by the author. J.R.R. Tolkien's own description for the original edition: "If you care for journeys there and back, out of the comfortable Western world, over the edge of the Wild, and home again, and can take an interest in a humble hero (blessed with a little wisdom and a little courage and considerable good luck), here is a record of such a journey and such a traveler. The period is the ancient time between the age of Faerie and the dominion of men, when the famous forest of Mirkwood was still standing, and the mountains were full of danger. In following the path of this humble adventurer, you will learn by the way (as he did) -- if you do not already know all about these things -- much about trolls, goblins, dwarves, and elves, and get some glimpses into the history and politics of a neglected but important period. For Mr. Bilbo Baggins visited various notable persons; conversed with the dragon, Smaug the Magnificent; and was present, rather unwillingly, at the Battle of the Five Armies. This is all the more remarkable, since he was a hobbit. Hobbits have hitherto been passed over in history and legend, perhaps because they as a rule preferred comfort to excitement. But this account, based on his personal memoirs, of the one exciting year in the otherwise quiet life of Mr. Baggins will give you a fair idea of the estimable people now (it is said) becoming rather rare. They do not like noise." ... Read more

Reviews (1341)

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book ever written published in a beautiful format
Tolkien's Hobbit takes the imagination on a wonderful flight of fantasy. I read this book on a yearly basis and each year I am delighted and captivated by the world of Bilbo Baggins. Bilbo is a reluctant member of an adventure that will forever change his life and the lives of those around him. He accompanies 13 dwarves on a mission to reclaim the gold and mountain kingdom of their ancestors from the dragon, Smaug. They have many adventures and mishaps on their journey to the lonely mountain including the climactic battle of five armies. Bilbo finds a magic ring along the way which leads, not only to a rise in his stature, but also to a new adventure for his friends in "The Lord of the Rings." Tolkien is a master storyteller and the depth of his skill is best seen in this tale. In the following trilogy, "The Lord of the Rings" the story is continued, but the sheer delight of "The Hobbit" is never fully recaptured. This collector's edition is beautifully bound. Even more enjoyable are the illustrations and paintings by the author himself.

5-0 out of 5 stars Read it at least once per year!
Tolkien's Hobbit takes the imagination on a wonderful flight of fantasy. I read this book on a yearly basis and each year I am delighted and captivated by the world of Bilbo Baggins.

Bilbo is a reluctant member of an adventure that will forever change his life and the lives of those around him. He accompanies 13 dwarves on a mission to reclaim the gold and mountain kingdom of their ancestors from the dragon, Smaug. They have many adventures and mishaps on their journey to the lonely mountain including the climactic battle of five armies. Bilbo finds a magic ring along the way which leads, not only to a rise in his stature, but also to a new adventure for his friends in "The Lord of the Rings."

Tolkien is a master storyteller and the depth of his skill is best seen in this tale. In the following trilogy, "The Lord of the Rings" the story is continued, but the sheer delight of "The Hobbit" is never fully recaptured. This collector's edition is beautifully bound. Even more enjoyable are the illustrations and paintings by the author himself.

5-0 out of 5 stars Very Pleased!
I knew when I ordered the book that it was hard back, but when I opened the box and there was this beautiful green box with a very beautiful green book inside with a picture and the gold writing around the edge I was very pleased. It was much more than I was expecting. There are pictures inside that are illistrated by the author. This book has most definatly lived up to "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" legacy. It is truly a beautiful book!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit
This is one of the best books ever written! Prof. Tolkein is one of the most brilliant writers this wold has ever seen! Now a lot more people now about his works!! Thank You Peter Jackson!!!!!

Boys aren't the only ones who like LOTR!!!!! Some girls like it too!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Hobbit (Leatherette Collector's Edition)
Another masterpiece of Tolkien! A Classic that i would ask my children to read... Nothing compares to what Tolkien has accomplished.. Even in death he speaks to us through the pages of his work... ... Read more


13. The Golem's Eye (Bartimaeus Trilogy, Book 2)
by Jonathan Stroud
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.21
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786818603
Catlog: Book (2004-09-01)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 176
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Amazon.com

Due to the success of his first campaign involving theAmulet of Samarkand,Nathaniel, now fourteen, has been appointed the youngest representative ever to the Office of Internal Affairs, and has been devising traps to capture members of the Resistance--a secretive group of commoners who are determined to undermine the ruling class of magicians. When a magic-sapping Golem’s surprise first attack is labeled an act of Resistance terrorism, Nathaniel reluctantly summons Bartimaeus for help. Meanwhile, a zealous young member of the Resistance, Kitty Jones, is planning to rob the sacred tomb of the great magician Gladstone, and turn the power of his buried magical instruments against the spell makers. The towering clay Golem and its shadowy master unites the destinies of Nathaniel, Bartimaeus, and Kitty together in one fateful night--unfortunately, that night is much too slow in coming. Stroud’s second book is far too long and gloomy, focusing more on the priggish Nathaniel and wronged Kitty than the dijinni readers have come to adore. Fans of Jonathan Stroud’s breakout hit, The Amulet of Samarkand, may be a little disappointed to discover that Bartimaeus features so little his second book. While Stroud cleverly uses the class war between the ruling magicians and the disgruntled commoners as a metaphor for current political and social clashes, the text suffers overall from a lack of the dijinni’s famous facetious footnotes. Avid fans are left skimming the slow parts and hoping that when Bartimaeus escapes his servile bonds he will be given more space to make them laugh. --Jennifer Hubert ... Read more


14. The Artemis Fowl Files (Artemis Fowl)
by Eoin Colfer
list price: $12.95
our price: $9.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786856394
Catlog: Book (2004-10-13)
Publisher: Miramax
Sales Rank: 568
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15. The House of the Scorpion
by Nancy Farmer
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689852231
Catlog: Book (2004-05-01)
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Sales Rank: 6005
Average Customer Review: 4.87 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Matteo Alacrán was not born; he was harvested. His DNA came from El Patrón, lord of a country called Opium -- a strip of poppy fields lying between the United States and what was once called Mexico. Matt's first cell split and divided inside a petri dish. Then he was placed in the womb of a cow, where he continued the miraculous journey from embryo to fetus to baby. He is a boy now, but most consider him a monster -- except for El Patrón. El Patrón loves Matt as he loves himself, because Matt is himself.

As Matt struggles to understand his existence, he is threatened by a sinister cast of characters, including El Patrón's power-hungry family, and he is surrounded by a dangerous army of bodyguards. Escape is the only chance Matt has to survive. But escape from the Alacr n Estate is no guarantee of freedom, because Matt is marked by his difference in ways he doesn't even suspect. ... Read more

Reviews (86)

5-0 out of 5 stars A good intro to sci-fi for those not fans of it
As a college student and future teacher, I was enrolled this past semester in a children's literature course. As required reading,we had two books from each genre. I have never liked science fiction and was a little discouraged to see my book was near 400 pages! It was difficult to find at the library, so I thought about buying it. I didn't though,because I didn't think I'd like it. I just finished it about an hour ago. I couldn't put it down! It wasn't only becase it was due today either! Nancy Farmer did a great job of making you care about the characters. The main character of the book is Matt. You see his struggle to live a sub-human life as a clone. After he meets his genetic "parent" El Patron, he begins to receive better treatment. Read this book if you want to find out what happens to Matt as El Patron has a need for him and what happens to the Opium Empire, which is between Aztlan (future Mexico) and the U.S. At times I was a little frustrated that I did not know Spanish, not knowing how some words and names were pronounced, but Nancy translates these phrases. I am considering buying this book and will recommend it an upper grade class if I am an upper grade teacher. Maybe this would be a good read aloud.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderous and Exciting!
The House of the Scorpion is what you would call a book 'beyond its time'. Not only is the setting a century from now, but the sensation of feeling as if you were in a time warp flying through the future (well not quite as expressive as the Jetsons') is accompanied with reading the book itself. Nancy Farmer gives the life story of a young 'boy' who is actually a clone of a 140+ year old drug lord named Matteo Alacran, (or El Patron as he is more locally called throughout the book) ruler of the country of Opium (an area within 'former' Mexico and the US). Of course, the clone is also given the same name as well (Matt). In the beginning, Matt was grown within a cow (yes cow) from DNA given from El Patron. Despite his old age, El Patron creates his clones as a way to help him live on through the use of a clone's organs once his own grow bad. However, clones usually have their brains destroyed so any form of rebellion would be prevented. As for El Patron, he does exactly the opposite. Instead, he gives his clones the lap of luxury to give them confidence until it's too late.
As a young boy, Matt is shielded from the outside world from his caretaker Celia, cook of El Patron's mansion. As time progresses, Matt is later discovered and winds up in the Big House (El Patron's house). From here on Matt begins his long journey of self discovery to find out who and what he really is. However, no journey goes without obstacles. Tom, a son of a US senator's wife (ok the wife cheated a little), terrorizes Matt's life by doing whatever possible to make his life a nighmare. Likewise, the entire estate of the Alacran's segregate Matt from itself for what Matt is. On the other hand, Maria, daughter of the US senator (no cheating this time) ends up being Matt's secret crush, that is despite some difficulties in the beginning. Tam Lin is another of Matt's favorites. Originally being a 'terrorist', he is one of El Patron's top bodyguards and becomes Matt's as well. Tam Lin teaches Matt of nature and survival as he (Matt) soon learns these techniques and lessons would come to great use in the near future (You'll have to read why...hey I can't tell everything :)]. Secret passages, hospitals, exploration, captivity, love, self-discovery, and an all out war of mind over body plus much more is what one would find in this guaranteed Farmer classic: The House of the Scorpion.

Other info:
Reading Level: Middle School +
Recommendations: Great for school reports and projects or just for fun!
Overall: Guaranteed to send shivers down the spine and tears in the end! Will keep you begging for more!

5-0 out of 5 stars Adam's Review
The authors purpose for writing this novel was to give the reader suspense and mystery. One example is when Matt, the main character, is framed for killing his friends dog when he didn't. He then must prove his innocents to a crowd of prejudice people. It is suspenceful when one of Matt's best friend's, Tam Lin, pretends to become evil in order to help save Matt.I think the author definitely achieved her two goals of being suspenseful and providing mystery. This book was brilliantly written.

5-0 out of 5 stars All I can say is wow.
After reading this book over and over again and not getting the least bit bored, I realized that this was my favorite book ever. The sad thing is, I don't even own it. Once again...all hail Nancy Farmer.

Books I reccomend:
The Ear The Eye and The Arm
Halo: The Fall of Reach

VISIT NFSUCLAN.CJB.NET!

5-0 out of 5 stars I found that this was the greatest book ever.
I loved this book. I found it clever, funny, and filled with action. It also related to my life a lot, because sometimes I am treated with not much respect. I've read this book 7 times and still haven't gotten bored with it...all hail Nancy Farmer, once again. (...) ... Read more


16. The Dark Is Rising Sequence: Silver on the Tree/The Grey King/Greenwitch/The Dark Is Rising/Over Sea, Under Stone
by Susan Cooper
list price: $24.95
our price: $16.47
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0020425651
Catlog: Book (1993-10-31)
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Sales Rank: 1243
Average Customer Review: 4.79 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Joined by destiny, the lives of the Drew children, Will Stanton, and aboy named Bran weave together in an exquisite, sometimes terrifying tapestry ofmystery and quests. In the five-title series of novels known as The Dark IsRising Sequence, these children pit the power of good against the evil forces ofDark in a timeless and dangerous battle that includes crystal swords, goldengrails, and a silver-eyed dog that can see the wind. Susan Cooper's highlyacclaimed fantasy novels, steeped in Celtic and Welsh legends, have won numerousawards, including the Newbery Medal and the Newbery Honor. Now all fivepaperback volumes have been collected in one smart boxed set. These classicfantasies, complex and multifaceted, should not be missed, by child or adult.The set includes Over Sea, UnderStone, The Dark IsRising, Greenwitch, The Grey King, and Silver on the Tree. (Ages 9 andolder) --Emilie Coulter ... Read more

Reviews (163)

5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent fantasy series that is HIGHLY underrated
I first stumbled upon Susan Cooper's THE DARK IS RISING sequence when I was in sixth grade. I was required to read a Newberry Award-winning book and do a report, and the cover of THE GREY KING looked kind of cool, so I gave it a shot. Fifteen years later I still can't believe I haven't heard more about this series.

C.S. Lewis set the standard for children's fantasy literature with THE NARNIA CHRONICLES, and Susan Cooper has equaled Lewis' accomplishment in these books. In some ways, the stories are much better because Cooper's target audience is a bit older, wiser, and more mature. Evil characters are not always obvious in Cooper's world, nor are they always super-intelligent. Cooper weaves elements of Arthurian legend and Welsh mythology into modern day England in a way that tends to swallow the reader whole. Even as an adult I find these books rich and enjoyable; it is easy to forget that one is reading 'children's literature'.

Fans of THE NARNIA CHRONICLES or HARRY POTTER will find that THE DARK IS RISING is another series readers will enjoy no matter what their age may be. My one caveat would be to parents of young children: there are scenes in these stories that may not be appropriate for children under the age of 10 or so. As always, be aware of what your children are reading. Once your children have reached an appropriate age, however, I would highly recommend THE DARK IS RISING for both you and your children!

4-0 out of 5 stars Strong series
I re-read this series recently, wondering if it would still seem as good as it did when I was a child. And the answer is, it doesn't. But it still has a great deal to offer.
The five books are set in Britain, not tied particularly closely to any decade within the twentieth century. They are all quest stories, with the child heroes seeking various magical artefacts to help the Light in its struggle against the Dark.
"Over Sea, Under Stone" introduces Simon, Jane and Barney Drew, following a mysterious manuscript in search of a golden grail. This adventure takes place during the summer holidays in Cornwall, and introduces their enigmatic Great-Uncle Merriman.
"The Dark is Rising" is the story of Will Stanton, who comes into his power as an Old One, a champion of the Light, on his eleventh birthday. Assisted by Merriman, he is destined to find the Six Signs.
"Greenwitch" unites the Drews, Will and Merriman in Cornwall as they hunt for a second manuscript, lost in the hunt for the grail. But can they win out over the power of the Greenwitch?
"The Grey King" sends Will to Wales in search of the golden harp that is needed to wake the Sleepers, warriors of the Light. He meets Bran, a lonely and troubled boy, who proves to be surprisingly important in his search and the struggle against the Dark.
"Silver on the Tree" reunites all the characters as they search for the crystal sword, the last necessary artefact, and travel to the final confrontation with the Dark.
There's a great deal to like in these books. Cooper pitches the writing at a suitably adult level so that, while not too difficult for children, they never feel twee or condescending. They are suitably atmospheric, with the settings brought alive by good descriptive writing and a healthy injection of Celtic mythology. Many of the characters are interesting and likeable; Will is the stand-out in this regard. The two "Will" books, "The Dark is Rising" and "The Grey King" are the best of the series. There is more action and a greater sense of risk and tension in these books.
So why has my regard for this series dropped over the years? There are two reasons. The first is that, reading as an adult, I don't find the books all that well-grounded in their mythological territory. Tolkien wrote stories set in a world that feels real. Cooper's ideas of magic, Light and Dark, heroes and villains, are very thin by comparison. As a consequence, to me there is little sense of what is truly at stake in what is supposed to be an all-time epic struggle, little sense of real risk; and all too often there are deus ex machina solutions as the magical heroes suddenly "know", without explanation, just what they need to do to win out.
The second reason is "Silver on the Tree". I found this a weak end to the saga, with too many deus ex machina solutions and too many vitally important plot points coming out of nowhere (Mrs Rowlands being one, Bran's love for his human father another). Much of the book seemed pointless filler. The final confrontation lacked power (both with regard to Cooper's writing and in plot terms) and seemed all too easy.
However, these caveats are things that may seem far less important to younger readers - I know they didn't bother me the first time I read this series. And the series as a whole is certainly well-crafted, exciting and enjoyable.

5-0 out of 5 stars Still one of the Best
It's great to start to see Susan Cooper around the place again. With all of the Potter hype and the renewed interest in the wonderful Diana Wynne Jones, Susan Cooper deserves some time in the limelight for the outstanding Dark is Rising sequence. She's steeped in anglo-saxon mythology in much the same way as Alan Garner, but has created a much warmer and more accessible world than Garner.

The first book in the sequence was clearly originally written as a stand-alone book, but I would guess it planted seeds of ideas which took a decade to germinate when she picked up the story again. After the long gap, the next four books came quite thick and fast (coinciding with my childhood) and the writing of them is dynamic and exciting. The characters are fantastic, with the Merlin figure Merry being one of the most endearing attempts to create that arch-sorcerer. They are great fun from start to finish and are as intelligent, fresh and fantastic as when I first read them nearly thirty years ago (ouch!).

5-0 out of 5 stars The Dark is Rising Sequence
For all fans of Harry Potter the Dark is Rising books would also be a great book sequence. It includes magic, fantasy, and many other things. I cannot stop thinking about them! Susan Cooper uses such good descriptions that you actually feel as if you were there. This is a great sequence I can't get Merriaman, Lyon, Will Stanton, Jane, Simon, and Barney Drew, the lady, the Grey King, and all the others out of my head. You would reaaly enjoy these books. They are great books. (...)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Dark Is Rising
The Dark is rising sequence - I first discovered this book in sixth grade in a friend's house. It was the hardcover edition and the pictures were interesting so I read it. Later on, I bought these books right here.
The books are about the Light and the Dark. One of the main reasons I thought this book was excellent was that they weren't just for young people. The characters were highly understandable and the language wasn't just one of those easy-to-read ones. Personally, I like 'The Dark Is Rising,' 'The Grey King,' and 'Silver On the Tree' better than others. Books taking place in Cornwall was kind of vague and not adventurous.
All in all, I highly recommend this book to fantasy lovers of all ages. ... Read more


17. Queen of the Slayers (Buffy The Vampire Slayer)
by Nancy Holder
list price: $9.99
our price: $8.99
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Asin: 1416902414
Catlog: Book (2005-06-01)
Publisher: Simon Spotlight Entertainment
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18. Messenger
by Lois Lowry
list price: $16.00
our price: $10.88
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Asin: 0618404414
Catlog: Book (2004-04-26)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books
Sales Rank: 1493
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Strange changes are taking place in Village. Once a utopian community that prided itself on its welcome to new strangers, Village will soon be closed to all outsiders. As one of the few people able to travel through the dangerous Forest, Matty must deliver the message of Village"s closing and try to convince Seer"s daughter to return with him before it"s too late. But Forest has become hostile to Matty as well, and he must risk everything to fight his way through it, armed only with an emerging power he cannot yet explain or understand. ... Read more

Reviews (22)

4-0 out of 5 stars You fill in the blanks
I did not like this book as much as the first two in the series. However, art is not always supposed to cheer us up. I think that Lowry is the kind of author who really wants the reader to become the storyteller and fill in the blanks. There is no neat package at the end, even in the book which is the third of the trilogy. Matty's true name communicates what I believe to be Lowry's central message. I don't want to spoil the end, so I won't reveal his true name, but the following quote is similarly revealing, and my favorite of the book. "So you could meet in the middle with your gifts? It wouldn't be so hard if you only went half way. If you met." Despite the abrupt ending, Messenger is a must read for those who have read The Giver and Gathering Blue.

5-0 out of 5 stars matty is not dead
first time i read the Giver, i was hooked and so i read the Gathering blue and Messenger. i finished reading it not 15 minutes ago and i have to say something. otherwise, i will not be in peace.

i love lois lowry style, she makes me think of what my real name might be.

anyway, there are questions after i read the messenger and not to mention upset about it, but when i think of it, i realize, there goes lois lowry's style again.

we know that everytime Leader, kira and matty use their gifts, they will always tired and fall asleep.matty, since we know that he is a healer,( though doesnt know realize much the extend of his power since he discovered just recently), healed a frog and dogs. and if you are talking of healing the forest and the village, it's gonna be huge. so, matty is gonna sleep for maybe 3-4 days.. in his mind, he drifted overhead before, looking down on a struggling boy leading a crippled girl, so after a tremendous work of healing, he is drifting again. to let go in peace meaning his work is done and he has to rest. i dont think it's a self-destructing gift. village needs him as a healer. and in the distance the sound of keening began.why, they wont even reach the village for a couple of days and Village doesnt know what happen to Leader, Kira and Matty yet(they dont have the gift of seeing beyond). i guess the keening is for Ramon's sister.

it's a good book. im planning to read the other books by lois lowry. she has become my favorite author.

3-0 out of 5 stars Unanswered questions left me wanting more
If you're anything like me, The Giver was a powerful and thought-provoking book. I was looking forward to some suspense of the same intensity, but closure as well. I had enjoyed the change of pace with Gathering Blue and was intrigued to see how the two stories would be tied together. Overall, the book was just too short. Characters were not developed as fully and the connection between the two worlds seemed almost trivialized. By the end if you missed even one word, nothing made sense.

The last chapter was a frenzy and the ending was too much of a "quick-fix" for a group of books that dealt with very heavy issues. I did like the portrayal of the Village and the interesting change in people who forgot their past and the kindness others had shown them. It would be a good tie in with immigration stories.

However, I just wanted more, more answers, more explanation. What was Jonas like now besides his job description? He seemed to walk around in an overly wise daze. What had happened to his town? All in all, I would say stick to The Giver for classroom use. Gathering Blue and Messenger have good issues to address as well, but The Giver does so with the most clarity and excellence in writing.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great....
I was excited to find out what happened to the characters in both the Giver and Gathering Blue. I was surprised to find out the lives of some of the characters. I was upset that the ending ended like the other two. I had hoped that this book would finally tie up all of the loose ends completly. I guess Lowry is going to have to write yet another stellar book!

3-0 out of 5 stars A Connection Between Two Worlds
While this book isn't exactly your typical fairy tale, if you like magical stories, you'll like this book. Have you read The Giver and Gathering Blue? If not, you should definitely read these books before you read Messenger. Lois Lowry connects these two books in Messenger.
In Messenger the main character's name is Matty. Matty is the only one who can travel through Forest without being killed, so he takes messages to outside villages. He hopes that when he gets his real name he will be Messenger. At the beginning of this book Matty's friend Ramon gets a "Gaming Machine" that his family traded for at Trade Mart. Then, some of the people of Village, who used to be very welcoming to new people in their village, want to close Village to all outsiders. A meeting is called to decide whether Village will be closed or not. Soon, some "new ones" come to Village. They are welcomed as usual, but a small group of people protest. The schoolteacher, who used to be very welcoming to "new ones," leads them. The people of Village are given names based on what they do. For example, Seer, the man Matty lives with that is blind; Leader; and Mentor, the schoolteacher. Matty discovers he has a power to heal things. He saves a frog, a dog, and a puppy from dying. Then, Matty decides he wants to go and see what Trade Mart is like. When Matty is there, he notices odd procedures. He also notices changes in behavior of people who have traded. You can hear what each person is trading for but not what the person is trading for it. One change in behavior is when one woman whose husband walks slowly, yells at her husband to hurry up which she has never done before. Next, Jean, Mentor's daughter, gives Matty her puppy, which Leader names Frolic. Frolic goes everywhere with Matty. Matty goes to the meeting that will decide whether Village will stay open to outsiders anymore or not. The decision ends up being that Village will close, although Matty is opposed to this. He is sent to post the message that Village is closing. He also agrees to bring Seer's daughter, Kira, back to Village before it closes. Before he leaves, he is told not to spend his gift and has to resist the urge to use it when he sees Ramon is sick. On the way through Forest, it is a little more challenging than usual. Matty learns about Kira's power to see the future. When Matty takes Kira back through the Forest, they face many unusual challenges. Some of these are burning sap and poking branches. Leader goes after Matty and Kira because he can see beyond and tell that they are in trouble. To save the world, using his power to heal, Matty has to make some major sacrifices.
I give this book three out of five stars. This is because it was disappointing compared to The Giver and Gathering Blue. This book has a slow start. It takes a while to get to the action. The book doesn't grab you in right away. Some things that were good about this book are that is was really interesting when you would find a connection to either The Giver or Gathering Blue. One example is that Matty was the mischievous little boy that Kira was friends with. The characters of this book are interesting. For example, it is interesting to see how Matty changes. He used to call himself "the fiercest of the fierce." Now, Matty doesn't do that. You also get into this book later.
Matty is a brave boy. He is proud that he is the only one who can go into Forest. It is unique that he can go through Forest. He is eager to get his real name, and he wants it to be Messenger. Matty was happy with his life until things began to change. The nice people and things of Village turned bad. In this book, Matty discovers that he has a power. His power is that he can heal things that are hurt or dying. He healed a frog whose leg was bitten almost all the way off. He also healed a sick puppy and its mother. This is something that is unique to him.
A key scene in this novel is at the very end, when Matty saves the world. Matty is almost dying because Forest turned bad and is hurting them with things like burning sap. Leader, using his power to see beyond, and Kira, using her power to see ahead, meet. Leader tells Kira that they need Matty's power, now. Matty doesn't think there is any way that he has enough energy to use his power, but he turns over and puts his hands on the ground. He feels his power going out of him. Everything is better. Forest isn't evil anymore, Mentor is back to his old ways of reading poetry and being welcoming, and Ramon is no longer sick. Matty sees all of these things changing. He drifts out of his body. He watches himself giving all his energy to the world.
This scene was a really good way to end the book. This is because it just resolves everything in a nice way. Things are a little more normal back in Village and the people have stopped trying to close Village.
In conclusion, I somewhat recommend this book. If you like magic or you like to discover little connections and other interesting things, this is a great book for you. I would recommend that before you read this book, you should read The Giver and Gathering Blue. ... Read more


19. The Sea of Trolls
by Nancy Farmer
list price: $17.95
our price: $12.56
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0689867441
Catlog: Book (2004-09-01)
Publisher: Atheneum/Richard Jackson Books
Sales Rank: 248
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Amazon.com

Three time Newbery honor author Nancy Farmer's epic fantasy, The Sea of Trolls, is gigantic in every way. There are big Vikings and bigger trolls. There are big themes--hope, despair, life and death. At a substantial 450+ pages, the sheer size of this hefty tome is impressive. But, like all of Farmer's fine work, the large scale has room for enormous quantities of heart and humor. At the center of this massive adventure is a small Saxon boy named Jack, who's never been much good at anything until the Bard of his medieval village makes him an apprentice. Then, just as Jack is learning to tap into and control his power, he is kidnapped (along with his little sister, Lucy) and taken to the court of King Ivar the Boneless and his half troll queen Frith. When one of Jack's amateur spells causes the evil queen's beautiful hair to fall out, he is forced to undertake a dangerous quest across the Sea of Trolls to make things right, or suffer the consequences--the sacrifice of his beloved sister to Frith's patron goddess, Freya. Along the way Jack faces everything from giant golden troll-bears to man-eating spiders, yet each frightening encounter brings wisdom and understanding to the budding young Bard. No quester who enters these pages with Jack will go away unsatisfied. Farmer's skillful melding of history, mythology, and humor, is reminiscent of both Tamora Pierce and Terry Pratchett's medieval fantasies, and will no doubt be HUGELY enjoyed by fantasy readers of all ages. --Jennifer Hubert ... Read more


20. The Guide to the Territories of Halla (Pendragon)
by D.J. MacHale
list price: $7.99
our price: $7.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1416900144
Catlog: Book (2005-05-01)
Publisher: Aladdin
Sales Rank: 70974
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