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$18.95 $0.86
181. Antarctica
$5.95
182. Lichens of Antarctica and South
list($19.95)
183. Antarctica:On the Frozen Sea
$5.95
184. Frederick Cook and the forgotten
$17.95 $3.99
185. Beyond Cape Horn: Travels in the
$5.95
186. Protecting Antarctica: as part
$30.95 $26.92
187. The Sea Shall Embrace Them: The
$30.00 $17.95
188. Under Polaris: An Arctic Quest
list($59.95)
189. My Arctic Journey: A Year Among
list($14.95)
190. Above the Circle
191. Antarctic Odyssey: In the Footsteps
$49.95 $38.94
192. To the top of the continent: Discovery,
193. Audubon Western bird guide; land,
$5.95
194. Ladies, the gwich'in, and the
list($4.99)
195. White Bear : Encounters with the
196. Antarctica; land of frozen time
$29.95 $2.81
197. Ring of Ice: True Tales of Adventure,
$5.95
198. Leader guides Western Arctic:
199. North to the Orient
$14.93 list($21.95)
200. Voyage To The End Of The World:

181. Antarctica
by Charles Neider
list price: $18.95
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Asin: 0815410239
Catlog: Book (2000-03)
Publisher: Cooper Square Publishers
Sales Rank: 1128795
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Antarctica is a fascinating collection of vivid accounts from the journals of fourteen explorers. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars FASCINATING
This is a fascinating compliation of true stories about some of the bravest people ever! Their stories of death, suffering and discovery in THE final frontier of our planet are absolutely riveting! If you "get" why they did it, you'll treasure this book. Even if you don't understand their reasons for having to explore Antarctica, you'll still be i for a great read and find a special respect for these true warriors. ... Read more


182. Lichens of Antarctica and South Georgia: A Guide to their Identification and Ecology. (Reviews). (book review) : An article from: Arctic
by Irwin M. Brodo
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Asin: B0009FMD4C
Catlog: Book
Manufacturer: Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary
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Book Description

This digital document is an article from Arctic, published by Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary on June 1, 2002. The length of the article is 1041 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Lichens of Antarctica and South Georgia: A Guide to their Identification and Ecology. (Reviews). (book review)
Author: Irwin M. Brodo
Publication: Arctic (Refereed)
Date: June 1, 2002
Publisher: Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary
Volume: 55Issue: 2Page: 199(2)

Article Type: Book Review

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183. Antarctica:On the Frozen Sea
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Asin: 0792256050
Catlog: Video
Sales Rank: 97475
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184. Frederick Cook and the forgotten Pole. (Info North).(Robert E. Peary credited with being first to reach North Pole) : An article from: Arctic
by Randall J. Osczevski
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Asin: B0008DS1PK
Catlog: Book
Manufacturer: Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary
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Book Description

This digital document is an article from Arctic, published by Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary on June 1, 2003. The length of the article is 5267 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Frederick Cook and the forgotten Pole. (Info North).(Robert E. Peary credited with being first to reach North Pole)
Author: Randall J. Osczevski
Publication: Arctic (Refereed)
Date: June 1, 2003
Publisher: Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary
Volume: 56Issue: 2Page: 207(9)

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185. Beyond Cape Horn: Travels in the Antarctic
by Charles Neider
list price: $17.95
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Asin: 0815412355
Catlog: Book (2002-09-01)
Publisher: Cooper Square Publishers
Sales Rank: 671198
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

Author and explorer Neider writes about his third trip to Antarctica, telling of the beauty of the desolate land, its history, and the current ecological debates surrounding it. ... Read more

Reviews (2)

4-0 out of 5 stars like an enthusiastic hobbyist
Once past the alarmingly dull first chapter - a detailed treatise on Antarctic law which combines the style of a superannuated college professor with that of an assiduous low-level bureaucrat - "Beyond Cape Horn" settles into an enjoyable though disjointed read.
Neider's book is a happy democracy in which all facts are equal and each anecdote merits the same amount of space and generous allotment of adjectives. He does not sift the wheat from the chaff, prioritize, or even impose much order. An account of Shackleton's Endurance expedition, a vivid depiction of life aboard an icebreaker and interviews with members of the Scott and Byrd expeditions jostle for space amid a list of condiments available in the base mess hall, a biographical paragraph or three on every explorer who ever ventured near the Antarctic regions, and a meditation on the life of Rachel the Husky. (We also get a blow-by blow description of the men butchering a seal for Rachel.)
There is something endearing in this. Neider is like an enthusiastic hobbyist, full of information and bursting to tell us all about it. He draws us in, whether he is watching killer whales at play, examining gorgeously-colored caverns of glacial ice, or musing on the moral probity of a helicopter crew filming a penguin "in a panic which [they themselves] have caused."
And it is hard to dislike a writer who refuses to take sea-sickness pills because Darwin had none on the Beagle.

5-0 out of 5 stars A vivid and memorable account
Beyond Cape Horn: Travels In The Antarctic is a personal experienced based account of the wonders of Antarctica's landmass and the ocean surrounding it. Written by the late scholar and three-time Antarctic explorer Charles Neider (1915-2001), Beyond Cape Horn is drawn from his third navigation in 1977 of the Antarctic seas on a mission to observe the habitat of the Southern Ocean as it was changing in response to increasing commercial activity. Neider surveys the land, the water currents, the natural life that flourishes in spite of the cold and otherwise inhospitable climate. A vivid and memorable account which is enhanced by extensive interviews with Antarctic explorers such as Sir Charles Wright, Laurence Gould, and Sir Vivan Fuchs (the first man to cross Antarctica's landmass), Beyond Cape Horn is an exceptional blend of personal memoir and scientific treatise which is particular recommended for those who appreciate travel, exploration, and the magnificence of untamed nature. ... Read more


186. Protecting Antarctica: as part of the changing pattern of cruising, more and more vessels, and passengers, are entering the continent's waters with an ...An article from: Safety at Sea International
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Asin: B0008EE0MW
Catlog: Book
Manufacturer: DMG World Media Ltd.
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Book Description

This digital document is an article from Safety at Sea International, published by DMG World Media Ltd. on October 1, 2003. The length of the article is 746 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Protecting Antarctica: as part of the changing pattern of cruising, more and more vessels, and passengers, are entering the continent's waters with an increase in the risks to both. We examine the problem.(navigation)
Publication: Safety at Sea International (Magazine/Journal)
Date: October 1, 2003
Publisher: DMG World Media Ltd.
Page: 16(1)

Distributed by Thomson Gale
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187. The Sea Shall Embrace Them: The Tragic Story of the Steamship Arctic (Wheeler Hardcover)
by David W. Shaw
list price: $30.95
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Asin: 1587242451
Catlog: Book (2002-07-01)
Publisher: Wheeler Publishing
Sales Rank: 1664787
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

The 1854 collision at sea between the American ship Arctic and the Vesta, a much smaller French steamship, set in motion one of the most harrowing events in maritime history. David W. Shaw has based this fascinating account on the firsthand testimony of the few who survived the wreck, including the Arctic's heroic captain, James C. Luce, who was forced to fight his mutinous crew as they took the lifeboats and left hundreds of passengers to suffer a cruel and painful death. Not only did 400 people -- including Luce's own frail son -- die by daybreak, but the wreck also ended the domination of the seas by the American maritime fleet for the rest of the nineteenth century.

Utterly compelling, The Sea Shall Embrace Them is a stirring slice of heretofore little-known American history. Beautifully written, it puts the reader on deck as a ship full of men, women, and children do battle both with a mighty ocean and with their own baser instincts. ... Read more

Reviews (15)

4-0 out of 5 stars Engrossing tale
I found this book to be a well written account of a tragic maritime accident. Captain Luce, the captain of the SS Arctic, comes alive on the pages. His love for his disabled son comes across strongly and makes Luce human across the distance of 150 years. The book introduces us to a time when the American shipping industry (taking advantage of the British being occupied with the Crimean War) led the world in transatlantic shipping. The author shows us how the competitive nature of the time to always be the fastest led to the disaster. When the tragedy strikes and the ship is damaged, the author brings the disaster to life as we see the crew abandoning women and children (not a single woman or child survived the sinking) as they steal the few lifeboats the ship carried. It is in discussing the events after the sinking where the book fails in my opinion. Nothing was done to punish the crew and the author doesn't really explain why the maritime courts never sought out the crew for punishment. Overall, however, the book is well written and informative.

5-0 out of 5 stars A tale of cowardice and tragedy
It's always refreshing to find a book that tells me about a little known incident in American history. This book, concerning the 1854 sinking of the steamship Arctic, is one of those books. As an added bonus, it's extremely well-written, reading almost as if it were a novel. There are a lot of nautical terms thrown about, but there is a glossary to help those, like myself, who are unfamiliar with them. We get a capsule history of the Great Race across the Atlantic between competing British and American companies, and a bit about ship design 150 years ago, when most were wooden, with side paddle wheels. The story about the collision of the Arctic with another ship, and the subsequent tragedy that happened because many crew members ignored the adage "women and children first" is heartbreaking. The astonishing survival of some of the folks from the ship, including the captain, is quite riveting, in large part because of the excellent writing involved. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and highly recommend it to others.

5-0 out of 5 stars "the sea is an unforgiving body"
Readers who approach Shaw's The Sea Shall Embrace Them as an academic historical account of the sinking of the American steamship Arctic in 1854 will be disappointed. Although Shaw mentions sources sporadically throughout the text (mostly at the beginning), most of the information, including quotations, are not referenced. Shaw writes a lot of details including what was going through the minds of the main people involved in the tragedy, their mannerisms, the environment they saw, etc. through interpretation.

If readers approach this work as history written for a mass audience presented with a novelist's flair, they will find this book to be riveting. The chapters are brief (most around 8 pages) and the story is interesting, exciting, and fast-moving. At times, it may be a little more flowery than most students of history are used to, but such possibly superfluous descriptions of scenery, etc. are not that distracting. It mostly affects a handful of pages in the first chapters, although my favorite example is on page 152: "...men and women, as well as their teenagers, children, and infants, would never again admire the blazing fall foliage soon to be dressing the environs of New York in a spectrum of orange, red, and yellow even more intense in color than when Arctic set off on her last voyage in September." The book does not always read like this, though. Of course, the story gets more exciting as it approaches the accident and sinking with huge loss of life; however, I also found the beginning chapters very interesting, especially the competition between the English Cunard Line and the American Collins Line for supremacy of the overseas mail. Cunard will of course be challenged later by the White Star Line which created Titanic and her sister ships. Much of this story has similarities to Titanic, so those who enjoy reading about the latter will probably find this book to be of great interest.

Shaw demonstrates an incredible amount of research. When listing the salaries of the Collins employees or the price of a ticket on the Arctic, he includes the equivalent in today's money which better explains his points (it cost over $2,300 in today's money for a first class one-way fair, pg 40. Ouch!). He also uncovers many interesting details. For example, 7 of the 9 ships Luce captained before Arctic sank under another captain's command (pg. 87).

Footnotes would help this book. For example, why does Shaw describe Luce as being depressed while setting of on his final voyage on the Arctic? Was the detail garnered from a diary entry or a later account made by the captain? Still, Shaw demonstrates vast knowledge of the sea and I am confident many of his details, while probably not derived directly from sources, is relatively accurate. Some elements are found lacking. For example, there is much information on those struggling for life on rafts and a paddle box, but nothing on those who left early in the lifeboats who survived. Possibly these survivors-mostly crew-feared reprisals if they gave their accounts, but such is not noted. Also, Shaw maintains that the seemingly doomed Vesta could have saved all passengers and crew on Arctic if Luce had stuck around (pg. 120). What substantiates this claim? Vesta was a smaller ship crippled by the collision. Did an inquiry come to this conclusion? For the most part though, Shaw tells the story quite thoroughly considering the amount of source material available. Shaw also explains why this story is important (the Arctic was a symbol of American pride). Although the ending seems a little skimpy, Shaw explains that, due to the times, there was not as much outrage over some of the disgraceful stories that came out as to the behavior of some of the crew members as one would expect in the sue-happy times in which we now live (pg. 203). Despite its faults in terms of documentation, The Sea Shall Embrace Them is a compelling tale beautifully told.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Spellbinding Tale of the Sea
I have to disagree with some of the book's reviewers, in that I found Mr. Shaw's tale fascinating and well-articulated. It is a story that is largely unknown, yet deserving of the telling, since it greatly impacted future, transatlantic travel. Much of the reference material is from a more florid era of writing, which to a modern reader may be somewhat tiresome; but Shaw handles it well, blending sections taken directly from reports of the time with modern insight and logical assumptions. (If he says the ship's captain gazed out across the sea, can anyone doubt that in truth, Capt. Luce did exactly that?...even though he didn't write anyone a letter stating such?) Without some input on Shaw's part, the book would become a simple recitation of newspaper articles.

In the earlier portion of the book, Shaw gives an extremely interesting view of what it was like to travel the North Atlantic, in 1854...especially, aboard the largest and most luxurious ship of the time, the Arctic. Insight is provided into Collins' philosophy of "paying for the best" employees, and the level of clientele to whom he catered. You are introduced to various, illustrious passengers, including members of Collins' own family, and to the battle that Collins was fighting, with Congress and with Cunard, to become the preeminent steamship company on the New York to Liverpool run.

Finally, of course, what you have been waiting for arrives...the foggy morning of September 27th, when the two ships collide and, instantaneously, the numerous decisions which Capt. Luce must make to minimize the damage and loss of life. Tragically, you watch his efforts repeatedly defeated by a terrified crew, the blinding fog, the fatal damage to the ship, an insufficient number of lifeboats, loss of his first mate, and the frigid waters of the Grand Banks forty nautical miles from Cape Race, Newfoundland.

I would recommend the book heartily to anyone who enjoys his history mixed with drama and suspense. Paradoxically, each time I went back to the book I found myself hoping the Arctic wouldn't really sink.

3-0 out of 5 stars A Tragic Story Adequately Told
This somewhat insubstantial volume is about the loss in 1854 of the American steamship Arctic in a collision on the Grand Banks off Newfoundland. This tragedy somewhat prefigured the more famous 1912 Titanic disaster in many respects. One of the big differences, though, is that out of 87 survivors (from roughly 400 people on the ship), only 22 were passengers, and all of those were men. This is because the crew bum-rushed the lifeboats and took off as quickly as possible, and the women weren't strong enough to claw their way through the frenzied masses.

The book takes a somewhat novelistic approach, which I find awkward. It features some dialogue, but evidently only as drawn from primary sources. Still, there are a lot of references to minor details that seem pretty clearly made up just for atmosphere. It may be nit-picky of me, but I don't want to hear about the captain staring at himself in the mirror and looking at his scar and thinking about his lost child unless a document can be cited that that is exactly what happened.

Also, the author is a sailing dude, so he made sure to lard his book with phrases like "Under a stiffening breeze, the crew had no choice but to let the biffenboffer spank the stalwart broadsheet." Okay, I get it--you know all about sailing. That doesn't mean you have to go showing off in front of the laypeople. (A glossary is provided in the back, but I didn't know that until too late.)

Overall, it's a fair effort, but really only of interest for those who want to pack their libraries with maritime disaster stories. ... Read more


188. Under Polaris: An Arctic Quest (McLellan Books)
by Tahoe Talbot Washburn
list price: $30.00
our price: $30.00
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Asin: 0295977612
Catlog: Book (1999-02-01)
Publisher: University of Washington Press
Sales Rank: 1819569
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars UNDER POLARIS, AN ARCTIC QUEST. By Tahoe Talbot Washburn. Se
This marvelous book is a blend of adventure story, scientific diary, and ethnographic study. The author, Tahoe Talbot Washburn, accompanied her husband, Lincoln Washburn, to the Canadian Arctic in 1938-1941, helping him do his graduate field work in the glacial geology of the region. The author was a keen observer of native people and their way of life. She recorded what we now see in retrospect as the waning years of a nomadic way of life for the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Prior to World War II, many Inuit roamed freely across the high Arctic, camping in snow houses (igloos) constructed along the trail at the end of the day. The Canadian Arctic Inuit were still essentially nomads; they did not live in or visit permanent settlements, except for a few important events each year. Accordingly, governmental authorities and missionaries had to go on expeditions to meet with the Inuit. Soon after the war, this pattern changed dramatically, and seemingly irrevocably, towards a more settled way of life. This book is made all the more fascinating because it provides many glimpses into a way of life perched on the cusp of radical change. The Washburns were much more than casual visitors to the Canadian Arctic. They lived there for months at a time, including one extended stay from August, 1940 to February, 1941. They spent precious little time indoors, preferring to move about the Arctic islands, hiking, boating, camping, and dog-sledding in winter. The scientific aim of this multi-year project was to determine the extent of regional glaciation in the late Pleistocene, a much-debated topic of that day. By collecting marine fossils and mapping traces of glacial scouring in bedrock, Lincoln Washburn was able to begin the process of reconstructing the extent of ice sheets during the last glaciation. This thesis project marked the beginning of his long and illustrious career in glacial geology. However, geologic research is only incidental to this book. It brought the Washburns to Arctic Canada, but once there, they fell in love with the land and its people. Both Lincoln and Tahoe relished the arduous Arctic lifestyle, where physical endurance and mental acuity often make the difference between survival and death. They marveled at the ingenuity, patience, and sense of humor that seemed to sustain the Inuit through manifold hardships. Tahoe Washburn spent many months emulating the role of Inuit women, including daily food preparation (for both people and sled dogs), sewing of leather garments, and hide preparation (including chewing caribou hides to soften them). Although limited by not understanding the Inuit language, she learned by observation. Her Native companions appreciated her efforts to follow their ways, and took the time to teach her many skills that few outsiders ever learned. The book is richly illustrated, with 107 photos and six maps. Although the material in the book was taken from diaries, it has been well-edited, never becoming dull or repetitive. I heartily recommend this book to readers interested in the natural history and ethnography of the Arctic.

Review published in Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, Vol. 31, No. 4. Copyright: Regents of the University of Colorado ... Read more


189. My Arctic Journey: A Year Among Ice-Fields and Eskimos
by Josephine Diebitsch-Peary
list price: $59.95
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Asin: 0404116698
Catlog: Book (2001-06-01)
Publisher: Ams Pr
Sales Rank: 3623881
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190. Above the Circle
by Marty Basch
list price: $14.95
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Asin: 0964651017
Catlog: Book (1997-08-01)
Publisher: Top of the World Communications
Sales Rank: 1073236
Average Customer Review: 3 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (2)

1-0 out of 5 stars Chatty little tale about the Scandanavian people
I was looking to experience the Artic Circle on a bicycle without leaving the comforts of my home. "Into Thin Air" is a perfect example of the potential of a true adventure. Instead I found the author mostly interested in describing a few of the travelers (many not from the Artic) he encountered. I would have loved to learn more about the actual cycling, the topography, culture and peoples of this stark and brutal land. Lots of potential not fully realized in this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Arctic bicycling at its best!
Whoever thought anyone would ride a bicycle in the Arctic? Basch is a gifted writer and rider. He's the funniest guy on two wheels. ... Read more


191. Antarctic Odyssey: In the Footsteps of the South Polar Explorers
by Graham Collier, Patricia Collier

Asin: B00005VER8
Catlog: Book
Sales Rank: 2649169
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

A full-color, beautifully illustrated journey across the icy last continent, the homes of its endangered animals, and the history of its exploration.

It is the most remote and inhospitable, the coldest and driest of the earth's continents. Its bleakly stunning landscapes have attracted the boldest of the heroic age of exploration. Graham Collier tells its story in gorgeous photographs and vivid prose - and how, like Scott, Amundsen, Shackleton, and others before him, he fell under the spell of Antarctica.

Very few people, scientists or explorers, have seen Antarctica as has Graham Collier. He has visited the camps of Scott and Shackleton, reached the slopes of the 13,000-foot volcanic Mount Erebus, and traveled to the unimaginably remote Peter I Island and Elephant Island, where the crew of the Endurance was marooned for four months. He has walked among basking seals, called on penguin rookeries, been dive-bombed by skua-gulls, and admired albatrosses like those in "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." Following in the footsteps of the great explorers from Captain Cook and James Clark Ross to Shackleton and Douglas Mawson, he re-creates the experience of encountering the "last continent" in all its icy splendor.

In this exquisite book, Collier attempts to answer polar explorer Jean-Baptiste Charcot's question, "Where does the strange attraction of the polar regions lie, so powerful, so gripping that on one's return from them one forgets all weariness of body and soul and dreams only of going back? ... Read more

Reviews (2)

3-0 out of 5 stars Book Description
It may be a perfectly wonderful book but reaching the slopes of Mount Erebus is no feat since it is right outside of McMurdo Station. As a person who has spent time working at all 3 Antarctic Station, I find the book description overblown. I'm sure the book itself is full of wonderful photos as Antarctic is truly a stunning place. However, if someone is looking for an adventure story, I doubt if this covers it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful to read
This book is enjoyable and at times profound. It is a nice introduction to the continent. My only wish is that the book had more pictures since I will never see the antarctic. I especially wish more pictures were taken of the exployers' huts. ... Read more


192. To the top of the continent: Discovery, exploration and adventure in sub-arctic Alaska : the first ascent of Mt. McKinley, 1903-1906
by Frederick Albert Cook, Frederick A. Cook
list price: $49.95
our price: $49.95
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Asin: 0965399516
Catlog: Book (1996)
Publisher: Distribution, Alpen Books
Sales Rank: 2329580
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description

90th Anniversary reprint edition of Cook's account of the first ascent of Mt. McKinley in 1906.The first to circumnavagate McKinley in 1903, Cook's claim would later be rejected by many, but in 1994 an expedition followed his route and determined that he had been where he described in his 1907 first edition.Contributions and maps by the 1994 Ruth Glacier Expedition and new photos along with the first publication of Cook's diary and index. ... Read more

Reviews (2)

2-0 out of 5 stars Classic fake is quaintly amusing
Originals of this rare book are expensive - $300 for a nice copy, so it is a public service to offer an affordable paperback. I first read the article Cook wrote in one of the magazines of the time; Century magazine I believe it was. Cook's fakery is well proven with Washburn's book The Dishonorable Dr. Cook, of course, but any book actually written by Dr. Cook is hilarious to read. That is why I bought this one after reading the article published in 1907.

Cook's writing is described as "flowery" or "dramatic", but knowing he's a faker makes it so much fun to read. His North Pole book, by comparison, is mean spirited because by then he'd been exposed - in this work he is trying to come off as a serious explorer. Anyone who knows real mountaineering will have a good laugh at Cook with his leather boots (on ice walls???), silk tent that fits in his pocket, tent pole that doubles as an ice axe, sleeping bag that you wear as a parka, and very scant climbing details. But then he suddenly reaches the top of a world-class mountain. How'd he do it? He just climbed and gritted his teeth, and climbed some more! When he got hungry he had bread he'd baked himself ahead of time with home made pemmican. Amazingly naive, but he fooled a lot of folks.

On a more bizarre note is the extra material from his trust-funded descendants who photographed Fred's earlier routes about McKinley on their camping trip in 1994. They must be something akin to the Flat Earth Society. Goes to show that if you never give up, even with a fake, you can get pretty far; although not to the top of Denali.

A great gift for anyone you know who is a rock climber.

5-0 out of 5 stars Cook Revisited
Here's another new edition from the great explorer, writer, photogrtapher and unique personality, Dr. Frederick Cook.This book joins "Through the First Antartic Night," and "My Attainment of the Pole" as welcome re-reads for some of usand will hopefully drawnew readers who are interested in exploration.As usual, Cook's writing and photography are both very good and the story of the approach and climb of Mount Mckinley in Alaska (unbelievably difficult to approach, let alone climb, at that time) is a great read.Descriptions of both terrain and his climbing companions are vivid and memorable.

Cook is of course better known as the center of a huge century old controversey (still going on today) over whether he really reached the North Pole.Those who wanted to push the claim of Robert Peary and discredit Cook, bribed Cook's climbing partner into denying they had made it to the top of Mount Mckinley in 1906.This effort was massively financed and largely successful in discreding both the Mckinley climb and Cook's later claim of having made it to the North Pole.

The new material included in these books give some added ammunition in support of Cook's claims, but will probably not change many minds among those who have been involved in this debate. For the most part, opinions have become totally polarized and even nasty over the years.Best bet?Enjoy these books and make up your own mind. Whatever the truth, Cook as an explorer, writer and personality is well worth knowing. ... Read more


193. Audubon Western bird guide; land, water, and game birds, Western North America, including Alaska, from Mexico to Bering Strait and the Arctic Ocean
by Richard Hooper Pough

Asin: B00005X7TZ
Catlog: Book
Sales Rank: 1325170
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194. Ladies, the gwich'in, and the rat: travels on the Athabaska, Mackenzie, Rat, Porcupine, and Yukon rivers in 1926. : An article from: Arctic
list price: $5.95
our price: $5.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00098ITSS
Catlog: Book
Manufacturer: Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary
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Book Description

This digital document is an article from Arctic, published by Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary on September 1, 1999. The length of the article is 1008 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Ladies, the gwich'in, and the rat: travels on the Athabaska, Mackenzie, Rat, Porcupine, and Yukon rivers in 1926.
Publication: Arctic (Refereed)
Date: September 1, 1999
Publisher: Arctic Institute of North America of the University of Calgary
Volume: 52Issue: 3Page: 312-13

Article Type: Book Review

Distributed by Thompson Gale
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195. White Bear : Encounters with the Master of the Arctic Ice
by CHARLES FEAZEL
list price: $4.99
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Asin: 0345373979
Catlog: Book (1992-04-22)
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Sales Rank: 2028780
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars a good read
This collection of artic tales is compelling and educational.It'll make a good companion to a hot day... guaranteed to cool you off! (Besides, my Dad wrote it, so it's got to be great!) ... Read more


196. Antarctica; land of frozen time
by Roger A. Caras

Asin: B00005VERE
Catlog: Book
Sales Rank: 1970410
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197. Ring of Ice: True Tales of Adventure, Exploration, and Arctic Life
list price: $29.95
our price: $29.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1558215379
Catlog: Book (2000-06)
Publisher: The Lyons Press
Sales Rank: 1211429
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

From the time of the ancient Greeks until the 19th century, European explorers imagined that beyond the ring of ice that encircled the Arctic lay a warm, calm sea that would take them to the Orient. Instead of this easy Northwest Passage, notes Peter Stark, those explorers found what the Inuit and Eskimo inhabitants of the region knew they would: "ice, ice, and more ice."

In this well-chosen anthology, Stark offers a documentary history of changing views of the Arctic over the last two and a half centuries. His collection begins with the words of Georg Wilhelm Steller (for whom many Arctic animal species are named), who accompanied the star-crossed Danish explorer Vitus Bering across the far northern Pacific. The memoirs of other explorers follow, intermingled with prose and poetry from the indigenous peoples of the region. Most of those explorers, like the unfortunate American surveyor Adolphus Greely and the Italian aviator Umberto Nobile, recount wrong decisions taken in the face of horrendous circumstances, whether howling gales or the madness of companions. Few of their stories end happily, save that their narrators usually survived. The closing pages of Stark's anthology are given over to a new kind of explorer, the literary naturalist, whose greatest exemplar is Barry Lopez (Arctic Dreams).

Students of the history of exploration and the peoples of the Arctic will find Stark's book to be an engaging survey. --Gregory McNamee ... Read more

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Impacted my life - truly inspiring
Though I read it several years ago, the impact of this book is still with me. It helps me appreciate the life I have, and inspires me to push harder. The human tales in this book, many culled from actual diary or journal entries, are more gripping than perhaps any fiction I've ever read. If you feel you need a sense of perspective, this is one healthy dose. Reading it was a great way to transport myself from my day to day troubles and experience, again often firsthand, a completely different life situation. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Meaning of Ice
If you are intrigued by the allure that the Arctic has for some people, or are yourself unable to resist subzero weather at the top of the world, then Ring of Ice is a must. Stark has collected a truly diverse range of stories beginning with the comedy of errors endured by Georg Wilhelm Stellar, the German-born scientist aboard Vitus Bering's 1741 Russian expedition to the North American coast, and ending with the luminous prose of modern Artic explorers such as Barry Lopez.

Stark's informative introductions to each essay are both helpful and amusing. He has also sought to balance the primarily European writers and their points of view with those of the native Inuit people by preceding each essay with an Inuit poem. "The poems emphasize the Inuit ethic of sharing, egalitarianism, and incessant hunting, as well as the simple joys and fears of life." They are, of course, in sharp contrast to the accounts of the European explorers, who sought to conquer rather than work with nature, and usually perished as a result.

The book is divided into 4 sections (called books), but the progression of pieces is linear. The 1998 piece entitled "Tale of a Hunter's Daughter," is so pignantly written and captures the feeling of both the land and the woman struggling to make her way in it, that it is worth the price of the whole book. Of course there are other stand-outs, including "How Dr.Hayes Learned to Love Seal Blubber," "Nansen Strolls Farthest North," and "Cold Oceans: By Sea Kayak to Greenland."

Oddly enough, the poetry, which I thought was an excellent idea, is made inaccessible and difficult to read by the fact that it has been set in a script font that is too small to read comfortably. As a result, your eyes naturally gravitate towards the correctly sized, regular fonts used in the essays. This is really strange, given the time and effort that obviously went into the rest of the book, and I hope that Stark has made a very loud stink. It's hard to make yourself work at reading the poetry, which by its nature takes a little bit of work to appreciate. Otherwise a fine collection.

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book!
This is a wonderful book!Peter Stark has selected an extraordinary collection of vignettes from a wide range of original writings about the Arctic and its explorers.I've read many (but certainly not all) of his sources in their entirety, and enjoyed re-reading extracts of those that I have read before as much as I enjoyed reading for the first time those that were new to me.Stark has a fine eye, an encyclopaedic knowledge of the Arctic and a gift for weaving together these many tales into a fine, telling tapestry of Arctic adventure.Terrific!

5-0 out of 5 stars For any collection covering world exploration
Over the last two centuries expeditions have penetrated the Arctic and brought back important information - if they returned at all. This provides true stories of Arctic exploration and adventure, presenting the journals, letters and firsthand experiences of the explorers and natives of the region alike. An excellent addition for any collection covering world exploration. ... Read more


198. Leader guides Western Arctic: Stephen Kakfwi. : An article from: Wind Speaker
by Kenneth Williams
list price: $5.95
our price: $5.95
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Asin: B00097V6W0
Catlog: Book
Manufacturer: Aboriginal Multi-Media Society of Alberta (AMMSA)
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Book Description

This digital document is an article from Wind Speaker, published by Aboriginal Multi-Media Society of Alberta (AMMSA) on March 1, 1997. The length of the article is 590 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Leader guides Western Arctic: Stephen Kakfwi.
Author: Kenneth Williams
Publication: Wind Speaker (Newsletter)
Date: March 1, 1997
Publisher: Aboriginal Multi-Media Society of Alberta (AMMSA)
Volume: 14Issue: 11Page: 3(sup)

Distributed by Thompson Gale
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199. North to the Orient

Asin: 0151671397
Catlog: Book (1966-06)
Publisher: Harcourt
Sales Rank: 2125090
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200. Voyage To The End Of The World: With Tales From The Great Ice Barrier
by David Burke
list price: $21.95
our price: $14.93
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 087081771X
Catlog: Book (2005-02-28)
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
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Book Description

Author, journalist, and explorer David Burke was smitten with Antarctica on his first visit in 1958. Forty-three years later he made his sixth trip south aboard a 12,000-ton Russian icebreaker, Kapitan Khlebnikov. The captain and crew’s objective was to go farther south than any ship had sailed before. In Voyage to the End of the World, Burke documents his journey from Hobart, Australia, across the Southern Ocean to the Ross Sea region and ultimately to the farthest edge of the Great Ice Barrier. En route the passengers encountered B15, the world’s largest recorded iceberg, nearly the size of Connecticut.

Interspersed with reports and documents from early luminaries of exploration such as Amundsen, Scott, Shackleton, and Byrd (who all launched their expeditions from bases on the Barrier), Burke’s account illustrates just how much the Antarctic has changed in the past century. ... Read more


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